Natural Gas Drilling Rigs and Natural Gas Pumping Units
Range Resources and FTS International Use Clean-Burning Natural Gas to Power Equipment for Hydraulic Fracturing  August 04, 2015  WASHINGTON COUNTY, Pa. (PRWEB)
rig conversions in the Marcellus Shale to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG)
Second Seneca 100% LNG-Powered Drilling Rig Goes Online
CONSOL Switching to Dual Fuel Drilling Rigs in Marcellus/Utica
CONSOL Orders Additional 3 Dual Fuel Generators for 2nd Rig
Seneca announced they are converting two of their rigs to run on LNG
EQT Converts 2nd Drilling Rig in WV Marcellus to Run on LNG
Nabors Offshore - 16 cyl CAT 399  dual fuel conversions
Halliburton Dual-Fuel Service in Hydraulic Fracturing Pumps
Baker Hughes fleet of Rhino hydraulic fracturing units to bifuel pumps
DGB-Modified 3512Cs dual fuel for Citadel Drilling and Tycrop Pressure Trailers
Sidewinder drilling HAS 3 RIGS IN BAKKEN SLAWSON IS THINKING LNG FOR ITS DRILLING RIG
The abundance of unconventional low-permeability gas in North America suggests that the extreme ratio of gaseous heating value cost to liquid hydrocarbon heating value cost could persist for an extended period of time. Therefore, both operators and pumping service companies have real incentives to develop and optimize these systems.
Bakken_multi_pads



 
The parade of rig conversions in the Marcellus Shale to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG) continues.   First EQT, then CONSOL switching to duel-fuel LNG/diesel engines.
After EQT and CONSOL, Seneca Resources started to convert drilling rigs to run on 100% LNG (see Seneca Boasts First 100% LNG-Powered Drill Rig in Marcellus).
You may now add Antero Resources to the club.
Antero recently converted the first of three rigs in West Virginia to run on 100% natural gas engines manufactured (as they were for Seneca) by General Electric. The engines will run on LNG, propane or even dry "field gas" that comes from the well itself. Kewl. From the Antero/GE press release:

CONSOL Switching to Dual Fuel Drilling Rigs in Marcellus/Utica
In the near future, drilling and fracking at CONSOL Energy drill sites will be powered by dual fuel technology using LNG (liquefied natural gas) and diesel fuel. You may recall MDN reported on CONSOL’s experimentation with dual fuel technology at two different locations last year (see CONSOL Orders Additional 3 Dual Fuel Generators for 2nd Rig).
Linde, the company providing CONSOL with dual fuel technology to run the generators and other drilling equipment, issued a press announcement yesterday which says, in essence, that CONSOL has decided to go “all in” and start using Linde’s dual fuel solutions throughout all of their drilling operations in the Marcellus and Utica Shale:

Second Seneca 100% LNG-Powered Drilling Rig Goes Online
MDN recently told you about Seneca Resources, the first Marcellus driller to convert a drilling rig to run on a 100% liquefied natural gas (LNG) engine, a rig they now use for drilling in Lycoming County, PA (see this MDN story). Seneca has just completed the conversion of a second 100% LNG-powered rig and uses it for drilling in Forest, Elk, Jefferson and McKean counties in PA.

Stands to reason the company that makes the engine would want to crow about it, and sure enough they now have. General Electric is the manufacturer of the Jenbacher J320 turbocharged natural gas engine, and they issued this press release yesterday about their innovative new engine being used by Seneca:

Seneca Boasts First 100% LNG-Powered Drill Rig in Marcellus

EQT was the first driller in the Marcellus Shale to convert a drilling rig to run on electricity produced by LNG, or “liquefied natural gas” (see this MDN story). CONSOL has also been experimenting with converting some of their rigs to use LNG too (see this MDN story). You may now add a third driller to the list: Seneca Resources. Seneca is the gas drilling arm of National Fuel Gas Company.
Yesterday, Seneca announced they are converting two of their rigs to run on LNG. But unlike EQT and CONSOL which mix LNG with diesel fuel in a blend, Seneca is using 100% LNG to power their rigs—a first for drilling rigs in the Marcellus Shale. Seneca says they’ve already converted one rig that’s now in operation, a second rig will be finished in November, and a third rig is coming later this year. Seneca also says someday they’d like to use the gas coming out of the ground to power the rig that’s drilling it. Cool.
GE’s 1-megawatt Jenbacher J320 turbocharged natural gas engines. The Jenbacher units were combined with Ensign Drilling-designed rig packages to provide all the electricity needed by each drilling rig. The J320 represents GE’s first U.S. Environmental Protection Agency certified technology for mobile and stationary drilling applications.

CONSOL Orders Additional 3 Dual Fuel Generators for 2nd Rig
CONSOL Energy has ordered an additional three dual fuel electrical generator conversions at a second drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale. MDN previously reported that CONSOL was experimenting with three dual fuel generator conversions—blending liquefied natural gas with diesel—at one location (see this MDN story). Looks like the experiment is going well enough that CONSOL has ordered another three conversions for a different location.

EQT Converts 2nd Drilling Rig in WV Marcellus to Run on LNG
EQT was the first driller in the Marcellus to convert electrical generators used at a drilling site to burn liquefied natural gas, or LNG (see this MDN story). EQT announced yesterday they’ve commissioned a second drilling rig, located in West Virginia (as was the first converted rig) to be converted to the new LNG technology.

Linde Says Early Results from LNG/Diesel Generators Promising
Drilling rigs for shale gas use a lot of electricity to power the equipment—so much electricity each drill site uses enough generators to power an entire town. Drillers make their own electricity rather than draw from the local power grid. Almost all electrical generators at well sites are powered by diesel engines. But a few enterprising companies are offering alternatives to diesel. Hey, why not use natural gas to power those engines, since you’re drilling for natural gas!
Linde North America is one of those enterprising companies. CONSOL Energy’s gas division is experimenting with a dual-fuel technology that combines liquefied natural gas (LNG) with diesel, blending them together, a technology being pioneered by Linde. CONSOL is currently testing it with three generators in the Marcellus, and according to Linde and CONSOL, the early results are promising.

DUAL-FUEL CAT CONVERSIONS
Nabors Offshore - 16 cyl CAT 399 dual fuel  http://www.energyconversions.com/picturescat.htm

EQT Converts Marcellus Drilling Rigs to Run on LNG
Drilling rigs take a lot of horsepower to run, and the engines that run them are big and use a lot of fuel. That fuel is typically diesel, and the emissions may (or may not) cumulatively contribute to air pollution if there are enough drilling rigs in a particular region. At least that’s the contention of the federal EPA.
EQT, in a public relations coup, is the first to start converting its Marcellus Shale drilling rigs from running on diesel to running on liquefied natural gas (LNG). LNG has a couple of advantages: it costs about 40% less than diesel, and it pollutes less when burned. EQT’s first conversion is a rig operating in northern West Virginia.



Baker Hughes converts a fleet of its Rhino hydraulic fracturing units to bifuel pumps

The use of natural gas over diesel is becoming more widespread, likely due to the cost benefits associated with fuel switching, according to a Nov. 28 analyst report from GHS Research. GHS referenced Baker Hughes' Nov. 26 announcement that it would convert a fleet of its Rhino hydraulic fracturing units to bifuel pumps as a way to improve operational efficiency, lower costs and reduce health, safety and environment impacts.
The new pumps use a mixture of gas and diesel, reducing diesel use by up to 65 percent with no loss of hydraulic horsepower. The converted fleet, which meets all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions standards, can also reduce a number of emissions including nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide and particulate matter.
Baker Hughes first converted a small fleet of its units in Canada; the success Baker Hughes saw with this endeavor prompted to company to convert an entire fleet in the United States. The company is converting several more fleets of Rhino trucks to Rhino Bifuel equipment. Baker Hughes also has a test program in Oklahoma, where a number of light-duty vehicles have been converted to natural gas

Cabot used a mobile pressure pumping unit provided by FTSI, which was then retrofitted with a dynamic gas blending kit from Caterpillar. This system allows diesel to be substituted with natural gas during high-pressure pumping operations and is compatible with field gas, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas.
Cabot joins the likes of Apache (NYSE: APA  ) , which in January became the first energy exploration and production company to power a full hydraulic fracturing operation using natural gas-burning engines at its Granite Wash operations in Oklahoma. By switching to natural gas, Apache said it expects to reduce fuel costs by roughly 60%, while also lowering emissions.
Apache and Cabot's successful efforts in using cleaner-burning natural gas are a promising development for the oil and gas industry, which is constantly under fire for its alleged neglect of the environment. Not only is using natural gas a cost-effective solution for hydraulic fracturing operations, but it is an innovative way to utilize the nation's abundant supply of the fuel, while also minimizing greenhouse gas emissions.

Halliburton, Schlumberger and Baker Hughes.

The abundance of unconventional low-permeability gas in North America suggests that the extreme ratio of gaseous heating value cost to liquid hydrocarbon heating value cost could persist for an extended period of time. Therefore, both operators and pumping service companies have real incentives to develop and optimize these systems.

Baker Hughes converts fracking units to bifuel pumps
The new pumps reduce diesel use by up to 65 per cent whilst maintaining hydraulic horsepower
Texas-based oilfield services company Baker Hughes this week announced that it has converted a fleet of hydraulic fracturing units to bifuel pumps compatible with natural gas, in order to increase the cost efficiency of operations and reduce the environmental risk of unconventional oil and gas extraction.
Baker Hughes subsidiary Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations has converted a fleet of Rhino hydraulic fracturing units to bifuel pumps, the company said in a statement on Monday. The new pumps are powered by natural gas and diesel, reducing diesel use by up to 65 per cent whilst maintaining hydraulic horsepower, Baker Hughes claims. The converted fleet can also reduce nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions.
The conversion was made following successful results from a similar initiative by the oilfield service company in Canada. Baker Hughes is in the process of converting several more fleets of Rhino trucks for bifuel usage. The firm is following the ranks of a number of oil and gas operators in the Marcellus Shale which have converted several drilling rigs to support natural gas as a fuel.
"Baker Hughes has seen excellent results with this initiative," said Mike Davis, Baker Hughes' president of Pressure Pumping for US land. "The environmental benefits are significant. We're reducing emissions from the engines driving the stimulation pumps and less fuel is needed to keep our pumps going.  In addition, this has the added value of improving job site safety by eliminating re-fueling demands during operations."
Baker Hughes’s new Rhino units were recently used in a hydraulic fracturing job in the Eagle Ford Shale for energy firm Cheyenne Petroleum Company. The company claims the 65 per cent cut in diesel fuel consumption can help the oil company achieve significant cost reductions
 
The abundance of unconventional low-permeability gas in North America suggests that the extreme ratio of gaseous heating value cost to liquid hydrocarbon heating value cost could persist for an extended period of time. Therefore, both operators and pumping service companies have real incentives to develop and optimize these systems.
The technologies required to retrofit large diesel engines so that they can operate on a combination of natural gas and diesel has been in use for a number of years in midstream and upstream applications. Until recently, however, engines that power hydraulic fracturing pumps have not had the attention in this area that other fixed-footprint power sources have received.

Historically, a number of limiting conditions have combined to slow the acceptance and implementation of natural gas as a fuel in hydraulic fracturing operations:
 The logistics associated with delivering a clean and predictable supply of natural gas to a given fracturing fleet in a temporary, remote location raise challenges.
The logistics associated with distributing the fuel safely in and among a multitude of heavy vehicles that are constantly being repositioned during the stimulation and completion operations cause concerns. Though such logistics might seem minor, the ramifications of failure are so large that extreme measures must be taken to ensure system integrity and safety during a wide range of unpredictable conditions.
In a 24-hour period of use, fracturing pumps typically cycle through many different combinations of speeds and loads. The implication is that the ratio of natural gas to diesel injected into the system must be instantaneously varied to allow the development of the required torque during these periods of changing loads and engine speeds.
Regulatory tightening of new off-road diesel engine criteria in the U.S. (a progressive series of tiered standards mandating increased reduction of noxious gases and particulate matter) may have temporarily diverted attention from dual-fuel service efforts until the last two to three years.

The recent move toward implementation was initially driven by several operators and their service companies who recognized that the huge differential in the normalized cost of diesel and natural gas would likely be a long-term condition. In addition, public demand for more environmentally friendly fossil fuels suggested that any substitutionary use of natural gas could conceivably offset the burning of heavier hydrocarbons.

Natural Gas Sources
Several sources of natural gas can be used in dual-fuel service. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is an option involving onsite storage at -260 F and a vaporization unit. Approximately 1.6 gallons of LNG are required to produce the energy equivalent of 1 gallon of diesel fuel (129,400 BTU).

Compressed natural gas (CNG) is an alternative, which is typically stored in mobile tube trailers at about 3,600 psi. The pressure must be reduced to a usable range, and no vaporization equipment is required.
The cost to convert to dual fuel is a challenge since a significant expense is associated with the installation of the conversion kits.
On a comparative energy basis, approximately 4 gallons of CNG are required to produce the same amount of energy as 1 gallon of diesel. Local field gas can be used if it has been properly conditioned with respect to removal or reduction of water, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and other impurities. While field gas has the distinct advantage of limited transport cost, approximately 1,000 gallons (133 cubic feet) of pipeline gas is required to produce the energy equivalent of 1 gallon of diesel.

Dual-System Operation
With current dual-fuel systems, natural gas is introduced into the engine through fumigation of the intake airstream. Depending on speed and load, substitution ratios as high as 60 percent can be achieved. Gas initially flows from its localized source, and its pressure is subsequently regulated to near zero at the engine intake. It is directed past a gas shutoff valve, heat exchanger, low-pressure variable regulator, throttle body and finally to the intake manifold.

A typical frac fleet can use anywhere from 1.0 to 3.0 million standard cubic feet (MMSCF) for a day’s operations, depending on the total hydraulic horsepower present and the number of hours spent pumping. Current commodity pricing of natural gas per unit of heating value is approximately 15 to 20 percent of the price of No. 2 off-road diesel.
From a purely fiscal standpoint, the extra cost of planning, infrastructure and implementation of dual-fuel services can make sense even if the differential (cost/unit of heating value) between the two fuels is as low as 40 percent.

Dual-fuel systems are required to demonstrate that they meet the certification standards of the engines on which they are installed. In the U.S., regulatory requirements mandate that new, large, off-road engines manufactured in or after 2015 (EPA Tier 4F) demonstrate even further reductions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC).
Dual-fuel systems often require additional exhaust catalysts (depending upon the particular regulatory tier), and such incremental upgrades will likely be required to achieve the ultra-low emissions required by Tier 4F regulation.

Application of Dual-Fuel Engines
Dual-fuel scenarios in fracturing fleets are currently most applicable when a fleet is dedicated long-term to a specific play and/or particular operator. Engine conversion kits have significant capital cost associated with their installation, and to take advantage of the potential cost savings, a consistent source of natural gas should be available at each pad that a given pumping fleet will occupy. However, if gas is not available for a series of fracturing treatments, the dual-fuel units can run on 100 percent diesel fuel.

Halliburton Dual-Fuel Service in Hydraulic Fracturing Pumps
Using natural gas to power the frac spread by Doug Walser, Pinnacle, a Halliburton Business Line

March 27, 2013
From an efficiency standpoint, acquiring conversion kits and building up the extra infrastructure required may not make sense if dual-fuel services are used only sporadically. In addition to the cost of installing conversion kits, a typical fleet must carry auxiliary equipment and distribution infrastructure on a separate truck or trailer. Maximizing the overall value of dual-fuel processing requires that the operator’s supply chain management focus on the specifics of ensuring 100-percent or near-100-percent use of the dedicated equipment.
Along this line, the industry trend toward smaller hydraulic fracturing footprints is most consistent with the use of clean and dry field or pipeline gas. Though LNG and CNG are all part of the mix of options available to operators, they require more tractors and trailers on location and, by implication, more square footage of pad space.

The abundance of unconventional low-permeability gas in North America suggests that the extreme ratio of gaseous heating value cost to liquid hydrocarbon heating value cost could persist for an extended period of time. Therefore, both operators and pumping service companies have real incentives to develop and optimize these systems.

About the author:
Doug Walser has extensive (31 years) Permian Basin, Mid-Continent, Appalachia, Rockies and South Texas experience with Dowell Schlumberger; The Western Company of North America; BJ Services; and Pinnacle, a Halliburton business line. He has specialized in the calibration of three-dimensional fracture modeling via a number of methods. Recently, he has specialized in the examination and comparison of the various emerging resource plays in North America, and more specifically, plays with liquid hydrocarbons. He has written 14 papers and holds three patents in his areas of interest. He can be reached at doug.walser@pinntech.com.


DGB-Modified 3512Cs dual fuel for Citadel Drilling and Tycrop Pressure Trailers
Caterpillar Oil & Gas has disclosed new customers for its 3512C engines outfitted for natural gas-diesel duel fuel operation with the manufacturer’s own Dynamic Gas Blending kits. The operators are Citadel Drilling for upwards of a dozen drill rigs and Tycrop, for 20 trailers carrying 3512C-powered well stimulation gear.
Citadel is building “Technically Advanced AC Triple” drilling rigs to comprise a fleet of 12 to 14 units over the course of the next five to six years, Caterpillar says.

“The first three Cat DGB units have been delivered and tested and are slated to be field operational by the end of June 2014 on Citadel’s first rig,” Caterpillar reports. Three Cat 3512C modules each with rated power of 1,kilowatts (1,476 brake horsepower) at 1200 rpm, will be used to power each of the Citadel land drilling rigs.

Compressed Natural Gas or Field Gas

“Our customers will save in excess of $50,000 per month in fuel savings by utilizing our rigs equipped with the cost-effective Cat DGB power and CNG or field gas supply,” Citadel CEO Dan Hoffarth says in the Caterpillar announcement. “The Cat DGB solution has operational consistency and a fantastic support team in Finning Canada and is, in my opinion, the dual fuel leader in the industry,” he said.

“Citadel Drilling just experienced the most trouble free start-up and generator syncing process in our electrical/automation providers’ history. The engines were put online, synced and power shared better than any project we have been associated with,” Hoffarth said.
Diesel Displacement Up to 70%
For Tycrop, Cat reports an initial order for 3512C engines with DGB for 20 equipment trailers. Each engine will provide 2,500 horsepower at 1,900 rpm of rated power and will be manufactured in an ATAAC – air-to-air-after-cooled – configuration. The engines for Tycrop will also feature Product Link, a Caterpillar telematics solution for comprehensive engine management.
“The Dynamic Gas Blending kit,” Caterpillar says, “automatically adjusts to changes in incoming fuel quality and pressure allowing engines to run on a wide variety of fuels, from associated gas to vaporized LNG with no loss of performance integrity. It maintains diesel performance levels with up to 70% replacement of diesel with gas, accepts up to 55% inerts and can be applied to existing engines with EPA certification.”

Finning Canada Got It Done
“No customer input or gas analysis is needed during operation, and no recalibration is required when the equipment is moved or the gas supply changes.”
Cat credits its dealer Finning Canada for leading the Citadel and Tycrop sales efforts and said that Finning Canada will support the companies’ dual fuel work.

ND Drilling Rigs Saturday July 18 2015 And fracing units:
http://www.patenergy.com/drilling/rigs/
Patterson Drilling Rigs  10 in ND 1000 1500 and 2000+ hp
Abraxas, 1
Armstron, 1
Burlington RES, 4
Continental, 10
Denbury, 1
Enerplus Res, 1
EOG Resources, 3
Marathon Oil, 1
Newfield PROD, 1
Oasis, 3
Petro Hunt, 2
QEP Energy, 2
Sinclair, 1
Slawson, 1
SM Energy, 4
Whiting, 8
WPX Energy Williston, 1
XTO Energy, 9
Zavanna, 1    AES, 1
Canelson, 1
Craig, 2
Cyclone, 4
Ensign, 1
Extreme, 1
Frontier, 1
H & P(Helmerich & Payne), 9
Nabors, 25
Patterson, 10
Pioneer, 2
Precision, 4
Raven, 1
Sidewinder, 1
Stoneham, 1
Trinidad, 2
True, 1
Unit, 5

   North Dakota    NABORS
        AC    SCR        TOTAL        MECH
<1000 hp    1     1     2     7     4        
<1400 HP    11     41     6     1     48   
>2000 hp     1     49     12     1     62     1   
PACE-X RIGS
17 SOME WITH 3512 DUAL FUEL CAT AVAILABLE UP TO 4 3516 CATS

COMPLETION AND PRODUCTION SERVICES
ROCKIES    69    FRAC CREWS     10    TRUCKS        56

http://www.patenergy.com/#  PATTERSON DRILLING COMPANY AND PRESSURE PUMPING
North Dakota 13
Universal Pressure Pumping, Inc. and Universal Well Services, Inc. are subsidiaries of Patterson-UTI Energy, Inc.

Sidewinder drilling HAS 3 RIGS IN BAKKEN SLAWSON IS THINKING LNG FOR ITS DRILLING RIG
http://www.sidewinderdrilling.com/rig-fleet

H&P http://www.hpinc.com/drilling/business-segments/us-land
North Dakota 239 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 255 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 256 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 257 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 258 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 259 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000

North Dakota 272 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000
North Dakota 293 20,000 AC (FlexRig4) 600,000
North Dakota 294 20,000 AC (FlexRig4) 600,000
North Dakota 295 20,000 AC (FlexRig4) 600,000

North Dakota 309 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000
North Dakota 316 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000
North Dakota 317 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000

North Dakota 320 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000
North Dakota 324 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000
North Dakota 325 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 500,000

North Dakota 329 20,000 AC (FlexRig4) 600,000
North Dakota 353 18,000 AC (FlexRig4) 600,000
North Dakota 386 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 392 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000

North Dakota 438 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 446 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 448 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 449 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 454 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 456 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 457 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 471 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000
North Dakota 492 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000

North Dakota 515 25,000 AC (FlexRig5) 750,000
North Dakota 516 25,000 AC (FlexRig5) 750,000
North Dakota 517 25,000 AC (FlexRig5) 750,000
North Dakota 524 25,000 AC (FlexRig5) 750,000
North Dakota 535 25,000 AC (FlexRig5) 750,000
North Dakota 640 22,000 AC (FlexRig3) 750,000

UNIT DRILLING RIGS IN NORTH DAKOTA ALL HAVE 3-3512C CATS  1500 hp
EXCEPT ONE WHICH HAS 2-379TAs 1000 hp
http://unitdrilling.com/Operations.html
SHOWS 12 RIGS IN NORTH DAKOTA


Range Resources and FTS International Use Clean-Burning Natural Gas to Power Equipment for Hydraulic Fracturing  August 04, 2015  WASHINGTON COUNTY, Pa. (PRWEB)

Range Resources and FTS International have successfully partnered on an initiative to use clean-burning natural gas from producing gas wells to power an entire pressure pumping fleet, yielding several environmental benefits.

Range Resources and FTS International (FTSI) have successfully partnered on an initiative to use clean-burning natural gas from producing gas wells to power an entire pressure pumping fleet, yielding several environmental benefits. To date, FTSI has completed 15 wells and a total of 365 stages for Range Resources using this fleet.

FTSI's new fleet uses a technology called dual fuel, where the pressure pumping engines operate on a mixture of natural gas and a small portion of diesel. The dual fuel engines can displace up to 65 percent of the diesel fuel traditionally used to operate pressure pumping equipment.

The benefits of this technology include:
Reduced air emissions for a cleaner environment, due to a reduction in diesel usage
Reduced truck traffic when field gas at or near the well site is used (reduces transportation of diesel fuel to site)
Reduced costs, as natural gas can be a less expensive fuel option than diesel, providing potential cost savings for the industry and for energy consumers

Range Resources Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Ray Walker commented, "In today's environment, improving operational efficiencies is critical. This growing technology not only allows Range to improve our well economics but it allows for the use of a clean burning fuel. Advances like these are how we as an industry have been able to reduce emissions from natural gas production by 38% since 2005, according to the EPA."

FTSI CEO Greg Lanham said, "We are pleased to offer this technology in a dedicated fleet to Range Resources. This solution is not only environmentally conscious, but also helps us be more operationally efficient, delivering exceptional uptime and reliability during hydraulic fracturing operations. FTSI is privileged to work with market leaders like Range that are early adopters of this type of technology."

Range Resources Corporation is a leading independent oil and natural gas producer with operations focused in Appalachia and the Midcontinent region of the United States. The Company pursues an organic growth strategy targeting high return, low-cost projects within its large inventory of low risk, development drilling opportunities. The Company is headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. More information about Range can be found at http://www.rangeresources.com.

FTS International (http://www.ftsi.com) is the largest private well completion service company in North America. The company provides well completion services, including pressure pumping, wireline and reservoir optimization technologies. Exploration and production companies use FTSI's products, services and expertise to enhance recovery rates from oil and gas wells, primarily in unconventional plays.