Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
 Friday  Saints of this Day December  02 Quarto Nonas Decémbris  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }

The saints “a cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Humility is the only thing that no devil can imitate. If pride made demons out of angels, there is no doubt that humility could make angels out of demons. -- St John Climacus

I prayed for eighteen years for her
December 2 – Foundation of the Fraternity of Mary’s Heart at the Church of Notre-Dame des Victoires (Paris, France, 1836)

When faith is strong it works wonders (Mk 16:17).
Its apeal is never refused (Mk 9:23) especially when it asks for forgiveness of sin (Lk 7:50) and for that salvation of which it is the necessary condition (Lk 8:12, Mk 16;16 cf. Ac 3:16 +).

"As a priest, one day I got an urgent call to go see a woman with a brain tumor who was usually unconscious. But when I came to the patient, she was fully awake! Although I asked her if she wanted to confess her sins, she refused. As I was getting ready to leave, she changed her mind and asked for confession and the Holy Viaticum. Moments later, she fell back into a coma...
"I thought when I got home that someone must have been praying a lot for that soul. She regained consciousness just when I arrived—for me to be able to administer the sacraments while she was fully lucid—I don’t see any other explanation... She died soon afterwards.

"Two weeks later, the mother of the deceased arrived. She had come from Budapest to find out about her daughter’s death. Immense joy appeared on her face when she learned that her daughter had accepted the last rites with full knowledge!"

'"My heart felt such relief,"' "the pious woman later said." '"I have been praying for 18 years for her conversion, ever since she lost her faith and fled Hungary with some German soldiers at the end of the war. Thank God, now I know she is saved... "'
An initiative of the Association Mary of Nazareth  
Collection of Marian Stories Story told by Brother Albert Pfleger
In Fioretti de la Vierge Marie, Ephèse Diffusion


December 2 - Our Lady of Didynia (Cappadocia)   A Time of Waiting Unique in World History (I)
While the Blessed Virgin was on earth, all Israel was awaiting "the One to come"

    When she was a little child, the Virgin Mary waited, in the midst of her people Israel, for the coming of the Messiah, who had been heralded not just by only one prophet, but by a long succession of men who, as time went by over the centuries, foretold and kept adding to previous prophecies. She waited in the midst of a small nation, tossed by history, which had survived every confrontation with the empires surrounding it and which was to remain the only nation that was able to resist the break-up of the ancient world and to preserve its identity intact. Israel always held on to the unshakeable knowledge that it was destined to be the instrument of divine providence and have a global significance. The time of the Messiah's coming, clearly yet mysteriously heralded by the prophets, was constantly sought. And this period of expectancy and fulfillment had become so clearly defined and precise at this particular moment in history, that more than 100 Messianic candidates had been identified by the historians. "As the people were in expectation" (Lk 3:15) when John the Baptist appeared, they all asked him, "Are you He who is to come, or shall we look for another?" (Lk 7:19). This was an absolutely unique period in history, and, according to many experts, this singular aspect of Christianity is, of itself, sufficient to set it apart in the religious history of the world. Source: Jesus Hypotheses by Vittorio Messori, Saint Paul Pubns. (1978)

December 2 – Establishment of the Fraternity of the Holy Heart of Mary at Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church (Paris, France, 1836) 
 
“Anthony, if you win this victory, this crown is for you!”
Anthony Claret was born in 1807 in Spain near Montserrat, a shrine dedicated to the Virgin Mary. As a young child, he already had a strong devotion to the Madonna. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1835.

One day, Anthony was forced to stay in bed with a bad ‘flu. As he shook with fever, impure images came into his mind. So he called on the Blessed Virgin for help. She appeared to him holding in her hands a crown of roses. “Anthony,” she said, “if you win this victory, this crown is for you!” Anthony triumphed over temptation and calm returned to his soul.

His apostolate was particularly effective because of his deep devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Wherever he went, he established the Confraternity of the Holy Heart of Mary and pushed for the recitation of the family Rosary. But his master-achievement was his founding of the Congregation of the Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (the Claretian Missionaries) in Catalonia on July 16, 1849.

Appointed Archbishop of Cuba in 1849, to mark his gratitude to the Blessed Virgin, he added the name of Mary to his name. In Cuba, Father Antony Mary Claret founded the "Institute of the Religious of Mary Immaculate, the Claretian Missionaries" for the education of girls.  www.notredamedesvictoires.com

 
When faith is strong it works wonders (Mk 16:17).

 Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  December 2016
Universal: End to Child-Soldiers.
That the scandal of child-soldiers may be eliminated the world over.
Evangelization: Europe  That the peoples of Europe may rediscover the beauty, goodness, and
truth of the Gospel which gives joy and hope to life.
Wednesday, December 2
- 650 bc The Holy Prophet Habakkuk (Abbacum) 8th of the Twelve Minor Prophets foresaw destruction of Jerusalem Temple, the Babylonian Captivity and later return of captives
250 Martyr Myrope of Chios; myrrh from Hermione relics, daughter of the holy Apostle Philip, healed the sick; St Isidore appeared surrounded by angels; St Myrope surrendered soul to God
Greek Calendar  Martyr Abibus the New.  St. Ioannicius of Devich, monk.  Venerable Joannicius of Devic
  "One must pass through solitude and dwell in it to receive God’s grace.
It is there that one empties oneself, that one drives before oneself all that is not God,
and that one completely empties this little house of our soul to leave room for God alone. 

Charles de Foucald, founder of the Little Brothers and Sisters of Jesus.


- 650 bc The Holy Prophet Habakkuk (Abbacum) 8th of the Twelve Minor Prophets foresaw
        destruction of Jerusalem Temple, the Babylonian Captivity and later return of captives
250 Martyr Myrope of Chios; myrrh from Hermione relics, daughter of the holy Apostle Philip,
       healed the sick; St Isidore appeared surrounded by angels & St Myrope surrendered soul to God
259 St. Pontian  Martyr of Rome
3rd v. Saint Evasius (Italian: Sant'Evasio)
4th v. St. Bibiana Virgin Martyr
4th v. Sts.  John & others of Egypt thebaid Heraclemon, Andrew, &Theophilus of Egypt Also 12 June
406 St. Chromatius Bishop Pope Synod of Aquileia condemned Arianism 381praised by St. Jerome
       ST. CHROMATIUS INVITES US TO ENTER INTO CONTACT WITH GOD
600 St Jesse (Ise), Bishop of Tsilkan in Georgia born Antioch Syria great gifts of prayer wonderworking moved a river
        St. Lupus Bishop of Verona
       
St. Solomon, Archbishop of Ephesus.
        St. Cyril of Phileotes in Greece.

1176 Saint Athanasius, hermit of the Near Caves of Kiev contemporary of archimandrite St Polycarp miracles; relics
        are in the Near Caves

1314 St Stephen Urosh, King of Serbia faithful to Lord provided for widows orphans pacified quarrels maintained
        peace charitable to  poor defended downtrodden
1381 Saint John [Jan] of Ruysbroeck, priest First Prior of Groenendaal and Mystic
1741 Blessed Rafal Chylinski Franciscan
Apud Forum Cornélii, in Æmília, natális sancti Petri, Epíscopi Ravennátis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris, cognoménto Chrysólogi, doctrína et sanctitáte célebris.  Ipsíus tamen festum prídie Nonas hujus mensis recólitur.
    At Imola, St. Peter Chrysologus, bishop of Ravenna, confessor and doctor of the Church, celebrated for his learning and sanctity.  His feast is celebrated on the 4th of this month.

December 2 - Our Lady of Consolation and Providence (1749) -
Fraternity of the Immaculate Heart of Mary at Notre Dame of Victories Church (Paris, 1836)

Consecrate Your Parish to the Holy and Immaculate Heart of Mary (I)
The parish of Notre Dame of Victories, located in the business center of Paris, near the Stock Exchange,
is surrounded by theatres and nightclubs and had become the central point for political demonstrations,
agitating Paris for many years. The parish had seen almost all feeling and religious inclination die out in its midst;
its church was deserted, even on days of important solemnities; sacraments and other religious practices had been given up, and nothing seemed able to put an end to this deplorable state of affairs,
which had existed for more than ten years.
On December 3, 1836, the feast day of Saint Francis Xavier at 9:00 a.m., I began Holy Mass at the foot of the altar of the Blessed Virgin; I was reciting the first verse of the psalm, when terrible thoughts assailed my mind.
I started thinking about the uselessness of my ministry in that parish; it was not unusual for me to have these thoughts, I had had so many different occasions to notice and remind myself of the fact.
I felt that I had failed in my ministry and I wanted to resign my functions at Notre Dame of Victories.

Despite all my efforts to dispel these unhappy thoughts, I was so overwhelmed that my mental faculties were boggled;
I began reading and reciting the prayers without understanding what I was saying. After reciting the Sanctus,
I stopped for a moment, seeking to recollect myself; so frightened had I become by my strange state of mind,
I said to myself, "Dear God, what is happening to my mind? How can I offer the Divine Sacrifice?
My mind is not in a normal state to consecrate.
Oh my God, deliver me from this unhappy distraction!" Hardly had I uttered this prayer in my heart
when I very distinctly heard these words spoken to me in a clear and solemn way,
"Consecrate your parish to the Holy and Immaculate Heart of Mary."
Father Desgenettes, priest at Notre Dame of Victories Church (Paris, d. 1860)
In Sanciáno, Sinárum ínsula, item natális sancti Francísci Xavérii, Sacerdótis e Societáte Jesu et Confessóris, Indiárum Apóstoli, géntium conversióne, donis et miráculis clari; qui plenus méritis et labóribus obdormívit in Dómino.  Ipsum beátum virum Pius Décimus, Póntifex Máximus, cæléstem sodalitáti et óperi Propagándæ Fídei Protectórem elégit atque constítuit; Pius vero Papa Undécimus peculiárem ómnibus Missiónibus Patrónum dedit et confirmávit.  Ejus autem festívitas, jussu Alexándri Papæ Séptimi, sequénti die celebrátur.
   

In Sanchan, an island of China, the birthday of St. Francis Xavier, priest of the Society of Jesus, confessor and Apostle of the Indies.  He was renowned for his conversion of the heathen, his gifts and miracles, and he was filled with merits and good works when he fell asleep in the Lord.  Pope Pius X chose and appointed him the heavenly protector of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith and of the work for the same object.  Pope Pius XI confirmed this and appointed him the special patron of all the Foreign Missions.  His feast, by decree of Pope Alexander VII, is kept on the following day.

  Greek Calendar  Martyr Abibus the New.  St. Ioannicius of Devich, monk.  Venerable Joannicius of Devic
  "One must pass through solitude and dwell in it to receive God’s grace.
It is there that one empties oneself, that one drives before oneself all that is not God,
and that one completely empties this little house of our soul to leave room for God alone. 
In doing this, do not fear being unfaithful toward creatures. 
On the contrary, that is the only way for you to serve them effectively"
Charles de Foucald, founder of the Little Brothers and Sisters of Jesus  (Raphael Brown, Franciscan Mystic, p. 126).

406 St. Chromatius Bishop Synod of Aquileia condemned Arianism 381 praised by St. Jerome
"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Apud Forum Cornélii, in Æmília, natális sancti Petri, Epíscopi Ravennátis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris, cognoménto Chrysólogi, doctrína et sanctitáte célebris.  Ipsíus tamen festum prídie Nonas hujus mensis recólitur.
    At Imola, St. Peter Chrysologus, bishop of Ravenna, confessor and doctor of the Church, celebrated for his learning and sanctity.  His feast is celebrated on the 4th of this month.

In Sanciáno, Sinárum ínsula, item natális sancti Francísci Xavérii, Sacerdótis e Societáte Jesu et Confessóris, Indiárum Apóstoli, géntium conversióne, donis et miráculis clari; qui plenus méritis et labóribus obdormívit in Dómino.  Ipsum beátum virum Pius Décimus, Póntifex Máximus, cæléstem sodalitáti et óperi Propagándæ Fídei Protectórem elégit atque constítuit; Pius vero Papa Undécimus peculiárem ómnibus Missiónibus Patrónum dedit et confirmávit.  Ejus autem festívitas, jussu Alexándri Papæ Séptimi, sequénti die celebrátur.
    In Sanchan, an island of China, the birthday of St. Francis Xavier, priest of the Society of Jesus, confessor and Apostle of the Indies.  He was renowned for his conversion of the heathen, his gifts and miracles, and he was filled with merits and good works when he fell asleep in the Lord.  Pope Pius X chose and appointed him the heavenly protector of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith and of the work for the same object.  Pope Pius XI confirmed this and appointed him the special patron of all the Foreign Missions.  His feast, by decree of Pope Alexander VII, is kept on the following day.
November 19 / December 2, Tuesday
Prophet Obadiah (Abdias). Martyr Barlaam of Caesarea in Cappadocia. (services combined) St. Barlaam and St. Ioasaph, prince of India, and St. Abenner the king, father of St. Ioasaph. Martyr Azes of Isauria and with him 150 soldiers. Martyr Heliodorus in Pamphylia. St. Barlaam, abbot of the Kiev Caves. St. Hilarion, monk, Wonderworker of Thessalonica.
(Greek Calendar: Martyr Agapius. Martyrs Anthimus, Thalalaeus, Christopher, Euphemia and her children. Martyr Pancharius.) Repose of Metropolitan Philaret of Moscow (1867).
230  Pope Saint Pontian or Pontianus, was pope from July 21, to September 28, 235
ST PONTIAN, POPE AND MARTYR
PONTIAN, who is said to have been Roman, followed St Urban I as bishop of Rome about the year 230. The only known event of his pontificate is the synod held at Rome that confirmed the condemnation already pronounced at Alexandria of certain doctrines attributed to Origen. At the beginning of the persecution by the Emperor Maximinus the pope was exiled to Sardinia, an island described as nociva, "unhealthy“, whereby perhaps the mines were meant; here he resigned his office. How much longer he lived and the manner of his death are not known: traditionally life was beaten out of him with sticks. Some years later Pope St Fabian translated his body to the cemetery of St Callistus in Rome, where in 1909 his original epitaph was found: PONTIANOC EPICK MPT, the last word having been added later. 


- 650 bc The Holy Prophet Habakkuk 8th of the Twelve Minor Prophets foresaw destruction of Jerusalem Temple, the Babylonian Captivity and later return of captives to their native land.
descended from Tribe of Simeon he prophesied  650 B.C.

During the war with the Babylonians the prophet withdrew to Arabia, where the following miracle occurred.
When he was bringing dinner to the reapers, he met an angel of the Lord, and instantly by the strength of his spirit he was transported to Babylon, where at the time the Prophet Daniel was languishing in prison.
The food intended for the reapers assuaged the hunger of the exhausted Prophet Daniel (Dan. 14:33-37).


After the end of the war with the Babylonians, the Prophet Habakkuk returned to his homeland and died at a great old age. His relics were found at the time of Emperor Theodosius he Younger (408-450), together with the relics of the Prophet Micah (August 14).
The Fourth Ode of the Psalter ("O Lord, I have heard thy report, and was afraid...") is based on Habakkuk 3:2-19.
Habakkuk
    The short Book of Habakkuk is very carefully constructed. It opens with a dialogue between the prophet and his God; twice the prophet complains, twice the divine oracle answers, 1:2-2:4. The second oracle calls down five curses on the wicked oppressor, 2:5-20. Next, in a psalm, the prophet celebrates the final triumph of God, ch. 3. The authorship of this last chapter has been disputed, but without it the composition would lose its symmetry. The musical instructions that precede, punctuate and follow the psalm merely prove that it was used liturgically. That the whole book was so used is doubtful; the liturgical quality of its style was probably more imitative than functional.
    The historical context of the prophecy and the identification of the oppressor are both doubtful. The Assyrians, the Chaldaeans, and even Jehoiakim, king of Judah, have been suggested. It seems most likely that the book refers throughout to the Chaldaeans, named in 1:6. God has made use of them to punish his people but they in their turn will be punished for their excessive cruelty, since Yahweh is on the march to save his people; the prophet awaits this intervention with an anxiety that finally gives way to joy. If this interpretation is correct, the book should be dated between the battle of Carchemish in 605 (which made Nebuchadnezzar master of the Middle East) and the first siege of Jerusalem in 597. Thus Habakkuk would be very little later than Nahum and, like him, a contemporary of Jeremiah.

Habakkuk sounds a note new to the teaching of the prophets; he has the temerity to demand an account from God of his ordering of the world. Judah indeed has sinned, but why should a God of holiness, 1:12, with eyes too pure to look at evil, 1:13, choose the savage Chaldaeans to wreak his vengeance? Why must the bad be punished by the worse? Why should he appear to strengthen the arm of injustice?
This is the problem of evil posed at international level and Habakkuk’s dismay is felt by many people today. To them as to him comes the divine answer: by paradoxical ways almighty God prepares the final triumph of justice; trusting in God, the virtuous man’s life will be secure, cf. 2:4, a precious maxim of Habakkuk’s which St Paul will later incorporate into his teaching on faith, Rm 1:17; Ga 3:11; Heb 10:38.
250 Martyr Myrope of Chios; myrrh from Hermione relics, daughter of the holy Apostle Philip, healed the sick; St Isidore appeared surrounded by angels and St Myrope surrendered her soul to God

The Holy Martyr Myrope was born in the city of Ephesus at the beginning of the third century. She lost her father at an early age, and her mother raised her in the Christian Faith. St Myrope frequently visited the grave of the Martyr Hermione (September 4), daughter of the holy Apostle Philip, took myrrh from her relics, and healed the sick with it.

During the persecution by Decius (249-251), Myrope went with her mother to the island of Chios, where they spent their time in fasting and prayer. Once, by order of the cruel governor of the island, the soldier Isidore (May 14), a man of deep faith and great piety, was martyred. St Myrope secretly removed the body of the martyr and buried it. The soldiers, who had been ordered not to allow the Christians to take Isidore's body, were sentenced to death.

St Myrope took pity on the condemned, and she told the soldiers and then the governor what she had done. At the trial she confessed herself a Christian. For this they gave her a fierce beating and then threw her in prison. At midnight, while she was praying, a light shone in the prison. St Isidore appeared surrounded by angels, and St Myrope surrendered her soul to God. The prison was immediately filled with a sweet fragrance. The pagan guard, trembling at the vision, told this to a priest. Later, he accepted Baptism and a martyric death for his confession of Christ.
St. Lupus Bishop of Verona Italy
Verónæ sancti Lupi, Epíscopi et Confessóris.    At Verona, St. Lupus, bishop and confessor.
In Africa natális sanctórum Mártyrum Sevéri, Secúri, Januárii et Victoríni; qui ibídem martyrio coronáti sunt.
    In Africa, the birthday of the holy martyrs Severus, Securus, Januarius, and Victorinus, who were there crowned with martyrdom.

Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum Eusébii Presbyteri, Marcélli Diáconi, Hippólyti, Máximi, Adriæ, Paulínæ, Neónis, Maríæ, Martánæ et Auréliæ; qui omnes in persecutióne Valeriáni, sub Secundiáno Júdice, martyrium complevérunt.
    At Rome, the holy martyrs Eusebius, a priest, Marcellus, a deacon, Hippolytus, Maximus, Adria, Paulina, Neon, Mary, Martana, and Aurelia, who fulfilled their martyrdoms under the judge Secundian in the persecution of Valerian.

259 St. Pontian  Martyr of Rome
Item Romæ sancti Pontiáni Mártyris, cum áliis quátuor.    Also at Rome, St. Pontian, martyr, with four others.
He was put to death with four other Christians during the persecutions of the Church under Emperor Valerian.
3rd v. Saint Evasius (Italian: Sant'Evasio)
Bríxiæ sancti Evásii Epíscopi.    At Brescia, St. Evasius, bishop.
Believed a missionary and bishop of Asti, in north-west Italy. He was forced to flee to the great Padan forest known as the Selva Cornea, where he and numerous followers were beheaded by pagan, or alternatively by Arian, enemies in the area of what is now Casale Monferrato. He is venerated as a saint and patron of a number of towns in Piedmont and Lombardy. His cult is liveliest at Casale, where his remains are conserved in the cathedral dedicated to him.
Evasio_e_Pietro_martire.jpg

No account of Evasius’s life is regarded by scholars of hagiography as reliable. According to the Historia e vita di Sant'Evasio Vescovo e Martire by the Augustinian Fulgenzio Emiglio, published in 1708, he was born in Benevento, moved to Rome in 260 and was sent as a bishop to Asti in 265. There he suffered persecution at the hands of pagan opponents of Christianity and was forced to leave the town. The earliest account of the story, the anonymous Passio Sancti Evasii, which has been variously dated at early eleventh-century, tenth-century and ninth-century, sets it in the times of the Lombard king Luitprand, who reigned during the years 712–744.
In the versions deriving from the latter Evasius’s opponents were Lombard adherents of Arian Christianity, rather than pagans. Still other accounts place his life during the fourth century and have him consecrated as Asti’s first bishop around 330. Carbon dating of his relics (assuming that they are genuine) favours the third-century hypothesis.

It is said that following his flight from Asti, Evasius took refuge in the forest known as Selva Cornea along with two companions Proietto and Maliano and probably a third, Natale. At the site of today’s Pozzo Sant’Evasio, near Casale, a miracle occurred. The bishop, tired from his journey, pushed his crozier into the ground and lay down to sleep. The pastoral staff set root and blossomed and a spring appeared at its foot.

Evasius continued his work of conversion in Casale (then perhaps known as Sedula, or Sedulia), founded a small church dedicated to Lawrence the Deacon and attracted numerous followers. (The remains of such a church exist beneath the current cathedral.) In some accounts he is identified as the first bishop of Casale.

Again, however, the saint attracted fierce opposition and he was beheaded along with Proietto, Maliano and 143 companions, on the orders of the prefect (or duke or sculdascio) Atubolo. Skeletal analysis of his remains suggests that Evasius died at about the age of 60.

In the version of his life which sets it in the third century the date of Evasius’s martyrdom is given as 1 December 292, during the reign of Diocletian whose later persecution of Christians is well-known. For the version of the story which places it in the first part of the eighth century, the context is that of the struggle between those Lombards who remained attached to their Arian beliefs and the soon-to-be-victorious Trinitarian new guard, associated particularly with the Catholic Theodolinda who had been Lombard queen from 588 to 628, and to which King Luitprand belonged.
4th v. St. Bibiana Virgin Martyr
Romæ pássio sanctæ Bibiánæ, Vírginis et Mártyris, quæ, sub Juliáno Imperatóre sacrílego, ob Christum támdiu plumbátis cæsa est, donec rédderet spíritum.
    At Rome, the martyrdom of the saintly virgin Bibiana, under the sacrilegious Emperor Julian.  For the sake of our Lord she was scourged with leaded whips until she expired.
ST BIBIANA, OR VIVIANA, VIRGIN AND MARTYR
THE church of St Bibiana in the city of Rome existed in the fifth century and is said by the Liber Pontificalis to have been dedicated by Pope St Simplicius {468-483} and to have contained her body. But of the time at which she suffered and the circumstances of her passion nothing certain is known. The notices of her and her family in the Roman Martyrology, and the lessons of her feast in the Roman Breviary, are taken from a late legend which is a quite untrustworthy compilation. According to it St Bibiana suffered under the Emperor Julian the Apostate {331-363}.
   She was a native of Rome, and daughter to Flavian, exprefect of the city, and his wife, Dafrosa, who were both zealous Christians. Flavian was apprehended, burned in the face with a hot iron, and banished to Acquapendente, as the Roman Martyrology asserts on the twenty-second of this month. After his death his wife, Dafrosa, being equally faithful to Christ, was on the same account confined to her house for some time, and at length beheaded. Bibiana and her sister, Demetria, were stripped of all they had in the world and suffered much from poverty for five months, but spent that time in their own house in fasting and prayer. At length, brought into court, Demetria fell down dead in the presence of the judge, who gave orders that Bibiana should be put into the hands of a woman named Rufina, who was extremely artful and undertook to bring her to another way of thinking. But Rufina’s blandishments were tried in vain on St Bibiana, and when they failed to tempt her from the way of faith and chastity blows were found to be just as fruitless.
   She was tied to a pillar and whipped with scourges loaded with lead: and so she died. Her body was left in the open air that it might be eaten by scavenging dogs. But they would not touch it, and, having lain exposed two days, it was buried in the night near the palace of Licinius by a priest called John, in the same house where lay her mother and sister.

   This John is associated with St Pimenius who was the tutor of the Emperor Julian before he apostatized. When Julian began persecuting, Pimenius escaped to Persia and thus survived all the other personages in the story. Returning at length to Rome he met Julian in the street, whereupon the emperor said, Glory be to my gods and goddesses because I see you. To which the saint replied, Glory be to my Lord Jesus Christ, the Nazarene who was crucified, because I see you not. Whereupon Julian ordered him to be thrown off the bridge into the Tiber.
But the whole legend, as Delehaye shows, has been evolved from slightly older hagiographical fictions of the same character,
   particularly those connected with the story of SS John and Paul. It is possible that the name Pimenius is simply an adaptation
   of the Greek word Ποιμην, which means “shep­herd”, and that thus we get into touch with “ St Pastor . The story of St
   Bibiana has been very fully discussed by Delehaye in his Étude suret legendier romain (1936), pp. 124-143 and in an
   appendix (pp. 259—268) he has edited the two texts which are of particular importance. These respectively bear the headings
   Passia Sancti Pygmenii and Vita Sancti Pastoris. Pimenius or Pygmenius is in fact the central figure of this setting of the
   legend, and it is his name, not that of Bibiana, which is com­memorated in the Hieronymianum. See further M. E. Donckel’s
   article
Studien uber den Kultus der hl. Bibiana in the Römische Quartalschrift, vol. xliii (1935), pp. 23—33, and Quentin,
   Les martyrologes historiques, pp. 494—495. Because St Bibiana is represented in her story as having been locked up with
   mad people she was widely honoured as a patron of the insane and epileptics.


 We have the following account from a later tradition.
In the year 363, Julian the Apostate made Apronianus Governor of Rome. St. Bibiana suffered in the persecution started by him. She was the daughter of Christians, Flavian, a Roman knight, and Dafrosa, his wife. Flavian was tortured and sent into exile, where he died of his wounds. Dafrosa was beheaded, and their two daughters, Bibiana and Demetria, were stripped of their possessions and left to suffer poverty. However, they remained in their house, spending their time in fasting and prayer.Apronianus, seeing that hunger and want had no effect upon them, summoned them. Demetria, after confessing her Faith, fell dead at the feet of the tyrant. St. Bibiana was reserved for greater sufferings. She was placed in the hands of a wicked woman called Rufina, who in vain endeavored to seduce her. She used blows as well as persuasion, but the Christian virgin remained faithful.
4th v. Sts.  John and others of Egypt.
Saint John lived in Egypt in the fourth century, and is mentioned in the Life of St Onuphrius.

St Heraclemon of Egypt Saint Heraclemon lived in Egypt in the fourth century, and is mentioned in the Life of St Onuphrius.
St Andrew of Egypt Saint Andrew lived in Egypt in the fourth century, and is mentioned in the Life of St Onuphrius.
St Theophilus of Egypt Saint Theophilus lived in Egypt in the fourth century, and is mentioned in the Life of St Onuphrius.

After he had buried St Onuphrius, St Paphnutius came upon an oasis which impressed him with its beauty and abundance of fruit-bearing trees.

Four youths inhabiting this place came to him from out of the wilderness. The youths told Abba Paphnutius that in their childhood they had lived in the city of Oxyrhynchus (Upper Thebaid) and they had studied together. They had burned with the desire to devote their lives to God.
Making their plans to go off into the desert, the young men left the city and after several days' journey, they reached this place.

A man radiant with heavenly glory met them and led them to a desert Elder. "We have lived here six years already," said the youths. "Our Elder dwelt here one year and then he died. Now we live here alone, we eat the fruit of the trees, and we have water from a spring." The youths gave him their names, they were Sts John, Andrew, Heraclemon and Theophilus (Dec. 2).

The youths struggled separately the whole week long, but on Saturday and Sunday they gathered at the oasis and offered up common prayer. On these days an angel would appear and commune them with the Holy Mysteries. This time however, for Abba Paphnutius' sake, they did not go off into the desert, but spent the whole week together at prayer. On the following Saturday and Sunday St Paphnutius together with the youths was granted to receive the Holy Mysteries from the hands of the angel and to hear these words,
"Receive the Imperishable Food, unending bliss and life eternal, the Body and Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ, our God."
St Paphnutius made bold to ask the angel for permission to remain in the desert to the end of his days. The angel replied that God had decreed another path for him. He was to return to Egypt and tell the Christians of the life of the desert-dwellers.

Having bid farewell to the youths, St Paphnutius reached the edge of the wilderness after a three day journey. Here he found a small skete, and the brethren received him with love. Abba Paphnutius related everything that he had learned about the holy Fathers whom he had encountered in the desert. The brethren wrote a detailed account of what St Paphnutius said, and deposited it in the church, where all who wished to do so could read it. St Paphnutius gave thanks to God, Who had granted him to learn about the exalted lives of the hermits of the Thebaid, and he returned to his own monastery.
Saint John is also commemorated on June 12 with St Onuphrius .
406 St. Chromatius Bishop Synod of Aquileia condemned Arianism 381 praised by St. Jerome
Aquiléjæ sancti Chromátii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.    At Aquileia, St. Chromatius, bishop and confessor.
407 ST CHROMATIUS, BISHOP OF AQUILEIA
CHROMATIUS was brought up in the city of Aquileia, of which he was probably a native, and lived there with his widowed mother (of whom St Jerome’s good opinion is seen in a letter written to her in the year 374) his brother, who also became a bishop, and unmarried sisters. After his ordination to the priesthood St Chro­matius took part in the synod of Aquileia against Arianism in 381, baptized Rufinus in his early manhood, and soon acquired a great reputation. On the death of St Valerian in 388 he was elected bishop of Aquileia, and in that office became one of the most distinguished prelates of his time. He was a friend and correspondent of St Jerome (who dedicated several of his works to him), at the same time pre­serving his association with Rufinus, and trying to act as peace-maker and moderator in the Origenistic dispute. It was owing to the encouragement of St Chromatius that Rufinus undertook the translation of the Ecclesiastical History of Eusebius and other works, and at his suggestion St Ambrose commented on the prophecy of Balaam; he helped St Heliodorus of Altino to finance St Jerome’s translation of the Bible. Chromatius was an energetic and valued supporter of St John Chrysos­tom, who had a high opinion of him; he wrote to the Emperor Honorius protesting against the persecution of Chrysostom, and Honorius forwarded the protest to his brother, Arcadius, at Constantinople. But the efforts of Chromatius were without effect. He was himself a capable commentator of the Holy Scriptures; seventeen of his treatises on parts of St Matthew’s gospel are extant and a homily on the Beatitudes. St Chromatius died about the year 407, and is named in the Roman Martyrology; his feast is observed in the churches of Gorizia and Istria, formerly parts of the Aquileian province.

There seems to be no formal biography; but some attention has been directed to St Chromatius of late years on account of the writings attributed to him. See Bardenhewer, Geschichte der altkirchilchen Literatur, vol. iii, pp. 548—551; P. de Puniet in the Revue d’histoire ecclésiastique, vol. vi (1905), pp. 15—32, 304—318 P. Paschini in the Revue Bénédictine, vol. xxvi (1909), pp. 469—475. The works attributed to Chromatius are printed in Migne, PL., vol. XX, CC. 247—436, but the state of the text is very unsatisfactory to him most probably be attributed the “Expositio de oratione dorninica printed by M. Andrieu in Lea Ordines romani du haut moyen âge, vol. ii (1948), pp. 417—447.
St. Chromatius Bishop of Aquileia, died about 406-407. He was probably born at Aquileia, and in any case grew up there.
He became a priest of that church and about 387 or 388, after the death of Valerianus, bishop of that important city. He was one of the most celebrated prelates of his time and was in active correspondence with his illustrious contemporaries, St. Ambrose, St. Jerome, and Rufinus. Himself a scholarly theologian, he urged these three friends to the composition of many learned works. St. Ambrose was encouraged by him to write exegetical works; St. Jerome dedicated to him different translations and commentaries, which he had written at his suggestion (translations of the Books of Paralipomenon, Tobias, the books of Solomon, commentaries on the Prophecy of Habacuc {Habakuk}). In the bitter quarrel between St. Jerome and Rufinus concerning Origenism, Chromatius, while rejecting the false doctrines of Origen, attempted to make peace between the disputants.
He always maintained ecclesiastical communion with Rufinus and induced him not to answer the last attack of St. Jerome, but to devote himself to new literary works, especially to the translation of the "Ecclesiastical History" of Eusebius. Chromatius opposed the Arian heresy with much zeal and rooted it out in his diocese. He gave loyal support to St. John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople, when unjustly oppressed, and wrote in his favour to Honorius, the Western emperor, who sent this letter to his brother, Arcadius. This intercession, however, availed nothing. Chromatius was also active as an exegete. There are preserved seventeen treatises by him on the Gospel according to St. Matthew (iii, 15-17; v-vi, 24), besides a fine homily on the Eight Beatitudes (counted as an eighteenth treatise). His feast is celebrated 2 December

He was a native of Aquileia, Italy, and participated in the Synod of Aquileia that condemned Arianism in 381. Seven years later he became the bishop of the see. A friend of St. Jerome, Chromatius also encouraged Rufinus to translate Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History. He was known and revered as a scholar and was described by St. Jerome as “a most learned and most holy man.” Chromatius was also a friend of St. John Chrysostom.

Part of Chromatius’ commentary on St. Matthew is extant.
ST. CHROMATIUS INVITES US TO ENTER INTO CONTACT WITH GOD
VATICAN CITY, DEC 5, 2007 (VIS) - In today's general audience, which was held in the Paul VI Hall, Benedict XVI dedicated his remarks to the figure of St. Chromatius, bishop of Aquileia in northern Italy, "a dynamic center of Christian life located in the 'Decima regione' of the Roman empire, 'Venetia et Histria'."  "Between the middle of the third century and the early years of the fourth," said the Pope, "the persecutions of Decius, Valerian and Diocletian had produced a large number of martyrs." At the same time, the Church of Aquileia was facing "the threat of the Arian heresy."
  In 381 Chromatius, then a priest and the expert assistant of Bishop Valerian of Aquileia, participated in a synod "to eliminate the last residues of Arianism in the West."

  The Holy Father recalled how Chromatius was born in Aquileia in the year 345, "he was ordained a deacon then a priest and finally elected as pastor of that church in 388. Having received episcopal consecration from St. Ambrose, he dedicated himself courageously and energetically to a task of immense proportions because of the vastness of the lands entrusted to his care: the ecclesial jurisdiction of Aquileia stretched to what is currently the territory of Switzerland, Bavaria, Austria and Slovenia, even reaching as far as Hungary."
The saintly bishop died an exile in Grado in 407, the same year as St. John Chrysostom.

  The Holy Father indicated that of St. Chromatius' works, more than 40 sermons and over 60 commentaries on the Gospel of St. Mark survive. "He was wise master and a zealous pastor," said the Pope. "In his teaching he always began from the Word of God and to that he always returned. Among subjects particularly dear to him were, primarily, the Trinitarian mystery which he considered in its revelation throughout the history of salvation, the theme of the Holy Spirit, ... and the mystery of Christ. The incarnate Word is true God and true man: He fully assumed the human condition so as to give it His own divinity." 

  His "insistence on the human nature of Christ led Chromatius to speak of the Virgin Mary," said the Pope, pointing out how the saint described Mary in various ways such as "the evangelical virgin capable of accepting God," and compared her with the Church, both being "virgins and mothers." The Holy Father then explained that "Chromatius' ecclesiology is developed above all in his commentary on Matthew," where he writes that "the Church is unique, she is born from the blood of Christ." 

  Chromatius "knew how to address his people using a fresh, vivacious and incisive language." As a "good pastor, in troubled times such as his own marked by the barbarian incursions, he stood alongside the faithful to comfort them and open their souls to faith in God, Who never abandons His children." 

  In off-the-cuff remarks at the end of his talk, the Pope noted how "St. Chromatius reminds us that Advent is a time of prayer, in which we must enter into contact with God. God knows us, He knows me, He knows each of us. He loves me, He does not abandon me. Thus trustingly, let us proceed into the liturgical time that has just begun." AG/ST. CHROMATIUS/...   VIS 071205 (560)
600 St Jesse the Bishop of Tsilkan in Georgia born Antioch in Syria great gifts of prayer and wonderworking moved a river
Saint Jesse, Bishop of Tsilkan, was born at Antioch in Syria to a pious Christian family. While still a child he felt drawn to the spiritual life, and when he reached maturity he entered one of the monasteries in Antioch, with the blessing of his parents, where at the time ascetic Jesse the Monk John Zedazeni (May 7).

St Jesse was included among the number of the Thirteen holy Syrian (Cappadocian) Fathers (their general commemoration is May 7), who were chosen by lot by the Monk John Zedazeni (as commanded him by the Mother of God). St Jesse arrived in Georgia with them, and with them he taught and instructed the people in the pious life, providing an example of sanctity and healing the sick.

The reports of the deeds of the Thirteen Syrian Fathers spread about among the people so that Eulabius the Katholikos of Georgia (533-544) proposed having a council of bishops meet and choose certain of these ascetics to fill vacant episcopal Sees. Because of the difficulty of whom to choose, since all of them were worthy of the office of bishop, they proposed to go to the city of Zaden, where the ascetics dwelt, and to select those who were celebrating the Divine Liturgy at the time.

In this manner they became bishops: the hieromonk Habib (the account about him is located under November 29) and the hierodeacon Jesse, appointed to the See of Tsilkan. Having arrived in his diocese, Jesse was astonished by the rampant pagan rites, customs and superstitions. He zealously concerned himself with the restoration of piety, preaching constantly and frequently celebrating the church services. His work bore fruit -- in the Tsilkan diocese Orthodox piety was affirmed, and with it also was affirmed the Church of Christ.

Continuing also his ascetic efforts, St Jesse attained to great gifts of prayer and wonderworking. Through his prayer, in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ there separated off from the River Xana a stream of water, which -- in following the course that the saint intended, formed the bed of a canal and stretched to the church of the Most Holy Theotokos (near Tsilkan). Having put his diocese in good order, St Jesse set off preaching to the Ossetians and other mountain peoples of the great Caucasus mountain range. He made the rounds of he ravines and the rocky crags with the Gospel and cross in hand, everywhere affirming the teaching of God's revelation.

St Jesse learned about his approaching death through a revelation from above. Gathering his flock and clergy, he preached a spiritual instruction, received the Holy Mysteries, and with hands upraised to Heaven he offered up his soul to the Lord. This transpired at the end of the sixth century. (The exact day of the saint's death is August 18). The venerable relics of St Jesse, already glorified by healing at the time of his burial, were consigned to earth in the church of the Most Holy Theotokos at Tsilkan, between the altar table and the table of oblation. The Church subsequently numbered St Jesse among the saints and established his day of commemoration as December 2.

1176 Saint Athanasius, hermit of the Near Caves of Kiev contemporary of archimandrite St Polycarp miracles
(July 24) of the Kiev Caves.
St Athanasius was grievously ill for a long time. When he died, the brethren prepared him for burial, and on the third day the igumen came to bury him. However, they all saw the dead man alive. He was sitting up and weeping. To all their questions he replied only:

"Seek salvation, obey the igumen in everything, repent each hour and pray to our Lord Jesus Christ,
to His All-Pure Mother and to Sts Anthony and Theodosius, to allow you to end your life here. Do not ask me anything else, for I must pray"
(There is a similar story of St Hesychius [October 3] in THE LADDER of St John Climacus, Step 6).
After this he lived for twelve years more in solitude in a cave. During that time he spoke not a word to anyone. He wept day and night, and partook of a little bread and water only every other day. Just before his death, he assembled the brethren, and repeated his earlier words to them, and then he peacefully departed unto the Lord (in about the year 1176).

The monk Babylas, who had suffered illness and an infirmity of the legs for many years, was healed at his relics. "As I lay there," he related told the brethren, " I cried out in pain. Suddenly, St Athanasius appeared to me and said, 'Come to me, and I shall heal you.' I wanted to ask him how and when he had returned here, but he became invisible. I believed his words and asked to be taken to his relics. And indeed, I have been healed." St Athanasius was buried in the Antoniev Cave. His memory is celebrated also on September 28 and on the second Sunday of Great Lent.
Venerable Athanasius the Recluse of the Kiev Caves

Saint Athanasius, Recluse of the Far Caves of Kiev is mentioned in the Fourth Ode of the general Canon of the Monastic Fathers of the Far Caves. The "Sayings and Lives of the Saints Who Repose in the Cave of St Theodosius," says that St Athanasius had no need of candles in the cave, since a heavenly light shone for him. He grants healing to all who approach him with faith.
The memory of St Athanasius is celebrated also on August 28 and on the second Sunday of Great Lent.
1314 St Stephen Urosh, King of Serbia faithful to Lord provided for widows orphans pacified quarrels maintained peace charitable to  poor defended downtrodden.

Saint Stephen Urosh, King of Serbia, was son of King Dushan Nemany. Dushan sought the daughter of the French king for his son, but the Roman Pope insisted that the princess not change from the Latin confession. Dushan did not want to see a Catholic in his family, and because of this St Stephen Urosh entered into marriage with the daughter of Vlad, Prince of Walachia.

Upon the death of his father (+ 1355), St Stephen Urosh became the independent and actual ruler of Serbia. He was faithful to the Lord, like a father he provided for widows and orphans, he pacified quarrels and maintained peace, he was charitable to the poor, and defended the downtrodden.

In the interests of peace in Serbia and indeed for the preservation of his own life, St Stephen was obliged to flee to his kinsman, Prince Lazar. St Stephen's uncle, Vulkashin, immediately seized the throne, but his fear of rivals gave him no peace. Through his sister, St Stephen's mother, he invited his nephew to come to the city of Skopje, on the pretext of a reconciliation. Greeting him with honor, as Tsar, he invited him to go hunting. When St Stephen, weary from the hunt, went off with his horse to a well and bent over to take a sip of water, Vulkashin struck him a mortal blow on the head with a mace.

1381 Saint John [Jan] of Ruysbroeck, priest First Prior of Groenendaal and Mystic
John Ruysbroeck, whose name derives from his birthplace in Belgium, was Chalplain of the Church of St. Gudula in Brussels, and wrote a number of books dealing with the spiritual life. When he was fifty, feeling the need to be more free for the service of God, he retired with a few companions to Groenendaal. He built a Monastery and founded a Congregation of Canons Regular of which he was the Prior. He lived in constant prayer and meditation, and helped a large number of people who came to him for teaching and advice. He died, aged nearly ninety, in 1381.

BD JOHN RUYSBROECK (A.D. 1381)
JAN VAN RUYSBROECIC, Joannes Rusbrochius, or as he is generally called in English, John Ruysbroeck, was born at the place of that name near Brussels in 1293. In those days it was a small village, and John was certainly of humble birth, though of his father nothing is known, and of his mother only her goodness and love for her son. At the age of eleven he went to live with his uncle, John Hinckaert, who was a minor canon of the collegiate church of St Gudula at Brussels, and attended the schools of the city. Some years later his mother joined him there, living in a béguinage, and soon after her death John was ordained priest at the age of twenty-four.
Subsequently, in consequence of a sermon preached in St Gudula’s, Canon Hinckaert’s way of life underwent considerable modification. He gave away his superfluous goods and income and, in company with another canon, Franco van Coudenberg, a younger man, undertook to join a life of contemplation to his canonical activities. Bd John associated himself with these two. Between 1330 and 1335 he wrote some polemical pamphlets, which have perished, but soon after he wrote the Book of the Kingdom of God’s Lovers. This work like all his others was written in Flemish that it might reach people at large, and is a refutation of false mysticism and an exposition of the true way to God. The Spiritual Espousals, and several other mystical works of a practical kind followed it.
Some commentators claimed that John was illiterate and ignorant, thus adding an adventitious interest and merit to his writings. But in fact there is every evidence that he was a capable philosopher and theologian, well read both in the works of the contemporary scholastics and of the masters of the past. The claim was made in his own time and answered by Gerson at Paris, who accused him of pantheistic ideas in the third book of the Spiritual Espousals: “It has been said that the man who wrote this book was illiterate and uneducated, and consequently an attempt has been made to regard it as inspired by the Holy Ghost. But it gives evidence rather of human scholarship than of divine inspiration and the style is somewhat laboured. Besides, in order to deal with such a subject, piety is not enough: one must be a scholar as well.”

Between 1340 and 1343 John was writing the first part of the Book of the Spiritual Tabernacle, an allegory of the mystical life, and in the spring of the latter year the three priests left Brussels. They were called to a complete dedication of themselves to God in a life of uninterrupted contemplation; in the city they were hampered by a clergy many of whom were debased and worldly, and, moreover, while John had raised hostility by his vigour against heresy, Canon van Coudenberg got into trouble with his prince.
With the permission of this John III, Duke of Brabant, they received an assignment from the hermit Lambert of the hermitage of Groenendael in the forest of Soignes, where they built a larger chapel and established themselves. But their first six years were not peaceful, troubled in particular on the one hand by the criticism of the chapter of Sainte-Gudule and of neighbouring monks, and on the other by the ducal hunt and its followers: not being associated with any religious order they had no protection against these nuisances. Accordingly, in 1349, being then increased by five disciples, they formed themselves into a community of canons regular of St Augustine and made
their vows before the bishop of Cambrai. The aged Hinckaert dying the following year, Franco van Coudenberg was nominated to govern the new monastery as provost, aided by John Ruysbroeck as prior. It was Franco who “made” Groenendael in a material and administrative sense, and John’s presence there was a great attraction to the numerous aspirants who offered themselves to the com­munity. He was an exemplary religious, docile, patient, obedient, fond of manual labour (at which he was rather clumsy), and a better subject than superior.

Gerard Naghel, a Carthusian of Hérinnes, speaks of Ruysbroeck making a visit to that monastery: “How much might be said of his strong manly face, alight with joy, of his humble and affectionate speech, of the spirituality radiating from him, of a religious bearing that showed itself even in his way of wearing his clothes…Though we wanted to hear him talk about himself he never would, but just drew lessons from the sacred epistles…He showed himself as free from conceit as if he had never written his own books.”

 Bd John would spend hours in the forest, which surrounded the monastery, listening, as it were, where no human distractions came between his ear and the voice of God. He made notes on waxed tablets, and elaborated and arranged them at his leisure in his cell. Once when he was missing at supper a canon went out to look, and found him sitting in ecstasy under a lime tree, surrounded by unearthly light. Thus he completed the Spiritual Tabernacle and undertook the other books which have given him an assured place among the greater contemplatives of the middle ages.* {* It is curious that in Ruysbroeck, as in other mystics of that age, notably the Englishman Richard Rolle of Hampole, there was a marked tendency to pass from ordinary prose into a rhythmical cadence, and even into whatever was then the prevailing form of poetic diction whether it was rhyme or alliteration. The tendency is noticeable even in the Latin of Thomas a Kempis’s “Imitation of Christ”, which was sometimes known for this reason as the Musica ecclesiastica.}

It is often urged that Ruysbroeck said nothing that had not been said by other mystics before him, that his originality lay in the way the matter was presented. But to say something in a new way is emphatically to say something new, and, standing between the thirteenth century and the Renaissance, he effected a combination between philo­sophical elements drawn from Scholasticism on the one hand and Neoplatonism on the other. It has been well said that if Ruysbroeck’s voice had not possessed an altogether new accent, if his doctrine had contained nothing original, his extra­ordinary influence would be unexplainable.

   The attraction of personal sanctity is sufficient to account for the heterogeneous crowds that made pilgrimages to see him at Groenendael. But there were others, doctores ac clerici non mediocres, on whom he is known to have had a strong direct influence. Chief among them was Gerard Groote, founder of the Brothers of the Common Life, through whom Bd John’s teaching had its effect on the school of Windesheim and on Thomas a Kempis; while the pattern of monastic life at Groenendael was responsible for Windesheim becoming not Carthusian or Cistercian but Augustinian.

The last few years of his life Bd John was unable to leave the cell, which he shared with Provost Franco, who was even older than himself. One night he dreamed that his mother came to him and said that God would call him before Advent. The next day he asked to be taken to the common infirmary, where, wasted by a fever, he prepared for death with devotion and a ready mind. It came on December 2, 1381, in his eighty-eighth year. Once a year, on the second Sunday after Pentecost, the chapter of Sainte-Gudule came in procession to Groenendael in honour of John Ruysbroeck; and when the monastery was suppressed in 1783 his relics were translated to Brussels, only to be lost at the Revolution. The often-interrupted efforts to secure his beatification were successful only in 1908, when St Pius X confirmed his cultus and allowed his feast to the Canons Regular of the Lateran and the diocese of Malines. In Abbot Cuthbert Butler’s opinion there has probably been no greater contemplative than Ruysbroeck, “and certainly there has been no greater mystical writer”.
Groenendael in honour of John Ruysbroeck; and when the monastery was suppressed in 1783 his relics were translated to Brussels, only to be lost at the Revolution. The often-interrupted efforts to secure his beatification were successful only in 1908, when St Pius X confirmed his cultus and allowed his feast to the Canons Regular of the Lateran and the diocese of Malines. In Abbot Cuthbert Butler’s opinion there has probably been no greater contemplative than Ruysbroeck, “and certainly there has been no greater mystical writer”.
What we know of the history of John Ruysbroeck is almost entirely derived from a Latin biography written by a Certain Henry Pomerius (the name is a latinization of Bogaerts, Van den Bogaerde). This biography seems certainly to have been composed between 1429 and 1431 and consequently some fifty years after the death of Bd John. But the biographer had before him an earlier life by John van Schoonhoven, which has perished. The text of Pomerius may be found printed with a valuable introduction in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. iv (1885), pp. 257-334. See also A. Auger, Étude sur les mystiques des Pays-Bas au moyen âge (1892); W. De Vreese in the Biographie nationale de Belgique, vol. xx, cc. 507-591 J. Van Mierlo in Dietsche Warande en Belfort (1910), vols. i and ii; C. S. Durrant, Flemish Mystics and English Martyrs (1925), pp. 3-14; F. Van Ortroy in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxi (1912), pp. 384-387; J. Kuckhoff, Johannes von Ruysbroeck (1938); and S. Axters, Spiritualité des Pays-Bas (1948). Although Ruysbroeck undoubtedly knew Latin, all his works were written in the Flemish of the period. This, we are told, readily lends itself to misinterpretation by those who are not experts, and translations are often unreliable. The Latin version of his works made by Surius is in many cases no better than a loose paraphrase. On the other hand a very scholarly and careful rendering of all the authentic writings into French, under the general title of oeuvres de Ruysbroeck l’Admirable, has been brought out by the Benedictines of Saint-Paul de Wisques (6 vols., 1912-38). A life of the beatus was written in English by D. Vincent Scully (1910); Evelyn Underhill wrote a study, Ruysbroeck (1915); R. F. Sherwood Taylor translated the Seven Steps of the Ladder of Spiritual Love (1944) and E. Colledge The Spiritual Espousals (1952), previously known in English as “The Adornment of the Spiritual Marriage”. The hook by Fr Axters, above, published in English 1954.   
1741 Blessed Rafal Chylinski Franciscans
Born 1694  near Buk in the Poznan region of Poland, Melchior showed early signs of religious devotion; family members nicknamed him "the little monk." After completing his studies at the Jesuit college in Poznan, Melchior joined the cavalry and was promoted to the rank of officer within three years.

Against the urgings of his military comrades, in 1715 Melchior joined the Conventual Franciscans in Kraków, receiving the name Rafal, and was ordained two years later. After pastoral assignments in nine cities, he came to Lagiewniki (central Poland), where he spent the last 13 years of his life, except for 20 months ministering to flood and epidemic victims in Warsaw. In all these places, Rafal was known for his simple and candid sermons, for his generosity as well as his ministry in the confessional. People of all levels of society were drawn to the self-sacrificing way he lived out his religious profession and priestly ministry.

Rafal played the harp, lute and mandolin to accompany liturgical hymns. In Lagiewniki he distributed food, supplies and clothing to the poor. After his death, the Conventual church in that city became a place of pilgrimage for people throughout Poland. He was beatified in Warsaw in 1991.
Comment:  The sermons preached by Rafal were powerfully reinforced by the living sermon of his life. The Sacrament of Reconciliation can help us bring our daily choices into harmony with our words about Jesus’ influence in our life.
Quote: During the beatification homily, Pope John Paul II said, "May Blessed Rafal remind us that every one of us, even though we are sinners, has been called to love and to holiness" (L'Osservatore Romano, 1991, vol. 25, number 19).

 Friday  Saints of this Day December  02 Quarto Nonas Decémbris  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  December 2016
Universal: End to Child-Soldiers.
That the scandal of child-soldiers may be eliminated the world over.
Evangelization: Europe  That the peoples of Europe may rediscover the beauty, goodness, and
truth of the Gospel which gives joy and hope to life.
   `   

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      
 
                                                                           
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


  We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue