Monday  Saints of this Day April 25  Séptimo Kaléndas Maii  

Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

litanaie_majores_papal_procession.jpg

When all people believe in my power, there will be peace
 
The Virgin Mary appeared in Marienfried, Germany, in 1946, to a 22-year old woman called Bärbel Ruess. There were three apparitions in all: on April 25, May 25 and June 25 of the same year.

In the first apparition, Mary told Bärbel:
"Where the utmost trust reigns and where it teaches people that I can do everything, there I will spread peace. Then, when all people believe in my power, there will be peace..."
Bishop Venancio Pereira of Fatima wrote:
"For me, the shrine of Marienfried is a synthesis of Marian devotion in our time. It is one of the most important Marian shrines of the Church."
Bishop Rudolf Graber of Regensburg wrote on July 25, 1976:
"Those who carefully study the message of Marienfried discover the interpretation of Revelation Chapter 12, where the '"Great Red Dragon"; hunts the Lady clothed with the sun, trying to destroy her Son."
On March 20, 2000, the local bishop, from the diocese of Augsburg, authorized pilgrimages to Marienfried,
though the Church has not taken an official position yet.


Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
  .

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Mary's Divine Motherhood
    1 Peter 5:5-14 ; Psalms 89:2-3, 6-7, 16-17 ; Mark 16:15-20 ;
1st v. St Anianus Bishop St Mark shoemaker aide great fervor and virtue
150 St. Philo and Agathopodes Antiochene deacons authored Acts recounting life and death of St. Ignatius of Antioch

392 St. Phaebadius one of “the illustrious men” of the Church extirpated Arianism heresy
 480 St. Macedonius Patriarch of Constantinople Council of Chalcedon defender
 489 St. Macaille Bishop of Croghan prelate vows of St. Brigid

7th v. Authaire of La Ferté courtier at King Dagobert Ipalace France (AC)
 729 Egbert of Rathemigisi Northumbrian monk of Lindisfarne OSB (RM)
 891 Photius career of scholarship and public service at the imperial court legitimate patriarch of Constantinople Orthodox objection to doctrine of the Holy Spirit: Filioque
1000 St. Robert of Syracuse Benedictine abbot He headed the monastery at Syracuse, Sicily.

1586 Bl. William Marsden &  Blessed Robert Anderson  priest Martyr of England
1586 Bl. Robert Anderton Jesuit Cardinal theology professor notable figure Catholic Reformation defended Gallileo
1597 Philip of Jesus friar Miracles attested the power before God of these first martyrs of Japan patron of Mexico City, Mexico
1913 Blessed Giovanni Battista Piamarta (AC)


April 25 - Apparitions of the Great Mediatrix of Graces of Marienfried to Bärbel Ruess (Germany, 1946)
 
I bring you the Peace of Christ
 The Virgin Mary appeared in Marienfried, Germany, a parish of Pfaffenhofen (district of Neu-Ulm), to a 22 year-old visionary named Bärbel Ruess. She had three apparitions in the course of 1946: on April 25, May 25, and June 25.
During the first apparition, the Virgin Mary told Bärbel: “Where we find the utmost trust and where the people are taught that I can do everything, I will bring peace. When all people have faith in my power, peace will come. I am the sign of the living God. I imprint my sign on my children's foreheads. The star will hunt down my sign, but my sign will overcome the star.”
When Bärbel asked her, “Who are you?” the Virgin answered: “If I were not wearing a veil, you would have recognized me.” Before leaving, the Lady also said: “May the peace of Christ be with you and with all those who come here to pray.”
This place later received the name of “Marienfried” (Mary's peace) to recall the words of the Blessed Virgin Mary: “I bring you the Peace of Christ.”
 Maria Hepp Excerpt from The Message of Marienfriend, published by Paul Geiselmann, Laupheim, 1969 (Germany). pierre2.net


April 24 – Our Lady of Miracles (Italy, 1583)
When Sri Lanka was preserved from foreign invasion by the Virgin Mary 
In February of this year, the Holy Father Pope Francis addressed a group of faithful from Sri Lanka on pilgrimage in Rome to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the consecration of the Church in Sri Lanka to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Here is an excerpt from his speech:

(…) You have come on pilgrimage to Rome to render homage to Our Lady, at the end of the celebrations to mark the 75th anniversary of the consecration to her of the Church in Sri Lanka.
Seventy-five years ago, the dark clouds of what would be the second world conflict were thickening in the skies and the faithful, guided by a sure intuition of faith, entrusted themselves to Our Lady, who always defends her children from dangers.
In 1940, in the dramatic circumstances of the war, the Archbishop of Colombo, Mgr Jean Marie Masson, of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, made a vow to build a shrine in honor of Our Lady if the island were preserved from foreign invasion. So it came about, and after the end of the war the beautiful Shrine of Our Lady of Lanka at Tewatte was built, and was consecrated forty years ago.

(…) I entrust you to the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Lanka.
I ask you to pray for me and from my heart I bless you.
 Pope Francis  Zenit.org, February 10, 2014

 
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Dearly beloved, today our Saviour is born; let us rejoice. Sadness should have no place on the birthday of life. Let the sinner be glad as he receives the offer of forgiveness. Let us give thanks to God the Father, through his Son, in the Holy Spirit, because in his great love for us he took pity on us.
-- Pope St. Leo the Great


Mary Our Mother of Love April 25 - Our Lady of Good Counsel (Italy, Genazzano, 1476)
Needless to say, Our Lady is the mother of humankind and she particularly favors mothers and those who live and care for their families and children, as she lived in close union with her Son and husband.
   Mary's love is the love of a mother for us her children and the love of Jesus' mother for her Son.
It's the pure love which brought up the Savior of the World and which now points us, her children, towards Him.
The way to God is through Jesus (cf Jn 14:6) and His mother wants to lead us by the hand to her Son, where we will find eternal peace and joy.

It is through the love of Jesus that we experience complete joy. "I have told you this so that my own joy may be in you and your joy be complete. This is my commandment: love one another, as I have loved you" (Jn 15:11-12).
See http://www.maryslove.com/html/links.html

Dedication of the Lower Holy Chapel of Paris in honor of Our Lady (France, 1248)  Mary, for Jesus My Redeemer, Make My Heart White like a Lily (I)
O Blessed Virgin, my tender Mother, for Jesus my Redeemer make my heart like a violet and white like a very pure lily.
For Him, O my Mother, make my whole being white and humble.
When the pain causes me atrocious suffering, I think that Our Lord, who is so good, has me suffer in proportion to the love I feel for Him and that He feels for me. This is why I am always smiling and I always feel peaceful inside! I live for Jesus, to be united with Him! This is what I ask him: to die in His Love.  Marthe Robin Private Diary, January 3, 1930
1st v. St Anianus Bishop St Mark shoemaker aide great fervor and virtue
 150 St. Philo and Agathopodes Antiochene deacons authored Acts recounting life and death of St. Ignatius of Antioch
        Evodius, Hermogenes & Callistus MM (RM)
4th v. Kebius preached conversion in Cornwall B (AC)

        Saturninus, Theophilus & Revocata MM (RM)
 300 Theophilus of Caesarea M (RM)
 312 Saturninus, Theophilus & Revocata MM (RM)
       Antiochíæ sancti Stéphani, Epíscopi et Mártyris, qui ab hæréticis Synodum Chalcedonénsem impugnántibus, multa passus
 392 St. Phaebadius one of “the illustrious men” of the Church extirpated Arianism heresy
 480 St. Macedonius Patriarch of Constantinople Council of Chalcedon defender
 489 St. Macaille Bishop of Croghan prelate vows of St. Brigid
5th v. Mun of Lough Ree hermit another nephew of Saint Patrick B (AC)
5th v. Dyfnan  saintly son of Welsh chieftain Brychan (AC)
 525 Deodatus of Blois, Abbot (AC)
 539 Vedast of Arras holy from childhood instrumental in the conversion of Clovis I to Christianity B (AC)
7th v. Authaire of La Ferté courtier at King Dagobert Ipalace France (AC)
7th v. Bova (Beuve, Bona) abbess & Doda rejected marriage proposals she  devote to service of God OSB VV (RM)
 729 Egbert of Rathemigisi Northumbrian monk of Lindisfarne OSB (RM)
 737 Erminus of Lobbes practicing apostolic zeal as abbot and regional bishop OSB B (RM)
 750 Saint Relindis of Eyck abbess OSB, Abbess (AC)
 780 St. Mella Widow abbess
       Blessed Corona of Elche Benedictine nun OSB V (AC)
 857 Heribald of Auxerre Benedictine monk abbot love of well-regulated lives ceremonies well-built churches
 891 Photius career of scholarship and public service at the imperial court legitimate patriarch of Constantinople
       Orthodox objection to doctrine of the Holy Spirit
1000 St. Robert of Syracuse Benedictine abbot He headed the monastery at Syracuse, Sicily.
1243 Blessed Boniface of Valperga monk bishop of Aosta B (PC)
1586 Bl. William Marsden &  Blessed Robert Anderson  priest Martyr of England
1586 Bl. Robert Anderton Jesuit Cardinal theology professor notable figure Catholic Reformation defended Gallileo
1597 Philip of Jesus friar Miracles attested the power before God of these first martyrs of Japan patron of Mexico City, Mexico
1913 Blessed Giovanni Battista Piamarta (AC)

Alexandríæ natális beáti Marci Evangelístæ.  Hic, discípulus et intérpres Apóstoli Petri, rogátus Romæ a frátribus scripsit Evangélium, quo assúmpto, perréxit in Ægyptum, primúsque Alexandríæ Christum annúntians, constítuit Ecclésiam; ac póstea, pro fide Christi tentus, fúnibus vinctus et per saxa raptátus, gráviter afflíctus est; deínde, reclúsus in cárcere, primo angélica visitatióne confortátus est, et demum, ipso Dómino sibi apparénte, ad cæléstia regna vocátus, octávo Nerónis anno.
    At Alexandria, the birthday of St. Mark the Evangelist, disciple and interpreter of the apostle St. Peter.  He wrote his gospel at the request of the faithful at Rome, and taking it with him, proceeded to Egypt and founded a church at Alexandria, where he was the first to preach Christ.  Afterwards, being arrested for the faith, he was bound, dragged over stones, and endured great afflictions.  Finally he was confined to prison, where, being comforted by the visit of an angel, and even by an apparition of our Lord himself, he was called to the heavenly kingdom in the eighth year of the reign of Nero.

 63 [74] ST MARK, EVANGELIST (c. A.D.)
FOR our knowledge of the personal history of St Mark, the author of the second gospel, we are dependent more or less upon conjecture. It is generally believed that he must be identical with the “John surnamed Mark” of Acts xii 12 and 25, and that the Mary whose house in Jerusalem was a kind of rendezvous for the apostles was consequently his mother. From Col. iv 10 we learn that Mark was a kinsman of St Barnabas who, as stated in Acts iv 36, was a Levite and a Cypriot, and from this it is not unlikely that St Mark was of a levitical family himself.
When Paul and Barnabas returned to Antioch, after leaving in Jerusalem the alms they had brought, they took John surnamed Mark with them, and in their apostolic mission at Salamis in Cyprus, Mark helped them in their ministry (Acts xiii 5), but when they were at Perga in Pamphylia he left and returned to Jerusalem (Acts xiii 13). St Paul seems consequently to have suspected Mark of a certain instability, and later, when preparing for a visitation of the churches in Cilicia and the rest of Asia Minor, he refused to include John Mark, though Barnabas desired his company. The difference of opinion ended in Barnabas separating from St Paul and going with Mark again to Cyprus. None the less when Paul was undergoing his first captivity in Rome, Mark was with him and a help to him (Col. iv 10). Also in his second Roman captivity, shortly before his martyrdom, St Paul writes to Timothy, then at Ephesus, enjoining him to “take Mark and bring him with thee, for he is profitable to me for the ministry”.

On the other hand tradition testifies strongly in the sense that the author of the second gospel was intimately associated with St Peter. Clement of Alexandria (as reported by Eusebius), Irenaeus and Papias speak of St Mark as the interpreter or mouthpiece of St Peter, though Papias declares that Mark had not heard the Lord and had not been His disciple. In spite of this last utterance, many commentators incline to the view that the young man (Mark xiv 51) who followed our Lord after His arrest was no other than Mark himself. What is certain is that St Peter, writing from Rome (I Peter v 13), speaks “my son Mark” who apparently was there with him. We can hardly doubt that this was the evangelist, and there is at any rate nothing which conclusively shows that this young man is a different person from the “John surnamed Mark” of the Acts.
Turning to more uncertain documents, we have in the first place to note a curiously sober narrative—sober in the sense that the miraculous element is very restrained and the local knowledge exceptional—which purports to have been written by the same John Mark to give an account of that second visit of Barnabas and himself to Cyprus, which ended in the martyrdom of the former, here assigned to A.D. 53. It is noteworthy that the compiler of this apocryphal “passion” had apparently no idea that Mark was himself the author of the second gospel, for great prominence is given to the possession by Barnabas of a record of our Lord’s sayings and doings which he had obtained from St Matthew. This seems an unlikely detail to be invented and put in the mouth of one who was himself known to be one of the four evangelists. On the other hand the concluding passage represents Mark as sailing for Alexandria and there devoting himself to the work of teaching others “what he had learned from the apostles of Christ”.

That St Mark lived for some years in Alexandria and became bishop of that see is an ancient tradition, though his connection with their native city is not mentioned either by Clement of Alexandria or by Origen. Eusebius, however, records it, and so also does the ancient Latin preface to the vulgate of St Mark’s Gospel. This last notice, referring to some personal deformity of the evangelist, mentioned also at an earlier date by Hippolytus, suggests that it was a mutilation self-inflicted to prevent his ordination to the priesthood of which he deemed himself unworthy. But while it is quite probable that St Mark did end his days as bishop of Alexandria, we can put no confidence in the “acts” of his supposed martyrdom. These are briefly summarized in the notice which still stands in the Roman Martyrology:
“At Alexandria, the birthday of St Mark the Evangelist, who was the disciple and interpreter of Peter the Apostle. He was sent for to Rome by the brethren and there wrote a gospel, and having finished it, went into Egypt. He was the first to preach Christ at Alexandria and formed a church there. Later he was arrested for his faith in Christ, bound with cords and grievously tortured by being dragged over stones. Then, while shut up in prison, he was comforted by the visit of an angel, and finally, after our Lord Himself had appeared to him, he was called to the heavenly kingdom in the eighth year of Nero.”
The city of Venice claims to possess the body of St Mark which is supposed to have been brought there from Alexandria early in the ninth century. The authenticity of the remains preserved for so many hundred years has not passed unquestioned, and in any case it may be doubted whether the percolation of water, which for long periods rendered the subterranean confessio where they repose quite inaccessible, has not wrought irreparable damage to the frail contents of the shrine. It is certain, however, that St Mark has been honoured from time immemorial as principal patron of the city. St Mark’s emblem, the lion, like the emblems of the other evangelists, is of very ancient date. Already in the time of St Augustine and St Jerome, “the four living creatures” of Apoc. iv 7—8 were held to be typical of the evangelists, and these holy doctors were reduced to tracing a connection between St Mark and his lion by the consideration that St Mark’s Gospel begins with a mention of the desert and that the lion is lord of the desert.
On St Mark’s day are celebrated the litaniae majores, but it should be pointed out that this solemn procession, formerly associated with a fast, has no connection of origin with the festival of the holy evangelist. It is not improbable that the litaniae majores date back in Rome to the time of St Gregory the Great or even earlier, whereas the liturgical recognition of St Mark on this day was only introduced at a much later period. There can be no reasonable doubt, as Mgr Duchesne long ago pointed out, that the ceremony and prayers of the litany (i.e. supplications) are no more than the christianized adaptation of the Robigalia occurring on the same day, which are commemorated in Ovid’s Fasti. Of this pagan procession and lustration something has been said under Candlemas day, February 2.
In the martyrologies and liturgical tradition of both East and West, Mark the Evangelist and John Mark are regarded as being separate persons. John Mark is in the Greek Menaon on September 27, and on the same date the Roman Martyrology has: “At Byblos in Phoenicia, St Mark the bishop, who by blessed Luke is also called John and who was the son of that blessed Mary whose memory is noted on June 29”. That he became a bishop at Byblos or elsewhere is a tradition of the Greeks, from whom the West acquired it.

The so-called “acts” and other apocryphal documents connected with St Mark are printed in the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. iii see also September, vol. vii. The text of the passio of St Barnabas attributed to John Mark will be found in the same collection in the second volume for June, under Barnabas, and it has also been edited by Tischendorf in his Acta Apostolorum Apocrypha, vol. iii, pp. 292 seq. See further the Dictionnaire de Ia Bible and DTC., under Marc”; and amongst non-Catholic contributions to the subject the introduction to St Mark’s Gospel by C. H. Turner in Bishop Gore’s New Commentary on Holy Scripture (1928) may be specially recommended, as well as the article by F. Chase in Hastings’s Dictionary of the Bible. For the relics of St Mark at Venice cf. G. Pavanello, in the Rivista della Città di Venezia, August, 1928; and Moroni, Dizionario di Erudizione, vol. xc, pp. 265—268.

St. Mark April 25, 2007 
Most of what we know about Mark comes directly from the New Testament. He is usually identified with the Mark of Acts 12:12. (When Peter escaped from prison, he went to the home of Mark's mother.)
Paul and Barnabas took him along on the first missionary journey, but for some reason Mark returned alone to Jerusalem. It is evident, from Paul's refusal to let Mark accompany him on the second journey despite Barnabas's insistence, that Mark had displeased Paul. Later, Paul asks Mark to visit him in prison so we may assume the trouble did not last long.

The oldest and the shortest of the four Gospels, the Gospel of Mark emphasizes Jesus' rejection by humanity while being God's triumphant envoy. Probably written for Gentile converts in Rome—after the death of Peter and Paul sometime between A.D. 60 and 70—Mark's Gospel is the gradual manifestation of a "scandal": a crucified Messiah.
Evidently a friend of Mark (Peter called him "my son"), Peter is only one of the Gospel sources, others being the Church in Jerusalem (Jewish roots) and the Church at Antioch (largely Gentile).
Like one other Gospel writer, Luke, Mark was not one of the 12 apostles. We cannot be certain whether he knew Jesus personally. Some scholars feel that the evangelist is speaking of himself when describing the arrest of Jesus in Gethsemane: "Now a young man followed him wearing nothing but a linen cloth about his body. They seized him, but he left the cloth behind and ran off naked" (Mark 14:51-52).
Others hold Mark to be the first bishop of Alexandria, Egypt. Venice, famous for the Piazza San Marco, claims Mark as its patron saint; the large basilica there is believed to contain his remains.

A winged lion is Mark's symbol. The lion derives from Mark's description of John the Baptist as a "voice of one crying out in the desert" (Mark 1:3), which artists compared to a roaring lion. The wings come from the application of Ezekiel's vision of four winged creatures (Ezekiel, chapter one) to the evangelists.
Comment:    Mark fulfilled in his life what every Christian is called to do: proclaim to all people the Good News that is the source of salvation. In particular, Mark's way was by writing. Others may proclaim the Good News by music, drama, poetry or by teaching children around a family table.
Quote:    There is very little in Mark that is not in the other Gospels—only four passages. One is: “...This is how it is with the kingdom of God; it is as if a man were to scatter seed on the land and would sleep and rise night and day and the seed would sprout and grow, he knows not how. Of its own accord the land yields fruit, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. And when the grain is ripe, he wields the sickle at once, for the harvest has come” (Mark 4:26-29).

75 Mark, Evangelist according to Papias, "he had neither heard the Lord, nor ever been his disciple, but later had attended Peter, who composed his teachings to suit the needs of the moment, but did not profess to make a regular collection of the Lord's sayings. And so Mark made no mistakes; writing down the particulars just as he remembered them."(RM)
The Holy Disciple and Evangelist Mark, named also John-Mark (Acts 12: 12), was a Disciple from among the Seventy, and was also a nephew of the Disciple Barnabas (Comm. 11 June). He was born at Jerusalem. The house of his mother Mary adjoined the Garden of Gethsemane. As Church Tradition relates, on the night of the Sufferings of Christ on the Cross he followed after Him, wrapped in a linen winding-cloth, and he fled from the soldiers catching hold of him (Mk. 14: 51-52). After the Ascension of the Lord, the house of his mother Saint Mary became a place of prayerful gatherings of Christians and a lodging for certain of the Apostles (Acts 12: 12).
      Saint Mark was a very close companion of the Apostles Peter and Paul (Comm. 29 June) and of the Disciple Barnabas. Saint Mark was at Seleucia together with Paul and Barnabas, and from there he set off to the island of Cyprus, and he crossed over the whole of it from East to West.
In the city of Paphos Saint Mark was an eye-witness, of how Apostle Paul had struck blind sorcerer Elymas (Acts 13: 6-12).

After working with the Apostle Paul, Saint Mark returned to Jerusalem, and then with the Apostle Peter he arrived in Rome, from whence at the latter's bidding he set out for Egypt, where he became founder of the Church. During time of the second evangelic journey of the Apostle Paul, Saint Mark met up with him at Antioch. From there he set out preaching with the Disciple Barnabas to Cyprus, and then he went off again to Egypt, where together with the Apostle Peter he founded many churches, and then also at Babylon. From this city the Apostle Peter directed an Epistle to the Christians of Asia Minor, in which he points to Saint Mark as his spiritual son (1 Pet. 5: 13).  When the Apostle Paul came in chains to Rome, the Disciple Mark was at Ephesus, where the cathedra-seat was occupied by Saint Timothy (Comm. 4 January). The Disciple Mark arrived together with him in Rome. There also he wrote his holy Gospel (c. 62-63).
   From Rome Saint Mark again set off to Egypt. At Alexandria he made the beginnings of a Christian school, from which later on emerged such famous fathers and teachers of the Church, as Clement of Alexandria, Sainted Dionysios (5 October), Sainted Gregory Thaumatourgos ("Wonderworker", Comm. 5 November), and others. Zealous with the arranging of Church Divine-services, the holy Disciple Mark compiled the order of Liturgy for the Alexandrian Christians.  Later on in preaching the Gospel, Saint Mark also visited the inner regions of Africa, and he was in Libya at Nektopolis.
During the time of these journeys, Saint Mark received inspiration of the Holy Spirit to go again to Alexandria and confront the pagans.
There he visited at the home of the dignitary Ananias, for whom he healed a crippled hand. The dignitary happily took him in, hearkened with faith to his narratives, and received Baptism. And following the example of Ananias, many of the inhabitants of that part of the city where he lived were baptised after him. This roused the enmity of the pagans, and they gathered to kill Saint Mark. Having learned of this, the holy Disciple Mark made Ananias bishop, and the three Christians: Malchos, Sabinos and Kerdinos – presbyters.
The pagans pounced upon Saint Mark when he was making Divine-services. They beat him, dragged him through the streets and threw him in prison. There Saint Mark was granted a vision of the Lord Jesus Christ, Who strengthened him before his sufferings. On the following day the angry crowd again dragged the holy disciple through the streets towards the court-room, but along the way Saint Mark died with the words: "Into Thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit".

The pagans wanted to burn the body of the holy disciple. But when they lit up the bon-fire, everything grew dim, thunder crashed and an earthquake occurred. The pagans fled in terror, and Christians took up the body of the holy disciple and buried it in a stone crypt.
This was on 4 April in the year 63. The Church celebrates his memory on 25 April.

In the year 310, a church was built over the relics of the holy Disciple Mark. In the year 820, when the Mahometan Arabs had established their rule in Egypt and those of this different faith oppressed the Christian Church, the relics of Saint Mark were transferred to Venice and placed in the church of his name.
In the ancient iconographic tradition, which adopted symbols for the holy Evangelists borrowed from the vision of Saint John the Theologian (Rev. 4: 7), the holy Evangelist Mark is depicted by a lion – symbolising the might and royal dignity of Christ (Rev. 5: 5). Saint Mark wrote his Gospel for Christians from among the gentile-pagans, since he emphasises predominantly the words and deeds of the Saviour, in which particularly is manifest His Divine Almightiness. The many particularities of his account can be explained by his proximity to the holy Apostle Peter. All the ancient writers testify, that the Gospel of Mark represents a concise writing-down of the preaching and narratives of the first-ranked Apostle Peter. One of the central theological themes in the Gospel of Saint Mark is the theme of the power of God, doing the humanly impossible, wherein the Lord makes possible that which of man is impossible. By the efficacy of Christ (Mk. 16: 20) and the Holy Spirit (Mk. 13: 11), His disciples are to go forth into the world and preach the Gospel to all creatures (Mk. 13: 10, 16: 15).© 1996-2001 by translator Fr. S. Janos.
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)

St. Mark (John Mark) 2nd Gospel before year 60 Greek for Christian Gentile converts St. Paul St. Barnabas associates (who was Mark's cousin) Patron of notaries.
St. Mark

The second Gospel was written by St. Mark, who, in the New Testament, is sometimes called John Mark. Both he and his mother, Mary, were highly esteemed in the early Church, and his mother's house in Jerusalem served as a meeting place for Christians there.  St. Mark was associated with St. Paul and St. Barnabas (who was Mark's cousin) on their missionary journey through the island of Cyprus. Later he accompanied St. Barnabas alone. We know also that he was in Rome with St. Peter and St. Paul. Tradition ascribes to him the founding of the Church in Alexandria.
St. Mark wrote the second Gospel, probably in Rome sometime before the year 60 A.D.; he wrote it in Greek for the Gentile converts to Christianity. Tradition tells us that St. Mark was requested by the Romans to set down the teachings of St. Peter. This seems to be confirmed by the position which St. Peter has in this Gospel. In this way the second Gospel is a record of the life of Jesus as seen through the eyes of the Prince of the Apostles.

The Holy Apostle and Evangelist Mark, also known as John Mark (Acts 12:12), was one of the Seventy Apostles, and was also a nephew of St Barnabas (June 11). He was born at Jerusalem. The house of his mother Mary adjoined the Garden of Gethsemane. As Church Tradition relates, on the night that Christ was betrayed he followed after Him, wrapped only in a linen cloth. He was seized by soldiers, and fled away naked, leaving the cloth behind (Mark 14:51-52). After the Ascension of the Lord, the house of his mother Mary became a place where Christians gathered, and a place of lodging for some of the Apostles (Acts 12:12).

St Mark was a very close companion of the Apostles Peter and Paul (June 29) and Barnabas. St Mark was at Seleucia with Paul and Barnabas, and from there he set off to the island of Cyprus, and he traversed the whole of it from east to west. In the city of Paphos, St Mark witnessed the blinding of the sorcerer Elymas by St Paul (Acts 13:6-12). 
After working with the Apostle Paul, St Mark returned to Jerusalem, and then went to Rome with the Apostle Peter. From there, he set out for Egypt, where he established a local Church.  St Mark met St Paul in Antioch. From there he went with St Barnabas to Cyprus, and then he went to Egypt again, where he and St Peter founded many churches. Then he went to Babylon. From this city the Apostle Peter sent an Epistle to the Christians of Asia Minor, in which he calls St Mark his son (1 Pet 5:13).

When the Apostle Paul came to Rome in chains, St Mark was at Ephesus, where St Timothy (January 4) was bishop. St Mark went with him to Rome. There he also wrote his holy Gospel (ca. 62-63).
From Rome St Mark traveled to Egypt. In Alexandria he started a Christian school, which later produced such famous Fathers and teachers of the Church as Clement of Alexandria, St Dionysius of Alexandria (October 5), St Gregory Thaumatourgos (November 5), and others. Zealous for Church services, St Mark composed a Liturgy for the Christians of Alexandria.
St Mark preached the Gospel in the inner regions of Africa, and he was in Libya at Nektopolis.

During these journeys, St Mark was inspired by the Holy Spirit to go again to Alexandria and confront the pagans. There he visited the home of Ananias, and healed his crippled hand. The dignitary happily took him in, listened to his words, and received Baptism.
Following the example of Ananias, many of the inhabitants of that part of the city where he lived were also baptized. This roused the enmity of the pagans, and they wanted to kill St Mark. Having learned of this, St Mark made Ananias a bishop, and the three Christians Malchos, Sabinos, and Kerdinos were ordained presbyters to provide the church with leadership after his death.
The pagans seized St Mark when he was serving the Liturgy. They beat him, dragged him through the streets and threw him in prison. There St Mark was granted a vision of the Lord Jesus Christ, Who strengthened him before his sufferings. On the following day, the angry crowd again dragged the saint through the streets to the courtroom, but along the way St Mark died saying, "Into Your hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit."

The pagans wanted to burn the saint's body, but when they lit the fire, everything grew dark, thunder crashed, and there was an earthquake. The pagans fled in terror, and Christians took up the body of St Mark and buried it in a stone crypt. This was on April 4, 63. The Church celebrates his memory on April 25.

In the year 310, a church was built over the relics of St Mark. In 820, when the Moslem Arabs had established their rule in Egypt and oppressed the Christian Church, the relics of St Mark were transferred to Venice and placed in the church named for him.  In the ancient iconographic tradition, which adopted symbols for the holy Evangelists borrowed from the vision of St John the Theologian (Rev 4:7) and the prophecy of Ezekiel (Ez. 1:10), the holy Evangelist Mark is represented by a lion, symbolizing the might and royal dignity of Christ (Rev 5:5).

St Mark wrote his Gospel for Gentile Christians, emphasizing the words and deeds of the Savior which reveal His divine Power. Many aspects of his account can be explained by his closeness to St Peter. The ancient writers say that the Gospel of Mark is a concise record of St Peter's preaching.
One of the central theological themes in the Gospel of St Mark is the power of God achieving what is humanly impossible. The Apostles performed remarkable miracles with Christ (Mark 16:20) and the Holy Spirit (Mark 13:11) working through them. His disciples were told to go into the world and preach the Gospel to all creatures (Mark 13:10, 16:15), and that is what they did.
1st v. St Anianus Bishop St Mark shoemaker aide great fervor and virtue
Item Alexandríæ sancti Aniáni Epíscopi, qui, beáti Marci discípulus ejúsque in Episcopátu succéssor, clarus virtútibus quiévit in Dómino.
    Also at Alexandria, Bishop St. Anian, disciple of blessed Mark, and his successor in the episcopate.  With a great renown for virtue, he rested in the Lord.
1st v. ST ANIANUS, BISHOP OF ALEXANDRIA
ACCORDING to the so-called “Acts of St Mark”, St Anianus, the second bishop of Alexandria, had been a shoemaker, whose hand, wounded by an awl, had been healed by the evangelist at his first entrance into the city. Other writers, on the other hand, assert that St Anianus was an Alexandrian of noble family. He is said to have been consecrated bishop in order that he might govern during the absence of St Mark, whom he afterwards succeeded. Eusebius speaks of him as “a man well pleasing to God and admirable in all things”, and Epiphanius mentions a church in Alexandria built in his honour.

See the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. iii.

In the apocryphal Acts of Mark, Anianus is described as the second bishop of Alexandria, Egypt. Mark states that Anianus was originally a shoemaker.
Other lists refer to Anianus as a noble who was consecrated by Mark and named to succeed him.

Anianus of Alexandria B (RM) 1st century. According to Eusebius and the apocryphal acta of Saint Mark, Anianus was a shoemaker by trade. He was converted to Christianity and became a disciple of Saint Mark when he was healed of an awl wound. His fervor and virtue were so great that Mark appointed Anianus as his vicar during his absence and upon Mark's death Anianus succeeded him as bishop of Alexandria for 18 years and seven months.
Other sources have him a noble who was named bishop by Mark. Saint Epiphanius mentions a church in Alexandria built in the honor of Anianus (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
63 {75 }Mark, Evangelist according to Papias, "he had neither heard the Lord, nor ever been his disciple, but later had attended Peter, who composed his teachings to suit the needs of the moment, but did not profess to make a regular collection of the Lord's sayings. And so Mark made no mistakes; writing down the particulars just as he remembered them."(RM)
Alexandríæ natális beáti Marci Evangelístæ.  Hic, discípulus et intérpres Apóstoli Petri, rogátus Romæ a frátribus scripsit Evangélium, quo assúmpto, perréxit in Ægyptum, primúsque Alexandríæ Christum annúntians, constítuit Ecclésiam; ac póstea, pro fide Christi tentus, fúnibus vinctus et per saxa raptátus, gráviter afflíctus est; deínde, reclúsus in cárcere, primo angélica visitatióne confortátus est, et demum, ipso Dómino sibi apparénte, ad cæléstia regna vocátus, octávo Nerónis anno.
    At Alexandria, the birthday of St. Mark the Evangelist, disciple and interpreter of the apostle St. Peter.  He wrote his gospel at the request of the faithful at Rome, and taking it with him, proceeded to Egypt and founded a church at Alexandria, where he was the first to preach Christ.  Afterwards, being arrested for the faith, he was bound, dragged over stones, and endured great afflictions.  Finally he was confined to prison, where, being comforted by the visit of an angel, and even by an apparition of our Lord himself, he was called to the heavenly kingdom in the eighth year of the reign of Nero.
feast day in the East is September 23; feast of the translation of his relics to Venice is celebrated on January 31.

Among the younger figures of the New Testament is John Mark (Acts 12:25), mentioned several times in the New Testament. Of the four Gospels his is the most vivid and informal because it was probably the first recorded (AD 60-70). In some ways it is the most descriptive Gospel, yet he writes as though it had to be done quickly.

Papias, bishop of Hierapolis, Asia Minor, called him the interpreter of Peter, c. 130, and said that he preached the gospel in Alexandria. An ancient tradition had the Gospel written down in Rome for Gentile Christians.
He recorded the story of Jesus as he heard it from the lips of Saint Peter. "For," according to Papias, "he had neither heard the Lord, nor ever been his disciple, but later had attended Peter, who composed his teachings to suit the needs of the moment, but did not profess to make a regular collection of the Lord's sayings. And so Mark made no mistakes; writing down the particulars just as he remembered them."
Mark's Gospel is written in awkward Greek, full of Semitic turns of phrases, cumbersome participles, and a lack of transitions. Yet Mark's simple language, stripped of rhetorical flourishes, without oratorical periods, without concern for syntax, is perhaps the clearest language through which to see best the flesh and blood of Jesus. The miracles of Jesus must have deeply affected Mark because his Gospel recounts many of them.
In order to demonstrate Jesus's divinity to the Romans, Mark skillfully shows Jesus as a worker of miracles rather than Jesus fulfilling prophecies that would be unknown to his intended readers.


Saint Mark Image of Saint Mark courtesy of Saint Charles Borromeo Church
Mark's Gospel starkly sets out the demands of Jesus on his followers.  Jesus had suffered, says Mark; His followers will suffer similarly.
Indeed, Jesus had explicitly warned the disciples about this. But it is also clear that those who can endure such sufferings will be greatly rewarded, for what Mark claims to be bringing is 'good news,' 'the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God,' as he states in the very first verse.

Another early historian, Eusebius, reporting the words of Saint Clement of Alexandria says that Saint Mark, a follower of Saint Peter, was asked by Roman tradesmen to compose a permanent memorial of Saint Peter's sermons, and so came to write, from his memory of them, the Gospel which bears his name.

Saint Ireneaus also tells us that Mark was Saint Peter's interpreter and mouthpiece.
Saint Mark was a cousin of Barnabas (Col. 4:10). His mother, Mary, was evidently a person of some wealth and position in Jerusalem, for her home was a center of hospitality to which the leaders of the early Church naturally gravitated.
When Saint Peter escaped from prison, he came "to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose surname was Mark; where many were gathered together praying," and it was a maid of the house, called Rhoda, who answered the door.

Mark was probably a Levite, because we know that his kinsman Barnabas was one (Acts 4:36), and perhaps a minor minister in the synagogue.
He accompanied Paul and Barnabas to Antioch in AD 44 (Acts 12:25), then to Salamis in Cyprus, and with Barnabas was on Paul's first missionary journey (Acts 13:5), but left Paul at Perga in Pamphylia and returned alone to Jerusalem (Acts 13:13).
For some reason he evidently offended Paul, who did not take him on his second missionary journey to Cilicia and Asia Minor, which was the occasion of the disagreement and separation of Paul and Barnabas (Acts 15:36-40).

Mark accompanied Barnabas to Cyprus (Acts 15:39) and then, evidently back in Paul's good graces, was with him in Rome during his first imprisonment (Col. 4:10), where he was apparently a disciple of Peter, who affectionately called him "my son, Mark" (1 Peter 5:13).

During Paul's second Roman captivity, shortly before his martyrdom, he writes to Timothy, who was at Ephesus, to "take Mark and bring him with you, for he is profitable to me for the ministry" (2 Timothy 4:11).
An early uncertain tradition, recorded by Eusebius, renders Mark the first bishop of Alexandria, but neither Papias nor Clement of Alexandria mentions it.
The tradition says that upon his arrival in Alexandria, like Paul arriving in Damascus, Mark found lodging with an inhabitant, in this case with a shoemaker. The shoemaker was also to become a saint, whose feast is celebrated today-- Anianus.
Tradition continues that Mark was martyred during the reign of Emperor Trajan or the "eighth year of Nero," and the shoemaker Anianus succeeded him as bishop.

One Easter Sunday, the uncertain tradition continues, April 24, 68, Mark was arrested. The long path of Jesus, from Gethsemani up to the palace of Anna, which Mark had not had the courage to pursue in Jerusalem, had been reserved for him, with a rope around his neck, from Alexandria up to the little port of Bucoles.
Tintoretto The Stealing of the Dead Body of St. Mark
Tintoretto, Galleria dell'Accademia, Venice Electronic image from Web Gallery of Art

He fell several times along the way. Finally, after having carried his rope all day and then for a night, and feeling it sink into his flesh, in the end he no longer desired that it be removed. He wanted to find this collar to his measure, this light yoke--and died strangled.

In the East, John Mark is believed to be a separate person who became bishop of Biblios and whose feast is celebrated on September 27.

Regardless of Papias's remarks that Mark never knew our Lord, there is speculation that he would have been acquainted with Jesus. He may have been the unnamed youth (mentioned only in Saint Mark's Gospel 14:51-52) who appeared at the time of the Betrayal, wrapped in a sheet, as if he had come straight from his bed, and who, when caught, escaped into the night (this has always been curious to me).
It is likely enough that Saint Mark, as a boy, had been drawn to the scene, but it is only a conjecture.

Other Scripture scholars note that the Last Supper may have occurred in the room reserved in Mark's mother's house for pilgrims, and that the Garden of Gethsamane belonged to the family. It would have been common enough for one of the family members or servants to sleep in the garden as a protection against thieves, which would explain the boy sleeping in the open (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Gill, Walsh, White).
Tintoretto
By the 2nd century after Christ, Christians transferred the emblem to the four Evangelists (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) in written allusions. These became visual symbols in the 5th century.

Saint Mark is the patron of Venice, to where his relics were reputedly brought in the 9th century from Alexandria. Although the original church of St. Mark in Venice was destroyed in 976, the rebuilt basilica contains both the relics and a magnificent series of mosaics on Mark's life, death, and translation. These date from the 12th-13th centuries and form a unique record (Farmer). He is also the patron of Egypt, glaziers, notaries, secretaries, and Spanish cattle breeders (for which there is no obvious explanation). He is invoked by captives (Roeder, White).The Miracle of St. Mark Freeing the Slave Tintoretto, Galleria dell'Accademia, Venice Electronic image from Web Gallery of Art
In art, Saint Mark is an evangelist with a book or scroll and a winged lion. At times he may be shown (1) with palm and book (sometimes pax tibi Marce is written on his book); (2) as a bishop with his throne decorated with lions; (3) coming to the aid of Venetian sailors; or (4) rescuing Christian slaves from the Saracens (Roeder).

The winged lion is used as Saint Mark's emblem. This is one of the four winged creatures of Ezekiel 1:10; 10:14 that were first applied by Jewish scholars to the four archangels (Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, and Uriel) with reference to and later used in reference to the four major prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel). Traditionally, it is explained that the winged lion is chosen for Mark because his gospel speaks of the royal dignity of Christ, and because he begins his account of Saint John the Baptist with the "voice crying is the desert" (Appleton).
150 St. Philo and Agathopodes Antiochene deacons authored Acts recounting life and death of St. Ignatius of Antioch
Antiochíæ sanctórum Philónis et Agathópodis Diaconórum, de quibus beátus Ignátius, Epíscopus et Martyr, laudábilem in suis epístolis mentiónem facit.
    At Antioch, the deacons Saints Philo and Agathopodes, who were praised in the letters of blessed Ignatius, bishop and martyr.
St. Philo and Agathopodes are believed to have authored the Acts recounting the life and death of St. Ignatius of Antioch. They were deacons who assisted Ignatius and, after his martyrdom in Rome, brought back to Antioch those relics they could recover from Roman authorities.
Evodius, Hermogenes & Callistus MM (RM)
Syracúsis, in Sicília, sanctórum Mártyrum fratrum Evódii, Hermógenis et Callístæ.
    At Syracuse in Sicily, the holy martyrs Evodius, Hermogenes, and Callista.
The Roman Martyrology mentions this group three times. On August 2, they are given as the three sons of Theodota, martyred at Nicaea in Bithynia. On the other two dates their martyrdom is placed at Syracuse, and in each of these places, the third name is given as Callista, indicating a sister and not a third brother. There is no passio of the martyrs of Syracuse, and it is possible that they suffered at Nicaea (Benedictines).
Martyr with Callistaes, and Hermogenes, possibly the three sons of Theodota. They were martyred in Nicaea, Bithynia. Some confusion results from contradictory evidence — in some traditions they are venerated on August 2, and in other traditions their martyrdom is listed in Syracuse, Italy. In yet other lists the third victim is listed as Callistus.

300 Theophilus of Caesarea M (RM).
According to the apocryphal life of Saint Dorothy, Theophilus is the lawyer who mocked her on her way to martyrdom. She sent him apples and flowers 'from the heavenly garden' and he was converted to Christianity. He himself was beheaded at Caesarea, Cappadocia, several years later, perhaps with Saturninus and Revocat
a (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).
312 Saturninus, Theophilus & Revocata MM (RM)
A group of martyrs concerning whom place of martyrdom is not  known (Benedictines).
Silvanus, Luke, and Mucius MM (RM). Bishop Silvanus of Emesa, Phoenicia, his deacon Luke, and his lector Mucius were martyred under Maximian following a long imprisonment. The Roman Martyrology identifies this Silvanus with the companion of Tyrannio (Benedictines).
Antiochíæ sancti Stéphani, Epíscopi et Mártyris, qui ab hæréticis Synodum Chalcedonénsem impugnántibus, multa passus, in Oróntem flúvium præcipitátus est, témpore Zenónis Imperatóris.
    At Antioch, St. Stephen, bishop and martyr, who suffered a great deal from the heretics opposed to the Council of Chalcedon, and was cast into the river Orontes, in the time of Emperor Zeno.

4th v. Kebius preached conversion in Cornwall B (AC).
4th century. Saint Kebius was ordained bishop by Saint Hilary (315-368) of Poitiers, and, returning into his own country, preached conversion in Cornwall (Husenbeth).
392 St. Phaebadius one of “the illustrious men” of the Church extirpated Arianism heresy
Also called Fiari, bishop of Agen in Southern Gaul.
He was a very well known bishop and was termed by St. Jerome one of “the illustrious men” of the Church.
With his friend St. Hilary of Poitiers, he worked to extirpate the heresy of Arianism in the West.
480 St. Macedonius Patriarch of Constantinople Council of Chalcedon defener
He was exiled by the Arians for his
defense of the Council of Chalcedon.
489 St. Macaille Bishop of Croghan prelate vows of St. Brigid
Offaly, Ireland, a disciple of St. Mel (488-490). He was one of the prelates receiving the vows of St. Brigid (450-525).
Macaille of Croghan B (AC) (also known as Macculi, Macull). The sources say that there are two bishops whose feasts fall on the same day named Macaille (the second one actually has his feast on April 27). One was a disciple of Saint Patrick, and the other was only converted by him (though the stories do not indicate that either was really a disciple, per se, of Patrick).
   Today's Macaille was a disciple of Saint Mel and assisted him in receiving the vow of Saint Brigid. There is a tradition that Mel erred in using the service for the consecration of a bishop, and that Macaille strongly protested. Saint Mel refused to admit he was wrong and said that it was all the will of God. This Macaille became the first bishop of Croghan, Offaly.

A third gentleman, sometimes known as Saint Maccai, was also a disciple of Saint Patrick and is venerated on the isle of Bute (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth, Montague).
  5th v. Mun of Lough Ree hermit another nephew of Saint Patrick B (AC).
Described as another nephew of Saint Patrick, who consecrated him bishop of what is now County Longford.
He ended days as  hermit on an island in Lough Ree (Benedictines).
  5th v. Dyfnan  saintly son of Welsh chieftain Brychan (AC).
One of the many saintly sons of the Welsh chieftain Brychan, Saint Dyfnan founded a church at Anglesey (Benedictines).
  525 Deodatus of Blois, Abbot (AC).
Deodatus was either a hermit or an abbot in the area of Blois.
At a later period the town of Saint-Dié grew up around his cell or monastery (Benedictines).
539 Vedast of Arras holy from childhood instrumental in the conversion of Clovis I to Christianity B (AC)
(also known as Foster, Gaston, Vat, Vaast, Waast) Born in western France, died February 6, 539; other feasts at Arras are celebrated Feb 06, July 15 and October 1.

539   ST VEDAST, OR VAAST, BISHOP OF ARRAS
   ST VEDAST was very young when he left his own province, which seems to have been in the west of France. His aim was to live concealed from the world in the diocese of Toul, but there he came under the notice of the bishop who, recognizing his qualities, promoted him to the priesthood. When Clovis I, King of France, returning from his victory over the Alemanni, was hastening to Rheims to be baptized, he asked at Toul for some priest to accompany him on his journey and to prepare him. Vedast was presented to the monarch for that purpose. His biographers tell how, as they were about to cross the Aisne, a blind beggar on the bridge besought the saint to restore his sight. St Vedast prayed and made the sign of the cross on his eyes and immediately the power of vision was given back to him.
   This miracle confirmed the king in the faith and converted several of the courtiers.
   St Vedast assisted St Remigius (Rémi) in instructing the Franks until that prelate consecrated him bishop of Arras that he might re-establish the faith where it had died out.  Entering the city in 499, he restored sight to a blind man and cured one who was lame. These miracles disposed the hearts of many unbelievers to accept the Gospel, which had suffered much from the inroads of the northern marauders.
   Vedast could find no traces of Christianity except the ruins of a church where, within the memory of certain old people, Christians had worshipped.  St  Vedast found the people boorish and obstinate, but he persevered, and in the  end we are told he succeeded in restoring Christianity throughout the land.
         He laboured nearly forty years, and left his church at his death in a flourishing condition.
           There are two ancient lives of St Vedast, one seemingly by St Jonas of Bobbio, the other
         by Alcuin. Both will be found in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. i, and in MGH.,
         Scriptores Merov., vol. iii. See also L. Van der Essen, Saints Merovingiens (1907); and
         W. S. Simpson, Life and Legend of St Vedast (1896); and E. Guilbert, St Vaast .
         (1938). Two English medieval churches were dedicated under the name of St Vedast,
         one of which is in London in
Foster  Lane.

   When he was still very young, Vedast had left his home and led a holy life concealed from the world in the diocese of Toul, where the bishop, charmed with his virtue, consecrated him to the priesthood. Vedast, a fellow-worker with Saint Remigius in the conversion of the Franks, was instrumental in the conversion of Clovis I to Christianity.
The occasion of Clovis's conversion was a victory over the Alemanni in 496.
   He had already been influenced by Saint Clothilde, whom he had married four years earlier.
After his victory, he was heading to Rheims to receive baptism at the hands of Remigius, but at Toul he requested the help of a priest who might instruct and prepare him for the holy sacrament as he travelled. Vedast was presented to his majesty for this purpose.
When Vedast restored the sight of a blind man along the Aisne River with a prayer and the sign of the cross, Clovis was strengthened in his resolve to become a Christian and some of his courtiers converted immediately.

After being consecrated in 499 as bishop of Arras (united with Cambrai in 510) by Remigius, Vedast ruled the united sees of Arras- Cambrai for about 40 years. Upon his arrival in Arras, he restored sight to a blind man, and cured another who was lame. These miracles excited the attention, and disposed the hearts of many to open themselves to receive the Gospel. Although the region had been Christianized during the Roman occupation, the repeated incursion of Vandals and Alans had virtually destroyed any remnant of the faith. At the beginning of episcopacy, the only vestige of Christianity in his see was a ruined church. Though nearly discouraged at the ravages done to the faith, Vedast's patience, meekness, charity, and most especially prayers, allowed God to triumph over superstition and lust, and the faith was restored throughout that area.

Vedast was buried in the cathedral, but 128 years later Bishop Saint Aubertus changed a little chapel which Vedast had built in honor of St. Peter into an abbey, and translated the Vedast's relics into this new church, leaving a small portion of them in the cathedral. The great abbey of Saint Vedast was finished by Bishop Saint Vindicianus and endowed by king Theodoric or Thierry, who lies buried in the church with his wife Doda.

Many sites through Arras, Cambrai, and Belgium commemorate his name, as do three ancient church in England (in London, Norwich, and Tathwell in Lincolnshire). Although it is unlikely that Vedast ever visited England, his cultus there dates to the 10th century, which was heightened in the 12th century by the presence of Arrouaise Augustinians in the country. In England, he is sometimes known as Saint Foster, which is the derivation of that family name.

The feast of Vedast was included in the Benedictional of Saint Ethelwold, the Missal of Robert of JumiŠges, and the Leofric missal, as well as the calendars of Sarum, York, and Hereford. Blessed Alcuin wrote a vita for Vedast, as well as an Office and Mass in his honor for usage at Arras. In a letter to the monks of Arras in 769, Alcuin calls Vedast his protector (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).

As in the stained glass image in the church of Blythburgh, Suffolk, Saint Vedast is pictured as a bishop with a wolf carrying a goose in its mouth (Roeder) (which had been rescued by Vedast for its poor owners). Other attributes include a child at his feet or a bear (Farmer). He is invoked on behalf of children who walk with difficulty, and for diseases of the eyes (Roeder).

7th v. Authaire of La Ferté courtier at King Dagobert Ipalace France (AC)

(also known as Oye) 7th century. Saint Authaire was a courtier at the palace of King Dagobert I of France and father of Saint Ouen of Rouen. He is the patron of the village of Le- Ferté-sous-Jouarre, where he usually resided (Benedictines).
7th v. Bova (Beuve, Bona) abbess & Doda rejected marriage proposals she  devote to service of God OSB VV (RM)

7th century. Saint Bova, sister of Saint Balderic (Baudry) and near relative of King Dagobert, edified the royal court and entire kingdom by her virtues. She rejected all marriage proposals because she decided to devote herself to the service of God. After her brother founded Montfauçon Abbey, in 639 he built a convent near Rheims, where Bova ruled as abbess until her death c. 680.

Her niece Doda followed in her footsteps and succeeded her as abbess. The relics of both saints were later translated to Saint Peter's Abbey in Rheims. Although their original vitae were destroyed in a fire, a later writer recorded the traditions related by the nuns in the 10th century (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
729 Egbert of Rathemigisi Northumbrian monk of Lindisfarne OSB (RM)

Saint Egbert was a Northumbrian monk of Lindisfarne who migrated to Ireland and lived at Rathelmigisi (Rathmelsigi) in Connaught. In 684, he unsuccessfully tried to dissuade King Egfrith from invading Ireland. At Rathelmigisi Egbert trained several bands of monks for the German missions that included Saints Wigbert and Willibrord. When his companion Æthelhun died of the plague and he contracted it, too, Egbert vowed voluntary exile for life if he recovered. Although he wanted to join the missionaries, his vow and a vision instructing him otherwise, led Egbert to become an admirable monk on the island of Iona in Scotland. There he attempted to induce the monks to adopt Roman liturgical practices. He succeeded at last: in fact, on the day of his death, Easter was celebrated at Iona for the first time according to the Roman reckoning. Egbert's feast is found in both the Roman and Irish martyrologies and in the metrical calendar of York (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Gill).
737 Erminus of Lobbes practicing apostolic zeal as abbot and regional bishop OSB B (RM)
Láubiis, in Bélgio, natális sancti Ermíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
    At Lobbes in Belgium, the birthday of St. Ermin, bishop and confessor.
(also known as Ermin, Erminon) Born in Laon; Erminus given the Benedictine habit in Laon by Saint Ursmar (713) after his ordination to the priesthood. Erminus followed in Ursmar's footsteps by practicing his apostolic zeal as abbot and regional bishop of Lobbes (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
  750 Saint Relindis of Eyck OSB, Abbess (AC).
(also known as Renildis, Renula, Renule) Relindis was educated with her sister Herlindis in the Benedictine monastery of Valenciennes. She became an expert in embroidery and painting. Saint Boniface appointed her abbess of the convent of Eyck (Maaseyk) on the Meuse, which had been founded by her parents (Benedictines).
 780 St. Mella Widow abbess.
She was the mother of St. Cannech and Tigernach, and lived in Connaught, Ireland. She became the abbess of Doire­Melle, Leitrim
Blessed Corona of Elche Benedictine nun OSB V (AC).
Date unknown. A Benedictine nun of Elche Abbey near Valencia, Spain (Benedictines).
857 Heribald of Auxerre Benedictine monk abbot love of well-regulated lives ceremonies well-built churches OSB B (AC)
857 ST HERIBALD, Bishop OF AUXERRE
AN ancient Gallican martyrology asserts of St Heribald that the light of his virtues, hidden for a time in a monastic cell, afterwards spread its rays over the whole of Gaul and drew upon him not only the love but the wonder of his contemporaries. From the abbey of St Germanus, which he ruled, he was promoted to the bishopric of Auxerre; and he enshrined in a more worthy place the body of St Germanus. The exact date of his death is uncertain.

See Mabillon, Acta Sanctorum O.S.B.., vol. iv, part a, pp. 573—578, and Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, pp. 445--446.

First as a Benedictine monk and abbot of Saint Germanus Abbey in Auxerre, then as bishop there, Saint Heribald demonstrated his love of well-regulated lives and ceremonies and well-built churches (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
891 Photius; career of scholarship and public service at the imperial court; legitimate patriarch of Constantinople Orthodox objection to doctrine of the Holy Spirit BM

Born in Constantinople, c. 810; died there c. 891; canonized by the Orthodox Church. Photius, a member of a patrician family, was a man of very great ability and learning who until mid-life followed a career of scholarship and public service at the imperial court, where he was secretary of state and filled other offices. Then, in 858, Emperor Michael III banished the patriarch Ignatius, and Photius, who until then had been a layman, was made patriarch.

From that time Photius's life is one of difficulties between himself and Pope Saint Nicholas I and his successor Adrian II, complicated by the fluctuations of Byzantine politics--a long, complex, and often obscure struggle that is a matter of ecclesiastical history. It did not end until 879 when, Ignatius being dead, Pope John VIII recognized Photius as the legitimate patriarch of Constantinople and peace was restored between the churches.

For Orthodox Catholics, Saint Photius was the standard-bearer of their church in its disagreements with the pope of Rome; to Roman Catholics, he was a proud and ambitious schismatic: the relevant work of scholars over the past generation has somewhat modified partisan judgements. All agree on the virtue of his personal life and his remarkable talents, even genius, and the wide range of his intellectual aptitudes. Pope Nicholas himself referred to his 'great virtues and universal knowledge.'

Of his extensive writings the one of most general interest is the Bibliotheca or Myriobiblion, which has been translated into English and which includes descriptions and summaries of 279 books of all kinds, including extracts from works whose original text no longer exists. His Mystagogy of the Holy Spirit is important as a classical statement of Orthodox objections to the doctrine of the Holy Spirit's proceeding from the Father and the Son (Filioque) (Attwater).
1000 St. Robert of Syracuse Benedictine abbot He headed the monastery at Syracuse, Sicily.  
1243 Blessed Boniface of Valperga monk bishop of Aosta B (PC)
Boniface, a monk of the Benedictine abbey of Fruttuaria, was chosen to be prior of the Augustinian canons regular of Saint Ursus at Aosta in 1212 and finally bishop of Aosta (1219-1243) (Benedictines).
1586 Bl. Robert Anderton, Jesuit, Cardinal, theology professor, notable figure, Catholic Reformation defended Gallileo

1586 BR. ROBERT ANDERTON AND WILLIAM MARSDEN, MARTYRS
ROBERT ANDERTON and William Marsden were two young Lancashire men who were ordained priests at Rheims and sent upon the English mission. The ship which was conveying them to England was driven out of her course to the shore of the Isle of Wight, where the passengers were obliged to disembark. Suspicion at once fell upon the two young men: they were taken before a magistrate to be questioned, and, as they did not deny that they were priests, they were sent to prison.
At their trial they protested not only that they had made a forced landing, but also that at the time of their arrest they had not been in England for the statutory period which would bring them within the scope of the penal law. Although this was actually the case, they were found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. A reprieve, however, was granted until the will of the Privy Council could be ascertained, and the prisoners were sent up to London for further examination. In the end they were executed in the Isle of Wight on April 25, 1586, their cheerful fortitude on the scaffold producing a profound impression upon all who witnessed it.
See Challoner, MMP., pp. 114—115 Burton and Pollen, LEM., vol. i, pp. 202—210. Fr Pollen in his Acts of English Martyrs, pp. 75—80, prints in full the proclamation which was posted up at the time of their execution.
   
Robert Bellarmine (1542-1621) + Cardinal, theolo­gian, and a notable figure in the Catholic Reformation. Born at Monte Pulciano, in Tuscany, Italy, he studied under the Jesuits and then entered the Society of Jesus in 1560. Ordained in 1570 at Louvain, Belgium, he served there as a professor of theology and became firmly convinced of the need for superior training in theology in order to defend Catholic doctrines prop­erly against the Protestant intellectuals in Northern Europe.
He thus departed for Rome in 1576, becoming a professor of theology at the Collegium Romanum, the newly founded Jesuit school in the Eternal City. Made a cardinal in 1599 by Pope Clement VIII (r. 1592-1605), he became the archbishop of Capua in 1602. He re­mained a leading figure in Rome and a trusted theo­logical advisor to the Holy See. In 1605, he was named head of the Vatican Library. Thus he took part in the controversy over Galileo called upon Church officials to declare the Copernican theory to be “false and erroneous,” while urging Galileo to abandon his defense of the theory because of the controversy it might create, most so with the Protestants.

From the time of his teaching at the Louvain, Robert was one of Catholicism’s most ardent defenders and a brilliant controversialist against the Protestants, providing a famous definition of the Catholic Church: “The one and true Church is the assembly of men, bound together by the profession of the same sacraments, under the rule of legitimate pastors, and in particular the see of the Vicar of Christ on earth, the Roman Pontiff.” Feast day: September 17.
1586 Bl. William Marsden &  Blessed Robert Anderson priest Martyr of England.

A native of Lancashire, he studied at Oxford and then departed the island for Reims, France, where he was ordained in 1585 with Blessed Robert Anderson. They were sent to England but were forced to land on the Isle of Wight in a storm. They were arrested, and then condemned and hanged on April 25 on Wight. Both were beatified in 1929, and share the feast.
1597 Philip of Jesus; friar; Miracles attested the power before God of these first martyrs of Japan patron of Mexico City, Mexico OFM M (RM)

(also known as Philip de las Casas Born in Mexico City, Mexico, May 1, 1571; died in Nagasaki, Japan, 1597; beatified by Pope Urban VIII; canonized by Pope Pius IX in 1862; feast day formerly February 5.

The life of Saint Philip points again to the importance of the domestic church--the family. Early in life Saint Philip ignored the pious teachings of his immigrant Spanish family, but eventually he entered the Reformed Franciscan Convent of Santa Barbara at Puebla, Mexico--and soon exited the novitiate in 1589. Grieved at the inconstancy of his son, Philip's father sent him on a business trip to the Philippines.

Like many of us, Philip sought to escape God's love in worldly pleasures but the Hound of Heaven tracked him down. Gaining courage by prayer, Philip was again able to follow his vocation, joined the convent of Our Lady of the Angels in Manila in 1590, and took his vows in 1594. The richest cargo Philip could have sent back to Mexico couldn't have pleased his father more than the message that Philip had been professed a friar. Alonso de las Casas obtained directions from the commissary of the order that Philip should be sent to Mexico to be ordained a priest.

He embarked with other religious on the Saint Philip in July 1596 but storms shipwrecked them in Japan. Amid the storm, Philip saw over Japan a white cross, in the shape used in that country, which after a time became blood-red, and remained so for some time. It was an omen of his coming victory.

The ship's captain sent Philip and two others to the emperor to gain permission for them to continue their voyage, but they could not obtain an audience. He then continued to the Franciscan house in Macao to see if they could apply pressure. In the meantime, the pilot of the Saint Philip had excited the emperor's fears of Christians, causing him to contemplate their extermination.

In December, officers seized a number of the Franciscan fathers, including Philip, three Jesuits, and several of their young pupils. When Philip had that they were to die, he responded with joy. His left ear was cut off, and he offered the first fruit of his blood to God for the salvation of Japan.

The martyrs were taken to Nagasaki, where crosses had been erected on a high hill. When Philip was led to the one on which he was to die, he knelt down, clasped it, and exclaimed, "O happy ship! O happy galleon for Philip, lost for my gain! Loss--no loss for me, but the greatest of all gain!" He was bound to the cross, but the footrest under him gave way, so that he was strangled by the cords that bound him. While repeating the name of Jesus, he was the first of the group to die. Philip was 25. Miracles attested the power before God of these first martyrs of Japan (Benedictines, Butler, Delaney).

Saint Philip is the patron of Mexico City, Mexico.

1913 Blessed Giovanni Battista Piamarta (AC)
Born at Brescia, Italy, November 26, 1841; died at Remedello, April 25, 1913; beatified October 12, 1997. 


 Monday  Saints of this Day April 25  Séptimo Kaléndas Maii  
   Fifth Week in Easter  Passover, April 22 -30

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
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Widowed Saints  html
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Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005
 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).-
Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
The Pope said this today before reciting the midday Angelus with several thousand people gathered in the courtyard of the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, south of Rome.
Referring to the Gospel reading for today's Mass, the Holy Father reflected on the faith of Peter, which is shown to be "still immature and too much influenced by the 'mentality of this world.'”  He explained that when Christ spoke openly about how he was to "suffer much, be killed and rise again, Peter protests, saying: 'God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you.'"
"It is evident that the Master and the disciple follow two opposed ways of thinking," continued the Pontiff. "Peter, according to a human logic, is convinced that God would never allow his Son to end his mission dying on the cross.  "Jesus, on the contrary, knows that the Father, in his great love for men, sent him to give his life for them, and if this means the passion and the cross, it is right that such should happen."
Christ also knew that "the resurrection would be the last word," Benedict XVI added.
Serious illness
The Pope continued, "If to save us the Son of God had to suffer and die crucified, it certainly was not because of a cruel design of the heavenly Father.  "The cause of it is the gravity of the sickness of which he must cure us: an evil so serious and deadly that it will require all of his blood. 
"In fact, it is with his death and resurrection that Jesus defeated sin and death, reestablishing the lordship of God."
Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today; April 25
From that time Photius's life  891 Photius career of scholarship and public service at the imperial court legitimate patriarch of Constantinople Orthodox objection to doctrine of the Holy Spirit (Filioque) is one of difficulties between himself and Pope Saint Nicholas I and his successor Adrian II, complicated by the fluctuations of Byzantine politics--a long, complex, and often obscure struggle that is a matter of ecclesiastical history. It did not end until 879 when, Ignatius being dead, Pope John VIII recognized Photius as the legitimate patriarch of Constantinople and peace was restored between the churches.


Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today; April 24
Pope St Gregory the Great despatched  to England in 601:  624 St Mellitus of Canterbury missionary Archbishop of Canterbury from 619
Pius XII, Sovereign Pontiff, enrolled among the number of the saints at Angers in France, St. Mary Euphrasia Pelletier, virgin and foundress of the Institute of the Good Shepherd Sisters.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today; April 22
 174 Soter, Pope charity personal kindness care for persecuted condemned Montanists (RM)
 282 The Departure of the Holy Father Anba Maximus The Fifteenth Pope of Alexandria.
 296 Saint Caius, Pope Dalmatian M (RM)
167 to 175 Pope Soter and Caius, Saints and Popes
They have their feast together on 22 April, on which day they appear in most of the martyrologies, though Notker and a few others give Soter on the 21st and Caius on the 19th or 21st.

 536 Pope Agapitus I archdeacon opposed Monophysites Pope (RM) in the opinion of Pope St Gregory I he was “a trumpet of the gospel and a herald of righteousness”.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today; April 21
Pope Clement XI in 1720, 1109 Anselm of Canterbury Doctor of the Church OSB B Cur Deus Homo, the most famous treatise on the Incarnation ever written; canonized and included among the Doctors of the Church by Pope Clement XI in 1720.  An attempt to persuade Pope Urban II to depose the saint was equally futile.  After due consideration Paschal II confirmed his predecessor’s decisions, and Henry thereupon sent word to St Anselm forbidding his return if he continued recalcitrant, and pronouncing the confiscation of his revenues.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today; April 21
Pope St. Gregory the Great. -- 599 St. Anastasius XI Antioch Patriarch learning holiness comforting afflicted observed perpetual silence except for charityIn 593 Anastasius was restored to his see by Pope St. Gregory the Great.