August 24
Bartholomew or Nathanael? (John 1:47b) (John 1:48b) (John 1:49b) (John 1:50b) (John 21:1-14)
We are confronted again with the fact that we know almost nothing about most of the apostles.
Yet the unknown ones were also foundation stones, the 12 pillars of the new Israel whose 12 tribes now encompass the whole earth. Their personalities were secondary (without thereby being demeaned) to their great office of bearing tradition from their firsthand experience, speaking in the name of Jesus, putting the Word made flesh into human words for the enlightenment of the world. Their holiness was not an introverted contemplation of their status before God. It was a gift that they had to share with others. The Good News was that all are called to the holiness of being Christ’s members, by the gracious gift of God.

325 The Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos "Of St Peter"
was so called because it was painted by St Peter, Metropolitan of Moscow
 
Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  August 2016
Universal:   That sports may be an opportunity for friendly encounters between peoples and may contribute to peace in the world.
Evangelization:  That Christians may live the Gospel, giving witness to faith, honesty, and love of neighbor.
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

 
Wednesday, August 24, 2016
Revelation 21:9-14 ;  9Then came one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls full of the seven last plagues, and spoke to me, saying, "Come, I will show you the Bride, the wife of the Lamb." 10And in the Spirit he carried me away to a great, high mountain, and showed me the holy city Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God, 11having the glory of God, its radiance like a most rare jewel, like a jasper, clear as crystal. 12It had a great, high wall, with twelve gates, and at the gates twelve angels, and on the gates the names of the twelve tribes of the sons of Israel were inscribed; 13on the east three gates, on the north three gates, on the south three gates, and on the west three gates. 14And the wall of the city had twelve foundations, and on them the twelve names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb.

Psalms 145:10-13, 17-18 ; 10All thy works shall give thanks to thee, O LORD, and all thy saints shall bless thee! 11They shall speak of the glory of thy kingdom, and tell of thy power, 12to make known to the sons of men thy mighty deeds, and the glorious splendor of thy kingdom. 13Thy kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and thy dominion endures throughout all generations. The LORD is faithful in all his words, and gracious in all his deeds. 17The LORD is just in all his ways, and kind in all his doings. 18The LORD is near to all who call upon him, to all who call upon him in truth.

John 1:45-51 ;  45Philip found Nathan'a-el, and said to him, "We have found him of whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph." 46Nathan'a-el said to him, "Can anything good come out of Nazareth?" Philip said to him, "Come and see." 47Jesus saw Nathan'a-el coming to him, and said of him, "Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile!" 48Nathan'a-el said to him, "How do you know me?" Jesus answered him, "Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you." 49Nathan'a-el answered him, "Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!" 50Jesus answered him, "Because I said to you, I saw you under the fig tree, do you believe? You shall see greater things than these." 51And he said to him, "Truly, truly, I say to you, you will see heaven opened, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man."

CAUSES OF SAINTS

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary


  The Valley of Benediction  Aug 24 - Consecration of Our Lady of Benoite-Vaux (France, 1138)
As from 1140, the monks from Etanche Abbey in France owned land and a chapel in the little valley watered by a little tributary of the Meuse, half way between Verdun and Bar-le-Duc: they called it the Valley of Benediction or "Benoite-Vaux." 
According to the legend, woodcutters are said to have heard Angels singing the Ave Maria at this spot and to have found a statue of Mary at the foot of an oak tree not far from the river. The Blessed Virgin was holding an apple in one hand and the Infant Jesus in the other.
She is called "Comforter of the Afflicted" and the "Queen of Peace."

Mary in Islam and the Koran (II) August 24 - OUR LADY, HEALTH OF THE SICK
Another remarkable fact is that the name of Maryam is mentioned 34 times in the Koran, while 'Isa is mentioned only 25 times. The 34 times the name of Maryam is mentioned the name of 'Isa is intimately included 17 times.
The name of 'Isa is present 17 times out of 34 and described as "'Isa bnu Maryam" ('Isa, son of Mary). Jesus' status is fixed definitively: He is the son of Mary and not--supreme blasphemy to Islam--the Son of God.
Antoine Moussali Judaism, Christianity and Islam: A Comparative Study
(Judaisme, christianisme et islam : étude comparée), Ed. Paris 2000

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh,
was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

The great psalm of the Passion, Chapter 22, whose first verse "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
For kingship belongs to the LORD, the ruler over the nations.  All who sleep in the earth will bow low before God; All who have gone down into the dust will kneel in homage.  And I will live for the LORD; my descendants will serve you.  The generation to come will be told of the Lord, that they may proclaim to a people yet unborn the deliverance you have brought.
     St. Ptolemy, bishop, disciple of the blessed apostle Peter.  Being sent by him to preach the Gospel in Tuscany, he
     died a glorious martyr of Christ in the city of Nepi.

     St. Bartholomew
1st v. St. Romanus of Nepi  Early Christian martyr Disciple of St. Ptolemy
St. Eutychius, disciple of the blessed evangelist John.  He preached the Gospel in many countries, and was subjected to imprisonment, to stripes and fire, but finally he rested in peace.
 260 St. Massa Candida group of martyrs
 270 St. Aurea Martyr
 304 St. Tation Martyr St. Yrchard

6th v. Syra The martyr with faith she touched the robe of the priest, as the woman with the issue of blood once touched the robe of the Savior (Mt. 9: 20-22). She immediately received healing and she returned home healed.
 650 St. Ouen consecrated archbishop Rouen
      
St. Patrick, abbot At Nevers in France
 
718 St. George Limniota, monk.  reprehended wicked emperor Leo for breaking holy images, and burning the relics of the saints
 986 St. Sandratus Benedictine abbot
        St. Rose of St. Mary
1199 Saint Martyrius, Archbishop of Novgorod, was born in Stara Rus. On the northeast side of the city, near the right bank of the Polista River he founded in the year 1192 the Transfiguration men's monastery.
1326 Saint Peter, Metropolitan of Moscow, Three epistles of St Peter are preserved The first was to priests with an exhortation to pursue their pastoral service worthily, and to tend their spiritual children with zeal; In the second missive, the saint urged priests to be true pastors and not hirelings, and to be concerned about the strengthening of themselves with Christian and pastoral virtues. In the third letter, St Peter again exhorts priests concerning their pastoral obligations, and he urges laypeople to fulfill the commandments of Christ.
1325 The Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos "Of St Peter" was so called because it was painted by St Peter, Metropolitan of Moscow (+ December 21, 1326) while he was igumen of the Ratsk monastery near Volhynia. During a visit to the Ratsk monastery by St Maximus, Metropolitan of Kiev and All Russia (+ December 6, 1306), St Peter gave him this icon as a gift. The Metropolitan took it to Vladimir at Klyazma, where his cathedral was then located.
1314-1392 The Appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos to St Sergius of Radonezh: Once, late at night, St Sergius (1314-1392) was reading an Akathist to the Mother of God. Having finished his habitual rule, he sat down to rest a bit, but suddenly he said to his disciple, St Micah (May 6): "Be alert, my child, for we shall have a wondrous visitation." Scarcely had he uttered these words than a voice was heard: "The All-Pure One approaches!"
1314-1392 The Appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos to St Sergius of Radonezh:
St. Emily de Vialar, virgin, foundress of the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Apparition.  A shining example of fortitude, patience and charity, Sovereign Pontiff Pius XII added her to the number of saints
St. Mary Micaela, virgin, founded Institute of Religious Adorer-Slaves of the Blessed Sacrament and of Charity.  Burning with the desire to suffer and draw souls to God, numbered among the holy virgins by Pope Pius XI
1550 Saint Arsenius of Komel born in Moscow, descended from a noble family, the Sakharusov. In youth tonsured at the Trinity-Sergiev monastery, occupied himself there with copying books:  Gospel he copied in the year 1506.
1774 Saint Serapion was abbot of the Monastery of St. John the Baptist in the Davit-Gareji Wilderness; endowed by God with the ability to work miracles.
1779 Cosmas The New Hieromartyr, Equal of the Apostles, in the world Constas, was a native of Aitolia. He studied at first under the guidance of the archdeacon Ananias Dervisanos, and afterwards continued his education on Mount Athos, at the Vatopedi school renowned for teachers such as Nicholas Tzartzoulios (from Metsovo) and Eugenius Voulgaris (afterwards in the years 1775-1779 the archbishop of Ekaterinoslav and the Chersonessus).
1828 St. Jane Antide Thouret Foundress Daughters of Charity 
1854 Massíliæ, in Gállia, sanctæ Æmíliæ de Vialár, Vírginis, Fundatrícis Institúti Sorórum a sancto Joseph ab Apparitióne
1865 St MARY_MICAELA Foundress of Sisters consecrated especially to the Blessed Sacrament (1809-1865)



Népete sancti Ptolomǽi Epíscopi, qui fuit discípulus beáti Petri Apóstoli; atque, ab eo missus in Túsciam ad prædicándum Evangélium, in eádem civitáte gloriósus Christi Martyr occúbuit.
    At Nepi, St. Ptolemy, bishop, disciple of the blessed apostle Peter.  Being sent by him to preach the Gospel in Tuscany, he died a glorious martyr of Christ in the city of Nepi.
1st v. St. Romanus of Nepi  Early Christian martyr Disciple of St. Ptolemy; reportedly martyred at Nepi, in Tuscany, Italy, where he served as bishop
Népete sancti Románi, ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopi, qui, cum esset sancti Ptolomǽi discípulus, fuit étiam in passióne sócius.
    Also at Nepi, St. Romanus, bishop of that city, who was the disciple of St. Ptolemy, and his companion in martyrdom
.

Eódem die sancti Eutychii, qui fuit discípulus beáti Joánnis Evangelístæ; atque, ob Evangélii prædicatiónem in multis regiónibus cárceres, vérbera et ignes perpéssus, in pace tandem quiévit.
    Also, St. Eutychius, disciple of the blessed evangelist John.  He preached the Gospel in many countries, and was subjected to imprisonment, to stripes and fire, but finally he rested in peace.
Eutyches The Hieromartyr , a disciple of the holy Apostles John the Theologian and Paul, lived from the first century into the beginning of the second century, and was from the Palestinian city of Sebastea.

Although St Eutyches is not one of the 70 Apostles, he is called an Apostle because of his labors with the older Apostles, by whom he was made bishop. After hearing about Christ the Savior, St Eutyches first became a disciple of the Apostle John the Theologian. Later he met the Apostle Paul, and preached together with him on the early journeys.

St Eutyches underwent many sufferings: they starved him with hunger, beat him with iron rods, they threw him into the fire, and then to be devoured by wild beasts. Once, a lion was let loose upon the saint, which astonished everyone because it praised the Creator with a human voice. The hieromartyr Eutyches completed his labors in his native city, where he was beheaded with a sword at the beginning of the second century .
St. Bartholomew Sancti Bartholomǽi Apóstoli, qui Christi Evangélium in India prædicávit; inde in majórem Arméniam proféctus, ibi, cum plúrimos ad fidem convertísset, vivus a bárbaris decoriátus est, atque, Astyagis Regis jussu, cápitis decollatióne martyrium complévit.  Ipsíus sacrum corpus, primo ad Líparam ínsulam, deínde Benevéntum, postrémo Romam ad Tiberínam translátum ínsulam, ibi pia fidélium veneratióne honorátur.
    The apostle St. Bartholomew, who preached the Gospel of Christ in India.  Passing thence into the Greater Armenia where, after converting many to the faith, he was flayed alive by the barbarians, and having his head cut off by order of King Astyages, he fulfilled his martyrdom.  His holy body was first carried to the island of Lipara, then to Benevento, and finally to Rome in the Island of the Tiber, where it is venerated by the pious faithful.

ST BARTHOLOMEW, APOSTLE  (FIRST CENTURY)
THE name given to this apostle is probably not his proper name, but his patronymic, meaning the son of Tolmai, and beyond the fact of his existence nothing is certainly known of him.  Many scholars, however, take him to have been the same person as Nathanael, a native of Cana in Galilee, of whom our Lord said, "Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no guile".  Among the reasons advanced for this supposition is that, as St John never mentions Bartholomew among the Apostles, so the other three evangelists take no notice of the name of Nathanael; and they constantly put together Philip and Bartholomew, just as St John says Philip and Nathanael came together to Christ; moreover, Nathanael is reckoned with other apostles when Christ appeared to them at the sea of Galilee after His resurrection (John xxi).
The popular traditions concerning St Bartholomew are summed up in the Roman Martyrology, which says he preached the gospel of Christ in India; thence he went into Greater Armenia, and when he converted many people there to the faith he was flayed alive by the barbarians, and by command of King Astyages fulfilled his martyrdom by beheading...The place is said to have been Albanopolis (Derbend, on the west coast of the Caspian Sea), and he is represented to have preached also in Mesopotamia, Persia, Egypt and elsewhere.  The earliest reference to India is given by Eusebius in the early fourth century, when he relates that St Pantaenus, about a hundred years earlier, going into India (St Jerome adds "to preach to the Brahmins"), found there some who still retained the knowledge of Christ and showed him a copy of St Matthew's Gospel in Hebrew characters, which they assured him that St Bartholomew had brought into those parts when he planted the faith among them. But "India" was a name applied indifferently by Greek and Latin writers to Arabia, Ethiopia, Libya, Parthia, Persia and the lands of the Medes, and it is most probable that the India visited by Pantaenus was Ethiopia or Arabia Felix, or perhaps both. Another eastern legend says the apostle met St Philip at Hierapolis in Phrygia, and travelled into Lycaonia, where St John Chrysostom affirms that he instructed the people in the Christian faith.  That he preached and died in Armenia is possible, and is a unanimous tradition among the later historians of that country; but earlier Armenian writers make little or no reference to him as connected with their nation.  The journeys attributed to the relics of St Bartholomew are even more bewildering than those of his living body alleged relics are venerated at present chiefly at Benevento and in the church of St Bartholomew- in- the-Tiber at Rome.

Although, in comparison with such other apostles as St Andrew, St Thomas and St John, the name of St Bartholomew is not conspicuous in the apocryphal literature of the early centuries, still we have what professes to bean account of his preaching and "passion" preserved to us in Greek and several Latin copies. Max Bonnet (Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xiv, 1895, pp. 353-366) thinks the Latin was the original; Lipsius less probably argues for the priority of the Greek; but it may be that both derive from a lost Syriac archetype. The texts are in the Acta Sanctorum, August, vol. v  in Tischendorf, Acta Apostolorum Apocrypha, pp. 243-260; and also in Bonnet, Act. Apocryph., vol. ii, Pt. 1, pp. ,128 seq. There are also considerable fragments of an apocryphal Gospel of Bartholomew (on which see the Revue Biblique for 1913, 1921 and 1922), and traces of Coptic "Acts of Andrew and Bartholomew". The gospel which bears the name of Bartholomew is one of the apocryphal writings condemned in the decree of Pseudo-Gelasius. The statement that St Bartholomew was flayed alive before being beheaded, though this is not mentioned in the passio, is contained in the so-called "Breviarium Apostolorum" prefixed to certain manuscripts of the "Hieronymianum".  It is the flaying which has probably suggested the knife, often associated as an emblem with pictures of the saint; but on St Bartholomew in art see Künstle, Ikonographie, vol. ii, pp. 116-120.  The Indian question is examined in some detail by Fr A. C. Perumalil in The Apostles in India (Patna, 1953).
All that is known of him with certainty is that he is mentioned in the synoptic gospels and Acts as one of the twelve apostles. His name, a patronymic, means "son of Tolomai" and scholars believe he is the same as Nathanael mentioned in John, who says he is from Cana and that Jesus called him an "Israelite...incapable of deceit." The Roman Martyrology says he preached in India and Greater Armenia, where he was flayed and beheaded by King Astyages. Tradition has the place as Abanopolis on the west coast of the Caspian Sea and that he also preached in Mesopotamia, Persia, and Egypt. The Gospel of Bartholomew is apochryphal and was condemned in the decree of Pseudo-Gelasius
In the New Testament, Bartholomew is mentioned only in the lists of the apostles. Some scholars identify him with Nathanael, a man of Cana in Galilee who was summoned to Jesus by Philip. Jesus paid him a great compliment: “Here is a true Israelite. There is no duplicity in him” (John 1:47b). When Nathanael asked how Jesus knew him, Jesus said, “I saw you under the fig tree” (John 1:48b). Whatever amazing revelation this involved, it brought Nathanael to exclaim, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel” (John 1:49b). But Jesus countered with, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this” (John 1:50b).

Nathanael did see greater things. He was one of those to whom Jesus appeared on the shore of the Sea of Tiberias after his resurrection (see John 21:1-14). They had been fishing all night without success. In the morning, they saw someone standing on the shore though no one knew it was Jesus. He told them to cast their net again, and they made so great a catch that they could not haul the net in. Then John cried out to Peter, “It is the Lord.”

When they brought the boat to shore, they found a fire burning, with some fish laid on it and some bread. Jesus asked them to bring some of the fish they had caught, and invited them to come and eat their meal. John relates that although they knew it was Jesus, none of the apostles presumed to inquire who he was. This, John notes, was the third time Jesus appeared to the apostles.
Comment:  Bartholomew or Nathanael? We are confronted again with the fact that we know almost nothing about most of the apostles. Yet the unknown ones were also foundation stones, the 12 pillars of the new Israel whose 12 tribes now encompass the whole earth. Their personalities were secondary (without thereby being demeaned) to their great office of bearing tradition from their firsthand experience, speaking in the name of Jesus, putting the Word made flesh into human words for the enlightenment of the world. Their holiness was not an introverted contemplation of their status before God. It was a gift that they had to share with others. The Good News was that all are called to the holiness of being Christ’s members, by the gracious gift of God.
The simple fact is that humanity is totally meaningless unless God is its total concern. Then humanity, made holy with God’s own holiness, becomes the most precious creation of God.
Quote:  “Like Christ himself, the apostles were unceasingly bent upon bearing witness to the truth of God. They showed special courage in speaking ‘the word of God with boldness’ (Acts 4:31) before the people and their rulers. With a firm faith they held that the gospel is indeed the power of God unto salvation for all who believe..They followed the example of the gentleness and respectfulness of Christ” (Declaration on Religious Freedom, 11) .
260 St. Massa Candida group of martyrs
Carthágine sanctórum trecentórum Mártyrum, témpore Valeriáni et Galliéni.  Hi Mártyres magnánimi, inter ália supplícia, cum Præses fornácem calcáriam accéndi jussísset, et, in præséntia ejus, prunas cum thure exhibéri, atque illis dixísset: « Elígite e duóbus unum, aut thura super his carbónibus offérte Jovi, aut in calcem demergímini », fide armáti, Christum Dei Fílium confiténtes, ictu rapidíssimo se injecérunt in ignem, et inter calcis vapóres in púlverem sunt redácti; ex quo candidátus ille beatórum exércitus appellári Massa cándida méruit.
    At Carthage, three hundred holy martyrs, in the time of Valerian and Gallienus.  Among other torments inflicted on them, a pit filled with burning lime was prepared by order of the governor, who, live coals with incense being brought to him, said to the confessors: "Choose one of these two things: either offer incense to Jupiter upon these coals, or be thrown into the lime."  Armed with faith, and confessing Christ to be the Son of God, they quickly threw themselves into the pit, and amid the vapours of the lime were reduced to dust. From this circumstance, this white-robed company of the blessed earned for itself the name of the White Mass.

Suffered in Utica, in northern Africa. The name, translated as “the White Mass,” was believed to denote the fact that these martyrs were thrown into a lime pit, and their remains became one great white mass. Now it is believed that Massa Candida was an actual site near Utica in modem North Africa. Some 153 martyrs suffered there under Emperors Valerian and Gallienus
.

258? THE MARTYRS OF UTICA
THE story of these martyrs as known to himself was popularized by the poet Prudentius in one of his hymns, and it is recorded in the Roman Martyrology today in these words: The passion “at Carthage, of three hundred holy martyrs in the time of Valerian and Gallienus. The governor, among other torments, ordered a lime kiln to be lighted and charcoal and incense to be at hand near by; then he said to them, ‘Choose one of these two things: either offer incense to Jupiter upon these coals, or be thrown into that lime’. They, armed with faith and confessing Christ the Son of God, on a swift impulse threw themselves into the fire and were reduced to powder in the heat of the lime. Wherefore this white-robed company of the blessed earned for itself the name of the White Mass.” That is to say, their ashes made but one common mass cemented with the lime.

St Augustine says that this happened at Utica, twenty-five miles from Carthage, and that the martyrs numbered not three hundred but more than one hundred and fifty-three. Prudentius refers to them thus: “Whiteness [candor] possesses their bodies; purity [candor] bears their souls to Heaven. Hence they have merited to be for ever called the White Mass [Massa candida].”

But, as Father Delehaye points out in his commentary on the “Martyrology of Jerome”, it seems that this poetic description of Prudentius must be set aside.

“Massa Candida” is really the name of a place—the White Farm. A number of martyrs were buried there, but there is nothing to show that they suffered under Valerian. There was quite probably something in the nature of a massacre, as an early sermon, formerly without warrant attributed to St Augustine, dwells upon the bloodshed and the readiness of the martyrs to submit their necks to the sword; but on the other hand there is no evidence that they numbered either 300 or 153, for the latter figure was merely suggested to Augustine by a reference he had just made to the draught of fishes in John xxi ii. There can be little doubt that Prudentius evolved the whole story of the lime out of the name “massa candida”, which he interpreted according to his own exuberant fancy.

See Prudentius, Peristephanon, xiii, 76—87; P. Franchi de’ Cavalieri, in Studi e Testi, vol. ix (1902), pp. 37—51; G. Morin in Miscellanea Augustiniana, vol. i (1930), p. 647; H. Delehaye, CMH., pp. 449—450, and Origines du culte des martyrs (1933), pp. 384—385.

270 St. Aurea MartyrApud Ostia Tiberína sanctæ Aureæ, Vírginis et Mártyris; quæ saxo ad collum ligáto, in mare demérsa est.  Ipsíus autem corpus, ejéctum ad littus, beátus Nonnus sepelívit.
    At Ostia, on the Tiber, St. Aurea, virgin and martyr, who was plunged into the sea with a stone tied to her neck.  Her body being driven to the shore was buried by blessed Nonnus.
Ostia, in Italy. No reliable details survive of her death, but her shrine at Ostia attests to her martyrdom.
304 St. Tation Martyr
In Isáuria sancti Tatiónis Mártyris, qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, sub Urbáno Præside, gládio cæsus, martyrii corónam accépit.
    In Isauria, St. Tation, martyr, who received the crown of martyrdom by being beheaded in the persecution of Diocletian, under the governor Urbanus.
He was beheaded in Bithynia, under Emperor Diocletian.
The Martyr Tation lived in Bythnia and suffered under the emperor Diocletian (284-305). When the persecutors of Christians learned that he believed in Christ, they arrested him and took him to the city of Claudiopolis to the governor, Urban.

Many times they urged the saint to deny Christ, and they locked him in prison and gave him over to various tortures. They beat him with sticks and dragged him beyond the city for execution. The holy martyr, after making the Sign of the Cross, died along the way
.
5th v. St. Yrchard served as a missionary among the Picts.
Yrchard (d. fifth century) + Scottish bishop and disciple of St. Ternan, also called Yardcard.
Yrchard served as a missionary among the Picts
.
6th v. Syra The martyr with faith she touched the robe of the priest, as the woman with the issue of blood once touched the robe of the Savior (Mt. 9: 20-22). She immediately received healing and she returned home healed.
Syra  lived during the sixth century in Persia and was the daughter of an illustrious pagan priest of the fire-worshippers (i.e. Zoroastrians) from Karkh-Seleucia in Elimiade (Abizarde). Syra's father, fearing the influence of Christianity on his daughter, sent her to the city of Tharsis after the death of her mother to be educated as a pagan priestess.
Syra became a priestess at the heathen temple of fire, and occupied herself with honorable activity. But once, after speaking with some Christian beggars, Syra believed in Christ the Savior and began to live as a Christian. She began to learn prayers and Psalms, to fast and to read Christian books.

Syra once fell ill. She was not able to find a remedy for her sickness, so she went to the Christian church and asked the priest only to give her some of the ashes from the church, hoping to receive healing from them. The priest, knowing Syra to be a servitor of idols, refused her request.
Syra was not angered, recognizing her own unworthiness, but with faith she touched the robe of the priest, as the woman with the issue of blood once touched the robe of the Savior (Mt. 9: 20-22). She immediately received healing and she returned home healed.
Syra's family began to suspect that she wanted to accept Christianity, and they asked Syra's stepmother to persuade her to abandon this intention. The stepmother, pretending that she herself was a secret Christian, talked sweetly with Syra, telling her to keep her faith secret. She also told Syra to continue to serve the fire outwardly, so she would not fall away from Christ altogether by being subjected to torture.
Syra began to hesitate about accepting Baptism, but when she saw a vision in her sleep about the desolate fate which befell her mother after her death, and about the luminous abodes foreordained for Christians, she made up her mind and went to the bishop, asking him to baptize her. The bishop declined to fulfill her request, fearing to give the pagan priests a reason for persecuting Christians. Besides this, he thought that Syra, fearing her father's wrath, would deny Christ. The bishop advised her first to openly confess her faith in the Savior before her kinsfolk.
Once during the morning sacrifice, St Syra was stoking the priestly fire worshipped by the Persians as their god, and overturning the sacrifice she proclaimed loudly: "I am a Christian and reject false gods and I believe in the True God!"
The father beat his daughter until he became exhausted, and then threw her in prison. With tears and entreaties he urged her to return to her former faith, but Syra was unyielding. The father then denounced her to the pagan high priest, and afterwards to the governor and to the emperor Chozroes the Elder.
They tortured the holy maiden for a long time in prison, but the Lord strengthened her, and she stood firmly on her faith in Christ. After she bribed the prison guard, St Syra went to the bishop and received Baptism. The Lord granted St Syra the gift of wonderworking. When the Persians gave the martyr over for the leering of impious men, they began to jeer at the saint, saying: "What's the fable told about you, that the chains fall from your neck, hands and legs by themselves? Let us see now how the chains fall off!" St Syra prayed in the depths of her heart to the Savior, and immediately the chains fell from her. And this was not the only time.
Succumbing to her tortures, St Syra fell deathly ill. She began to entreat the Lord that He not permit her to die from the illness, but rather to grant her a martyr's crown. The Lord heard her and granted healing. Seeing the martyr healed, the prison guard and jail warden went to dishonor the holy maiden, but the Lord struck one with illness and the other one was struck dead. The martyr was condemned to be stranged.
They conducted the execution with refined cruelty. After a while they left go of the rope, asking the saint whether she wanted to change her mind and remain among the living. But the martyr, barely alive, refused and requested the execution be done quickly. The body of the saint was thrown to dogs to be devoured, but they would not touch it. Christians then buried the body of St Syra.
650 St. Ouen consecrated archbishop Rouen For miracles attributed to relics of St Ouen at Canterbury, see Analecta Boliandiana, vol. li (1933), pp. 285-292, and vol. lxiv (1946), pp. 50-53.
Rotómagi sancti Audoéni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.    At Rouen, St. Owen, bishop and confessor.

St Audoenus, or Ouen, Bishop of Rouen  684
St Ouen (Dado) was born at Sancy, near Soissons, about 6oo, of a Frankish family, his father being St Authaire. While he and his brother Ado were still children, living at Ussy-sur-Marne, their father entertained the exiled St Columban in his house.  The brothers were educated well and when they were of sufficient age were put at the court of King Clotaire II, where Ouen became one of a group of remarkable young men which included St Eligius, St Wandrille and St Didier of Cahors.  Ouen was in great favour with the king and with his son and successor, Dagobert I, who made him his referendary or chancellor; in this office Ouen steadily opposed the prevalent simony.
   He obtained of the king a grant of a piece of land situated in the forest of Brie where, in 636, he erected a monastery, called at present Rebais.  By the advice of St Faro, Bishop of Meaux, he sent for Aile, a disciple of St Columban from Luxeuil, and had him appointed the first abbot. St Ouen would have retired himself to Rebais, but Dagobert and his nobles could not be induced to give their consent.  St Ouen and St Eligius, though yet laymen, were for their zeal, piety and learning considered as equals even of the bishops, and they promoted the cause of religion and virtue through the whole kingdom.  Dagobert dying in 639, Clovis II, his son and successor, testified the same esteem for St Ouen, and kept him in the office of referendary.  At length Clovis was prevailed upon to give Ouen leave to receive ordination from Dieudonné, Bishop of Macon, and he was shortly after elected bishop of Rouen ; at the same time his friend St Eligius was chosen bishop of Noyon. They took a considerable time to prepare themselves for this dignity, by retreat, fasting and prayer, and received the episcopal consecration together at Rheims in 641.

  St Ouen in this new office increased his humility, austerities and charities. His zeal was indefatigable, and by his kindness and patience he was truly all things to all men.  He encouraged learning by the foundation of monasteries, and sent missionaries to those parts of his diocese that were still pagan  nor did he slacken his efforts for extirpating simony and other abuses.   He was a trusted adviser of King Thierry III and upheld the policy of Ebroin, the mayor of the palace, to such a degree that he was, perhaps inculpably, involved in Ebroin's ill-treatment of St Leger and of St Philibert.  Returning from a political mission to Cologne, St Ouen went to Clichy, and there fell ill and died, on August 24, 684.
The earliest of the lives of St Cuen dates from the beginning of the eighth century, and has been critically edited by W. Levison in MGH., Scritores Merov., vol. v, pp. 536-567. Levison also comments (pp. 548 seq.) on the two ninth-century lives the formee of which is printed with the first-named in the Acta Sanctorum, August, vol. iv, and the latter in the Analecta Ballandiana, vol. v, pp. 76-146.  By far the best modern contribution to the history of St Ouen is that of E. Vacandard, Vie de Saint Ouen (1902).  He has in particular rectified in several points the chronology of previous writers.  For miracles attributed to relics of St Ouen at Canterbury, see Analecta Boliandiana, vol. li (1933), pp. 285-292, and vol. lxiv (1946), pp. 50-53.
Ouen is also known as Owen and Audoenus. He was the son of St. Authaire and was born at Sancy near Soissons, France. He was educated at St. Medard Abbey, served at the courts of King Clotaire II and his son Dagobert I, who made him his chancellor and in 636 built a monastery at Rebais. He was pursuaded not to become a monk there by Dagobert, and despite the fact that Ouen was a layman, he was active in promoting religion and combating simony. He was continued as chancellor by King Clovis II, was ordained and in 641, was consecrated archbishop of Rouen. He encouraged learning and the founding of new monasteries, was known for his personal austerities and his charities, and supported missionary activities to pagan areas of his See. He supported Ebroin, mayor of the palace, against the nobles, and at the invitation of Thierry III, negotiated a peace between Neustria and Austrasia in Cologne. He died at Clich near Paris on August 24 while returning from Cologne.
718 Item sancti Geórgii Limniótæ Mónachi, qui, cum ímpium Leónem Imperatórem, quod sacras Imágines, frángeret Sanctorúmque relíquias combúreret, reprehendísset, hanc ob causam, ejus jussu mánibus abscíssis et cápite incénso, Martyr migrávit ad Dóminum.
   
Also, St. George Limniota, monk.  Because he reprehended the wicked emperor Leo for breaking holy images, and burning the relics of the saints, he had his hands cut off and his head burned by order of the tyrant, and went to our Lord to receive the recompence of a martyr.
Saint George Limniotes lived during the seventh and eighth centuries and was a monk of the Olympian monastery near Constantinople. He suffered for venerating icons under the Iconoclast emperor Leo the Isaurian (716-741). They burned his head and cut off his nose. St George died in the year .
Nivérnis, in Gállia, sancti Patrícii Abbátis.    St. Patrick, abbot At Nevers in France
986 St. Sandratus Benedictine abbot
Originally a monk in the monastery of St. Maximinus, Trier, Germany, he was named by King Otto I to go to St. Gall Monastery in Switzerland to bring needed reforms to that community. After completing his mission, he was named abbot of Gladbach and also abbot of Weissenburg
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1199 Saint Martyrius, Archbishop of Novgorod, was born in Stara Rus. On the northeast side of the city, near the right bank of the Polista River he founded in the year 1192 the Transfiguration men's monastery.

At the Novgorod cathedral, St Martyrius was chosen by lot after the death of St Gregory (May 24). On December 10, 1193 in Kiev, he was elevated to the rank of archbishop. St Martyrius became famous as an indefatigable builder of churches. In May 1195 he contracted for a church in the name of the Mother of God at the city gates, on September 13, 1196 he consecrated a church in honor of the Resurrection of Christ in a new women's monastery at Lake Myachina.

In January 1197 the saint consecrated a church in honor of St Cyril of Alexandria at the men's monastery of the same name 3 versts from Novgorod. In the year 1197, he contracted in the carpenter's quarter of Novgorod for a women's monastery in the name of the holy Great Martyr Euphemia, built by devout young women of the city.

In January 1197 St Martyrius consecrated at the Transfiguration monastery in Stara Rus a temple dedicated to St Nicephorus, Patriarch of Constantinople. In May 1198, he began to build a stone church in honor of the Transfiguration of the Lord, and on August 15 of the same year he consecrated it.

In that same year Princess Elena, wife of Prince Yaroslav Vladimirovich, built on the merchants' side at Molotkova a church in honor of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos at the monastery, founded by St Martyrius. The church was built in memory of the following miracle. A certain devout man of Novgorod went to church each day. Once he returned home, and became tired, fell asleep, and dropped a prosphora stamped with the image of the Theotokos. The dogs, smelling bread, ran up to the prosphora but jumped away, driven off by an invisible power.

Great Prince Vsevolod became disaffected with the people of Novgorod. In 1199 St Martyrius went to Vladimir with representatives of the townspeople. Along the way, on the shore of Lake Seliger, he died on August 24, 1199. His body was taken to Novgorod to the Martyriev Portico of the Sophia Cathedral, so named because it was built by St Martyrius. His icon is in the altar of the Novgorod Sophia Cathedral
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Limæ, in Perúvia, natális sanctæ Rosæ a sancta María, Vírginis, e tértio Ordine sancti Domínici.  Ejus vero festívitas tértio Kaléndas Septémbris celebrátur.
    At Lima in Peru, the birthday of St. Rose of St. Mary, virgin of the Third Order of St. Dominic.  Her feast is observed on the 30th of August.
Massíliæ, in Gállia, sanctæ Æmíliæ de Vialár, Vírginis, Fundatrícis Institúti Sorórum a sancto Joseph ab Apparitióne, fortitúdine, patiéntia et caritáte insígnis, quam Pius Duodécimus, Póntifex Máximus, in Sanctárum númerum rétulit.
    At Marseilles in France, St. Emily de Vialar, virgin, foundress of the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Apparition.  A shining example of fortitude, patience and charity, the Sovereign Pontiff Pius XII added her to the number of the saints.
Valéntiæ, in Hispánia, natális sanctæ Maríæ Michaélæ, Vírginis, Fundatrícis Congregatiónis Ancillárum a Sanctíssimo Sacraménto et Caritátis, patiéndi stúdio ac desidério ánimas Deo lucrándi inflammátæ, quam Pius Papa Undécimus sanctis Virgínibus accénsuit.
   
At Valencia in Spain, the birthday of St. Mary Micaela, virgin, who founded the Institute of Religious Adorer-Slaves of the Blessed Sacrament and of Charity.  Burning with the desire to suffer and draw souls to God, she was numbered among the holy virgins by Pope Pius XI.
1326 Saint Peter, Metropolitan of Moscow,Three epistles of St Peter are preserved The first was to priests with an exhortation to pursue their pastoral service worthily, and to tend their spiritual children with zeal; In the second missive, the saint urged priests to be true pastors and not hirelings, and to be concerned about the strengthening of themselves with Christian and pastoral virtues. In the third letter, St Peter again exhorts priests concerning their pastoral obligations, and he urges laypeople to fulfill the commandments of Christ.
died on December 21, 1326. The first transfer of his relics was on July 1, 1472 and a feastday was established. The second transfer of the relics of St Peter was after the consecration of the Dormition Cathedral, rebuilt on August 24, 1479, and the July 1 feastday was replaced.

There was a feastday of the appearance of the relics of St Peter (August 4) upon the occasion of an appearance to the wife of Ivan the Terrible (1533-1584), the Tsaritsa Anastasia (1547-1560). St Peter appeared to Tsaritsa Anastasia and would permit no one to open his grave. He commanded the grave to be sealed and a feastday established.

Three epistles of St Peter are preserved. The first was to priests with an exhortation to pursue their pastoral service worthily, and to tend their spiritual children with zeal. It concluded with an account of Church law concerning widowed priests, and intended to protect them from reproach and temptation. He advised them to settle in a monastery, and for their children to be enrolledin a monastery school for upbringing and instruction. In the second missive, the saint urged priests to be true pastors and not hirelings, and to be concerned about the strengthening of themselves with Christian and pastoral virtues. In the third letter, St Peter again exhorts priests concerning their pastoral obligations, and he urges laypeople to fulfill the commandments of Christ.

Prominent in church-state affairs, there was good reason even for his contemporaries to compare St Peter with Sts Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian and John Chrysostom. The principal effort of St Peter was in the struggle for an unified Russian state and the blessing of Moscow as the unifier of the Russian land
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1325 The Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos "Of St Peter" was so called because it was painted by St Peter, Metropolitan of Moscow (+ December 21, 1326) while he was igumen of the Ratsk monastery near Volhynia. During a visit to the Ratsk monastery by St Maximus, Metropolitan of Kiev and All Russia (+ December 6, 1306), St Peter gave him this icon as a gift. The Metropolitan took it to Vladimir at Klyazma, where his cathedral was then located.

Upon the death of St Maximus, the igumen Gerontius, who wished to become the new metropolitan, intended to take this icon to Patriarch Athanasius of Constantinople (October 24). The journey of Igumen Gerontius was delayed, however, by a terrible storm at sea. During this storm, the Most Holy Theotokos appeared to him and said: "The office of bishop will not be conferred upon you, but rather on the one who painted My Icon."

When he came before Patriarch Athanasius, St Peter was already in Constantinople and had been consecrated as Metropolitan. The Patriarch gave the icon to St Peter with the words: "Take the holy icon of the Mother of God, which you painted with your own hands, for this reason the Ever-Virgin Herself has granted you this gift, and She foretold your path."

St Peter took the icon to Vladimir, and when the metropolitan cathedral was transfered to Moscow in the year 1325, the icon was placed in the Dormition Cathedral above the table of oblation
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1314-1392 The Appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos to St Sergius of Radonezh: Once, late at night, St Sergius (1314-1392) was reading an Akathist to the Mother of God. Having finished his habitual rule, he sat down to rest a bit, but suddenly he said to his disciple, St Micah (May 6): "Be alert, my child, for we shall have a wondrous visitation." Scarcely had he uttered these words than a voice was heard: "The All-Pure One approaches!"

St Sergius rushed from the cell to the entrance, and suddenly it was illumined by a bright light, brighter than the sun. He beheld nearby in imperishable glory the Mother of God, accompanied by the Apostles Peter and John. Unable to bear such a vision, St Sergius reverently prostrated himself before the Mother of God. She said to him, "Fear not, My chosen one! I have come to visit you. Your prayer for your disciples and your monastery has been heard. Do not be troubled, for your habitation shall prosper, not only in your lifetime, but also after your departure to God. I will be with your monastery, supplying its needs abundantly, and protecting it." Having said this, the Mother of God became invisible.

For a long time St Sergius was in an inexpressible rapture, and having come to himself, he raised up St Micah. "Tell me, Father," he asked, "what is the meaning of this miraculous vision? My soul nearly left my body from terror!" But St Sergius was silent, and only his luminous face spoke of the spiritual joy which he had experienced. "Wait a bit," he said finally to his disciple, "my soul also trembles because of this wondrous vision."

After a while St Sergius summoned two of his disciples, Sts Isaac and Simon, and shared with them the vision and the promise of the Theotokos. They all sang a Molieben to the Mother of God. St Sergius spent the remaining part of the night without sleep, calling to mind the divine vision.

The appearance of the Mother of God at the cell of St Sergius, at the present place of the Serapionov chamber, was on one of the Fridays of the Nativity Fast in the year 1385. The commemoration of the visit of the Mother of God to the Trinity monastery and of Her promise was reverently kept by the disciples of St Sergius.

On July 5, 1422 the holy relics of St Sergius were uncovered, and soon after an icon of the Appearance of the Mother of God was placed on the grave of St Sergius. The icon was honored with great reverence.

In the year 1446 Great Prince Basil (1425-1462) was besieged at the Trinity monastery by the armies of Princes Demetrius Shemyaka and John of Mozhaisk. He barricaded himself into the Trinity cathedral, and when he heard that he was being sought, he took the icon of the Appearance of the Mother of God and with it met Prince John at the southern church doors, saying: "Brother, we kissed the Life-Creating Cross and this icon in this church of the Life-Creating Trinity at this grave of the Wonderworker Sergius, that we would neither intend nor wish any evil to any of our brethren among ourselves. Now I do not know no what will happen to me here."

The Trinity monk Ambrose reproduced the icon of the Appearance of the Mother of God to St Sergius, carved in wood (mid-fourteenth century).

Tsar Ivan the Terrible took the icon of the Appearance of the Mother of God on his Kazan campaign (1552). The most famous icon, painted in the year 1588, was by the steward of the Trinity-Sergiev Lavra, Eustathius Golovkin on a board from the wooden reliquary of St Sergius, which was taken apart in the year 1585 when the relics of St Sergius were placed in a silver reliquary (August 14).

Through this icon, the Mother of God repeatedly protected the Russian army. Tsar Aleksei Mikhailovich (1645-1676) took it on the Polish campaign in 1657. In the year 1703, the icon took part in all the military campaigns against the Swedish king Charles XII, and in 1812 Metropolitan Platon sent it to the Moscow military levy. The icon was carried in the Russo-Japanese War of 1905, and during World War I it was at the quarters of the supreme commander-in-chief in 1914.

A church was built over the grave of St Micah and at its consecration on December 10, 1734 was named in honor of the Appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos and the holy Apostles to St Sergius of Radonezh.

On September 27, 1841 the church was restored and consecrated by Metropolitan Philaret of Moscow , who said: "By the grace of the All-Holy and All-Sacred Spirit the restoration of this temple is now accomplished, fashioned before us in honor and memory of the Appearance of our Lady the Most Holy Theotokos to our holy God-bearing Father Sergius, to which St Micah was also an eyewitness."

The commemoration of this grace-bearing event is rightly marked by the consecration of a church, however, this whole monastery is a memorial of that miraculous visit. Therefore, its purpose in the continuing centuries was the fulfillment of the promise of the heavenly Visitor: "This place shall endure."

In memory of the visit of the Mother of God at the Trinity-Sergiev monastery, an Akathist to the Most Holy Theotokos is sung on Fridays, and a special service in honor of the appearance of the Mother of God is celebrated at the monastery on August 24, on the second day of the leave-taking of the Feast of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos .
1550 Saint Arsenius of Komel was born in Moscow, and was descended from a noble family, the Sakharusov. In his youth he was tonsured at the Trinity-Sergiev monastery, and he occupied himself there with the copying of books. There is a Gospel that he copied in the year 1506. In the years 1525-1527 the monk was igumen at the Trinity-Sergiev monastery. He often withdrew to the solitary Makrisch monastery. Great Prince Basil IV (1505-1533), making a visit to the monastery at that time, was surprised to behold the igumen of a prosperous monastery in old clothes covered with patches. The brethren explained that St Arsenius wished to travel in the wilderness.

Setting out together with his own cell elder to the Komel forest located 50 versts from Vologda, St Arsenius made a large wooden cross, and with this cross on his shoulders he set out through the forest to pick out a spot for a future monastery. Coming to a marshy place through a swamp, the monk stumbled under the heavy cross and fell. A heavenly beam of light flashed upon the ascetic at this very moment and convinced him to establish his monastery on this site. He set up the cross and built the first cell.

The local inhabitants, went there to hunt wild animals, and killed the disciple of St Arsenius. He himself was forced to withdraw into the Shelegod forest. Several monks soon gathered at his new monastery, and afterwards fugitives from a Tatar incursion upon the surrounding populace settled there. St Arsenius, seeking after silence, desired to live in a quieter spot.

In the year 1530 Great Prince Basil gave him a deed for land in the Komel forest at the Kokhtisha River. The monk began here to clear the forest together with his disciple Gerasimus. By prayer, the saint tamed the wild beasts. When several monks had gathered about him, he built a church in honor of the Placing of the Veil of the Most Holy Theotokos.

Visiting the Shelegod monastery, the monk instructed the peasants who had settled in the area of the monastery. He bid them reverently to observe feastdays and Sundays. Once when a peasant who had heard him started to work on a feastday, a wind suddenly arose scattering all his sheaves.

Having spent his life in fasting, prayer and constant work, St Arsenius died on August 24. 1550. His Life was written soon after his death, but burned in a fire in the Komel monastery in 1596. In shortened form, it was restored from the surviving manuscripts and augmented with posthumous miracles by John, a monk of the monastery.

A hundred years later after the death of the saint, the igumen Joasaph built a stone church at the monastery in honor of the Placing of the Veil of the Most Holy Theotokos. Two chapels of this church show the spiritual bond of teacher and disciple. The left chapel was dedicated to St Sergius of Radonezh, and the right to St Arsenius of Komel
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1774 Saint Serapion was abbot of the Monastery of St. John the Baptist in the Davit-Gareji Wilderness. He was endowed by God with the ability to work miracles.
Once St. Serapion set off for the city, following at a short distance behind several of the monastery’s brothers.

While they were traveling, a group of bandits attacked the monks who were walking in front of their abbot and made off with many of the church vessels they were carrying.

Terrified, the monks ran back to Serapion and told him what had happened.

“Great is God!” said Serapion. “I will not permit the unbelievers to steal His sacred things!”

With staff in hand, the elder raced ahead alone in pursuit of the robbers. When the robbers turned back they saw a terrible flame issuing forth from the elder’s staff and became greatly afraid. They abandoned the donkey that had been carrying their spoils and took to their heels. Another time Serapion suddenly burst out of his cell and cried to the brothers, “Woe is me! Woe is me! Robbers have attacked the servants on their way to the monastery!”

Having made this frightening announcement, he returned to his cell and began to pray. After a few hours the distraught servants arrived at the monastery and reported that bandits had attacked them along the way. The servants said that, when fleeing their attackers, they had abandoned the mules that were hauling the monastery’s property. A short time later the mules arrived at the monastery unaccompanied, bearing their load as before.

St. Serapion eventually abandoned his leadership of the monastery. He was tonsured into the great schema and withdrew into seclusion. Soon after, God revealed to him that his death was near, and he asked the brothers to bury him under the church gates, in a grave that he had prepared for himself. He intended for all who entered there to walk over his grave.
St. Serapion reposed in the year 1774.
1779 Cosmas The New Hieromartyr , Equal of the Apostles, in the world Constas, was a native of Aitolia. He studied at first under the guidance of the archdeacon Ananias Dervisanos, and afterwards continued his education on Mount Athos, at the Vatopedi school renowned for teachers such as Nicholas Tzartzoulios (from Metsovo) and Eugenius Voulgaris (afterwards in the years 1775-1779 the archbishop of Ekaterinoslav and the Chersonessus).

Remaining on Athos at the Philotheou monastery to devote himself to spiritual labors, he was tonsured a monk with the name Cosmas, and later was ordained hieromonk. The desire to benefit his fellow Christians, to guide them upon the way of salvation and strengthen their faith, impelled St Cosmas to seek the blessing of his spiritual fathers and go to Constantinople. There he mastered the art of rhetoric and, having received a written permit of Patriarch Seraphim II (and later from his successor Sophronius) to preach the Holy Gospel.

So the saint began to proclaim the Gospel at first in the churches of Constantinople and the surrounding villages, then in the Danube regions, in Thessalonica, in Verroia, in Macedonia, Chimaera, Akarnania, Aitolia, on the islands of Saint Maura, Kephalonia and other places.

His preaching, filled with the grace of the Holy Spirit, was simple, calm, and gentle. It brought Christians great spiritual benefit. The Lord Himself assisted him and confirmed his words with signs and miracles, just as He had confirmed the preaching of the Apostles.

Preaching in the remote areas of Albania, where Christian piety had almost disappeared among the rough and coarse people entrenched in sin, St Cosmas led them to sincere repentance and improvement with the Word of God.

Under his guidance, church schools were opened in the towns and villages. The rich offered their money for the betterment of the churches, for the purchase of Holy Books (which the saint distributed to the literate), veils (which he gave women, admonishing them to come to church with covered heads),for prayer ropes and crosses (which he distributed to the common folk), and for baptismal fonts so that children could be baptized in the proper manner.

Since the churches could not accommodate everyone wanting to hear the wise preacher, St Cosmas with forty or fifty priests served the Vigil in the fields, and in city squares, where thousands of people prayed for the living and for the dead, and were edified by his preaching. Everywhere that St Cosmas halted and preached, the grateful listeners set up a large wooden cross, which remained thereafter in memory of this.

The apostolic service of St Cosmas was brought to a close by his martyric death in the year 1779. At 65 years of age, he was seized by the Turks and strangled. His body was thrown into a river, and after three days, was found by the priest Mark and buried near the village of Kolikontasi at the monastery of the Entrance into the Temple of the Most Holy Theotokos. Afterwards, part of his relics were transferred to various places as a blessing.
He was glorified by the Ecumenical Patriarchate in 1961.
1828 St. Jane Antide Thouret Foundress Daughters of Charity
Neápoli in Campánia, sanctæ Joánnæ Antidæ Thouret, Vírginis, Institúti Sorórum a Caritáte Fundatrícis, quam Pius Papa Undécimus in album sanctárum Vírginum rétulit.
    At Naples in Campania, St. Joan Antide Thouret, virgin, who founded the Daughters of Saint Vincent de Paul, and whom Pope Pius XI added to the catalogue of holy virgins.

Foundress of the Institute of the Daughters of Charity in 1798. Jane entered the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul but was forced to return to secular life by the French Revolution. In Besancon France, she started a school for poor girls which later became the Daughters of Char­ity. She was canonized by Pope Pius XI



1854 Massíliæ, in Gállia, sanctæ Æmíliæ de Vialár, Vírginis, Fundatrícis Institúti Sorórum a sancto Joseph ab Apparitióne, fortitúdine, patiéntia et caritáte insígnis, quam Pius Duodécimus, Póntifex Máximus, in Sanctárum númerum rétulit.
    At Marseilles in France, St. Emily de Vialar, virgin, foundress of the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Apparition.  A shining example of fortitude, patience and charity, the Sovereign Pontiff Pius XII added her to the number of the saints.

Emily de Vialar feast day June 17
1865 SAINT MARY MICAELA Foundress of Sisters consecrated especially to the Blessed Sacrament (1809-1865)

Maria Soledad Micaela Desmaisieres y Lopez de Dicastillo, often called Madre Sacramento because she founded a religious Order of Sisters consecrated especially to the Blessed Sacrament, was born in Madrid on the first day of January, 1809, during a time of political unrest. From the age of nine to twelve, she was a pupil of the Ursulines of the city of Pau in France. At the age of thirteen, she lost her noble father, a general in the royal army. Her life as she grew older was divided between religious duties, which attracted her, and social ones involving trips, festivals and visits. In 1844, when she visited the Hospital of Saint John of God in Madrid, she saw with compassion the plight of young girls living a disordered life, and in 1845 established a school to re-educate them. She personally took on the direction of the school in January of 1849, and gave it new force.

She resolved in 1847 to live for God alone, and in Paris, during the same year on Pentecost, received a mystical grace of union with God. She was drawn to an ardent love for Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, as well as to an apostolate for the feminine youth of Madrid. Until 1856, she dedicated herself entirely to the school she had founded there, and then founded the Institute of Religious Adorer-Slaves of the Most Blessed Sacrament and of Charity. She was directed by Saint Anthony Mary Claret for several years after 1857; and the foundations multiplied. She promoted and animated various apostolic works for the laity — the Conferences of Saint Vincent de Paul, Sunday Schools for public school children; she counseled the Sisters of the Love of God at Zamora, at the request of their founder. Her Institute of the Blessed Sacrament was definitively approved by the Holy See in 1866, a year after the death of the Foundress on August 24, 1865, a victim of her charity for the cholera victims of Valencia.

For Madre Sacramento, religious consecration is a service of love. The religious is at the disposition of God to procure His glory; and God gives Himself to her, as she has given herself to Him. For God she loves suffering as a proof of love. The Foundress herself, in the last four years of her life, made the exceptional vow to choose what appeared to her as most perfect, in the practice of her vows of poverty, chastity and obedience; this vow requires a total and heroic gift of self. She was beatified in 1925 and canonized on March 4, 1934 by Pope Pius XI.


 Wednesday   Saints of this Day August  24 Nono Kaléndas Septémbris.   
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  August 2016
Universal:   That sports may be an opportunity for friendly encounters between peoples and may contribute to peace in the world.
Evangelization:  That Christians may live the Gospel, giving witness to faith, honesty, and love of neighbor.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
     
                                           
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish
 -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'  Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
 'The Gospel of Life'


"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
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Widowed Saints  html
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