Tuesday  Saints of April  19 Tertiodécimo Kaléndas Maii.  
Apparitions of the Virgin in Zeitoun from April 2 to June 15, 1968 (Egypt)
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

St Pothinus, (87-177 AD) >

Our Lady of Fourvieres, a sanctuary dating from the time of St Pothinus, (87-177 AD) was a martyr and bishop of Lyon. He was martyred along with Alexander, Attalus, Espagathus} erected on the site of a temple of Venus, is a popular place of pilgrimage in the diocese. In 1643 the people of Lyons consecrated themselves to Our Lady of Fourvieres and pledged themselves to a solemn procession on the 8th of December of each year, which still continues to this day.
DOUBLE your life-saving impact ...

 40 Days for Life
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

April 19 – Our Lady of the Country (Italy, 1559) –
Apparitions of the Virgin in Zeitoun from April 2 to June 15, 1968 (Egypt)
 
The Virgin seen by Christians and Muslims alike
Located between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, Egypt can boast of being the country where the Holy Family took refuge from the persecution of Herod, just months after the birth of the Incarnate Word in Bethlehem.
Even at that time, in the biblical history of the Hebrews, Egypt was known as the country where the Chosen People had lived for more than 400 years. Under the leadership of Moses, Israel returned to Palestine after 40 years spent in the desert.
Christians, especially the Copts, are a minority today in the land of the ancient pharaohs and pyramids, but their fervor, especially their Marian fervor, is still ardent after over two millennia and has been rewarded by the Virgin herself. Indeed, shrines born at the scenes of miracles and Marian apparitions abound in Egypt.

In particular, let us mention the recent apparitions of the Virgin in Zeitoun, a suburb of Cairo, in 1971. What is interesting here is that the Virgin wanted to be seen by Christians and Muslims alike—the latter being the country’s religious majority.
 
Mary of Nazareth Team


CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List
Acts of the Apostles
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
How do I start the Five First Saturdays?
Mary Mother of GOD
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
  .

April 19 – Our Lady of the Countryside (Italy, 1559) 
 
The niche is empty but …
 
The following story may sound unbelievable, but it is true. Although there is no statue of Our Lady in the niche above the altar of the chapel of the Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes in Alta Gracia (Argentina), we can see her image—even though the niche in question is actually empty.

Both the Christians and non-Christians who flock to the shrine claim they see the image. It appears even on photographs and it is distinctly visible from the front entrance. Then, strangely, it gradually disappears as we approach the altar.

This chapel, built and blessed in 1927, used to have a statue of Our Lady of Lourdes in a niche above the altar. In August 2011, the statue was removed from the niche to be restored.

The Discalced Carmelites brothers subsequently issued a press release stating that "the apparition of the image of the Blessed Virgin does not have, to date, a logical explanation. We interpret it as a sign to increase and deepen the Christian faith of God’s people." ...MDN Team


1st v. St. Timon 1/7 Deacons chosen by the Apostles to minister to Nazarene of Jerusalem
 275 Socrates and Dionysius Martyrs of Pamphylia MM (RM)
         St. Paphnutius Martyred priest of Jerusalem
 304  St. Vincent of Collioure Martyr
4th v. St. Hermogenes Armenian martyr w/others at Melitene
 396  St. Crescentius A disciple of St. Zenobius and St. Ambrose
 713  St. Ursmar Benedictine abbot-bishop missionary organized exceedingly successful in Flanders Belgium

 814  George of Antioch monk bishop of Antioch Pisidia BM (RM)
10th v. Saint Lazarus an Oriental king travelled to Rome pilgrimage to Gaul
 978   St. Gerold nobleman hermit gave his lands to Einsiedeln Monastery in Switzerland

1054    Leo IX "the pilgrim pope" - reformer deacon a stern bishop holy man & army officer  Pope (RM)
1164 Blessed Burchard of Bellevaus a favorite disciple of Saint Bernard OSB Cist Abbot (PC)

1289 Blessed Conrad de'Miliani evangelize Libya advisor to cardinal Masci (later Pope Nicholas IV) OFM (AC)  great a devotion to the Sacred Passion that he was sometimes allowed to behold our Lord crowned with thorns and to take part in His sufferings
1374   St. Pavoni, Anthony Dominican Inquisitor murdered at Bricherasio
1404    Blessed James of Oldo priest a Franciscan tertiary w/wife  turned their home into a church OFM Tert. (AC)

1602 St. James Duckett, Blessed bookseller imprisoned 9 years Martyr of England for his faith

We confess that one and the same Christ, Lord, and only-begotten Son, is to be acknowledged in two natures without confusion, change, division or separation. The distinction between the natures was never abolished by their union, but rather the character proper to each of the two natures was preserved as they came together in one person (prosopon) and one hypostasis.-- Council of Chalcedon
 
Our Lady of Fourvieres April 19 - (Lyons, France, 1643)            
Our Lady of Fourvieres, a sanctuary dating from the time of St Pothinus, (87-177 AD) was a martyr and bishop of Lyon. He was martyred along with Alexander, Attalus, Espagathus} erected on the site of a temple of Venus, is a popular place of pilgrimage in the diocese. In 1643 the people of Lyons consecrated themselves to Our Lady of Fourvieres and pledged themselves to a solemn procession on the 8th of December of each year, which still continues to this day.
It was in Lyons that sixty Gallic tribes erected the famous altar to Rome and Augustus. It was also the center from which Christianity gravitated throughout Gaul. Brutal persecution arose under Marcus Aurelius. Its victims at Lyons numbered forty-eight, half of them of Greek origin, half Gallo-Roman; among them were St Blandina and St Pothinus, first Bishop of Lyons, sent to Gaul by St Polycarp about the middle of the second century. The letter addressed to the Christians of Asia and Phrygia in the name of the faithful of Vienne and Lyons, and relating the persecution of 177, is considered one of the most extraordinary documents possessed by any literature; it is the baptismal certificate of Christianity in France. The successor of St Pothinus was the illustrious St Irenæus (d. 202).
Read: BENNETT, Four Witnesses: The Early Church in Her Own Words, Ignatius, 2002.

April 19 - Our Lady of Campania (Italy, 1559)
 – Apparitions of Zeitoun, Egypt, from April 2 to June 15, 1968 
 
Mary embodied the whole Church
On this Holy Saturday, “Tradition tells us that Mary somehow embodied the whole Church: she is the Credentium collectio universa (the universal gathering of the faithful). Thus, the Virgin Mary standing near the tomb of her Son is the icon of the Virgin Church who stays awake at her Spouse’s tomb and awaits the celebration of the Resurrection.

This intuition of such a close relationship between Mary and the whole Church comes from the pious exercise called ‘The Mother's Hour.’ While the Body of the Son is still resting in the tomb and his Soul has descended to hell “to announce to the forebears in the faith, who are still in the shadow of death, their imminent liberation, the Virgin, anticipating and personifying the Church, awaits the victory of her Son over death, showing an unshakeable faith”
(cf: Directory of Popular Piety # 146-147, Vatican City, December 2001).
 notredamedesneiges
notredamedesneiges.over-blog.com


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

1st v. St. Timon 1/7 Deacons chosen by the Apostles to minister to Nazarene of Jerusalem
 275 Socrates and Dionysius Martyrs of Pamphylia MM (RM)
         St. Paphnutius Martyred priest of Jerusalem
 304  St. Vincent of Collioure Martyr
4th v. St. Hermogenes Armenian martyr w/others at Melitene
 396  St. Crescentius A disciple of St. Zenobius and St. Ambrose
 713  St. Ursmar Benedictine abbot-bishop missionary organized exceedingly successful in Flanders Belgium
8th v. Saint John of the Ancient Caves Bethlehem, near Dead Sea labored in fasting, vigil, and prayer ordained priest glorified by his ascetic life
 814  George of Antioch monk bishop of Antioch Pisidia BM (RM)
10th v. Saint Lazarus an Oriental king travelled to Rome pilgrimage to Gaul
 978   St. Gerold nobleman hermit gave his lands to Einsiedeln Monastery in Switzerland
11th v. Saint Emma favored with the gift of working miracles
1012   St. Alphege Archbishop "1st Martyr of Canterbury." famed for care of poor and austere life incorrupt in 1105
1054    Leo IX "the pilgrim pope" - reformer deacon a stern bishop holy man & army officer  Pope (RM)
1164 Blessed Burchard of Bellevaus a favorite disciple of Saint Bernard OSB Cist Abbot (PC)
1182    Blessed Bernard the Penitent Many miraculous cures occurred at his tomb OSB Monk (AC)
1260 Blessed Luchesio and Buonadonna they set in motion the Secular Franciscan Order
1275    Wernher the Glass-Blower 14 yr-old M (AC)
1289 Blessed Conrad de'Miliani evangelize Libya advisor to cardinal Masci (later Pope Nicholas IV) OFM (AC)  great a devotion to the Sacred Passion that he was sometimes allowed to behold our Lord crowned with thorns and to take part in His sufferings
1374   St. Pavoni, Anthony Dominican Inquisitor murdered at Bricherasio
1404    Blessed James of Oldo priest a Franciscan tertiary w/wife  turned their home into a church OFM Tert. (AC)
1602 St. James Duckett, Blessed bookseller imprisoned 9 years Martyr of England for his faith
    ST EXPEDITUS in fact it is more than doubtful whether the saint ever existed. We may own that in the “Hieronymianum” the name Expeditus occurs among a group of martyrs both on the 18th  and the 19th of April, being assigned in the one case to Rome, and in the other to Melitene in Armenia;
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)

1st v. St. Timon century 1/7 Deacons chosen by the Apostles to minister at Nazarene of Jerusalem
Corínthi natális sancti Timónis, qui fuit unus de septem primis Diáconis.  Hic primo apud Berœam Doctor resédit, ac deínde, verbum Dómini disséminans, venit Corínthum; ibíque, a Judǽis et Græcis (ut tráditur) injéctus flammis, sed nihil læsus, demum, cruci affíxus, martyrium suum implévit.
    At Corinth, the birthday of St. Timon, one of the first seven deacons, who was first a teacher at Berea.  Afterwards, while preaching the word of the Lord at Corinth, he was delivered to the flames by the Jews and the Greeks, but remaining uninjured, he ended his martyrdom by crucifixion.

One of the Seven Deacons chosen by the Apostles to assist in the ministering to the Nazarene community of Jerusalem. He was mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles (6:5), although the traditions concerning him are confusing.

Timon the Deacon M (RM) 1st century. One of the first seven deacons (Acts 6:5), Saint Timon is said to have been crucified in Corinth, though there are conflicting stories about his life (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
275 Socrates and Dionysius Martyrs of Pamphylia MM (RM)
Eódem die sanctórum Mártyrum Socrátis et Dionysii, qui lánceis confóssi sunt.
    On the same day, the holy martyrs Socrates and Denis, who were killed with spears.
who were stabbed to death under Aurelian(?) (Benedictines).
Pamphylia: ancient name for the fertile coastal plain in southern Turkey.
Pamphylia is the ancient name of the rich and fertile alluvial plain of the rivers Kestros, Eurymedon, and Melas (the modern Aksu Çayi, Köprü Çayi, and Manavgat Çayi).
 St. Paphnutius Martyred priest of Jerusalem.
Eódem die sanctórum Mártyrum Socrátis et Dionysii, qui lánceis confóssi sunt.
    On the same day, the holy martyrs Socrates and Denis, who were killed with spears. No details of his martyrdom survive.
Paphnutius of Jerusalem M (RM). A priest martyred at Jerusalem (Benedictines). Paphnutius may be shown in art with Saint Thäis (Roeder).
304 St. Vincent of Collioure Martyr
Caucolíberi, in Hispánia Tarraconénsi, pássio sancti Vincéntii Mártyris.    At Collioure in Spain, the martyr St. Vincent.
It is known with certainty that he was put to death at Collioure, Gaul (modern France), under Emperor Diocletian (r. 284-305), although his Acts are considered quite unreliable.
Vincent of Collioure M (RM) A martyr at Collioure, Languedoc, under Diocletian. (Benedictines).
4th v. St. Hermogenes 4th century Armenian martyr w/others at Melitene
Melitínæ, in Arménia, sanctórum Mártyrum Hermógenis, Caji, Expedíti, Aristónici, Rufi et Galátæ, qui omnes una die sunt coronáti.
    At Melitine in Armenia, the holy martyrs Hermogenes, Caius, Expeditus, Aristonicus, Rufus, and Galatas, all crowned on the same day.
with Aristonicus, Expeditus, Galata, Gaius, and Rufus. They suffered at Melitene.

Hermogenes, Caius & Companions MM (RM). Hermogenes, Caius, Expeditus, Aristonicus, Rufus, and Galata were Armenian martyrs believed to have died at Melitene (Benedictines).
396 St. Crescentius A disciple of St. Zenobius and St. Ambrose
Floréntiæ sancti Crescéntii Confessóris, qui fuit discípulus beáti Zenóbii Epíscopi.
    At Florence, St. Crescent, confessor, a disciple of the blessed Bishop Zenobius.
who served as a subdeacon of Florence, Italy.
Crescentius of Florence (RM) Subdeacon to Saint Zenobius(c. 390) the bishop of Florence, Crescentius was also a disciple of Saint Ambrose(340-397)
In art, Saint Crescentius is a deacon (1) with a censer and chalice, (2) with a censer and book, or (3) tending the sick (Roeder). He is especially venerated in Florence, Italy (Roeder).
(Attwater2, Benedictines).
713 St. Ursmar Benedictine abbot-bishop exceedingly successful missionary in Flanders Belgium
In cœnóbio Laubiénsi, in Bélgio, sancti Ursmári Epíscopi.
    In the monastery of Lobbes in Belgium, the bishop St. Ursmar.
713 ST URSMAR, ABBOT AND BISHOP
THE abbey of Lobbes, one of the most famous in Belgium, was founded by St Landelin in 654. We do not know the name of his immediate successor, but in 689, or shortly afterwards, the government of the abbey was entrusted to St Ursmar, who may, or may not, have been already a bishop. Though various biographies. of him were written a century or two later, we learn singularly little about his early history, but conventional phrases about his sanctity, austerity and apostolic zeal occur in abundance. We are told that he consecrated the abbey church of Lobbes in honour of SS. Peter and Paul on August 26, 697, and that he afterwards built a separate church for the people upon the hill-side. Ursmar is also credited with the foundation of other monasteries, and much is said about his missionary work in evangelizing Flanders.

The various lives of St Ursmar have been printed by Mabillon in the Acta Sanctorum O.S.B., vol. iii, part i, pp. 248—355, and part 2, pp. 608—611. There are also several collec­tions of miracles. But see especially U. Berlière, Monasticon Beige, vol. i, pp. 200—201; Van der Essen, Etudes critiques . . . méroving., pp. 71—73 and 76—82; and G. Morin in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxiii (1904), pp. 315—319. There is also a modem life by C. L. Declèves (1886).

Perhaps a native of Ireland, he served as abbot-bishop of the abbey of Lobbes, on the Sambre, in Flanders, Belgium, from which he organized exceedingly successful missionary efforts in the region.

Ursmar of Lobbes, OSB Abbot B (RM) (also known as Ursmer) Abbot - bishop of Lobbes on the Sambre, Ursmar founded other monasteries (Aulne and Wallers in Belgium) and did fruitful missionary work in bringing the Gospel to Flanders (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia). In art, Saint Ursmar is depicted as a Benedictine abbot casting out a devil (Roeder).
8th v. Saint John of the Ancient Caves not far from Bethlehem, near the Dead Sea labored in fasting, vigil, and prayer ordained to the holy priesthood, and glorified by his ascetic life
So called because he lived during the eighth century in the Lavra of St Chariton (September 28)
This was called the "Old," or ancient cave, since it was one the oldest of the Palestinian monasteries. The Lavra was situated not far from Bethlehem, near the Dead Sea.
St John in his early years left the world, went to venerate the holy places of Jerusalem, and settled at the Lavra, where he labored in fasting, vigil, and prayer.
He was ordained to the holy priesthood, and glorified by his ascetic life.
814 George of Antioch monk bishop of Antioch Pisidia second Council of Nicaea (797), which condemned the iconoclasts BM (RM)
Antiochíæ Pisídiæ sancti Geórgii Epíscopi, qui, ob sanctárum Imáginum cultum, exsul occúbuit.
    At Antioch in Pisidia, St. George, a bishop, who died in exile for the veneration of sacred images.
Saint George was a monk before becoming bishop of Antioch, Pisidia. He participated in the second Council of Nicaea (797), which condemned the iconoclasts.
He stand against the heresy led him to be banished by emperor Leo V the Armenian. George died in exile (Benedictines).
10th v. Saint Lazarus an Oriental king travelled to Rome pilgrimage to Gaul
10th century. Saint Lazarus, an Oriental king, travelled to Rome with his daughter Aza. They continued their pilgrimage to Gaul, where they settled in Moyenmoutier (Encyclopedia).
978 St. Gerold nobleman hermit gave his lands to Einsiedeln Monastery in Switzerland
978 ST GEROLDUS
THE little village of Sankt-Gerold near Mitternach in the Wallgau continues to draw numbers of pilgrims to venerate the tomb of the tenth-century hermit who, with his two sons, lies buried in the church. Various legends have grown up about him but a few details of his life seem to be well established. Geroldus came of the Rhetian family of the counts of Sax, and he was a middle-aged man when he decided to retire from the world to live as a recluse. For years he occupied a hermitage which he had erected in the forest, on a plot of ground given him by his friend and neighbour Count Otto. His own land he had bestowed upon the Benedictine abbey of Einsiedeln, in which his sons Cuno and Ulric were monks, the gift having been sealed by the placing of a basketful of the soil upon our Lady’s altar. After the death of Geroldus, his sons obtained permission to occupy their father’s cell and to watch over his tomb. In later years, when the forest was cleared, the abbots of Einsiedeln, several of whom were members of the hermit’s family, established a church upon the spot. The building was desecrated and reduced to ruin at the Reformation, but in 1663 Abbot Placid of Einsiedeln enshrined the saint’s body in a new church beside the relics of Cuno and Ulric.

There is no ancient biography, but an account has been pieced together from various sources in the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. ii; and see Ringholtz, Geschichte von Einsiedeln, vol. i.
A nobleman who became a hermit in Switzerland. He was born into the Rhaetian family of Saxony counts. Becoming a recluse, Gerold gave his lands to Einsiedeln Monastery in Switzerland, where his sons were monks. Gerold then became a hermit in a forest near Mitternach in the Waalgu.

Geroldus of Einsiedeln, OSB Hermit (AC) (also known as Gerold) Of the lineage of the dukes of Saxony, Saint Geroldus bestowed his property to Einsiedeln Abbey, where his two sons, Udalric and Cuno, were monks. Geroldus himself became a hermit under obedience to its abbot, in a village near Mitternach. His sons, whose feasts are not celebrated, followed him into isolation and under his direction spent their time between work and prayer. After Geroldus's death, his hermitage became a place of pilgrimage (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
11th v. Saint Emma favored with the gift of working miracles
11th century. Emma, widow of Ludger, was favored with the gift of working miracles. She supported the poor of Bremen (Encyclopedia).
1012 St. Alphege Archbishop "1st Martyr of Canterbury." famed for care of poor and austere life incorrupt in 1105
Cantuáriæ, in Anglia, sancti Elphégi, Epíscopi et Mártyris.    At Canterbury in England, St. Elphege, bishop and martyr.
ST ALPHEGE, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, MARTYR
Sr ALPHEGE (Aelfheah; Elphege) when a young man entered the monastery of Deerhurst in Gloucestershire. Afterwards he withdrew to a deserted place near been refounded by St Dunstan. As an abbot Alphege would never tolerate the slightest relaxation of the rule, for he realized how easily a small concession may begin to undermine the regular observance of a religious house; he used to say that it was far better for a man to remain in the world than for him to become an imperfect monk.
Upon the death of St Ethelwold in 984, St Dunstan obliged Alphege to accept the bishopric of Winchester, although he was only thirty years of age and shrank from the responsibility. In this position his high qualities and exceptional abilities found a wider scope. His liberality to the poor was so great that during the period of his episcopate there were no beggars in the diocese of Winchester. Adhering to the austerity of his monastic days, he became so thin through prolonged fasts that men declared they could see through his hands when he uplifted them at Mass. The holy prelate had ruled his see wisely for twenty-two years when he was translated to Canterbury in. succession to Archbishop Aelfric. In order to be invested with the pallium, he paid a visit to Rome, where he was received by Pope John XVIII. 
At this period England was suffering severely from the ravages of the Danes. Joining forces in 1011 with the rebel earl Edric, they marched into Kent and laid siege to Canterbury; the leading citizens urged St Alphege to seek safety in flight. This he absolutely refused to do. The city was betrayed, when a terrible massacre ensued, men and women, old and young, being put to the sword. St Alphege hastened to the place where the worst deeds of cruelty were being perpetrated. Pressing through the crowd, he appealed to the Danes to cease their carnage: “Spare those poor innocent victims”, he exclaimed. “Turn your fury rather against me.” He was immediately seized, roughly handled, and then confined in a dungeon. Several months later he was released from prison because a mysterious epidemic had broken out amongst the Danes, but although he cured many of the sick by prayer and by giving them blessed bread, the barbarians demanded three thousand gold crowns for his ransom. The archbishop declared that the country was too poor to pay such a sum. He was therefore taken to Greenwich and upon a second refusal to pay the money demanded he was barbarously put to death, though a Dane, Thorkell the Tall, tried to save him. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle breaks into verse in recording his tragic end:
Then was he captive, who had been the head
Of the English race, and of Christendom.
There was misery to be seen, where bliss had been before
In that unhappy city. whence came to us first
Christendom and happiness, in the sight of God and man.
His body was recovered and buried at St Paul’s in London, but was translated to Canterbury with great honour by the Danish King Canute in 1023. That St Alphege did not actually die for the faith was pointed out by one of his successors, Lanfranc, to St Anselm, but the latter replied that in his opinion to die for justice was tantamount to martyrdom. The English always regarded the holy man as a martyr, and as such his name appears in the Roman Martyrology, while his feast is nowadays observed in the dioceses of Westminster, Clifton, Portsmouth and Southwark.
Wharton’s Anglia Sacra (vol. ii, pp. 122--142). As Freeman has pointed out (Norman Conquest, vol. i, pp. 658—660) Osbern cannot be regarded as a trustworthy source; the information we obtain from the Anglo-Saxon Chron­icle, Thietmar and Adam of Bremen is more reliable. See also Stanton’s Menology, pp. 164—166, where the references given to English calendars show that the cult of the martyr was general throughout the country.
He was born in 953 and became a monk in the Deerhurst Monastery in Gloucester, England, asking after a few years to become a hermit. He received permission for this vocation and retired to a small hut near Somerset, England.   In 984 Alphege assumed the role of abbot of the abbey of Bath, founded by St. Dunstan and by his own efforts. Many of his disciples from Somerset joined him at Bath. In that same year, Alphege succeeded Ethelwold as bishop of Winchester. He served there for two decades, famed for his care of the poor and for his own austere life.

King Aethelred the Unready used his abilities in 994, sending him to mediate with invading Danes. The Danish chieftain Anlaf converted to Christianity as a result of his meetings with Alphege, although he and the other chief, Swein, demanded tribute from the Anglo-Saxons of the region.   Anlaf vowed never to lead his troops against Britain again.

In 1005 Alphege became the successor to Aleric as the archbishop of Canterbury, receiving the pallium in Rome from Pope John XVIII. He returned to England in time to be captured by the Danes pillaging the southern regions. The Danes besieged Canterbury and took Alphege captive. The ransom for his release was about three thousand pounds and went unpaid.
Alphege refused to give the Danes that much, an act which infuriated them. He was hit with an ax and then beaten to death.

Revered as a martyr, Alphege's remains were placed in St. Paul's Church in London. The body, moved to Canterbury in 1023, was discovered to be incorrupt in 1105. Relics of St. Alphege are also in Bath, Glastonbury, Ramsey, Reading, Durham, Yorkminster and in Westminster Abbey. His emblem is an ax, and he is depicted in his pontifical vestments or as a shepherd defending his flock.

Elphege the Martyr, OSB BM (RM) (also known as Alphege, Aelfheah)
Born c. 954; died in Greenwich, England, in 1012. In the old Saxon Chronicle is the story of Elphege and of his martyrdom at the hands of the Danes. He came of a noble Saxon family, and against his mother's wish became a monk. He served first at Deerhurst Abbey in Gloucestershire, England, but left as a young man to become a hermit in Bath.
Elphege was made an abbot in Bath, and, over his objections, appointed as bishop of Winchester in 984, in which office he served rendered great public service for 22 years. He eliminated poverty in his diocese through his aid to the poor, and continued to live the life of great austerity.
Olaf, King of Norway, after attacking London without success, harried the southern coast and occupied Southampton, whereupon King Ethelred commissioned Elphege to act as his envoy to Olaf in the interests of peace. The mission of Elphege was successful, and he brought Olaf to the king at Andover, where a satisfactory peace was concluded, and where Olaf, already a Christian, was confirmed. The Norwegian King then withdrew his ships and never again invaded England.

In 1006, Elphege was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury, and received the pallium from Pope John XVIII in Rome. Then came a series of Danish raids which lasted no less than five years and which caused widespread suffering and disorder. Canterbury itself was captured in 1011 by the invaders and besieged by Earl Edric; the cathedral was burned, the city plundered, and many of its citizens were taken as slaves, including the archbishop who had refused to leave. "The Danes went to their ships and led the archbishop with them. He was then captive who was erewhile the head of the English and of Christendom."

When an epidemic broke out, Elphege was allowed to minister to the ill; otherwise, for two years he remained their prisoner and was only released by death. The chief Witan, clergy and laity, had been detained in London until the Danes had extracted from them 48,000 gold crowns, an exorbitant sum in the money values of that age. A further sum of 3,000 gold crowns was demanded for the permanent release of the archbishop, but he refused to allow this added imposition; there was already widespread calamity and distress and he would allow no further burden. He was given a week in which to find the money and stubbornly refused.

Then the Danes, incensed with anger and inflamed with drink, led him to the scaffold, pelting him with bones and stones and subjecting him to every indignity, although one of them, Thorkell the Tall, tried to save him. Finally, Elphege sank down in weakness, and, out of pity, a Dane called Thrum, who had been converted and baptized in prison, killed him with an axe to put an end to his sufferings. It cannot be said that Elphege died for the faith; but Saint Anselm vindicated his public veneration as a martyr, and his feast is still observed.

According to tradition, Elphege's murder took place at Greenwich, where a church still stands in his name. The following day his body was received in London with great reverence, and buried in Saint Paul's. Ten years later, Danish King Canute, moved by the entreaties of his pious wife, made reparation by removing the body of Elphege to Canterbury, where over his grave by the high altar he built a costly shrine (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Gill).

In art, Saint Elphege is portrayed as a bishop with an axe, carrying loaves of bread in his chasuble. He might also be shown (1) keeping a wolf from sheep or (2) struck with the axe by the Danes (Roeder). Elphege is venerated at Greenwich and Winchester (Roeder).

1054 Leo IX "the pilgrim pope" - reformer deacon a stern bishop holy man & army officer attempted stopping the schism  (RM)
Romæ sancti Leónis Papæ Noni, virtútum et miraculórum laude insígnis.
    At Rome, Pope St. Leo IX, illustrious for his virtues and his miracles.
1054 ST LEO IX, POPE St Benedict, who touched him with a cross was completely cured severe blood-poisoning
ALSACE, at that period a part of the Holy Roman Empire, was the birthplace of St Leo IX in the year 1002.  His father Hugh, who was closely related to the emperor, and his mother Heilewide were a pious and cultured pair of whom it is recorded, as though it were somewhat unusual, that they spoke fluent French as well as their own German tongue.
At the age of five, Bruno, as he was called, was sent to a school presided over by Berthold, Bishop of Toul. He displayed exceptional abilities and was placed under the special charge of a much older cousin, Adalbert, afterwards bishop of Metz. One experience of his boyhood made a profound impression upon the future pope. He was on a visit to his home when he contracted severe blood-poisoning caused by the bite of some reptile. While he lay between life and death he had a vision of St Benedict, who touched him with a cross, and when he came to himself the boy found that he was completely cured.
His studies ended, he was appointed to a canonry of St Stephen’s, Toul. When in 1026 the Emperor Conrad II went to Italy to quell a rebellion in Lombardy, Bruno, although now a deacon, was given command of the corps furnished by the aged bishop of Toul. His success in handling the men gave him a reputation for military skill which, in the light of future events, was perhaps unfortunate. While the army was still in Italy, Bishop Heriman died and the clergy and people of Toul immediately elected Bruno to be his successor. On Ascension day, 1027, amid the rejoicings of the people, he entered Toul to be enthroned in the cathedral over which he was to rule for twenty years. His first pastoral work was to enforce a stricter mode of life amongst his clergy, regular as well as secular. Inspired, no doubt, by his grateful devotion to St Benedict, he held the religious life in the utmost veneration, and did much to revive discipline and fervour in the great monasteries of his diocese, into which he introduced the reform of Cluny.
In the summer of 1048 Pope Damasus II died after a pontificate of twenty-three days, and the Emperor Henry III chose his kinsman Bruno of Toul as his successor.  He set out for Rome, stopping at Cluny on the way, where he was joined by the monk Hildebrand, afterwards Pope St Gregory VII. His nomination having been endorsed in due form, Bruno was enthroned, taking the name of Leo IX, early in 1049.
For many years the growing evil of simony in the Church had been exercising the minds of good men, lay as well as ecclesiastical. The mischief had reached such alarming proportions that it needed a strong hand to grapple with it. But Leo had no hesitation. Shortly after his accession, he called a synod in Rome which anathematized and deprived beneficed clergy guilty of simony, besides dealing sternly with the relaxation of the rule of celibacy. The collegiate life, which as a young man he had helped Bishop Heriman to uphold at Toul, he now recommended to the secular clergy throughout the Church. Moreover, as he was quite aware that to bring about the reforms he required would necessitate something more than the mere issue of orders from Rome, he embarked upon a kind of visitation of Western Christendom in order that he might personally enforce his regulations and arouse the conscience of those in authority. Besides the reformation of morals, which was his principal theme, he urged the extension of preaching and the better rendering of the sacred chant, an object dear to his heart.
In another sphere of activity St Leo was confronted with the necessity of condemning the doctrines of Berengarius of Tours, who denied Christ’s real presence in the Eucharist. Twice more did the energetic pope cross the Alps, once to revisit his former see of Toul and on the other occasion to attempt a reconciliation between Henry III and King Andrew of Hungary—well was he called Peregrinus apostolicus, “the Apostolic Pilgrim”.
Leo obtained for the patrimony of St Peter possession of Benevento and other territories in southern Italy, thus ultimately increasing the temporal power of the papacy. To himself they proved only a great embarrassment, for they were ravaged by the Normans. He led an army against the invaders, but was defeated and captured at Civitella and was detained for a while by his captors at Benevento. This was a blow to Leo’s prestige, and St Peter Damian and others criticized him severely—if battles were necessary, they said, they should be fought by the emperor, not by the vicar of Christ.
This was the time chosen by Michael Cerularius, patriarch of Constantinople, to accuse the Western church of heresy on the ground of certain points of discipline and ritual practice in which it differed from the Eastern church. Pope Leo answered in a long and indignant but not immoderate letter, and it was characteristic of him that he then began to study Greek the better to understand the arguments of his accusers. But though this was the beginning of the final separation of Christian East and West, St Leo did not live to see the further developments that followed the arrival in Constantinople of the legates whom he sent thither. His health was by this time shattered. He ordered that his bed and a coffin should be placed side by side in St Peter’s, and here he passed away peacefully before the high altar on April 19, 1054.
“Heaven has opened for the pontiff that this world was not worthy to keep:
the glory of the saints is his
, declared Didier, abbot of Monte Cassino, and in so saying he was echoing the voice of the multitude. All mourned him, seventy miraculous cures were claimed within forty days of Leo’s death, and in 1087 Bd Victor III confirmed the popular canonization by ordering the mortal remains of St Leo IX to be solemnly enshrined.

It was Leo who first promulgated the proposal to vest the election of future popes exclusively in the Roman cardinals—a suggestion which became law five years after his death. Amongst the monarchs with whom St Leo maintained friendly relations was St Edward the Confessor, whom he authorized to refound Westminster Abbey in lieu of a pilgrimage he had undertaken to make to Rome. During his pontificate King MacBeth is said to have visited the Holy See—perhaps in expiation of his crimes.

The sources for the life of St Leo IX are much too varied to be enumerated in detail. It must be sufficient to give a general reference to BHL., nn. 4818—4829, and to the notice prefixed to the excellent summary of this pontificate in Mgr H. K. Mann’s Lives of the Popes in the Middle Ages, vol. vi, pp. 19—182. For the ascetical aspects of the pope’s life the earlier portion of Wibert’s biography is particularly valuable, and so also are the docu­ments published by Fr A. Poncelet in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxv (1906), pp. 258—297. Though ignorant of these last-named materials, 0. Delarc’s book, Un pape alsacien (1876), may still be recommended for its thorough grasp of the conditions of the time E. Martin’s volume, St Leon IX, in the series “Les Saints”, is a convenient handbook. For anyone who wishes to make a study of the subject the works of Martens, Drehmann, Hauck and Brucker, written from quite different standpoints, would also have to be consulted. L. Sittler and P. Stintzi, St. Lion IX (1950), is a useful series of studies and excerpts, some with special reference to Alsace.
Born in Alsace, France, in 1002; died in Rome, April 19, 1054; canonized in 1087.
Pope Leo, baptized Bruno, curiously combined the life of a holy man with that of an army officer. He was a deacon when Emperor Conrad II, his cousin, invaded Italy. In spite of his holy orders, Bruno readily joined the emperor's army and fought valiantly. While still a deacon and a soldier, Bruno was chosen to be bishop of Toul in 1026 when he was visiting there.

During his 20 years as prelate of Toul, he was known as a stern bishop, who disciplined lax priests and brought order into the monasteries of his diocese. Then in 1048 he was elected pope. He took his spiritual advisor, Hildebrand (later Pope Saint Gregory VII), with him to Rome.

What he had done formerly on a small scale he attempted to apply to the whole Church.  First he began in earnest to reform the curia.  Leo combatted simony, enforced celibacy among the clergy, encouraged development of the chant and the liturgy, condemned Berengarius, and strove to prevent the schism between the Eastern and Western churches that was being engineered by Emperor Michael Coerularius.  Then, he tirelessly travelled throughout western Europe to enforce his reforms, and became known as the pilgrim pope.
Wherever he went he called together the bishops and clergy in councils, inspiring them to follow his lead.

Leo IX decided to consolidate the material position of the papacy by adding parts of southern Italy to his territories, but this proved to be his undoing. The Normans invaded these new territories; the warrior pope himself led an army in their defense- -an action that caused even Saint Peter Damian (1001dr of Church 1072) to criticize him. Unfortunately, too, the Normans defeated him. Pope Leo IX was captured at Civitella and imprisoned at Benevento. Although his captors declared themselves to be the pope's loyal subjects, they did not release Leo for several months.

In prison Leo began to learn Greek, in an attempt to understand better the teachings of the Eastern Church, which was now split from Rome.   But his health was failing. On his release, the pope ordered his bed to be placed in Saint Peter's Basilica next to a coffin. There he died (Benedictines, Bentley, Encyclopedia).
1164 Blessed Burchard of Bellevaus a favorite disciple of Saint Bernard OSB Cist. Abbot (PC)
Burchard was a favorite disciple of Saint Bernard at Clairvaux. He was successively appointed abbot of Balerne (1136) and Bellevaux (c. 1157) (Benedictines).
1182 Blessed Bernard the Penitent Many miraculous cures occurred at his tomb OSB Monk (AC)
NOTHING is known of the early years of this Bernard except that he was born in the diocese of Maguelone in Provence, and even his contemporary biographer could never ascertain of what crimes he had been guilty beyond his participation in a rising which had resulted in the death of an unpopular governor. We have, however, the exact wording of the certificate which he obtained from his bishop before entering upon his penitential life.
John, by the grace of God Bishop of Maguelone, to all the pastors and faithful of the Catholic Church, eternal salvation in the Lord. Be it known to you all that in expiation of the horrible crimes committed by him, we have imposed upon Bernard, the bearer of this present letter, the following penance. He is to go barefoot for seven years: he is not to wear a shirt for the rest of his life:  he is to observe the forty days before the Birthday of our Saviour like a Lenten fast: he is to abstain from meat and fat on Wednesdays and from everything but bread and a little wine on Fridays. On the Fridays of Lent and Embertide he shall drink nothing but water, and on all Saturdays which are not great festivals he shall take no meat or fat unless illness requires it. Therefore we ask you of your charity in Jesus Christ, for the redemption of your souls and in a spirit of compassion, to give to this very poor penitent the necessary food and clothing and to shorten his penance so far as reason may allow. Given at Maguelone in the year of the Incarnation of our Lord 1170 in the month of October. In force for seven years only.
In the garb of a penitent and loaded with heavy iron fetters, Bernard undertook a number of pilgrimages, during which he endured and even courted hardships of all sorts. Three times, it is said, he visited Jerusalem, and once went as far as India to implore the intercession of St Thomas. At last one day when he arrived at Saint-Omer, it was revealed to him that his travels were now to cease. A generous citizen gave him a little house abutting on the monastery of Saint-Berth, and the monks allowed him access at all hours to their church. He was always the first at the night offices and he would stand barelegged and barefooted on the stone flags even in the depth of winter when his flesh was cracked and frozen with the cold. He loved to make himself useful by nursing the poor or by cleaning the churches.
Bernard came to be a familiar and popular figure as he passed through the streets on his errands of mercy, replying to all greetings with the words, “God grant us all a good end”. The time came when he ventured to ask the monks to give him the habit, and they welcomed him, for they regarded him as a saint. Towards the end of his life he was endowed with the gift of prophecy and many miracles were attributed to him; and after his death the church was thronged by such crowds that the monks had the utmost difficulty in proceeding with the funeral: everyone was begging for some fragment of his garments or for something he had used. Bd Bernard’s biographer testifies that he had been an eye-witness of many of the wonderful cures which he relates.

This life printed in the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. ii, purports to have been written by one John, a monk of the abbey of Saint-Bertin.
Born in Provence, France; died at Saint Omer, 1182. Bernard committed some unspecified, apparently horrible, crime for which the bishop of Maguelonne (Provence) mandated seven years of public penance in 1170. Bernard performed the penance loaded with seven heavy iron bands. These he dragged from shrine to shrine-- Compostella, Rome, Palestine--until he reached Saint Bertin (Sithiu) Abbey. There he lived as a hermit until he mustered the courage to ask the monks of the abbey to receive him into their community. The monks readily welcomed him because they regarded him as a living saint. Many miraculous cures occurred at his tomb (Attwater2, Benedictines).
1260 Blessed Luchesio and Buonadonna they set in motion the Secular Franciscan Order
Luchesio and his wife Buonadonna wanted to follow St. Francis as a married couple. Thus they set in motion the Secular Franciscan Order.
Luchesio and Buonadonna lived in Poggibonzi where he was a greedy merchant. Meeting Francis—probably in 1213—changed his life. He began to perform many works of charity.
At first Buonadonna was not as enthusiastic about giving so much away as Luchesio was. One day after complaining that he was giving everything to strangers, Buonadonna answered the door only to find someone else needing help. Luchesio asked her to give the poor man some bread. She frowned but went to the pantry anyway. There she discovered more bread than had been there the last time she looked. She soon became as zealous for a poor and simple life as Luchesio was. They sold the business, farmed enough land to provide for their needs and distributed the rest to the poor.

In the 13th century some couples, by mutual consent and with the Church’s permission, separated so that the husband could join a monastery (or a group such as Francis began) and his wife could go to a cloister. Conrad of Piacenza and his wife did just that. This choice existed for childless couples or for those whose children had already grown up. Luchesio and Buonadonna wanted another alternative, a way of sharing in religious life, but outside the cloister.

To meet this desire, Francis set up the Secular Franciscan Order. Francis wrote a simple Rule for the Third Order (Secular Franciscans) at first; Pope Honorius III approved a more formally worded Rule in 1221.

The charity of Luchesio drew the poor to him, and, like many other saints, he and Buonadonna seemed never to lack the resources to help these people.
One day Luchesio was carrying a crippled man he had found on the road. A frivolous young man came up and asked, "What poor devil is that you are carrying there on your back?" "I am carrying my Lord Jesus Christ," responded Luchesio. The young man immediately begged Luchesio’s pardon.
Luchesio and Buonadonna both died on April 28, 1260. He was beatified in 1273. Local tradition referred to Buonadonna as "blessed" though the title was not given officially.
Comment: It is easy to mock the poor, to trample on their God-given dignity. Mother Teresa of Calcutta often referred to poverty as Christ’s "distressing disguise." Since it is so easy to make people feel unwanted—the poor, the sick, the mentally or physically handicapped, the aged, the unemployed— resisting that temptation indicates the level of generosity in our lives. If the followers of Francis see Christ in the poor as Luchesio and Buonadonna did, they enrich the Church and keep it faithful to its Lord.
Quote: Francis used to say, "Whoever curses a poor man does an injury to Christ, whose noble image he wears, the image of him who made himself poor for us in this world" (1 Celano, #76).
1275 Wernher the Glass-Blower 14 yr-old M (AC)
(also known as Werner) Born in Germany; Wernher was a 14-year-old boy in the service of a Jewish family at Oberwessel who was alleged to have been martyred on Maunday Thursday after he had received Holy Communion. He is venerated at Trier (Benedictines, Gill).
1289 Blessed Conrad de'Miliani evangelize Libya advisor to cardinal Masci (later Pope Nicholas IV) OFM (AC)  great a devotion to the Sacred Passion that he was sometimes allowed to behold our Lord crowned with thorns and to take part in His sufferings
1289 BD CONRAD OF ASCOLI great a devotion to the Sacred Passion that he was sometimes allowed to behold our Lord crowned with thorns and to take part in His sufferings
THE power of foreseeing the future is a gift which is seldom bestowed upon the young, but Conrad Miliani of Ascoli was a mere boy when, as we are told, he knelt before a peasant lad called Jerome Masci and greeted him, whether in jest or earnest, as destined to become pope. The prophecy was fulfilled in time, for Jerome in due course occupied the chair of St Peter as Nicholas IV. Although Conrad was of noble birth, there sprang up between the two youths a close friendship which was to prove lifelong. Together they entered the Franciscan Order, together they were professed, together they studied, and they received their doctor’s degree at Perugia on the same day.
Conrad began his public career as a preacher in Rome but, called to the mission-field, he obtained leave of Jerome, by this time minister general of the order, to attempt to evangelize Libya. His success in northern Africa was great: many thousands are said to have been converted by his teaching and miracles. His external activities were the outcome of a life of extreme austerity and of so great a devotion to the Sacred Passion that he was sometimes allowed to behold our Lord crowned with thorns and to take part in His sufferings.
Recalled to Italy, probably for reasons of health, he was selected to accompany Jerome, who was proceeding to France as papal legate; then the envoys returned to Rome, where Conrad spent a couple of years till he was sent to Paris to deliver lectures in theology. Besides attending to his professorial duties he found time to preach in the churches and to visit the sick poor in the hospitals. In 1289 Jerome, now pope, sent for his friend, whom he wished to have in the college of cardinals, but Conrad fell ill before he could reach Rome and died in his native town of Ascoli. His cultus was approved by Pope Pius VI.
There is an account of Conrad in the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. ii, but for fuller details we have to turn to Wadding (Annales Minorum, vol. v, pp. 212—215) and the other chroniclers of the order. See also Leon, Aureole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp. 83—88.
(also known as Conrad of Ascoli) Born in Ascoli Piceno; cultus confirmed by Pope Pius VI. Conrad joined the Franciscans with Jerome Masci (later Pope Nicholas IV), whose future elevation he foretold. Conrad was sent to evangelize Libya but was recalled to act as advisor to Masci, when he became a cardinal (Attwater2, Benedictines). Blessed Conrad is shown in art as a Franciscan with a cross and rosary preaching to Africans (Roeder).
1374 St. Pavoni, Anthony Dominican Inquisitor murdered at Bricherasio
Pavoni was born 1326 at Savigliani, Italy and entered the Dominicans. He was appointed the inquisitor general for Piedmont and Liguria and was murdered by several men at Bricherasio, almost certainly in revenge for some action of his in an official capacity.
1404 Blessed James of Oldo priest a Franciscan tertiary w/wife  turned their home into a church OFM Tert. (AC)
Born in Lodi, Italy; James enjoyed married life and good living. During a plague, he was converted to true faith and together with his wife became a Franciscan tertiary. They turned their home into a church and eventually James was ordained a priest.
1602 St. James Duckett, Blessed bookseller imprisoned 9 years Martyr of England for his faith
hanged at Tyburn. James was born in Gilfortriggs, Westmoreland, England. After being drawn to Catholicism, he refused to attend Protestant services and passed two terms in prison. He then took instructions and was baptized. James went to London, where he spent more time in prison and distributed Catholic materials. Arrested for his faith, he was imprisoned for nine years before his execution at Tyburn. He was beatified in 1929.

Blessed James Duckett M (AC) Born at Gilfortrigs, Skelsmergh, Westmorland, England; died at Tyburn, England, in 1602; beatified in 1929. James converted to Catholicism and settled in London as a bookseller. After being imprisoned several times (totalling nine years incarceration) for printing and selling Catholic books, James was martyred by hanging (Benedictines).
ST EXPEDITUS in fact it is more than doubtful whether the saint ever existed. We may own that in the “Hieronymianum” the name Expeditus occurs among a group of martyrs both on the 18th  and the 19th of April, being assigned in the one case to Rome, and in the other to Melitene in Armenia;
IT is perhaps necessary to mention St Expeditus, because at one time there was much talk of such a saint, and some good people were led to believe that, when there was need of haste, an undertaking committed to his patronage was likely to meet with prompt settlement. Without going into detail, two definite statements may be made in this matter. The first is that we have no adequate reason to think that any such saint was ever invoked in the early Christian centuries; in fact it is more than doubtful whether the saint ever existed. We may own that in the “Hieronymianum” the name Expeditus occurs among a group of martyrs both on the 18th  and the 19th of April, being assigned in the one case to Rome, and in the other to Melitene in Armenia; but there is no vestige of any tradition which would corroborate either mention, whereas there is much to suggest that in both lists the introduction of the name is merely a copyist’s blunder. Hundreds of similar blunders have been quite definitely proved to exist in the same document.
The second statement has reference to a story which pretends to explain the origin of this “devotion” by an incident of modem date. A packing-case, we are to containing a corpo Santo from the catacombs, was sent to a community of nuns in Paris The date of its dispatch was indicated by the use of the word “spedito”, but the recipients mistook this for the name of the martyr and set to work with great energy to propagate his cult. From these simple beginnings, it is asserted, a devotion to St Expeditus spread rapidly through many Catholic countries. In answer to this it should be pointed out that though the recognition of St Expeditus as the patron of dispatch depends beyond doubt upon a calembour or play upon words—there are many similar examples in popular hagiology—still the particular story about the Paris nuns falls to pieces, because as far back as 1781 this supposed martyr, St Expeditus, was chosen patron of the town of Acireale in Sicily, and because pictures of him were in existence in Germany in the eighteenth century which plainly depicted him as a saint to be invoked against procrastination.

Regarding the supposed martyr himself, see the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxv (1906), pp. 90—98, and the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. ii, part 2, p. 198. The story of the French nuns was told in the Fortnightly Review, Oct. 1906, p. 705; on which cf. The Month, Nov. 1906, pp. 544—346. Delehaye, in his Legends of the Saints, pp. 47—49, gives examples of the developments in popular devotion which have resulted from a play upon words or from a name that has been misunderstood.


On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
Listen to the podcast

 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005
 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).-
Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
The Pope said this today before reciting the midday Angelus with several thousand people gathered in the courtyard of the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, south of Rome.
Referring to the Gospel reading for today's Mass, the Holy Father reflected on the faith of Peter, which is shown to be "still immature and too much influenced by the 'mentality of this world.'”  He explained that when Christ spoke openly about how he was to "suffer much, be killed and rise again, Peter protests, saying: 'God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you.'"
"It is evident that the Master and the disciple follow two opposed ways of thinking," continued the Pontiff. "Peter, according to a human logic, is convinced that God would never allow his Son to end his mission dying on the cross.  "Jesus, on the contrary, knows that the Father, in his great love for men, sent him to give his life for them, and if this means the passion and the cross, it is right that such should happen."
Christ also knew that "the resurrection would be the last word," Benedict XVI added.
Serious illness
The Pope continued, "If to save us the Son of God had to suffer and die crucified, it certainly was not because of a cruel design of the heavenly Father.  "The cause of it is the gravity of the sickness of which he must cure us: an evil so serious and deadly that it will require all of his blood. 
"In fact, it is with his death and resurrection that Jesus defeated sin and death, reestablishing the lordship of God."
Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today; April 19
1054    Leo IX "the pilgrim pope" - reformer deacon a stern bishop holy man & army officer  Pope (RM)