Sunday Saint of April 02 Quarto Nonas Aprílis  
Day 33 of 40 Days For Life
April Is Child Abuse Prevention Month
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

April 2 - Our Lady of the Highest Grace (Dominican Republic, 1506)
- John Paul II (d. 2005)    Our Lady in Bosnia-Herzegovina (I)
Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

April 2 - First Apparition of the Virgin in Zeitoun (1968-1970), approved by the Coptic Patriarch: official feast of the Apparitions of Zeitoun - Death of Blessed John Paul II (2005) - Venerable Jean-Jacques Olier (d. 1589)
 
The Model of Interior Souls
It seems to me that the Virgin's attitude during the months between the Annunciation and the Nativity
is the model for interior souls—those chosen by God to lead deeper interior lives, at the bottom of the bottomless abyss.
Mary went about and tended to all her activities in great peace and recollection!

The most trivial of these activities were divinized by her, because, through all things, the Virgin always worshipped God's gift. That did not prevent her from working outside her home when charity was concerned.
The Gospel tells us that “Mary set out and traveled to the hill country in haste to her cousin Elizabeth.”

The unutterable vision she contemplated within herself never diminished her exterior charity, for
“if contemplation goes towards the praise and eternity of her Lord, it possesses unity and will not lose it.”

 Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity
La Vie spirituelle, (Spiritual Life), 1928.

 
In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, many apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary have been recorded throughout the ages. The most famous being Guadalupe (Mexico), La Salette, and Lourdes (France), Knock (Ireland) and Fatima (Portugal). But never in recorded Marian history has Our Lady appeared daily for so long a period of time, to so many chosen seers, with such a profound impact worldwide.

For more than 25 years, the "Gospa" has appeared daily in the quiet, rural village of Medjugorje in Bosnia-Herzegovina. This unprecedented series of apparitions to six youths (two boys and four girls), and later by inner locution to two more young girls, began in June 1981. It continues to this day, with one overriding objective: to bring the world back to God. The messages are poignant and elevated in urgency as Mary reveals that these will be her final apparitions on earth, because, as she adds, "It will no longer be necessary."
 
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI

Holy Week: A Liturgical Explanation for the Days of Holy Week
1st v Tryphenna and Tryphosa 2 converts of Saint Paul from Iconium in Lycaonia Romans (16:12) (RM)
 175 Probus of Ravenna the sixth bishop of Ravenna B (RM)
 251 Tryphon, Respicius and Nympha MM (RM) Patron of gardeners (Roeder)
 303 Saint Polycarp of Alexandria Martyr of Egypt
 303 Tiberius (of Agde), Modestus, and Florence MM (RM)
 305 St. Amphianus reproached chief proponent of the Diocletian persecutions for his crime of idolatry Martyred; sea was not able to endure corpse of the martyr and threw it up before the gates of the city all the inhabitants went out to see this prodigy, and gave glory to the God of the Christians, confessing aloud the name of Jesus Christ
 308 St. Theodosia Virgin martyred for her extreme faith
       Cápuæ sancti Victóris Epíscopi, eruditióne et sanctitáte conspícui. At Capua, Bishop St. Victor, well known for his sanctity and learning.
 390 St. Urban of Langres Bishop of Langres patron saint of vine dressers
 430 St. Mary of Egypt penitent sent to desert east of Palestine by the Blessed Virgin as a hermitess in absolute solitude for forty-seven years
 469 St. Abundius Greek priest bishop noted theologian obvious intellect and holiness attended Councils of Chalcedon and Milan
 490 Monitor of Orlèans Twelfth bishop of Orlèans B (RM) (Benedictines)
 573 St. Nicetius bishop of Lyons extensive revival of ecclesiastical chant Humility and assiduous prayer Great miracles confirmed the opinion of his sanctity
6th v. St. Musa Virgin child of Rome; a great mystic, visions and ecstasies, reported by St. Gregory I the Great
        St. Bronach  The "Virgin of Glen Seichis," Irish mystic listed in martyrologies of Tallaght /Donegal
653 & 638 St. Longis & Agnofleda Confessors of Christ
       Spes martyred during the persecutions at Les Andelys (Eure)
       Natalene Martyr of Pamiers M (RM) (also known as Lene)
9th v. Saint Titus the Wonderworker displayed zeal for the monastic life from his youth
 952 Anba Macarius, the Fifty-Ninth Pope of Alexandria;
The Departure of .
10th v Theoctista A nun of  Lesbos a hermitess on the Isle of Paros simili to Saint Mary of Egypt V (RM)
XII v. Sainted Savva, Archbishop of Surozh (now the city of Sudak), lived in the Crimea (early XII v.)
1507 St. Francis of Paola hermit foundation of the Minimi fratres ('least brothers') penance, charity, humility many miracles  gifts of prophesy insight into men's hearts uncorrupt 25 years but burned by Hugenots
1815 BD LEOPOLD OF GAICHE founded house for missioners and preachers could retire for their annual retreat other brethren and friends of the order could come for spiritual refreshment; numerous miracles reported at his grave 1839 St. Dominic Tuoc 3rd order Dominican martyr native of Vietnam 
1968 The Apparition of the Pure Lady the Virgin in the church of Zeiton.
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
  Sunday Saint of April 02 Quarto Nonas Aprílis  
Day 33 of 40 Days For Life
April Is Child Abuse Prevention Month

The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
  These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is general and binds all the followers of Christ.

Holy Week: A Liturgical Explanation for the Days of Holy Week

3. MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY: THE END These three days, which the Church calls Great and Holy have within the liturgical development of the Holy Week a very definite purpose. They place all its celebrations in the perspective of End; they remind us of the eschatological meaning of Pascha.
  So often Holy Week is considered one of the "beautiful traditions" or "customs," a self-evident "part" of our calendar. We take it for granted and enjoy it as a cherished annual event which we have "observed" since childhood, we admire the beauty of its services, the pageantry of its rites and, last but not least, we like the fuss about the paschal table. And then, when all this is done we resume our normal life.
   But do we understand that when the world rejected its Savior, when "Jesus began to be sorrowful and very heavy... and his soul was exceedingly sorrowful even unto death," when He died on the Cross, "normal life" came to its end and is no longer possible. For there were "normal" men who shouted "Crucify Him "who spat at Him and nailed Him to the Cross. And they hated and killed Him precisely because He was troubling their normal life. It was indeed a perfectly "normal" world which preferred darkness and death to light and life.... By the death of Jesus the "normal" world, and "normal" life were irrevocably condemned. Or rather they revealed their true and abnormal inability to receive the Light, the terrible power of evil in them. "Now is the Judgment of this world" (John 12:31). The Pascha of Jesus signified its end to "this world" and it has been at its end since then. This end can last for hundreds of centuries this does not alter the nature of time in which we live as the "last time." "The fashion of this world passeth away..." (I Cor. 7:31).


Pascha means passover, passage. The feast of Passover was for the Jews the annual commemoration of their whole history as salvation, and of salvation as passage from the slavery of Egypt into freedom, from exile into the promised land. It was also the anticipation of the ultimate passage - into the Kingdom of God.
   Christ was the fulfillment of Pascha. He performed the ultimate passage: from death into life, from this "old world" into the new world into the new time of the Kingdom. And he opened the possibility of this passage to us. Living in "this world" we can already be "not of this world," i.e. be free from slavery to death and sin, partakers of the "world to come." But for this we must also perform our own passage, we must condemn the old Adam in us, we must put on Christ in the baptismal death and have our true life hidden in God with Christ, in the "world to come...."


And thus Easter is not an annual commemoration, solemn and beautiful, of a past event. It is this Event itself shown, given to us, as always efficient, always revealing our world, our time, our life as being at their end, and announcing the Beginning of the new life.... And the function of the three first days of Holy Week is precisely to challenge us with this ultimate meaning of Pascha and to prepare us to the understanding and acceptance of it.

1. This eschatological (which means ultimate, decisive, final) challenge is revealed, first, in the common troparion of these days:

Troparion - Tone 8 Behold the Bridegroom comes at midnight, And blessed is the servant whom He shall find watching, And again unworthy is the servant whom He shall find heedless. Beware, therefore, O my soul, do not be weighed down with sleep, Lest you be given up to death and lest you be shut out of the Kingdom. But rouse yourself crying: Holy, Holy, Holy, are You, O our God! Through the Theotokos have mercy on us!

Midnight is the moment when the old day comes to its end and a new day begins. It is thus the symbol of the time in which we live as Christians. For, on the one hand, the Church is still in this world, sharing in its weaknesses and tragedies. Yet, on the other hand, her true being is not of this world, for she is the Bride of Christ and her mission is to announce and to reveal the coming of the Kingdom and of the new day. Her life is a perpetual watching and expectation, a vigil pointed at the dawn of this new day. But we know how strong is still our attachment to the "old day," to the world with its passions and sins. We know how deeply we still belong to "this world." We have seen the light, 'We know Christ, we have heard about the peace and joy of the new life in Him, and yet the world holds us in its slavery. This weakness, this constant betrayal of Christ, this incapacity to give the totality of our love to the only true object of love are wonderfully expressed in the exapostilarion of these three days:

"Thy Bridal Chamber I see adorned, O my Savior And I have no wedding garment that I may enter, O Giver of life, enlighten the vesture of my soul And save me."

2. The same theme develops further in the Gospel readings of these days. First of all, the entire text of the four Gospels (up to John 13: 31) is read at the Hours (1, 3, 6 and 9th). This recapitulation shows that the Cross is the climax of the whole life and ministry of Jesus, the Key to their proper understanding. Everything in the Gospel leads to this ultimate hour of Jesus and everything is to be understood in its light. Then, each service has its special Gospel lesson :

On Monday:

At Matins: Matthew 21: 18-43 - the story of the fig tree, the symbol of the world created to bear spiritual fruits and failing in its response to God.

At the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts: Matthew 24: 3-35: the great eschatological discourse of Jesus. The signs and announcement of the End. "Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away...."

"When the Lord was going to His voluntary Passion, He said to His Apostles on the way: Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, And the Son of Man shall be delivered up As it is written of Him. Come, therefore, and let us accompany Him, With minds purified from the pleasures of this life, And let us be crucified and die with Him, That we may live with Him, And that we may hear Him say to us: I go now, not to the earthly Jerusalem to suffer, But unto My Father and your Father And My God and your God, And I will gather you up into the heavenly Jerusalem, Into the Kingdom of Heaven...." (Monday Matins)
by THE VERY REV. ALEXANDER SCHMEMANN
1st v Tryphenna and Tryphosa 2 converts of Saint Paul from Iconium in Lycaonia Romans (16:12) (RM)
Tryphenna and Tryphosa are mentioned by the apostle in his letter to the Romans (16:12).
Tradition represents them as protectresses of Saint Thecla (Benedictines).
175 Probus of Ravenna the sixth bishop of Ravenna B (RM)
Relics of Probus, a Roman who became the sixth bishop of Ravenna, are still venerated in the cathedral there (Benedictines).

251 Tryphon, Respicius and Nympha MM (RM) Patron of gardeners (Roeder).
Tryphon was a gooseherd at Campsada near Apamea in Syria and was martyred at Nicaea under Decius. The names of Respicius and Nympha have been joined to that of Tryphon only since the 11th century; we know nothing about either of them and, in fact, there is doubt about their authenticity (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). In art, Tryphon is represented as a boy quelling a basilisk. Sometimes (1) an angel brings a crown of flowers to his martyrdom; (2) his feet are nailed to the ground; or (3) he is shown hung up and burned with torches. Venerated at Catarro.

303 Saint Polycarp of Alexandria Martyr of Egypt
He was put to death at Alexandria, Egypt, during the persecutions under Emperor Diocletian. Polycarp was cruelly tortured and then beheaded.

The Holy Martyr Polycarp suffered for his bold denunciation of the emperor Maxmian (305-313) for spilling innocent Christian blood in the city of Alexandria.

He openly confessed himself a Christian and went to voluntary torture. After cruel sufferings, the martyr was beheaded. 


303 Tiberius (of Agde), Modestus, and Florence MM (RM)
Invoked against madness and possession
These martyrs met their death under Diocletian at Agde, diocese of Montpellier (Benedictines). Tiberius is shown as a hermit with two lions at his feet, one of which holds a spiked club. He holds the martyrs palm in his hands. Invoked against madness and possession (Roeder).

305 St. Amphianus reproached chief proponent of the Diocletian persecutions for his crime of idolatry Martyr; sea was not able to endure corpse of the martyr and threw it up before the gates of the city all the inhabitants went out to see this prodigy, and gave glory to the God of the Christians, confessing aloud the name of Jesus Christ
 Cæsaréæ, in Palæstína, natális sancti Apphiáni Mártyris, qui, ante sanctum Ædésium Mártyrem, fratrem suum, in persecutióne Galérii Maximiáni, cum Prǽsidem Urbánum idólis immolántem arguísset, sæve dilaniátus est, et, pédibus lino in óleum intíncto eóque incénso obvolútis, acerbíssime cruciátus, ac demum in mare demérsus; atque ita, tránsiens per ignem et aquam, edúctus est in refrigérium.
       At Caesarea in Palestine, during the persecution of Galerius Maximian, the birthday of the martyr St. Amphian.  He reproved the governor Urban for sacrifícing to idols, so his body was cruelly cut in shreds, his feet wrapped in oil-soaked cloths, and set on fire.  After these painful torments, he was cast into the sea.  Thus through fire and water, he reached his everlasting repose.
also called Appian and Apian. He was a young man of Christian faith in Lycia, Turkey. Thus, at the age of 18, he retired to Caesarea, Palestine. There he became a disciple of Saint Pamphilius, who was teaching Scripture. He intruded upon a Roman governor's pagan sacrifices in the official residence.  Arrested for being a Christian, Amphianus continued his charges of vain idolatry to the governor. For this he was tortured to death.
 

306 SS. APPHIAN AND THEODOSIA, MARTYRS
AMONGST the martyrs of Palestine whom Eusebius knew personally and whose sufferings he has described, there are two who seem to have made a special impression upon him by reason of their tender age. One was Apphian, or Apian, a youth in his twentieth year, and the other was a girl of eighteen called Theodosia.
Apphian, born in Lycia, had passed through the then famous schools of Berytus in Phoenicia, where he had become a Christian, and he went to live at Caesarea when he was eighteen. Not long afterwards there came instructions to the governor of the city that everyone should attend the public sacrifices. Thereupon Apphian, communicating his design to no one—“not even to us”, says Eusebius, with whom he lived—went to the place where Urban the governor was offering the sacrifice, and, slipping unnoticed through the guards, laid hold of the magistrate’s arm and stopped him, exclaiming that it was impious to neglect the worship of the true God to sacrifice to idols. The guards fell upon him, beat him and kicked him, and he was thrown into a dark dungeon, where he remained twenty-four hours with his feet in the stocks. The following day, when his face had become so swollen with blows as to be unrecognizable, his sides were torn until his bones and entrails were exposed. To all interrogations he made but one reply: “I am a servant of Christ”. Lighted pieces of flax dipped in oil were next applied to his feet, but though the fire burnt to his bones his constancy could not be shaken. When urged to sacrifice he only said, “I confess Christ, the one God, and the same God with the Father.” Finding no weakening of resolution, the judge condemned him to be cast into the sea. Immediately after the sentence had been carried out there ensued a prodigy of which Eusebius says there were as many witnesses as there were inhabitants of Caesarea. The sea and city were shaken by an earthquake, and though the saint’s feet were weighted down by heavy stones, his body was cast up on the shore.
Of Theodosia, who appears to have suffered also under Maximinus, Eusebius writes in the following words: “After the persecution had lasted over five years, on the . . . fourth day before the nones of April—actually on the day of the Lord’s resurrection—there came into Caesarea a holy and very devoted girl called Theodosia, a native of Tyre. She approached some prisoners, who were sifting before the pretorium awaiting sentence of death, with the intention of greeting them and also probably of asking them to remember her when they came into the presence of God. She was set upon by the soldiers as though she had done something impious or criminal, and was brought before the president. He was in a savage mood and, moved by some cruel impulse, he condemned her to horrible tortures, her sides and her breasts being torn to the bone by means of iron teeth. Then, as she was still breathing and her face bore a happy smile, he caused her to be thrown into the sea.”
All this is taken from Eusebius in The Martyrs of Palestine. Two texts are preserved to us which may conveniently be consulted in E. Grapin’s edition in the series Textes et Documents pour l’étude historique du Christianisme, vol. iii, pp. 183--227. See also the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xvi (1897), pp. 122—127.
The Holy Martyrs Amphianos and Hedesios were brothers by birth. They lived in the city of Patara (province of Lycia) in the family of the pagan city-governor. For their further study in the pagan sciences they went to the city of Beirut. There the brothers came to believe in Christ and became ardent followers of Him. The holy brothers quit their pagan parents and departed to Alexandrian Caesarea, where they found for themselves an instructor, the Presbyter Pamphilos (the account about him is under 16 February), and under his guidance they became accomplished in spiritual life, dwelling in prayer and the study of sacred books.
At that time by decree of the emperor Maximian (305-313), a zealous pagan and cruel persecutor of Christians, -- all the inhabitants of the city of Caesarea were required to make a public offering of sacrifice.  To save themselves from idol-worship, many Christians had to hide themselves away in secret places. Saints Amphianos and Hedesios also hid away.

THE HOLY MARTYRS AMPHIANUS AND EDESIUS

These two young men were blood brothers from the city of Patara of distinguished but pagan parents. While they were studying the secular sciences in the city of Beirut, they were enlightened by the Spirit of God, and acknowledging the falsehood of paganism, discerned the truth of Christianity. When they returned home they could no longer live with their pagan parents and kinsmen and secretly fled to Caesarea in Palestine to the presbyter Pamphilius, renown for his sanctity and spiritual learning. With Pamphilius, they studied the Law of God day and night and practiced Christian asceticism. It is said of Pamphilius that he was twenty years old according to the flesh but, in understanding and generosity, he was a hundred years old.
When a persecution began during the reign of Maximian, many Christians fled the city and hid themselves. Others, willingly and rejoicefully, gave themselves into the hands of the persecutors in order to suffer for the Name of Him, Who first suffered for them. Amphianus was among the latter. Unafraid, he entered a pagan temple where Prince Urban was offering sacrifices to the idols, grabbed the prince by the hand which was holding the sacrifice and cried to him to refrain from serving and making sacrificial offerings to dead idols and to acknowledge the True God. Some of the pagans who heard these words and witnessing the great courage of Amphianus, repented and embraced the Faith of Christ. The enraged prince subjected Amphianus to torture. Among the other tortures, they wrapped the legs of Amphianus with cotton and set them on fire. When he remained alive, they tossed his body into the sea with a stone around his neck. The sea became turbulent and hurled his martyred body back into the city.
At first, Edesius was sent to a cooper mine in Palestine and was later taken to Egypt. In Alexandria, Edesiuswas filled with holy zeal against a certain Prince Hierocles who, in the market place, assembled Christian nuns, maidens and virtuous women and handed them over to the most shameful perverts for derision. Edesius, filled with holy zeal, struck the disgraceful prince. For that, he was tortured and drowned in the sea as was his brother Amphianus. As two innocent lambs, they were sacrificed for Christ about the year 306 A.D. and were translated to the glorious mansions of the Lord.

But when the governor of the city of Caesarea had to make the sacrifice to idols, Saint Amphianos boldly went into the temple, he took hold the hand of the governor standing with the pagan sacrifice, and began to urge him to forsake his error and believe in Christ.
By order of the governor, soldiers seized hold of Saint Amphianos, fiercely beat him and then threw him in prison. Two days later they led him to trial, where they beat him with iron rods and burned at his body with bundles of flax soaked in oil. The brave youth, steadfastly confessing his faith in Christ, was then thrown with a stone about his neck into the sea. But suddenly a strong storm blew up, and the waves carried the body of the martyr to shore, where Christians gave it burial. The brother of the Martyr Amphianos, Saint Hedesios, was likewise subjected to torture, and they then sent him off to the copper mines.
After a certain while they freed Saint Hedesios and sent him to Alexandria. There he learned of the extreme cruelty towards Christians by the governor Hierokles, and he boldly denounced him. They began to torture Saint Hedesios, and then like his brother they drowned him (+ 306).

Amphianus of Lycia M (RM) (also known as Aphian, Amphian, Appian, Apian) Died April 2, c. 305. Amphianus was a young Christian of Lycia, Asia Minor, whose parents gave him the best education possible in rhetoric, law, and philosophy in the famous schools of Berytus, Phoenicia. While he was away at school, he became a Christian. Upon completing his studies, he returned home but was disturbed by the idolatry of his parents. Thus, at the age of 18, he retired to Caesarea, Palestine. There he became a disciple of Saint Pamphilius, who was teaching Scripture.
In May 305, Galerius Maximianus, the chief proponent of the Diocletian persecutions, was declared emperor of the East, which Maximinus Daia governed under him, as Caesar. Letters came to Caesarea from Maximinus Daia ordering the governor to compel everyone to attend public, solemn sacrifices to the civic gods.

The Church historian Eusebius (De Martyr. Palaest., c. 4), with whom Amphianus lived, tells us that, without saying anything to anyone, Amphianus entered the governor's palace and stopped the latter on the point of offering sacrifices to idols. Amphianus, with youthful boldness, reproached him for his crime of idolatry. He was forthwith beaten, arrested and thrown into a dungeon, where he was kept in stocks for two days. As he was flayed, his only answer to all questions was: "I am a servant of Christ." Next the executioners were ordered to set his feet aflame. As his flesh melted like wax, he remained resolute, which struck his persecutors with astonishment.

He was thrown back into prison for three days. During his trial, he persisted: "I confess Christ the only God, and the same God with the Father." Although he was already half-dead, the judge ordered that he be thrown into the sea. Eusebius records that at his execution, the sea and the city were shaken by an earthquake accompanied by a dreadful noise. He writes that it was as if the sea were not able to endure the corpse of the martyr, and threw it up before the gates of the city: all the inhabitants went out to see this prodigy, and gave glory to the God of the Christians, confessing aloud the name of Jesus Christ (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).

306 St. Appian Martyr of Phoenicia, now Lebanon
He was born in Lycia, circa 286, and studied at Berytus, modern Beirut. From there he went to Caesarea, with Eusebius. When an imperial order demanded public sacrifice to the gods of Rome, Appian protested to the local governor. He was arrested and thrown into the sea with weights on his feet. Tradition states that an earthquake followed his execution, bringing the body back on shore. In some lists he is called Apphian.

The Holy Martyrs Amphianus and Edesius were brothers. They lived in the city of Patara (province of Lycia) in the family of the pagan governor. They went to the city of Beirut to study the pagan sciences. There they became ardent followers of Christ.  The holy brothers left their pagan parents and went to Alexandrian Caesarea, where they found an instructor, St Pamphilius (February 16), and under his guidance they became accomplished in the spiritual life, spending their time in prayer and the study of sacred books.

By decree of the emperor Maximian (305-313), a zealous pagan and cruel persecutor of Christians, all the inhabitants of Caesarea were required to offer public sacrifice. Many Christians, including Sts Amphianus and Edesius, had to hide in order to avoid sacrificing to idols.  When the city prefect of Caesarea was about to offer sacrifice to idols, St Amphianus boldly went into the temple, took the prefect's hand, and urged him to abandon his error and believe in Christ. 
By order of the governor, soldiers seized St Amphianus, fiercely beat him and then threw him in prison. Two days later they led him to trial, where they beat him with iron rods and burned his body with bundles of flax soaked in oil.  The brave youth, steadfastly confessing his faith in Christ, was then thrown into the sea with a stone about his neck. Suddenly a storm arose, and the waves carried the martyr's body to shore, where it was buried by Christians.
308 St. Theodosia Virgin martyred for her extreme faith
 Ibídem pássio sanctæ Theodósiæ, Vírginis Tyriæ, quæ, in eádem persecutióne, cum sanctos Confessóres ante tribúnal stantes públice salutásset, atque rogásset eos, ut, cum ad Dóminum perveníssent, sui recordaréntur, a milítibus tenta et ad Urbánum Prǽsidem ducta est; eóque jubénte, latéribus et mammis ad interióra usque dilaniátis, in mare tandem projícitur.
      In the same city, the passion of St. Theodosia, a virgin of Tyre.  In the same persecution, she publicly spoke to the holy confessors as they stood before the tribunal, and begged of them to remember her when they should be with God.  She was arrested and led to the governor Urban, at whose order her sides and breasts were deeply lacerated, and she was thrown into the sea.
A young girl of Tyre, Lebanon, she was only eighteen when she visited Caesarea (modern Israel). Beholding some Christians on their way to execution, she spoke to them and was immediately seized, tortured, and murdered by being thrown into the sea.
Theodora/Theodosia von Tyros Orthodoxe Kirche: 3. April und 29. Mai Katholische Kirche: 2. April
Theodora wurde um 290 in Tyros geboren. Sie lebte in Caesarea in Palästina und sprach während des Osterfestes verurteilten Christen Mut zu. Sie wurde gefangengenommen und als sie sich weigerte, den Götzen zu opfern, schwer gefoltert und mit einem Stein am Hals ins Meer geworfen. Als sie wieder auftauchte (von Engeln getragen), wurde sie wilden Tieren vorgeworfen, die sie aber nicht anrührten. Daraufhin wurde sie geköpft. Theodora starb nach der Überlieferung am 2. oder 3.4.308. Sie soll nach ihrem Tod ihren Eltern, die sie vom Martyrium abbringen wollten, mit einem goldenen Kreuz und einer goldenen Krone erschienen sein. Am 29. Mai feiert die orthodoxe Kirche die Übertragung ihrer Gebeine nach Konstantinopel und Venedig. Ihre Gebeine ruhen jetzt in Bologna.

Theodosia of Tyre VM (RM) Born in Tyre; died in Caesarea, Palestine, in 308. At age 18, the consecrated virgin, Saint Theodosia, travelled to Caesarea in Palestine, where she saw some Christian martyrs on their way to execution on Easter Sunday. She congratulated them on their happiness, asked them to pray for her, and exhorted them to patience and perseverance.
Overheard by the officials, she was seized, tortured on the rack, flayed, hanged by the hair, and pierced with nails. She endured all this cheerfully. Nothing could shake her inmost calm. To the judge she sweetly said: "By your torture you procure for me that great happiness which it was my grief to see deferred. I rejoice to see myself called to this crown, and return hearty thanks to God for vouchsafing me such a favor." Enraged that she could not disturb her, the governor finally ordered her to be cast into the sea. The other confessors he condemned to work the mines in Palestine.

Saint Theodosia is honored in both the East and the West, but she is particularly venerated in Venice, Italy. The historian Eusebius, an eyewitness, records her martyrdom in his History of the Martyrs of Palestine, c. 7 (Benedictines, Husenbeth). Saint Theodosia is portrayed in art as a maiden holding a stone. She may also be shown (1) being thrown into water with a stone around her neck; (2) as the angel brings her ashore; or (3) nailed through her feet to a cypress tree and hanged by her hair (Roeder).

Cápuæ sancti Victóris Epíscopi, eruditióne et sanctitáte conspícui.
At Capua, Bishop St. Victor, well known for his sanctity and learning.
390 St. Urban of Langres Bishop of Langres patron saint of vine dressers
 Apud Língonas, in Gállia, sancti Urbáni Epíscopi.       At Langres in France, Bishop St. Urban.
France, consecrated in 374. He is honored as a patron saint of vine dressers in some parts of Burgundy.

Urban of Langres B (RM) Died c. 390. Saint Urban was nominated as the sixth bishop of Langres in 374. In some parts of Burgundy and neighboring provinces he is honored as the patron saint of vine dressers (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). In art, Saint Urban is portrayed as a bishop with a bunch of grapes or a vine at his side. Sometimes he may be shown with (1) a book with a wine vessel on it or (2) grapes on a missal as he holds the triple cross (owing to confusion in southern Germany with Pope Urban II. Saint Urban is the patron of Burgundian vine-growers, gardeners, and coopers.
He is invoked against blight, frost, storm, and faintness (Roeder).

430 St. Mary of Egypt penitent {see april 01} sent to desert east of Palestine by the Blessed Virgin as a hermitess in absolute solitude for forty-seven years
 In Palæstína deposítio sanctæ Maríæ Ægyptíacæ, quæ peccátrix appellátur.       In Palestine, the death of St. Mary of Egypt, called the Sinner.

Orthodoxe Kirche: 1. April Katholische Kirche: 2. April

Maria von ÄgyptenMaria lebte im 3. oder 4. Jahrhundert in Alexandria in Ägypten. Nach den Legenden führte sie ein ausschweifendes Leben, vielleicht arbeitete sie als Prostituierte. Auf einer Reise nach Jerusalem wollte sie die Grabeskirche besuchen, wurde aber daran gehindert und eine Stimme sagte ihr, sie sei es nicht wert, das Kreuz des Erlösers zu sehen. Sie bereute daraufhin und ging in die Wüste östlich des Jordan. Hier lebte sie 47 Jahre in Einsamkeit und Askese. Dann fand sie der Mönch Zosimus, der ihr die Eucharistie reichte. Auf ihren Wunsch besuchte Zosimus sie ein Jahr später erneut, fand aber nur ihren Leichnam. Im 6. Jahrhundert setzte die Verehrung ihres Grabes ein. Viele Pilger besuchten das Grab und ihre Lebensgeschichte wurde ausgeschmückt: Sie soll, als Zosimus sie fand, nur mit ihren langen Haaren bekleidet gewesen sein und ihr Leichnam soll von einem Löwen begraben worden sein, während Engel ihre Seele in den Himmel geleiteten. Maria ist neben Maria Magdalena die zweite große Büßerin und sie wurde wie Maria Magdalena besonders in sittenstrengen Zeiten von Künstlern nackt dargestellt. Reliquien von Maria werden in Rom, Neapel und Antwerpen verehrt.

5th v. ST MARY OF EGYPT
THE story of St Mary of Egypt seems to be based upon a short and not incredible account contained in the Life of St Cyriacus, written by his disciple Cyril of Scythopolis. The holy man had retired with his followers into the wild and apparently uninhabited desert beyond Jordan. One day two of his disciples suddenly saw a human figure which escaped into some bushes, but which they afterwards tracked into a cave. The figure told them not to approach because she was a woman and naked, but upon being interrogated she informed them that her name was Mary, that she was a great sinner who had been a public singer and actress, and that she had come there to expiate her former life. The two returned to tell St Cyriacus what they had seen and heard. Upon the occasion of a second visit which they paid to the cave they found her lying dead and they buried her on the spot.
Round about this narrative there grew up an elaborate legend which attained enormous popularity in the middle ages and which is illustrated on the old glass windows of the cathedrals of Bourges, Auxerre and elsewhere. It may be summarized as follows:

In the reign of Theodosius the Younger, there lived in Palestine a holy monk and priest named Zosimus who, having served God with great fervour in the same house for fifty-three years, was divinely directed to leave his monastery for one near the Jordan, where he might learn how to advance still further on the path of holiness. He found that the members of this community on the first Sunday in Lent after Mass used to disperse in the desert to pass in solitude and penance the time until Palm Sunday. It was at that season, about the year 430, that Zosimus found himself a twenty days’ distance from his monastery, and sat down one day at noon to say his psalms and to rest.
Perceiving suddenly what appeared to be a human form he made the sign of the cross and finished his psalms. Then, looking up, he saw a white-haired, sun-tanned figure which he took to be a hermit, but which ran away as he went towards it. He had nearly overtaken it and was near enough to crave its blessing, when it exclaimed, “Father Zosimus, I am a woman: throw your mantle to cover me that you may come near me”. Surprised that she should know his name, he complied, and they entered into conversation. In reply to his inquiries the woman told him her strange story with many expressions of shame and penitence: “My country”, she said, “is Egypt. At the age of twelve, while my father and mother were still living, I went without their consent to Alexandria. I cannot think without trembling of the first steps by which I fell into sin or of the excesses which followed.”
She then described how she had lived as a public prostitute for seventeen years, not for money, but to gratify her lust. At the age of about twenty-eight, curiosity led her to join a band of people who were going to celebrate at Jerusalem the feast of the Holy Cross—and even on the journey she continued her evil courses, corrupting some of the pilgrims. Upon their arrival in Jerusalem she tried to enter the church with the rest of the congregation, but an invisible force held her back. After two or three ineffectual attempts, she withdrew into a corner of the outer court, and for the first time a full realization of her sinfulness swept over her. Raising her eyes to an eikon of the Blessed Virgin Mary she besought with tears the help of the Mother of God, vowing herself to a life of penance. With a lightened heart she was now able without any difficulty to enter the church to venerate the cross, and as she returned to the eikon to give thanks to our Lady she heard a voice which said, “Go over Jordan and thou shalt find rest”.

At a baker’s where she bought loaves she inquired the way to the Jordan, and started off forthwith, arriving that same night at the church of St John the Baptist on the bank of the river. Here she made her communion and crossed the Jordan into the wilderness, where she had remained ever since—about forty-seven years, as far as she could judge. She had seen no human being and had lived on edible plants and on dates. The winter cold and the summer heat had sorely afflicted her unprotected body, and she had often been tortured by thirst. At such times she had been tempted to regret the luxuries and the wines of Egypt in which she had formerly indulged. These and other assaults beset her night and day almost unremittingly for seventeen years, but she had implored the intercession of the Blessed Virgin and the divine assistance had never failed her. She could not read, and had never had any human instruction in holy things, but God Himself had taught her the mysteries of faith. At her request, Zosimus undertook not to divulge what she had said until after her death, and promised to meet her again beside the Jordan on the Maundy Thursday of the following year to give her holy communion.
The next Lent, Zosimus made his way to the selected meeting-place, bearing the Blessed Sacrament, and that same Maundy Thursday evening beheld Mary standing on the opposite bank of Jordan. After she had made the sign of the cross, she proceeded to walk upon the water until she reached dry ground beside the astonished priest. She received communion with deep devotion, following it by the recitation of the opening words of the Nunc dimittis. From a basket of dates, figs and lentils which Zosimus offered, she would accept only three lentils; and she thanked him for all he had done and commended herself to his prayers. Then, with a final entreaty that he would return a year later to the spot where they had first met, she departed over the river as she had come. But when Zosimus went back into the desert to keep this second appointment, he found Mary’s dead body stretched out upon the ground, whilst beside her on the sand were traced these words: “Father Zosimus, bury the body of lowly Mary. Render earth to earth and pray for me. I died the night of the Lord’s Passion, after receiving the divine and mystic Banquet.” The monk had no spade, but a lion from the desert came to his assistance and with its claws helped him to dig her grave. Zosimus resumed his mantle, which he treasured henceforth as a holy relic, and returned to tell his brethren all his experiences. He continued for many years to serve God in his monastery until a happy death released him in the hundredth year of his age.
This legend has had a remarkable diffusion and popularity in the East. In its developed form it seems to have been the composition of St Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem, who died in AD 638. Besides the digression referred to above, which Cyril of Scythopolis introduced into his Life of St Cyriacus, Sophronius had before him a somewhat similar story told by John Moschus in the Pratum Spirituale. This nucleus was elaborated into a narrative of respectable dimensions with the aid of sundry borrowings front the Life of St Paul of Thebes. St John Damascene, who died in the middle of the eighth century, makes long quotations from the developed Life of St Mary of Egypt and apparently regarded it as an authentic record. A good account of the whole matter is furnished by H. Leclercq in DAC., vol. x (1932), CC. 2128—2136, where a full bibliography will be found. See also the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. i; and A. B. Bujila, Rutebeuf La Vie de sainte Marie l’Egyptienne (1949).
In Cyril of Scythopolis' life of St. Cyryacus, he tells of a woman named Mary found by Cyryacus and his companions living as a hermitess in the Jordanian
She was discovered about 430 by a holy man named Zosimus, who was impressed by her spiritual knowledge and wisdom. He saw her the following Lent, but when he returned, he found her dead and buried her. When he returned to his monastery near the Jordan, he told the brethren what had happened and the story spread.
She told him she had been a famous singer and actress who had sinned and was doing penance in the desert. When they returned, she was dead. Around the story was built an elaborate legend that had tremendous popularity during the Middle Ages according to which she was an Egyptian who went to Alexandria when she was twelve and lived as an actress and courtesan for seventeen years. She was brought to the realization of her evil life before an icon of the Blessed Virgin, and at Mary's direction, went to the desert east of Palestine, where she lived as a hermitess for forty-seven years, not seeing a single human being and beset by all kinds of temptations, which were mitigated by her prayers to the Blessed Virgin.
Mary of Egypt, Hermit (RM) (also known as Maria Aegyptica) Died c. 500; feast day is sometimes kept on April 9 or 10. The story of Mary the penitent was known throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages. The story is told in Cyril of Scythopolis's life of Saint Cyriacus, according to John Moschus. He tells of a woman named Mary found by Cyriacus and his companions living as a hermit in the desert beyond the Jordan. She told him that she had been a famous singer and actress who had sinned and was doing penance in the desert; when they returned, she was dead. Around this core, the following story was elaborated and popularly retold in the Middle Ages:
Mary began her life in Egypt. Her parents adored her, which was already a bad start! She was the center of her family's world. Everything revolved, or had to revolve around her: papa, the sun, her cat.  Mary was not an unhappy child. On the contrary, everything was given to her, everyone gave in to her. So much so that one day, annoyed because her parents chanced to oppose one of her whims, she ran away from home--at age 12--to the metropolis of Alexandria.

At that time, a girl of 12 was a woman. Mary was beautiful. She was not adventurous or ambitious or she might not have hurled herself into the wickedness of prostitution for 17 sad years. She had no center, nothing on which to orient herself; she had no faith in anything, she hoped for nothing. She was cynical and disenchanted, at once worshipping and detesting money. There is only one explanation for her life: She loved nothing. Dignity is the premise for any love.

When she first tried to find her way in the city, she thought of a friend of her father's who lived there. He welcomed her, understood her, offered her refuge, and amused her. He destroyed all modesty, all remorse, all childhood in her. She went along with his debaucheries until she became attracted to another man and his stables, so she dropped the former for the latter, without notice. She was trapped. She lived like a glittering coin that is passed from pocket to pocket; she made her morality consist in not having any, indeed in losing sight of its very meaning. Nothing restrained her, nothing could.

Out of curiosity, not piety, Mary joined a group of pilgrims who were setting out for Jerusalem. She paid for her passage by offering herself to the sailors. In Jerusalem, an irresistible force prevented her from entering the church with the other pilgrims. In front of an icon depicting the Blessed Virgin or, according to another version, at the Holy Sepulchre, she was overcome by the enormity of her sinfulness. Interiorly, she was told to cross the Jordan, where she would find rest.

Immediately, Mary set out for the desert, unrecognizing and unrecognized, afraid of the world. All that she took with her were three wretchedly small loaves of bread to provide for her immediate needs, to provide her with time to develop the strength to beg. Thus, completely worn out, she arrived at the bank of the Jordan River. She had no desire to return to her parents' home.

She made her confession and took communion at the monastery of Saint John the Baptist, but did not tarry there. She left the monks to their mortifications. She had not seen any of them, because she had kept her eyes closed. She climbed the sandy hills to where the desert begins. Her life continued to be marked by excesses. Mary was to let herself dry out like a prune, for this was the remedy that she herself devised against her moral rot and decay.

We can't conceive of all she endured, what she was seeking, what she experienced during 47 years in an absolute solitude. During these years she suffered from drought and cold. She lived on berries and dates. Her clothes wore out. Sometimes she had been tempted to return to her life of sin, but always she prayed to the Virgin Mary for strength to resist the temptation. She could not read, but she was divinely instructed in the Christian faith.

There was a monk called Zosimus, who tells us certain things about Mary. He was an old man. About 430, after having lived in a monastery in Palestine for 53 years decided to join a community with stricter rules near the River Jordan. Thus, he came into a new area.

Like his companions, every year, on the first Sunday of Lent, he ate after Mass; then with his head bowed in deep meditation, he set out by himself for the desert. Each year he advanced further into the solitude of the sandy wastes by adding an extra day's walking. This time he had to walk for 20 days before coming to a rest. He sat on the ground and immediately began to pray. He knew noon had arrived because his shadow contracted around him. Distractedly, he saw someone walking in front of him. If it was the devil, he would protect himself against it in the name of Jesus Christ.

You've guessed it--before him stood Mary the penitent, but only a truly sharp person would have been able to distinguish her from a man in that state. She was entirely naked but this did not make him uneasy for her skin, roasted by the sun, was black and dry as an old scrap of wood. Her white hair fell down her back. The monk went up to her, but she backed away, crying out, "Throw me your mantle to cover me, for I have no clothes."

He pursued her up to a clump of bushes behind which she took cover. "Answer me, for the love of God, what are you doing here? Why and for how long?" "Zosimus, please hand me your mantle, bless me, forgive my sins, and I will come out. . . ."

It was thus that he learned about her life, and all that has been said and written about her since then. Her temptations and penances Zosimus drew out of her in great detail. Mary the Egyptian spoke only through the Bible whose meaning she found again spontaneously at the end of her long spiritual quest. Zosimus was impressed by her spiritual knowledge and wisdom.

Mary said to Zosimus, "Leave me your mantle; come to see me next year at Easter, with the Eucharist, and don't breathe a word!"
As he promised, Zosimus returned the following Holy Thursday to give her Holy Communion. He also brought figs, dates, and lentils with him. But after Mary had received the sacrament, she would take from him only three lentils. She thanked him and begged him to return the following year.

According to one rendition (no, legends are not always logical), Saint Mary died suddenly in the night after having left a message for the monk, her friend, which she traced out in the sand and which he was to read a year later: "Father Zosimus, bury the body of lowly Mary the sinner here. Render unto the earth what is the earth's, and pray for me."  This is how he learned her name. He had forgotten to ask her what it was.

Zosimus, with the help of a lion, buried her body. He took back his cloak, which he cherished for the rest of his life, and then he reverently buried Mary the Egyptian. She had lived for 78 years. Sixteen centuries later there are perhaps no greater deserts than the hearts of great cities. Mary the Egyptian, pray for us!

In actuality her body was found dead by two disciples of Saint Cyriacus, a 6th-century hermit, and became the center of these elaborate and popular stories (Attwater, Attwater2, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Gill).

In art, Saint Mary is generally portrayed clad only in her long hair with her emblem, three loaves of bread. She may also be shown (1) with Mary Magdalene (with whom she is often confused. The Magdalene often has a jar of ointment and crucifix, while Aegyptica has three loaves); (2) sitting under a palm tree and looking across the Jordan; (3) washing her hair in the Jordan; (4) chased from the church by an angel with a sword; or (5) receiving Holy Communion from Saint Zosimus (Roeder). Saint Mary was most popular in the East but also had a Western cultus. Her image was used by artists from the 12th century on carved capitals, in stained glass in the cathedrals of Chartres, Bourges, and Auxerre (13th c.), and in paintings and sculptures of the later Middle Ages (Farmer). Click here to see a 18th- century Russian icon of Mary of Egypt.
469 St. Abundius Greek priest bishop noted theologian obvious intellect and holiness attended Councils of Chalcedon and Milan who was born in Thessaloncia.
 Apud Comum sancti Abúndii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Como, St. Abundius, bishop and confessor.
He became the bishop of Como, Italy, and attended the Council of Constantinople in 450. As a result of his obvious intellect and holiness, he was sent by Pope St. Leo I the Great to the Emperor Theodosius II as an envoy of the Holy See. His mission led to the and to the Council of Chalcedon in 451 Council of Milan in 452. Abundius served as the pope's representative in such councils, clearly stating the Church's role and concerns.

Abundius of Como, Hermit (RM) (also known as Abondius, Abundias) Died c. 500. Saint Abundius, a Greek priest, was consecrated bishop of Como in northern Italy. Because he was an able theologian, Saint Leo the Great entrusted him with a mission to Emperor Theodosius the Younger, which led to the convening of the Council of Chalcedon in 451. At the council, Abundius presided as the pope's legate (Attwater2, Benedictines).
Saint Abundius is depicted in art as a bishop with a stag; sometimes shown raising a dead child to life (Benedictines, Roeder).
490 Monitor of Orlèans Twelfth bishop of Orlèans B (RM) (Benedictines)
573 St. Nicetius bishop of Lyons extensive revival of ecclesiastical chant Humility and assiduous prayer; Great miracles confirmed the opinion of his sanctity
 Lugdúni, in Gállia, sancti Nicétii, ejúsdem urbis Epíscopi, vita et miráculis clari.
       At Lyons in France, St. Nicetus, bishop of that city, renowned for his life and miracles.
Also Nizier, bishop of Lyons, France, from 553. The nephew of Bishop St. Sacerdos of Lyons, he was appointed successor to his uncle’s see. His time as bishop brought an extensive revival of ecclesiastical chant. He was also known for his abilities as an exorcist.
573 ST NICETIUS, or NIZIER, Bishop OF LYONS St Gregory of Tours relates a number of miracles that occurred at his tomb
ST Nicetas, or Nizier, a great-uncle to St Gregory of Tours, was descended from a Burgundian family and had been destined for the Church from an early age. Even after he was ordained priest, he continued to live in his own home with his widowed mother, whom he obeyed as implicitly as the lowliest of her servants. Although he valued letters so highly that he insisted that every boy born on the estate should learn to read and to know the psalms, yet he made a practice of personally assisting the servants and dependents in their manual labours, that he might carry out the apostolic precept, and have something to give to those that suffered need. When St Sacerdos, bishop of Lyons, lay on his death-bed in Paris, he was visited by King Childebert who urged him to nominate a successor. The aged prelate accordingly named his nephew Nicetius, who in due time was approved and consecrated. A man of blameless life, he was a determined opponent of loose and uncharitable speech, which he denounced on every possible occasion. He became famous for his power of exorcising unclean spirits; and in the course of an episcopate which lasted nearly twenty years St Nicetius revived and improved ecclesiastical chant in his diocese. St Gregory of Tours relates a number of miracles that occurred at his tomb.

See the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. i, where a short anonymous life is printed, as well as an account by Gregory of Tours. The former has been more critically edited by B. Krusch in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. iii, pp. 521—524. See also Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, pp. 166—167 Hefele-Leclercq, Conciles, vol. iii, pp. 182—184; and especially A. Coville, Recherches an, l’histoire de Lyon (1928), pp. 32~—346.
Nicetius of Lyons B (RM) (also known as Nizien, Nizier) Born in Burgundy; died in Lyons, France, on April 2, 573. Saint Nicetius was descended from an ancient family of Gaul. He was raised in piety and given a good education by his virtuous parents. Humility and assiduous prayer were his favorite virtues from the cradle. In his father's house he always chose to appear the lowest in the family, though by birth he had a right to claim the highest place next his parents. He readily gave a preference in all things to his brethren, and took a singular delight, during his hours of recreation, in performing the most servile offices. He instructed the servants and children in all Christian duties, and taught them the psalter and church office.
In 551, he succeeded his uncle Saint Sacerdos and governed the church of Lyons faithfully for 22 years, despite all the bad things that it is possible to say about him, and despite his violent temperament. Great miracles confirmed the opinion of his sanctity: his relics are preserved in the parish church of his name, in Lyons (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).

Nicetius or Nizier, bishop of Lyon (537) - Great-uncle to Gregory of Tours. A determined opponent of loose and uncharitable speech, which he denounced on every possible occasion. He became famous for exorcising unclean spirits; revived and improved ecclesiastical chant in his diocese.

 6th v. St. Musa Virgin child of Rome; a great mystic visions and ecstasies, reported by St. Gregory I the Great.
653 & 638 St. Longis & Agnofleda Confessors of Christ
Longis, also called Lonochilus or Lenogisil, was a founder of a monastery in Maine, France. Agnofleda was a virgin recluse in his care. Accused by false rumors, their innocence was proven miraculously.

Longis Date unknown. Saint Longis left his idolatrous family in Switzerland to find peace as a monk and priest at Saint-Longis (Encyclopedia).

Natalene; Martyr of Pamiers M (RM) (also known as Lene).
St. Bronach The "Virgin of Glen Seichis," an Irish mystic listed in the martyrologies of Tallaght and Donegal
She is much revered for her beauty and spiritual gifts. Glen-Seichis is now called Kilbrony or Kilbronach, located in County Down.

Bronach of Glen-Seichis V (AC) (also known as Bromana, Bronacha, Bronanna) Date unknown. The name of this virgin is registered in the martyrologies of Tallaght and Donegal. Glen-Seichis is the old name of Kilbroney or Kilbronach in County Down near Rostrevor, Ireland, which takes its present name from her.
Saint Bronach's Bell is the subject of a well-known Irish legend of a mysterious, invisible bell that rang in Kilbroney churchyard.
In 1885, a storm ripped down an old oak tree near Kilbroney, and in its branches was found a 6th-century bell. For many years the denizens heard a bell ringing and attributed it to a supernatural origin. It seems, however, that the bell was hidden during the Reformation to prevent its removal or destruction. Over the years the tongue had worn away, so the bell stopped ringing, yet talk of it did not.
The bell and Bronach's cross can now be found at the parish church of Rostrevor (Attwater2, Benedictines, D'Arcy, Husenbeth, Montague, Muirhead, Neeson).

Spes martyred during the persecutions at Les Andelys (Eure) (RM) (also known as Space)
Saint Spes was  (Benedictines).
9th v. Saint Titus the Wonderworker displayed zeal for the monastic life from his youth
He pursued asceticism in the ninth century at the Studion monastery near Constantinople. By his deeds of fasting, purity of life and mild disposition, St Titus gained the love of the brethren, and at their request he was ordained priest.
Fervent of faith, the saint stood up for the Orthodox veneration of icons during the Iconoclast persecution. Because of his virtuous life, God granted him the gift of wonderworking. The saint was translated to the Lord in his old age.

Titus der Wunderwirker Orthodoxe Kirche: 2. April
Titus war im 9. Jahrhundert Mönch im Studiteskloster in Konstantinopel. Er wurde zum Priester ordiniert und setzte sich während des Bildersturms für die Verehrung der Ikonen ein. Wegen seines frommen Lebenswandels wurde ihm die Gabe verliehen, Wunder zu vollbringen. Titus starb in hohem Alter.

 VENERABLE TITUS, THE MIRACLE-WORKER

From his youth, Titus loved Christ the Lord and detested the vanities of the world. Because of this, he retreated from the world, entered a monastery and received the Great Angelic Habit [The Great Schema-The Angelic Face]. Not feeling any remorse, he dedicated himself to the somber and narrow path of monasticism. Through great patience, he attained two basic virtues: that of humility and obedience. In these virtues, he surpassed "not only the brethren, but also all men." From his youth he preserved the purity of his soul and body. At the time of the Iconoclastic heresy he proved himself to be an unwavering pillar of the Church of God. Because of his great humility and purity, God bestowed upon him the gift of performing miracles, both during his life-time and after his death. When he was translated to the Lord he left behind a countless number of disciples. He died peacefully in the ninth century.
Amphian_St_Titus_the_Wonderworker_Edesius

The Monk Tito the Wonderworker devoted himself from the time of youth to the monastic life. He pursued asceticism in the IX Century at the Studite monastery near Constantinople. By his deeds of fasting, purity of life and mild disposition the Monk Tito gained the common love of the brethren and at their request he was ordained presbyter. Fervent of faith, the monk stood up bravely for the Orthodox veneration of icons during the time of Iconoclast persecution. For his virtuous life he was granted by God the gift of wonderworking. The saint expired to the Lord in old age.

 952 The Departure of Anba Macarius, the Fifty-Ninth Pope of Alexandria. 

On this day also of the year 668 A.M. (May 20th. 952 A.D.) St. Macarius the fifty ninth Pope of Alexandria, departed. He was born in the city of Shoubra. He rejected the world since his youth and he desired the monastic life. He went to the monastery of St. Macarius at the wilderness of Sheahat (Scetis). He lived in virtues and good conduct made him worthy to be chosen a Patriarch, and a successor for Pope Cosma. He was enthroned on the first of Baramouda 648 A.M. (March 27th. 932 A.D.).

When he went forth from Alexandria going to visit the monasteries in the desert of Scetis according to the custom of his predecessors, he passed by his home town to visit his mother who was a righteous woman. When his mother heard that he had arrived she did not go out to meet him. When he had come to the house, he found her sitting down weaving and she did not greet him or paid attention to him. He thought that she did not know him. He told her: "Don't you know that I am your son Macarius who was elevated to a great position and became a head for a great nation?" She answered him with tears in her eyes: "I did not ignore you and I know what became of you, but I would have rather seen you dead than seen you as a Patriarch. Before, you were responsible only for your own soul but now your are responsible about the souls of all your flock: Now remember you are in danger and it is difficult to escape it." She said that and went on weaving as she did before.

The father the Patriarch left her sad, and attended to his office with delegant and care. He instructed his people with preaching and sermons. He did not touch any of the church revenue, and did not lay his hand on any one without people consent. He commanded the bishops and the priests to watch their flock and to protect them with homilies and admonitions. He sat on the throne of St. Mark twenty years in peace and tranquility, then departed in peace.
May his prayers be with us and Glory be to God forever. Amen

10th v Theoctista A nun of  Lesbos a hermitess on the Isle of Paros simili to Saint Mary of Egypt V (RM)
(also known as Theoctiste) of Lesbos, The octista became a hermitess on the Isle of Paros. The story of her last Holy Communion seems to be an adaptation from the life of Saint Mary of Egypt (Benedictines).

XII v. Sainted Savva, Archbishop of Surozh (now the city of Sudak), lived in the Crimea (early XII Century)
 What is known about him is preserved as marginalia of the Greek Menaion written in the XII Century.
At 5 versts from the former city of Surozh {Sudak in the Crimea
} there exists a mountain, called Ai-Savva (Saint Savva), where there were once preserved the remains of a church and cave, in which apparently, the saint died and was buried. In the year 1872 was found an icon of Saint Savva of Surozh.
1507 St. Francis of Paola hermit foundation of the Minimi fratres ('least brothers') penance, charity, and humility many miracles  gifts of prophesy insight into men's hearts uncorrupt 25 years but burned by Hugenots
 Turónis, in Gállia, sancti Francísci de Paula Confessóris, qui Ordinis Minimórum Institútor éxstitit; atque, virtútibus et miráculis clarus, a Leóne Papa Décimo in Sanctórum númerum est adscríptus.
At Tours in France, St. Francis of Paula, founder of the Order of Minims.  Because he was renowned for virtues and miracles, he was inscribed among the saints by Pope Leo X.


1507 ST FRANCIS OF PAOLA, FOUNDER OF THE MINIM FRIARS miracles worker
ST FRANCIS was born about the year 1416 at Paola, a small town in Calabria. His parents were humble, industrious people who made it their chief aim to love and to serve God. As they were still childless after several years of married life, they prayed earnestly for a son, and when at last a boy was born to them, they named him after St Francis of Assisi, whose intercession they had specially sought.

In his thirteenth year he was placed in the Franciscan friary at San Marco, where he learnt to read and where he laid the foundation of the austere life which he ever afterwards led; although he had not professed the rule of the order, he seemed even at that tender age to outstrip the religious themselves in a scrupulous observance of its requirements. After spending a year there he accompanied his parents on a pilgrimage which included Assisi and Rome. Upon his return to Paola, with their consent, he retired first to a place about half a mile from the town, and afterwards to a more remote seclusion by the sea, where he occupied a cave. He was scarcely fifteen years old. Before he was twenty, he was joined by two other men. The neighbours built them three cells and a chapel in which they sang the divine praises and in which Mass was offered for them by a priest from the nearest church.
This date, 1452, is reckoned as that of the foundation of his order. Nearly seventeen years later, when the number of disciples had been augmented, a church and a monastery were built for them in the same place, with the sanction of the archbishop of Cosenza. So greatly were they beloved by the people that the whole countryside joined in the work of construction. Several miracles are said to have been worked by St Francis during the erection of the building, one or two of which were vouched for in the process of canonization. When the house was finished, the saint set himself to establish regular discipline in the community, whilst never mitigating anything of the austerity he practised. Though his bed was no longer a rock, it was a plank or the bare ground, with a log or a stone by way of a pillow. Only in extreme old age would he allow himself a mat. Penance, charity and humility formed the basis of his rule: charity was the motto he chose; but humility was the virtue which he inculcated continually on his followers. In addition to the three usual monastic obligations he imposed upon them a fourth, which bound them to observe a perpetual Lent, with abstinence not only from flesh but also from eggs and anything made with milk. Fasting he regarded as the royal road to self-conquest and, deploring as he always did the relaxation in the strict rule of Lent which the Church had been obliged to concede, he hoped that the abstinence of his followers might set a good example as well as make some sort of reparation for the lukewarmness of so many Christians.
Besides the gift of miracles St Francis was endowed with that of prophecy, and long afterwards, writing to Pope Leo X for the canonization of St Francis, the Bishop of Grenoble (uncle to Bayard, the “Chevalier sans peur et sans reproche”) wrote, “Most holy Father, he revealed to me many things which were known only to God and to myself”. Pope Paul II sent one of his chamberlains into Calabria to inquire about the truth of the wonderful things that were reported of the saint. Upon seeing a visitor approach, St Francis, who was busy with the masons over the construction of his church, left his work to greet him. The envoy attempted to kiss his hand, but this Francis would not allow; he protested that it was for him to kiss the hands which for some thirty years had been sanctified by offering the holy Sacrifice. The chamberlain, surprised that Francis should know how long he, a stranger, had been a priest, did not disclose his mission, but asked to speak with him and was led within the enclosure. Here he expatiated eloquently on the dangers of singularity, and censured Francis’s way of life as too austere for human nature. The saint attempted humbly to vindicate his rule and then, to prove what the grace of God would enable single-minded men to bear, he lifted out of the fire some burning coals and held them for some time in his hands unscathed. It may be noted that there is record of several similar examples of his immunity from the effects of fire. The chamberlain returned full of veneration for the holy man, and the new order received the sanction of the Holy See in 1474. At that time the community was composed of uneducated men, with only one priest. They were then called Hermits of St Francis of Assisi, and it was not until 1492 that their name was changed to that of “Minims”, at the desire of the founder, who wished his followers to be reckoned as the least (minimi) in the household of God.
St Francis made several other foundations in southern Italy and Sicily but he was threatened with a serious check to his activities; for Ferdinand, King of Naples, annoyed at some wholesome admonitions he and two of his sons had received from Francis, gave orders for him to be arrested and brought a prisoner to Naples. The official arrived to execute his order, but was so impressed with the saint’s personality and humility that, returning awestruck without his prisoner, he dissuaded Ferdinand from interfering in any way with so holy a man. Indeed all Italy was then ringing with the praises of St Francis as a saint, a prophet, and a wonder-worker.
It happened in 1481 that Louis XI, King of France, was slowly dying, after an apoplectic fit. Never had anyone a stronger passion for life or a greater dread of death, and so irritable and impatient was he that everyone feared to approach him. Realizing that he was steadily growing worse, he sent into Calabria to beg St Francis to come and heal him, making many promises to assist him and his order. Then, as his request was not acceded to, he appealed to Pope Sixtus IV, who told Francis to go. He at once set out; and King Louis gave ten thousand crowns to the herald who announced the saint’s arrival in his dominions, and sent the dauphin to escort him to Plessis-les-Tours. Louis, falling on his knees, besought Francis to heal him. The saint replied that the lives of kings are in the hands of God and have their appointed limits; prayer should be addressed to Him. Many interviews followed between the sovereign and his guest. Although Francis was an unlearned man, Philip de Commines, who often heard him, wrote that his words were so full of wisdom that all present were convinced that the Holy Ghost spoke through his lips. By his prayers and example he wrought a change of heart in the king, who died in resignation in his arms.
Charles VIII honoured Francis as his father had done, and would do nothing in the affairs of his conscience or even in state matters without his advice. He built for his friars a monastery in the park of Plessis and another at Amboise, at the spot where they had first met. Moreover, in Rome, he built for the Minims the monastery of Santa Trinità del Monte on the Pincian Hill, to which none but Frenchmen might be admitted.
St Francis passed twenty-five years in France, and died there. On Palm Sunday 1507 he fell ill, and on Maundy Thursday assembled his brethren and exhorted them to the love of God, to charity and to a strict observance of all the duties of their rule. Then he received viaticum barefoot with a rope round his neck, according to the custom of his order. He died on the following day, Good Friday, being then ninety-one years of age. His canonization took place in 1519.  Besides the rule which St Francis drew up for his friars, with a correctorium or method of enjoining penances and a ceremonial, he also composed a rule for nuns, and regulations for a third order of persons living in the world. Today the number of members of the Order of Minims is considerably reduced they are mostly found in Italy.
In the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. i, the Bollandists have printed a great part of the depositions made by witnesses in the process of canonization. Although the saint was canonized only twelve years after his death, still the advanced age to which he lived rendered it difficult to procure contemporary evidence as to his early life; those who had known him when he founded the Order of Minims were nearly all dead. Still the facts of his later career are well known, not only from the depositions but from the chronicles, letters and other documents of the period. Modern biographies are numerous, and among them may be mentioned those of Dabert (1875), Ferrante (1881), Rolland (1874), Pradier (1903), Porpora (1901) and G. M. Roberti (1915). Much information concerning the foundations of the Minims may be gathered from the volumes of G. M. Roberti, Disegno storico dell Online ad Minimi, 1902, 1909, etc.
Francis was born at Paola, Italy and was educated at the Franciscan friary of San Marco there, and when fifteen became a hermit near Paola. In 1436, he and two companions began a community that is considered the foundation of the Minim Friars. He built a monastery where he had led his eremitical life some fifteen years later and set a Rule for his followers emphasizing penance, charity, and humility, and added to the three monastic vows, one of fasting and abstinence from meat; he also wrote a rule for tertiaries and nuns. He was credited with many miracles and had the gifts of prophesy and insight into men's hearts. The Order was approved by Pope Sixtus IV in 1474 with the name Hermits of St. Francis of Assisi (changed to Minim Friars in 1492).

Francis established foundations in southern Italy and Sicily, and his fame was such that at the request of dying King Louis XI of France, Pope Sixtus II ordered him to France, as the King felt he could be cured by Francis. He was not, but was so comforted that Louis' son Charles VIII, became Francis' friend and endowed several monasteries for the Minims. Francis spent the rest of his life at the monastery of Plessis, France, which Charles built for him. Francis died there on April 2nd and was canonized in 1519.

Francis of Paola, O. Min., Hermit (RM) Born in Paola, Calabria, Italy, in 1416; died at Plessis-les-Tours, France, on April 2, 1507; canonized in 1519. 
Image of Saint Francis of Paola courtesy of  Saint Charles Borromeo Church

Francis's parents were of modest means and very devout. They were childless after many years of married life and prayed earnestly for a son. When God granted their prayer, they named the child after Saint Francis of Assisi, who was their special intercessor.
At 13, he joined the Franciscans at San Marco. There he was taught to read and learned to live austerely, which he did for the rest of his life. At 14, he accompanied his parents on a pilgrimage to Assisi and Rome. When they returned, he retired for a time to a place about a half mile from the town, and later, at age 15, to a more solitary place by the sea, where he lived in a cave as a hermit.
 
He was eventually joined by two other men (1436). Neighbors built them three cells and a chapel, where they sang the divine praises and where Mass was said for them by a priest from a nearby church. The foundation of his order in 1452 is said to have been called the Minimi fratres ('least brothers'), who accounted themselves least in the service of God. Their rule of life was notably austere.
About 17 years later, a church and monastery were built for them by the people of the area who had grown to love them, under the sanction of the archbishop of Cosenza. Francis maintained a regular discipline in the community. His bed was on a plank or the ground, with a log or stone for a pillow. He did not allow himself a mat until he was quite old. Charity was the motto he espoused, and humility was the virtue he urged his followers to seek. He asked that they observe a perpetual Lent, abstaining from meat, eggs, and dairy products.

The order received the approval of Pope Sixtus IV in 1474. The rule Francis wrote emphasized penance, charity, and humility. In addition to the three monastic vows he added one of fasting and abstention from meat. The friars were then called the Hermits of Saint Francis of Assisi (until the name was changed to Minim Friars in 1492), and they were composed of uneducated men with one priest. Francis also penned a rule for tertiaries and nuns.

If you read the long testimonies of the healed and the witnesses in the Acta Sanctorum, you would understand how Francis came by this reputation as a miracle-worker, and for other spiritual powers, especially his gifts of reading minds and prophecy.

Francis attained such fame as a worker of miracles that, in 1481, the dying King Louis XI of France sent for Francis, wishing the hermit to heal him, and promising to assist the order. Francis declined the invitation, but Louis appealed to Pope Sixtus IV, who ordered Francis to go. The king sent the dauphin to escort him to Plessis-les-Tours. When Louis fell on his knees before Francis and begged him to heal him, Francis told him that the lives of kings are in the hands of God and that Louis should pray to God.

The king and Francis had many discussions, and although Francis was an uneducated man, Philip de Commines, who was often present, wrote that he was so wise that hearers were convinced that the Holy Spirit spoke through him. He brought about a change of heart in the king, and Louis died, comforted, in his arms.

For a time he was tutor to Charles VIII, who respected Francis as his father had, and asked his advice on spiritual and state matters. Francis is credited with helping to restore peace between France and Brittany, and between France and Spain.  Charles built a monastery for Francis and his followers in the park of Plessis and another at Amboise, on the spot where they had first met. In Rome, he built the monastery at Santa Trinità del Monte on the Pincian Hill, to which only French Minims were admitted.

From the French court the renown of the saint spread to Germany and to Spain. The Emperor Maximilian and Ferdinand the Catholic founded new monasteries for him in their domains.  But Francis was so beloved that the French kings would not allow him to leave, and thus he spent the last 25 years of his life in France. He became famous for prophecies and miracles. He spent the last three months of his life in solitude in his cell, preparing himself for death.
On Palm Sunday, he became ill, and on Maundy Thursday, he assembled his brethren and urged them to love God, to be charitable, and to strictly observe the duties of their rule. He received the sacraments barefoot with a rope around his neck, according to the custom of the order, and died the following day.

As a witness at the canonization proceedings, "the worthy Jean Bourdichon, painter and chamberlain to our lord the king," testified that he had gone to the monastery of the Minimi after the death of Brother Francis and, in order to paint a likeness after the actual visage, had made a mold and cast of the face. 
The saint died on the morning of Good Friday at ten and the burial took place on the morning of Easter Monday. Regarding the funeral, Bourdichon says that a vast crowd of believers assembled and went home gladdened and greatly consoled by the sight of the deceased.

The same witness further testified that since the body was interred in a spot very frequently flooded by the nearby river, the brothers decided, on the advice of the princess, in order that it should not decay more quickly than it need, to disinter him and to rebury him in a stone sarcophagus in a higher grave. This took place 12 days after the funeral.

The witness was present when the corpse was taken out of the earth and laid in the sarcophagus. He saw the face as sound, unravaged, and without trace of dissolution as it was before interment. He knew this, because he purposely laid his face against that of the dead, in order to detect decomposition by the sense of smell.

He regarded the absence of decomposition as a miracle. He deposed further that he made another mask to enable him to make a more accurate and better painting. Asked whether, after the brother's death, the body had been eviscerated or opened, he declared that he knew nothing about this. The next witness said such proceedings had not taken place. As late as 1527, the corpse was still completely unchanged. Later it was burned by the Huguenots (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Gill, Schamoni, Walsh, White).

In art, dressed as a venerable friar, Saint Francis's emblem is the word Caritas in a circle of rays. At times he may be portrayed (1) standing on his cloak in the sea (a story told of several saints) (Roeder, White); (2) levitated above the crowd; kneeling in ecstasy with staff and book; (3) with the scourge and a skull (Roeder).

Saint Francis is the patron saint of sailors, naval officers, navigators, and all people associated with the sea. This patronage originated from an incident that was said to have occurred in 1464. Francis wished to cross the Straits of Messina to Sicily but was refused a boat. He lay his cloak on the sea, tying one end to his staff to make a sail, then sailed across with his companions (White). He is also invoked against plague and sterility (Roeder).

Franz von Paola Katholische Kirche: 2. April
Francesco wurde 1436 (oder 1416) in Paola in Kalabrien geboren. Er kam als Kind zu den Franziskanern zur Ausbildung, wurde Mönch und mit 15 Jahren Einsiedler. Um ihn sammelten sich weitere Einsiedler, so daß er 1454 in Cosenza ein Kloster baute und den Franziskanerorden der mindesten Brüder (Minimiten) gründete. Der Orden, der später auch den Namen Paulaner trug, wurde 1474 anerkannt. Franz, der die Gaben der Heilung und Prophetie bekommen hatte, ging 1482 auf Wunsch des Papstes zu dem todkranken König Ludwig XI. von Frankreich. Franz blieb in Frankreich und starb hier am 2.4.1507. 1519 wurde er heiliggesprochen. Sein Orden breitete sich trotz der streng asketischen Lebensweise (die Brüder legen das Gelübde ab, nur Fastenspeisen zu essen) rasch in Europa aus. Heute gibt es noch einige Paulanerklöster, auch ein weiblicher Zweig besteht seit 1495.

St. Francis of Paola
Francis was born at Paola, Italy and was educated at the Franciscan friary of San Marco there, and when fifteen became a hermit near Paola. In 1436, he and two companions began a community that is considered the foundation of the Minim Friars. He built a monastery where he had led his eremitical life some fifteen years later and set a Rule for his followers emphasizing penance, charity, and humility, and added to the three monastic vows, one of fasting and abstinence from meat; he also wrote a rule for tertiaries and nuns. He was credited with many miracles and had the gifts of prophesy and insight into men's hearts. The Order was approved by Pope Sixtus IV in 1474 with the name Hermits of St. Francis of Assisi (changed to Minim Friars in 1492). Francis established foundations in southern Italy and Sicily, and his fame was such that at the request of dying King Louis XI of France, Pope Sixtus II ordered him to France, as the King felt he could be cured by Francis. He was not, but was so comforted that Louis' son Charles VIII, became Francis' friend and endowed several monasteries for the Minims. Francis spent the rest of his life at the monastery of Plessis, France, which Charles built for him. Francis died there on April 2nd and was canonized in 1519. His feast day is April 2.
1815 BD LEOPOLD OF GAICHE founded house to which missioners and preachers could retire for their annual retreat and other brethren and friends of the order could come for spiritual refreshment; numerous miracles reported at his grave
Bd LEOPOLD was born at Gaiche in the diocese of Perugia, the son of humble parents, and was christened John. A neighbouring priest helped him with his education and in 1751, when he was eighteen, he received the Franciscan habit in the friary at Cibotola, taking the name Leopold. After he became a priest in 1757 he was sent to preach Lenten courses of sermons which soon made him famous. As the result of his eloquence and fervour, numerous conversions took place, enemies were reconciled, and penitents besieged his confessional. For ten years, from 1768 when he was made papal missioner in the States of the Church, he held missions in several dioceses, and even after he had become minister provincial he continued his apostolic labours. Fired by the example of Bd Thomas of Con and of St Leonard of Port Maurice he was anxious to found a house to which missioners and preachers could retire for their annual retreat and where other brethren and friends of the order could come for spiritual refreshment. He had, however, many difficulties to overcome and disappointments to meet before he could realize his desire, on the lonely hill of Monte Luco, near Spoleto.

When in 1808 Napoleon invaded Rome and imprisoned Pope Pius VII, religious houses were suppressed and their occupants turned out. Bd Leopold, a venerable old man of seventy-seven, was obliged to abandon his beloved convent, and with three of his brethren to live in a miserable hut in Spoleto. While there he acted as assistant to a parish priest, but afterwards he had charge of an entire parish whose pastor had been driven out by the French. Then he was himself imprisoned for refusing to take an oath which he considered unlawful. His imprisonment, however, was of short duration, for we soon find him giving missions once more. His fame was enhanced by his prophetical powers and by strange phenomena which attended him: for example, when he was preaching his head often appeared to his congregation as though it were crowned with thorns.
With the fall of Napoleon, Bd Leopold hurried back to Monte Luco, where he set about trying to establish things as they had been before but he only survived for a few months, dying on April 15, 1815, in his eighty-third year. The numerous miracles reported to have taken place at his grave caused the speedy introduction of the process of his beatification, which reached a favourable conclusion in 1893.

Abundant information is provided by the documents printed for the process of beati­fication and there is a life by Fr M. Antonio da Vicenza. See also Kempf, Holiness of the Church in the Nineteenth Century, pp. 95—96, and Seeböck, Die Herrlichkeit der Katholischen Kirche, pp. 212—213.
1839 St. Dominic Tuoc 3rd order Dominican martyr native of Vietnam
Arrested and tortured, he died in prison. Dominic was a native of Vietnam. He was canonized in 1988.

Blessed Dominic Tuoc M, OP Tert. (AC) Born in Tonkin; died 1839; beatified in 1900. Saint Dominic was a priest of the third order of Dominicans, who died of his wounds in prison (Benedictines).

1968 The Apparition of the Pure Lady the Virgin in the church of Zeiton.

On the eve of this day of the year 1684 A.M. which coincide with tuesday the 2nd. of April 1968 A.D., during the papacy of Pope Kyrellos VI, the hundred sixteenth Pope of Alexandria, our Lady and the pride of our faith started to transfigure in luminous spiritual forms in and around the domes of the church dedicated to her immaculate name in Zeiton, a suburb of Cairo.

This transfiguration continued in following nights in a manner that was never known in the East or the West. This transfiguration in some nights was as long as many hours, without stop, in front of tens of thousands of people from every race and religion, with every one seeing her, pointing at her and interceding to her with songs, hymns, tears, prayers and hails and She was looking to them in a compassionate way raising her hand at times to bless them in all directions.

The first one to notice this transfiguration was the workmen at the garage of the Public Transit System which was across the street from the church. The watchman Abdel-Aziz Aly, who was in charge of guarding the garage at that night, saw a luminous body over the dome of the church. He started shouting: "light over the dome" and he called the other workers in the garage. They all came and saw the bright light over the large dome of the church. When they looked closely, they saw a young lady in white, kneeling by the cross at the top of the dome. Because the dome had a round, smooth, and very sloping surface, it held the men as though they were nailed in their places watching the fate of the lady. Few seconds passed then they saw the kneeling lady as she stood over the dome. They gave out a cry of fear that she might fall down. They thought she was a girl in despair trying to commit suicide and they cried warning that person not to jump down and some of them called the police. The pedestrians, men and women started to gather around. The view of the lady was getting more clear and she appeared as a beautiful girl in a bright gown of light and had branches of olive tree in her hand, and around her flew white doves. Then they realized that they were seeing a heavenly spiritual view. They directed flood light to the luminous picture to remove all doubt from their minds, but instead it became more clear and bright. They cut the electricity off all the area but the lady remained in her heavenly illumination and her bright gown of light became more clear. She started moving around in a circle of light radiating from her body to all the directions around her. All the people then realized that this lady in front of them, without no doubt is the Virgin Mary. They started to shout and cry saying: "She is the Virgin ... She is the Mother of Light ... " They prayed with songs, hymns and hails all the night until the next morning.

Since that night the pure Virgin had transfigured in different spiritual views in front of thousands and ten of thousands of masses, Egyptian and foreigners, Christians and non-christians, men, women and children. Spiritual beings formed like doves would appear before, during and after the transfiguration zooming through the sky in a way raising the human from a materialistic to a heavenly atmosphere.

This transfiguration was in different forms. One of the most significant ways this apparition took place was that; the head of St. Mary under the vail looking down as in the picture of the sad Virgin and she was looking toward the Cross and that view would stay like this at times or slowly bow before the Cross at other times. The Cross itself will shine and illuminate although it was made of concrete. And some times an angel would appear standing behind her spreading his wings. That view might stay as long as many hours.

Another view was the view of the Mother of Light standing as a great Queen in a beautiful spiritual portrait radiating dignity, elegance and beauty. On her head was a crown of a queen as if it were made of diamonds and some times there appeared on the top of the crown a small luminous cross. And some times she appeared in the same way but carrying Christ, to Him is the Glory, in the form of a child on her hand and on His head a crown. And on other times she raised her both hands as She was blessing the world moving to the right, to the front, and to the left in a dignified way.

Many spiritual signs appeared before, during, and after the apparition of the Virgin the mother of the Lord's transfiguration. The appearance of tongues of yellowish flame would flash over the church and then subside and that repeated several times. Another form of the signs were the spiritual beings formed like doves, larger than the doves that we know, appear about midnight or after, flying in the middle of darkness illuminating in a fast speed, appeared suddenly from no where, and also disappeared suddenly. These spiritual beings appeared in different formations and in varying numbers. A fact we should be aware of that pigeons do not fly during the night. Another sign was the shooting stars which were constantly falling and were seen very close to the apparition on many occasions as if coming down to glorify her from heaven. Another sign was the fragrance of incense. The smoke of the incense poured out of the domes in large quantities. Substance resembling clouds, thick fog or smoke would roll in toward the church and completely cover the church.

Also the illuminated cloud that appeared over the domes of the church in large volume and often proceeded the transfiguration of the Virgin or at times the cloud slowly formed in the shape of the virgin. Sometimes the apparition of the Virgin would appear from the clouds.

This transfiguration and all the spiritual signs were a forerunner and announcement for serious or important events to come in the near and far future. Or it might be a spiritual gesture from heaven to indicate the Lord's caring for His church and His people and our country.

May the mercy of God be upon us all. May the Lord keep His people and church in peace, with the intercession of Our Lady and the pride of our race the pure Virgin St. Mary. Amen.


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR APRIL
Young People. 
That young people may respond generously to their vocations and seriously consider
offering themselves to God in the priesthood or consecrated life.


ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
  Sunday Saint of April 02 Quarto Nonas Aprílis  
Day 33 of 40 Days For Life
April Is Child Abuse Prevention Month

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
 
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Popes and other important Saints mentioned in articles of Saints today April 01
120 -132 St. Theodora Roman martyr sister of  Saint Hermes aid and care to her brother in prison.  At Rome, the passion of St. Theodora, sister of the illustrious martyr Hermes.  She underwent martyrdom in the time of Emperor Adrian, under the judge Aurelian, and was buried at the side of her brother, on the Salarian Way, a short distance from the city.
According to the Acta of Pope St. Alexander (r 105-115), she was the sister of  Saint Hermes and was martyred some time after her brother. She had given aid and care to her brother during his difficult time in prison.
The council and the delegates from Grenoble severally and collectively appear to have looked on Canon Hugh as the one man who was capable of dealing with the disorders complained of; but though unanimously elected it was with the greatest reluctance that he consented to accept the office. The legate himself conferred on him holy orders up to the priesthood, and took him to Rome that he might receive consecration from the pope.
1132 St. Hugh of Grenoble Benedictine bishop amazing modesty took upon himself all sins of others the cross he carried was heavy laden holy and redemptive great reputation for miracles.   The kindness of the reception he met emboldened the young bishop elect to consult St Gregory VII about temptations to blasphemy which sometimes beset him, causing him great distress and, as he considered, rendering him unfit for the high office to which he was called. The pontiff reassured him, explaining that God permitted these trials to purify him and render him a more fitting instrument for the divine purposes. These particular temptations continued to assault him until his last illness, but he never yielded to them in any way.
The Countess Matilda gave the twenty-eight-year-old bishop his crozier and some books, including the De officiis ministrorum of St Ambrose and a psalter to which were appended the commentaries of St Augustine. Immediately after his consecration. St Hugh hurried off to his diocese, but he was appalled by the state of his flock. The gravest sins were committed without shame; simony and usury were rampant; the clergy openly flouted the obligation to celibacy; the people were uninstructed; laymen had seized church property and the see was almost penniless. It was indeed a herculean task that lay before the saint.
  For two years he laboured unremittingly to redress abuses by preaching, by denunciations, by rigorous fasts and by constant prayer. The excellent results he was obtaining were patent to all but to himself: he only saw his failures and blamed his own incompetence. Discouraged, he quietly withdrew to the Cluniac abbey of Chaise-Dieu, where he received the Benedictine habit. He did not remain there long, for Pope Gregory commanded him to resume his pastoral charge and return to Grenoble.
A short time before his death he lost his memory for everything but prayer, and would recite the psalter or the Lord’s Prayer without intermission.
During his 52-year episcopacy, Hugh vainly tendered his resignation to each pope--Gregory VII, Gelasius II, Calixtus II, Honorius II, Innocent II, and others--and they refused him because of his outstanding ability. He never ceased imploring them to release him from the duties of his episcopal office up to the day of his death. During his last, painful illness he was tormented by headaches and stomach disorders that resulted from his long fasts and vigils, yet never complained.
St Hugh died on April 1, 1132, two months before attaining the age of eighty, having been a bishop for fifty-two years.  Pope Innocent II canonized him two years later.
1194 Hugh of Bonnevaux possessed singular powers of discernment and exorcism OSB Cistercian, Abbot (AC).
The Mother of Mercy, with a look of great kindness, addressed him, saying, “Bear yourself like a man and let your heart be comforted in the Lord; rest assured that you will be troubled no more by these temptations.”
IN one of his letters St Bernard of Clairvaux mentions with great praise a novice called Hugh, who had renounced considerable riches and entered the abbey of Mézières at a very early age against the wishes of his relations. He was nephew to St Hugh of Grenoble. Once, when greatly troubled by temptations and longings to return to the world, he entered a church to pray for light and help. As he raised his eyes to the altar, he beheld above it a figure which he recognized to be that of our Lady, and then, beside her, appeared the form of her divine Son. The Mother of Mercy, with a look of great kindness, addressed him, saying, “Bear yourself like a man and let your heart be comforted in the Lord; rest assured that you will be troubled no more by these temptations.” Hugh afterwards gave himself up to such severe penances that his health broke down and he seemed to be losing his memory. He owed his recovery to the wise common-sense of St Bernard, who ordered him off to the infirmary with instructions that he should be properly tended and allowed to speak to anyone he liked.

Not long afterwards he was made abbot of Bonnevaux, and in Hugh’s care the abbey became very flourishing. It was noted that the abbot could read men’s thoughts and was quick to detect any evil spirit which had access to the minds of his brethren. The stories that have come down to us testify to his powers of divination and exorcism. Like so many of the great monastic luminaries, both men and women, Hugh did not confine his interests to his own house or even to his order. Moved by what he felt to be divine inspiration he went to Venice in 1177, there to act as mediator between Pope Alexander III and the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. To him is due the credit of negotiating between them a peace which has become historic. St Hugh died in 1194, and his ancient cultus was approved in 1907.
1220 Jacqueline V Hermit recluse in Sicily reprimanded Pope Innocent III
1245 ST GILBERT, BISHOP OF CAITHNESS “Three maxims which I have always tried to observe I now commend to you: first, never to hurt anyone and, if injured, never to seek revenge secondly, to bear patiently whatever suffering God may inflict, remembering that He chastises every son whom He receives; and finally to obey those in authority so as not to be a stumbling-block to others.”
1849 BD LUDOVIC PAVONI, FOUNDER OF THE SONS OF MARY IMMACULATE OF BRESCIA.  THIS forerunner of St John Bosco in the education and care of boys, especially the orphaned and neglected, was born at Brescia in Lombardy in 1784. His parents were Alexander Pavoni and Lelia Pontecarali, and the family was of noble descent, with a sufficiency of property to maintain its position. Ludovic while still young showed a serious disposition; his sister Paolina said of him that “Ludovic was always a good religious youngster, while I was always a scamp”; and as a youth he already outlined his vocation when, during summer holidays at Alfianello, he played with the peasants’ children and taught them the catechism. On another occasion he threw his shirt out of the window to a beggar shivering in the street below. He had a taste and some capacity for the fine arts and might have become a painter or an architect, but probably nobody was surprised when he decided to study for the priesthood. This he did under the Dominicans (all the Lombard seminaries were closed in consequence of the revolution), and he was ordained priest in 1807.

Popes and other important Saints mentioned in articles of Saints today April 02
 469 St. Abundius Greek priest bishop noted theologian obvious intellect and holiness attended Councils of Chalcedon and Milan.   He became the bishop of Como, Italy, and attended the Council of Constantinople in 450. As a result of his obvious intellect and holiness, he was sent by Pope St. Leo I the Great to the Emperor Theodosius II as an envoy of the Holy See. His mission led to the and to the Council of Chalcedon in 451 Council of Milan in 452. Abundius served as the pope's representative in such councils, clearly stating the Church's role and concerns.
6th v. St. Musa Virgin child of Rome; a great mystic, visions and ecstasies, reported by St. Gregory I the Great

 952 Anba Macarius, the Fifty-Ninth Pope of Alexandria; The Departure of.  On this day also of the year 668 A.M. (May 20th. 952 A.D.) St. Macarius the fifty ninth Pope of Alexandria, departed. He was born in the city of Shoubra. He rejected the world since his youth and he desired the monastic life. He went to the monastery of St. Macarius at the wilderness of Sheahat (Scetis). He lived in virtues and good conduct made him worthy to be chosen a Patriarch, and a successor for Pope Cosma. He was enthroned on the first of Baramouda 648 A.M. (March 27th. 932 A.D.).

When he went forth from Alexandria going to visit the monasteries in the desert of Scetis according to the custom of his predecessors, he passed by his home town to visit his mother who was a righteous woman. When his mother heard that he had arrived she did not go out to meet him. When he had come to the house, he found her sitting down weaving and she did not greet him or paid attention to him. He thought that she did not know him. He told her: "Don't you know that I am your son Macarius who was elevated to a great position and became a head for a great nation?" She answered him with tears in her eyes: "I did not ignore you and I know what became of you, but I would have rather seen you dead than seen you as a Patriarch. Before, you were responsible only for your own soul but now your are responsible about the souls of all your flock: Now remember you are in danger and it is difficult to escape it." She said that and went on weaving as she did before.

The father the Patriarch left her sad, and attended to his office with delegant and care. He instructed his people with preaching and sermons. He did not touch any of the church revenue, and did not lay his hand on any one without people consent. He commanded the bishops and the priests to watch their flock and to protect them with homilies and admonitions. He sat on the throne of St. Mark twenty years in peace and tranquility, then departed in peace.
May his prayers be with us and Glory be to God forever. Amen

At Tours in France, St. Francis of Paula, founder of the Order of Minims.  Because he was renowned for virtues and miracles, he was inscribed among the saints by Pope Leo X.   ST FRANCIS was born about the year 1416 at Paola, a small town in Calabria. His parents were humble, industrious people who made it their chief aim to love and to serve God. As they were still childless after several years of married life, they prayed earnestly for a son, and when at last a boy was born to them, they named him after St Francis of Assisi, whose intercession they had specially sought.

In his thirteenth year he was placed in the Franciscan friary at San Marco, where he learnt to read and where he laid the foundation of the austere life which he ever afterwards led; although he had not professed the rule of the order, he seemed even at that tender age to outstrip the religious themselves in a scrupulous observance of its requirements. After spending a year there he accompanied his parents on a pilgrimage which included Assisi and Rome. Upon his return to Paola, with their consent, he retired first to a place about half a mile from the town, and afterwards to a more remote seclusion by the sea, where he occupied a cave. He was scarcely fifteen years old. Before he was twenty, he was joined by two other men. The neighbours built them three cells and a chapel in which they sang the divine praises and in which Mass was offered for them by a priest from the nearest church.

Besides the gift of miracles St Francis was endowed with that of prophecy, and long afterwards, writing to Pope Leo X for the canonization of St Francis, the Bishop of Grenoble (uncle to Bayard, the “Chevalier sans peur et sans reproche”) wrote, “Most holy Father, he revealed to me many things which were known only to God and to myself”. Pope Paul II sent one of his chamberlains into Calabria to inquire about the truth of the wonderful things that were reported of the saint. Upon seeing a visitor approach, St Francis, who was busy with the masons over the construction of his church, left his work to greet him. The envoy attempted to kiss his hand, but this Francis would not allow; he protested that it was for him to kiss the hands which for some thirty years had been sanctified by offering the holy Sacrifice. The chamberlain, surprised that Francis should know how long he, a stranger, had been a priest, did not disclose his mission, but asked to speak with him and was led within the enclosure. Here he expatiated eloquently on the dangers of singularity, and censured Francis’s way of life as too austere for human nature. The saint attempted humbly to vindicate his rule and then, to prove what the grace of God would enable single-minded men to bear, he lifted out of the fire some burning coals and held them for some time in his hands unscathed. It may be noted that there is record of several similar examples of his immunity from the effects of fire. The chamberlain returned full of veneration for the holy man, and the new order received the sanction of the Holy See in 1474. At that time the community was composed of uneducated men, with only one priest. They were then called Hermits of St Francis of Assisi, and it was not until 1492 that their name was changed to that of “Minims”, at the desire of the founder, who wished his followers to be reckoned as the least (minimi) in the household of God.
St Francis passed twenty-five years in France, and died there. On Palm Sunday 1507 he fell ill, and on Maundy Thursday assembled his brethren and exhorted them to the love of God, to charity and to a strict observance of all the duties of their rule. Then he received viaticum barefoot with a rope round his neck, according to the custom of his order. He died on the following day, Good Friday, being then ninety-one years of age. His canonization took place in 1519.  Besides the rule which St Francis drew up for his friars, with a correctorium or method of enjoining penances and a ceremonial, he also composed a rule for nuns, and regulations for a third order of persons living in the world. Today the number of members of the Order of Minims is considerably reduced they are mostly found in Italy.
1815 BD LEOPOLD OF GAICHE founded house for missioners and preachers could retire for their annual retreat other brethren and friends of the order could come for spiritual refreshment; numerous miracles reported at his grave.   When in 1808 Napoleon invaded Rome and imprisoned Pope Pius VII, religious houses were suppressed and their occupants turned out. Bd Leopold, a venerable old man of seventy-seven, was obliged to abandon his beloved convent, and with three of his brethren to live in a miserable hut in Spoleto. While there he acted as assistant to a parish priest, but afterwards he had charge of an entire parish whose pastor had been driven out by the French. Then he was himself imprisoned for refusing to take an oath which he considered unlawful. His imprisonment, however, was of short duration, for we soon find him giving missions once more. His fame was enhanced by his prophetical powers and by strange phenomena which attended him: for example, when he was preaching his head often appeared to his congregation as though it were crowned with thorns.
With the fall of Napoleon, Bd Leopold hurried back to Monte Luco, where he set about trying to establish things as they had been before but he only survived for a few months, dying on April 15, 1815, in his eighty-third year. The numerous miracles reported to have taken place at his grave caused the speedy introduction of the process of his beatification, which reached a favourable conclusion in 1893.

1839 St. Dominic Tuoc 3rd order Dominican martyr native of Vietnam.  Arrested and tortured, he died in prison. Dominic was a native of Vietnam. He was canonized in 1988.  Blessed Dominic Tuoc M, OP Tert. (AC) Born in Tonkin; died 1839; beatified in 1900. Saint Dominic was a priest of the third order of Dominicans, who died of his wounds in prison (Benedictines).
1968 The Apparition of the Pure Lady the Virgin in the church of Zeiton.  On the eve of this day of the year 1684 A.M. which coincide with tuesday the 2nd. of April 1968 A.D., during the papacy of Pope Kyrellos VI, the hundred sixteenth Pope of Alexandria, our Lady and the pride of our faith started to transfigure in luminous spiritual forms in and around the domes of the church dedicated to her immaculate name in Zeiton, a suburb of Cairo.

Popes and other important Saints mentioned in articles of Saints today April 03



Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING