Kryopak built 17 MMSCFD LNG plant.
Kryopak built 10 MMSCFD lng plant
Prepared by
Ken Kennedy 1961
Chief Executive Officer








Charlie Bartholomew
1981-2013

INTRODUCTION TO KRYOPAK 

KRYOPAK had its beginning in 1976.  KRYOPAK initially operated as a division of K. B. Kennedy Engineering Co., Inc. (A Missouri corporation organized in January 1961.) The following is a history of K. B. Kennedy Engineering Co., Inc. (Precursor of KRYOPAK Inc.).

    K. B. Kennedy, the organizer, and owner of K. B. Kennedy Engineering Company, worked as a Project Manager for the J. F. Pritchard Company.  It was with the Pritchard Co. that first involvement with LNG began in 1957.  Pritchard received the contract to perform engineering services for a liquefaction plant from Continental Oil using the cascade process.  This process was essentially the same as noted in Perry's Chemical Engineering, Handbook,  1950 Edition.  This system required three levels of refrigeration and three refrigerants.  1950's
    INVENTIONS & PATENTS: A NEW LNG PLANT PROCESS.
      In researching methods to improve this technology, Kennedy made an evaluation of an expander technology utilizing a Mollier Diagram as a reference point.  It was obvious to develop a theoretical process utilizing expansion energy of natural gas, used in the lowest level of the cascade process.  This process would to cover the full range covered by the three refrigerants.  The first step studied air separation processes.  The means to develop the cold refrigerant occurred next, since fractionation operations were not important.  The equipment utilized then was a reciprocating expander.
NEW TURBINE EXPANDER TECHNOLOGY vs.
EXISTING RECIPROCATING EXPANDER
A commercially available reciprocating expander was not then available to handle the large quantities of gas required for the 100 MMscfd plant under consideration.  Cooper Bessemer agreed to build such a machine but could not give the proper warranties.  An evaluation of the largest machines in service showed a very high maintenance factor as methane has very little lubricating value.  Having experience in hydraulic turbines and in steam turbines it was a logical step to explore centrifugal machines.  All the turbine manufacturers were concerned with low temperature lubricating problems. Air bearings were not very well developed at that time.  Theoretical benefits were evident.
1960's
K. B. KENNEDY ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC.:
MORE LNG PATENTS 1960's-1970's
K. B. KENNEDY ENG. Inc.; New Mexico;
MORE PATENTS; LNG PLANTS & GAS RESERVES 1970's-1980's
KRYOPAK FORMS IN KANSAS: LNG PACKAGED PLANTS.

CNG 
Prepared by Charlie Bartholomew mailto:kryopak@qwest.net 


Osh
June  2003
April 2008
January 2014