Monday  Saints of this Day December  19 Quartodécimo Kaléndas Januárii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
Mary Mother of GOD
FOURTH WEEK OF ADVENT   The Christmass Novena

Pope Authorizes 12 14 2015 Promulgation of Decrees Concerning 17 Causes,
Including Servant of God William Gagnon
November 23 2014 Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014  

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary


Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }
The saints “a cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

December 19, 2016
(late 14th - early 11th v
The Silence Of St. Joseph In A World Full Of Noise
 401 Anastasius I, Pope condemnation of Origen Saint Jerome helped him in his own way Saints Augustine and Paulinus of Nola praised his model of sanctity (RM)
 552 Saint Gregory Bishop of Homer (Omirits) possessed gifts healing wonderworking even in youth.
1205 Blessed William of Fenoli Carthusian lay-brother many miracles both during his life and after his death
1839 St. Francis Xavier Mau Martyr of Vietnam
1839 Bl. Francis Man Dominican
1839 St. Thomas De & Companions Vietnamese martyrs
1839 St. Augustine Moi martyr of Vietnam Dominican tertiary

December 19 – Our Lady of Remedies (Portugal)  
 
The Virgin who remedies all evils
 In the sixteenth century, the bishop of Lamego, of Portugal, commissioned from Rome an image of The Virgin who remedies all evils. He placed it in a chapel he had built over an older chapel dedicated to Saint Stephen, which is gone today—in its place is a public park. The devotion to "Our Lady of Remedies" kept growing, and in the 18th century a majestic church was dedicated to her.
Every year, from late August to mid-September, the city of Lamego holds a festival combining the feast of the city with the "Pilgrimage of Portugal" in honor of its patron saint. ... On the days that precede the pilgrimage, there is a show of lights with grand floral parade floats.
The Procession of Triumph is the most symbolic moment of the entire festival. With the Holy See’s special permission, a large float carrying the image of Our Lady of Remedies is transported on a cart pulled by oxen, making Lamego the only place in the Catholic world where an image of the Virgin is conveyed by animals.
The Mary of Nazareth Team 

December 19 - Our Lady of Toledo (Spain, 657)  Mary in the Midst of Israel's Waiting (X)
"After the ordeal he has endured, he will see the light" (Is 53:11)
The mystery of the Messiah who will renew the covenant and bring forgiveness and salvation to Israel and the nations was at the heart of Israel's and the Blessed Virgin's waiting and the time of his arrival was approaching. But how would this new covenant come to be? Whose blood would bring the forgiveness of sins?
    The images of the Paschal Lamb and the scapegoat were present in Mary's mind, like all Jews, but who saw that the words of the prophet Isaiah referred to the figure of the Servant of God? "He was oppressed, yet when he was afflicted he didn't open his mouth; as a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and as a sheep that before its shearers is mute, so he didn't open his mouth. By oppression and judgment he was taken away; and as for his generation, who among them considered that he was cut off out of the land of the living for the disobedience of my people to whom the stroke was due? They made his grave with the wicked and with a rich man in his death; although he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth" (Is 53:7-12).
     Those who opposed wisdom also mention the death of the Just: "Let us lay traps for the upright man, since he annoys us and opposes our way of life" (...) "He claims to have knowledge of our God and calls himself a child of the Lord" (...) "Let us condemn him to a shameful death" (Wis 2:12-20). The prophet Daniel, likewise, spoke of a Messiah cut off by "the people, of the prince who shall come to destroy the city and the sanctuary" (Dan 9:26).
     But hope remains forever: "Through him the pleasure of the Lord will be done. After the ordeal he has endured, he will see the light and be content" (Is 53.7-12), and the Psalmist always voices his confidence, even beyond death: "You cannot allow your faithful servant to see the abyss" (Ps 16:5-11).

December 19 - Our Lady of Toledo (Spain, 657)
What did the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Joseph do near the manger?
They looked at, contemplated and admired the Christ Child. That is all they did.
They were in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament exposed on the altar of the manger.
They blessed and thanked God who gave us his Son out of His love for us.
Nobody will ever be able to understand or explain what went on inside Mary at that time.
Zephaniah 3:14-17
14 Sing aloud, O daughter of Zion; shout, O Israel! Rejoice and exult with all your heart, O daughter of Jerusalem!
15 The LORD has taken away the judgments against you, he has cast out your enemies.
The King of Israel, the LORD, is in your midst; you shall fear evil no more.
16 On that day it shall be said to Jerusalem: "Do not fear, O Zion; let not your hands grow weak.
17 The LORD, your God, is in your midst, a warrior who gives victory; he will rejoice over you with gladness,
he will renew you in his love; he will exult over you with loud singing.
The Silence Of St. Joseph In A World Full Of Noise
 250 St. Nemesius Martyr of Egypt burned alive in Alexandria  between two criminals
 250 Timothy of Africa burnt alive in Africa under Decius M (RM)

 290 Boniface The Holy Martyr unharmed by boiling tin & tar relics glorified by numerous miracles
       Saint Aglaida (Aglae see Saint Boniface)
       St. Darius Martyr with Zosimus Paul Secundus Nicea
 303 Cyriacus and Companions martyred at Nicomedia MM (RM)
 307 St. Meuris & Thea Martyred virgins from Gaza

 308 Elias, Probus and Ares The Martyrs natives of Egypt heedless of safety cared for Christians locked up in prison
       
3rd v. St. Fausta mother of St. Anastasia - Sirmium Serbia
401 Anastasius I, Pope condemnation of Origen Saint Jerome helped him in his own way Saints Augustine and Paulinus of Nola praised his model of sanctity (RM)
 540 Gregory of Auxerre for 13 years as its 12th bishop B (RM)
 552 Saint Gregory Bishop of Homer (Omirits) possessed gifts healing wonderworking even in youth.
6th c. Samthana of Meath Irish abbess-founder of Cluain- Bronach in Meath V (AC)
       St. Manirus Bishop an apostle to Scotland kindness - goodwill 
6th v.  The Relocation of the Body of St. Severus, Patriarch of Antioch.
 790 St. Ribert Revered abbot of the monastery of Saint Oyend
1122 St. Bernard Valeara patron of Teramo
1153 Blessed Macarius of Würzburg first abbot of Saint James monastery, OSB Abbot (AC)
1188 Saint Elias Muromets of the Caves, nicknamed "Shoemaker" or "Cobbler,"
1205 Blessed William of Fenoli Carthusian lay-brother many miracles both during his life and after his death
1220 St. Adjutus abbot, famous for the spirit of prophecy
1370 Blessed Pope Urban V deeply spiritual Benedictine monk canon lawyer reformer
1511 Blessed Caecilia of Ferrara, OP V (PC)
1839 St. Francis Xavier Mau Martyr of Vietnam
1839 Bl. Francis Man Dominican
1839 St. Thomas De & Companions Vietnamese martyrs
1839 St. Augustine Moi martyr of Vietnam Dominican tertiary
        Avitus (Adjutus) of Micy, Abbot (RM)
 Romæ sanctæ Faustæ, quæ fuit mater sanctæ Anastásiæ, ac nobilitáte et pietáte éxstitit insígnis.
       At Rome, St. Fausta, mother of St. Anastasia, renowned for her noble birth and her holiness.
Arriving in Homer, St Gregory began to set the Church in order, preaching to both pagans and Jews.
After three years Elesbaan returned to Ethiopia, leaving the noble Abramius behind as King of Homer.
 St Gregory crowned and anointed Abramius as king. Soon he issued a decree that all his subjects be baptized.
 Then certain prominent Jews turned to the emperor saying that it was better for people to believe willingly rather than under compulsion. They requested that he should permit a debate on faith to be held between them and the Christians, vowing that if the Christians proved victorious in this debate, the Jews would accept Baptism.

The Jews were given forty days to prepare for the debate, which lasted for several days.
St Gregory refuted all arguments of the head Hebrew elder, Rabbi Ervan, using only texts from the Old Testament.
In a vision Ervan beheld the holy Prophet Moses, who worshipped the Lord Jesus Christ.
The prophet told Ervan that Ervan was in opposition to the truth and would be defeated.
By the grace of God Christian truth prevailed in the debate, but Ervan would not acknowledge his defeat.
He made a last desperate attempt.  He said, "If you want me to believe in your Christ, and to acknowledge that yours is the true God, then show Him to me, bishop!"
The saint replied: "Your request is impertinent. It is not with man that you contend now, but with God.
However, the Lord can do what you have asked in order to convince you."

Everyone waited to see what would happen.
St Gregory, having steadfast faith in God and trusting in Him, began to pray aloud.
He recalled the mystery of the Incarnation of God the Word, the miracles of His earthly life, the Three-day Resurrection and the Ascension into Heaven, and he invoked the power of the Life-Creating Cross.
"Show Thyself to these people, O Lord," he prayed, "and glorify Thy holy Name!"
When he finished the prayer, the earth quaked, and in the east the heavens were opened, and in a radiant cloud of light the Lord Jesus Christ came down on earth, and the Voice of the Lord was heard:
"Through the prayers of Bishop Gregory, He Whom your fathers put to death will heal you."

Like Saul, who was struck blind by the Heavenly light on the road to Damascus, the Jews were struck blind.
Then they believed in Christ and they implored the holy bishop to heal them.
Upon receiving holy Baptism, all of them were healed. Rabbi Ervan received the Christian name Leo (meaning "lion"). 
After this most extraordinary miracle, St Gregory guided the flock of Homer for another thirty years.
He reposed in the year 552 and was buried in a crypt in the cathedral of Afar.

What Did Joseph and Mary Do Near the Manger 
December 19 - Our Lady of Toledo (Spain, 657)

They looked at, contemplated and admired the Christ Child. That is all they did near the manger.
They were deep in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament exposed on the altar of the manger.
They blessed and thanked God who gave us his Son out of his love for us.
Nobody will ever be able to understand or explain what went on inside Mary at that time.

Saint John Marie Baptist Vianney, The Cure of Ars  html here

Advent's Great O Antiphons (III): O radix Jesse
December 19 - OUR LADY OF TOLEDO (Spain, 657)
Here we are now, O Son of Jesse, walking toward the city of your forefathers.
The Ark of the Lord has risen and is advancing, with the Lord in her womb, toward her resting place.

The Angels are escorting you, your faithful Spouse surrounds you with all his tenderness, heaven is delighted to see you, and the earth trembles under the happy weight of its Creator and its august Queen. Walk on, O mother of God and men, almighty Propitiatory (the cover of the Ark) which contains the divine Manna keeping man from dying!
Our hearts are following you, accompanying you, and, like your Royal ancestor, we swear "not to enter our house, lie on our bed, close our eyes, nor rest our head, until we have found in our heart a dwelling for the Lord whom you carry,
a tent for the God of Jacob."


Come then, thus veiled under the most pure flanks of the sacred Ark, O shoot of Jesse, until you leave it to shine before the eyes of the peoples, like a standard of victory. Then the vanquished kings will be silent before you, and the nations will address their good wishes to you. Make haste, O Messiah! Come to defeat all our enemies and deliver us.
Dom Gueranger The Liturgical Year - Advent -December XIX


God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea. 
As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. 
It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. 
Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  
Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves.  
O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory.
Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives. 
Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts. 
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
December 19 - Our Lady of Toledo (Spain, 657)
Mary in the Midst of Israel's Waiting (X)
"After the ordeal he has endured, he will see the light" (Is 53:11)
The mystery of the Messiah who will renew the covenant and bring forgiveness and salvation to Israel and the nations was at the heart of Israel's and the Blessed Virgin's waiting ? and the time of his arrival was approaching. But how would this new covenant come to be? Whose blood would bring the forgiveness of sins?
The images of the Paschal Lamb and the scapegoat were present in Mary's mind, like all Jews, but who saw that the words of the prophet Isaiah referred to the figure of the Servant of God?
"He was oppressed, yet when he was afflicted he didn't open his mouth; as a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and as a sheep that before its shearers is mute, so he didn't open his mouth. By oppression and judgment he was taken away; and as for his generation, who among them considered that he was cut off out of the land of the living for the disobedience of my people to whom the stroke was due? They made his grave with the wicked and with a rich man in his death; although he had done no violence, neither was any deceit in his mouth" (Is 53:7-12).
Those who opposed wisdom also mention the death of the Just: "Let us lay traps for the upright man, since he annoys us and opposes our way of life" (...) "He claims to have knowledge of our God and calls himself a child of the Lord" (...) "Let us condemn him to a shameful death" (Wis 2:12-20). The prophet Daniel, likewise, spoke of a Messiah cut off by "the people, of the prince who shall come to destroy the city and the sanctuary" (Dan 9:26).
But hope remains forever: "Through him the pleasure of the Lord will be done. After the ordeal he has endured, he will see the light and be content" (Is 53.7-12), and the Psalmist always voices his confidence, even beyond death:
"You cannot allow your faithful servant to see the abyss" (Ps 16:5-11).


The Silence Of St. Joseph In A World Full Of Noise
Vatican City, Dec 18, 2005 (VIS)
At midday today, in remarks to the faithful prior to praying the Angelus, Benedict XVI considered the figure of St. Joseph. Addressing thousands of pilgrims gathered in St. Peter's Square, the Pope recalled how the evangelist Matthew presents the saint as the model "of the 'just' man who, in perfect harmony with his wife, welcomes the Son of God-made-man, and watches over His human development." He added: "For this reason, in the days prior to Christmas, it is more important than ever to establish a kind of spiritual dialogue with St. Joseph, because he helps us to experience fully this great mystery of the faith."

John Paul II was greatly devoted to St. Joseph, said the Holy Father, and left us a meditation dedicated to him in the Apostolic Exhortation "Redemptoris Custos" (Guardian of the Redeemer), in which the late Pope "particularly stressed the silence of St. Joseph; a silence permeated by contemplation of the mystery of God, in an attitude of complete openness to the divine will. In other words, St. Joseph's silence was not an expression of interior emptiness, but on the contrary, of the fullness of faith that he carried in his heart, and that guided his every thought and deed.
"A silence through which Joseph, together with Mary, safeguarded the Word of God ... and continually compared it with the events of Jesus' life; a silence interwoven with constant prayer ... and with unreserved trust in Divine providence. It is no exaggeration to say that from His 'father' Joseph, Jesus learnt - at a human level - the vigorous interior life that is a premise of true justice, the 'superior justice' that one day He would teach His disciples."
Benedict XVI concluded: "Let us allow ourselves to be 'infected' by St. Joseph's silence! We need it greatly, in a world that is often too noisy, that does not favor meditation or listening to the voice of God. During this period of preparation for Christmas, let us cultivate interior meditation, in order to welcome and safeguard Jesus in our lives." ANG/ST. JOSEPH/... VIS 051219 (360)
250 St. Nemesius Martyr of Egypt burned alive in Alexandria
 Alexandríæ beáti Nemésii Mártyris, qui, primo per calúmniam quasi latro Júdici delátus, eóque crímine absolútus, mox, in persecutióne Décii, Christiánæ religiónis nómine accusátus, cum latrónibus jussus est incéndi, Salvatóris déferens similitúdinem, qui una cum latrónibus pértulit crucem.
      At Alexandria in Egypt, blessed Nemesius, martyr, who first was denounced before the judge as a robber, and being freed from that charge, soon after, in the persecution of Decius, was accused before the judge Emilian of being a Christian.  He was twice subjected to torture and condemned to be burned alive with robbers, thus bearing a resemblance to our Saviour, who was crucified with thieves.

250 SS. NEMESIUS AND OTHER MARTYRS
DURING the persecution of Decius, Nemesius, an Egyptian, was apprehended at Alexandria upon a charge of theft. He cleared himself of that, but was immediately accused of being a Christian. Thereupon he was sent to the prefect of Egypt and, confessing his faith, he was ordered to be scourged doubly more grievously than the thieves. Afterwards he was condemned to be burnt in company with robbers and other malefactors; whereby, as the Roman Martyrology says, he had the honour and happiness more perfectly to imitate the death of our divine Redeemer.
ARSEN1US, HERON and ISIDORE, with DioscoRus, a youth only fifteen years old, were committed at Alexandria in the same persecution. First of all the judge took the boy in hand and began to cajole him with fair speeches; then he assailed him with various tortures, but Dioscorus could be overcome in neither way. The rest, after enduring like torments, were burnt alive. But the judge discharged Dioscorus, on account of his years, saying he allowed him time to repent; and he departed free, for the consolation of the faithful.
In the Roman Martyrology St Nemesius is commemorated on December 19, the rest of these martyrs on the 14th. On the 8th is mentioned the finding of the relics at Rome of another ST NEMESIUS and other martyrs. They have two other entries in the Martyrology— their martyrdom on August 25 and translation of relics on October 21—though they are known only from the spurious pasdo of Pope St Stephen.
Alban Butler also mentions in this place SS. MENUS and THEA, two women at Gaza in Palestine, who when persecution raged under the successors of Diocletian bore bravely the cruelty of men and malice of the devil, and triumphed over both. Meuris died at the hands of the persecutors; but Thea lived some time after she had passed through dreadful torments, as we learn from the Life of St Porphyrius of Gaza.
Of Nemesius we know nothing but the few sentences which Lusebius (Eccl Hist., bk vi, ch. 41) has extracted from St. Dionysius of Alexandria. Similarly Meuris and Thea are mentioned only in the Life of Porphyrius by Mark the Deacon.
Egypt, during the persecutions under Emperor Trajanus Decius. Nemesius was arrested and scourged and then burned to death. Like Christ, he was executed between two criminals.
Nemesius of Alexandria M (RM) Born in Egypt; died 250. Nemesius was burnt at the stake between two thieves in Alexandria under Decius. In art, he martyrdom is portrayed (Roeder).

250 Timothy of Africa burnt alive in Africa under Decius M (RM).  
In Mauritánia sancti Timóthei Diáconi, qui, ob Christi fidem, post diros cárceres, in ignem conjéctus, martyrium consummávit.       In Morocco, St. Timothy, deacon, who after severe imprisonment for the sake of Christ was cast into the fire and achieved martyrdom.
The deacon Timothy was burnt alive in Africa under Decius (Benedictines).
290 The Holy Martyr Boniface unharmed by boiling in & tar relics glorified by numerous miracles
was the slave of a rich young Roman woman named Aglaida and he dwelt with her in an iniquitous cohabitation. But they both felt the sting of conscience and they wanted somehow to be cleansed of their sin. And the Lord granted them the possibility to wash away their sin with their blood and to finish their life in repentance.

Aglaida learned that whoever keeps relics of the holy martyrs in the home and venerates them receives great help in gaining salvation. Under their influence, sin is diminished and virtue prevails. She arranged for Boniface to go to the East, where there was a fierce persecution against Christians, and she asked him to bring back the relics of some martyr, who would become a guide and protector for them.

As he was leaving, Boniface laughed and asked, "My lady, if I do not find any relics, and if I myself suffer for Christ, will you accept my body with reverence?" Aglaida scolded him, saying that he was setting off on a sacred mission, but he was not taking it seriously. Boniface pondered her words, and during the whole journey he thought that he was unworthy of touching the bodies of the martyrs.

Arriving at Tarsus in Cilicia, Boniface left his companions at the inn and proceeded to the city square, where they were torturing Christians. Struck by the beastly horrible torments, and seeing the faces of the holy martyrs radiant with the grace of the Lord, Boniface marveled at their courage. He embraced them and kissed their feet, asking them to pray that he might be found worthy to suffer with them.

The judge asked Boniface who he was. He replied, "I am a Christian," and then refused to offer sacrifice to idols. They stripped him and hung him upside down, beating him so hard that the flesh fell from his body, exposing the bone. They stuck needles under his nails, and finally they poured molten tin down his throat, but by the power of the Lord he remained unharmed. The people who witnessed this miracle shouted, "Great is the God of the Christians!" Then they began to throw stones at the judge, and then they headed for the pagan temple, in order to cast down the idols.

On the following morning, when things had quieted down somewhat, the judge directed that the holy martyr be thrown into a cauldron of boiling tar, but this also caused the sufferer no harm. An angel come down from Heaven and bedewed him as he stepped into the cauldron. The tar overflowed the cauldron, splattering and burning the torturers themselves. St Boniface was then sentenced to beheading by the sword. Blood and a milky fluid flowed from his wounds. Beholding such a miracle, about 550 men believed in Christ.

St Boniface's companions, waiting for two days at the inn for him in vain, began searching for him, thinking that he had gotten drunk somewhere. At first their search was without success, but finally they came across a man who had been an eyewitness to the martyr's death. The man also led them to the place where the decapitated body lay. St Boniface's companions tearfully begged his forgiveness for their unseemly thoughts about him. After they ransomed the martyr's remains, they brought them back to Rome.
 On the eve of their arrival an angel appeared to Aglaida in her sleep and told her to prepare herself to receive her former slave, now the brother and fellow-servant of the angels. Aglaida summoned the clergy, and she received the holy relics with great reverence. Then she built a church on the site of his grave and dedicated it to the holy martyr. There she enshrined his relics, glorified by numerous miracles. After distributing all her wealth to the poor, she withdrew to a monastery, where she spent fifteen years in repentance, then fell asleep in the Lord. She was buried beside St Boniface. The sins of the one were washed away by his blood, the other was purified by her tears and asceticism. Both were found worthy to appear unsullied before our Lord Jesus Christ, Who desires not the death of a sinner, but that he should turn from his wickedness and live (Ezek. 33:11).We pray to St Boniface for deliverance from drunkenness.
He lived in Rome during the reign of Diocletian. He was slave to Aglais, the daughter of a Senator, and served as steward of her household and her large fortune. He also lived in fornication with her, and was addicted to drink. Despite these sins, he was kind, hospitable to strangers, and generous toward the needy.
In time, Aglais became troubled in her conscience over her way of life, and began to think of the account that she would have to give to God for her sins. Some Christians told her of the holy Martyrs and, moved by their accounts, she ordered Boniface to travel to Tarsus and bring back relics of these holy ones. Boniface, still deaf and blind to the things of God, said jokingly,
"And will you honor me as a Saint if I bring back my own body to you as a relic?"

  Boniface traveled to Tarsus with a large escort, well supplied with gold. He went straightaway to the Amphitheater, where he beheld a number of Martyrs being subjected to awful torments for the pleasure of the crowd, but bearing them all with patience and serenity. At the sight, the dissolute steward was touched by grace and felt his heart melt within him. He ran to the Martyrs, fell at their feet and kissed their chains, and loudly declared that he too was a disciple of Christ. So he too was put in chains, subjected to frightful tortures, and finally beheaded, rejoicing and praising God.
  Boniface's escort, mystified by his long absence, made inquiries and were astonished to discover that their godless and sinful companion had met a Martyr's death the day before. They paid fifty pounds in gold for his body and brought it back to Rome, thus fulfilling Boniface's own unwitting prophecy.
  An angel of the Lord appeared to Aglais and said, "Arise and go to meet him who was once your servant and companion in sin, but has now become our brother. Receive him as your master for, thanks to him, all your sins are to be forgiven." Rejoicing, Aglais received her former lover's holy relics and built a church in his honor, where many miracles were wrought. Aglais gave away her fortune, devoted herself to ascesis and prayer, and was herself granted the grace to work miracles. She reposed in peace thirteen years later, assured that the sins of her past had been effaced through the intercessions of the holy Boniface.
St. Darius Martyr with Zosimus Paul Secundus.
 Nicææ, in Bithynia, sanctórum Mártyrum Daríi, Zósimi, Pauli et Secúndi.
      At Nicaea, the Saints Darius, Zosimus, Paul, and Secundus, martyrs.
They died at Nicaea, Turkey.
6th v.  The Relocation of the Body of St. Severus, Patriarch of Antioch.
On this day, the body of St. Severus, Archbishop of Antioch, was relocated to the Zogag Monastery. This holy man departed in the city of Sakha at the house of a righteous wealthy man called Dorotheus, where he was hiding. Dorotheus sent the body, in a ship, with trustworthy men to the Zogag Monastery, located to the west of the city of Alexandria.
He commanded them not to enter the bay but to use the lake until they came to the shore. When they came to Kartasa, facing north, they sailed towards the west, but they did not find water deep enough to sail their ship and the crew was saddened and worried.
God, the Lover of man, He Who saved the children of Israel from their enemies, and opened up a way for them in the Red Sea and made them pass over, this same God preserved the body of Saint Severus from those who hated him. God made manifest this miracle. He made the ship sail in shallow water for six miles until they arrived to the shore.
From there they took the body of the Saint, carried it to the Zogag Monastery and laid it in the place which Dorotheus had built for it. There was great joy in the city of Alexandria and God worked great signs and wonders through the body of His saint Abba Severus. God honored St. Severus after his death even more than during his life.
His blessings be with us. Amen.
The Departure of St. Severus, Patriarch of Antioch.
On this day of the year 538 A.D., the holy father St. Severus, Patriarch of Antioch, departed. He was from Asia Minor. His grandfather, whose name was also Severus, saw in a vision someone telling him, "The child who is for your son will strengthen Orthodoxy, and his name will be after your name." When his son had this saint, he called him Severus. He was taught the Greek wisdom and church subjects.
Once, the saint was strolling outside the city, a shut-in saint came out of his cave crying, "Welcome to you Severus, teacher of Orthodoxy, and Patriarch of Antioch." Severus marvelled at how he called him by his name, for he did not know him before, and how he foretold what would become of him.
Severus grew in virtue and became a monk in the monastery of St. Romanus. The fame of his righteousness and his ascetic life spread out. When the Patriarch of Antioch departed, the bishops had a consensus to ordain him the Patriarch of the city in the year 512 A.D. The church was illuminated by his teachings which spread to all the universe, and he was one of the fathers who attended the Universal Council at Ephesus.
Shortly after, Emperor Anastasius died and Justinian, who was Chalcedonian in faith, reigned after him. He called upon this holy father and gave him great honors to persuade him to change his stand and to follow the Emperor's belief, but the Saint refused. The Emperor became angry, but the Saint did not fear his anger, and so the Emperor ordered him to be killed. Theodora, the Emperor's wife who was Orthodox in faith, knew about what the Emperor intended to do, so she told the saint to flee from his face.
St. Severus escaped to the land of Egypt and traveled everywhere and visited monasteries disguised as a monk. He strengthened the faith of the believers in the Orthodox doctrine. He dwelt in the city of Sakha in the home of a holy lay leader called Doretheos. God performed through him many miracles. He departed in the city of Sakha, and his body was relocated to the monastery of El-Zugag.
3rd v. St. Fausta mother of St. Anastasia - Sirmium Serbia
 Romæ sanctæ Faustæ, quæ fuit mater sanctæ Anastásiæ, ac nobilitáte et pietáte éxstitit insígnis.
      At Rome, St. Fausta, mother of St. Anastasia, renowned for her noble birth and her holiness.
The mother of St. Anastasia of Sirmium. Serbia, Yugoslavia. Fausta was a model matron of her era, demonstrating true virtue in raising a saint.
Fausta of Sirmium, Widow (RM) 3rd century. The legend of Saint Anastasia of Sirmium says that Fausta was her mother (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

303 Cyriacus and Companions martyred at Nicomedia MM (RM)
 Nicomedíæ sanctórum Mártyrum Cyríaci, Paulílli, Secúndi, Anastásii, Syndímii et Sociórum.
      At Nicomedia, the holy martyrs Cyriac, Paulillus, Secundus, Anastasius, Sindimius, and their companions.
All that is known of Cyriacus, Paulillus, Secundus, Anastasius, Syndimius and their companions is that they were martyred at Nicomedia under Diocletian (Benedictines).
307 St. Meuris & Thea Martyred virgins from Gaza
 Gazæ, in Palæstína, pássio sanctárum Meuris et Theæ.
       At Gaza in Palestine, the martyrdom of Saints Meuris and Thea.
in Palestine. Meuris died in prison while being tortured. Thea survived the initial tortures but died a short time later. They are believed to be the same as Valentina and Thea. They died in Alexandria, Egypt.
308 The Martyrs Elias, Probus and Ares natives of Egypt heedless of their own safety cared for Christians locked up in prison during the persecution of Maximian (305-313). For this they were arrested, subjected to torture and given over to death (+ 308).
401 Anastasius I, Pope condemnation of Origen Saint Jerome helped him in his own way Saints Augustine and Paulinus of Nola praised his model of sanctity (RM)
 Romæ deposítio sancti Anastásii Papæ Primi, viri ditíssimæ paupertátis et apostólicæ sollicitúdinis, quem (ut ait sanctus Hierónymus) diu Roma habére non méruit, ne orbis caput sub tali Epíscopo truncarétur; nam, haud multo post ejus óbitum, Roma a Gothis capta et dirépta fuit.
      At Rome, the death of Pope St. Anastasius I, a man who was rich in his poverty and filled with apostolic zeal.  St. Jerome says that Rome did not deserve to possess him long, lest the capital of the world should be devastated under so fine a bishop, for shortly after his death Rome was taken and sacked by the Goths.

ST ANASTASIUS I was a Roman and the successor of St Siricius in the year 399 among his friends and admirers were St Jerome, St Augustine and St Paulinus of Nola. The first named wrote of him that he was a distinguished man, of blameless life and apostolic solicitude, whom Rome did not deserve to possess long lest the world’s head be cut off while ruled by such a bishop (referring to the subsequent invasion by Alaric the Goth). St Jerome was as kind in speaking of his friends as he was merciless to his opponents, and Anastasius earned his gratitude by con­demning certain writings of Origen (d. 254), about which Jerome was having a fierce controversy with Rufinus.

Besides the account in the Liber Pontificalis (for which see the text and notes of Duchesne’s edition, vol. i, pp. 218 seq.), we have a few authentic papal letters, as well as references in St Jerome, St Paulinus of Nola, and St Augustine. Consult further E Caspar, Geschichte des Papsttums, vol. i (1930), pp. 280—294, and Hefele-Leclercq, Histoire des Conciles, vol. ii, pp. 126—135.

Born in Rome; died there in 401. Anastasius, the son of Maximus, was elected pope on November 27, 399, and ruled the Church for two years. His pontificate was marked by his condemnation of Origen in order to stop the errors of those who followed and expanded upon Origen's teachings, his urging the African bishops to continue their opposition to Donatism, and his personal holiness and piety.
Saint Jerome helped him in his own way, and Saints Augustine and Paulinus of Nola praised his model of sanctity. It is from Pope Anastasius that priests have the instruction to read the Gospels standing and bowing their heads. The laus in the Roman Martyrology reads: "At Rome, the death of Pope Saint Anastasius I, a man of extreme poverty and apostolic solicitude. Saint Jerome in his writings saith that Rome did not deserve to possess him for long..." (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).
540 Gregory of Auxerre Auxerre for 13 years as its 12th bishop B (RM).
 Antisiodóri sancti Gregórii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Auxerre, St. Gregory, bishop and confessor.
Gregory governed the see of Auxerre for 13 years as its 12th bishop. He died at the age of 85 (Benedictines).
552 Saint Gregory, Bishop of Homer (Omirits) possessed gifts of healing and wonderworking even in his youth
 Antisiodóri sancti Gregórii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Auxerre, St. Gregory, bishop and confessor.
Son of Agapius and Theodota, was filled with the grace of God and possessed gifts of healing and wonderworking even in his youth. The Providence of God led him to hierarchical service. While still a deacon at Mediolanum (Milan) he heard the foretelling of his destiny from a hermit, and then he received confirmation of these words from another spirit-bearing Elder who lived an ascetic life in the mountains.

When Gregory went to this holy schemamonk for guidance, a miracle occurred. As he approached the mountain, he saw a fiery column in the air. He soon realized that the fiery column was actually the man of God coming toward him. That night he saw the Elder standing in the air above the ground. The Elder revealed to St Gregory that he must go to Rome to pray in the church of Sts Boniface and Aglaida. Then he would go to Alexandria and to become a bishop. Then he would arrive in the city of Negran in the land of Homer (in southern Arabia) to proclaim the Gospel.

St Gregory felt himself unworthy of this, and wished to remain with the ascetic as his disciple. So that Gregory should have no doubts of the veracity of his words, the Elder revealed that he knew a secret about him. In a vision, Gregory had seen the First-Ranked Apostles Peter and Paul, and they had placed a bishop's omophorion upon him. St Gregory stayed a short time in Carthage (North Africa) serving as a deacon, then arrived in Rome. He went to the church of Sts Boniface and Aglaida, then to the tomb of St Peter. There he was granted a vision of the holy Apostle, who told him to walk the path of virtue and to live according to God's will. That night he saw the Apostle Paul in a dream bringing to him a cup filled with oil, foretelling that he should receive the grace of the priesthood and the episcopacy.

During this time the armies of the Ethiopian emperor Elesbaan (October 24) vanquished the Himyarite king Dunaan, who was of Jewish background. The city of Negran was liberated, and Christianity restored in the land of Homer. But all the clergy had been cruelly exterminated by Dunaan, and therefore Elesbaan sent emissaries to the Patriarch of Alexandria asking him to send a bishop to Negran, and clergy for the churches. While he was praying, the holy Apostle Mark appeared to the patriarch, bidding him to find a deacon named Gregory, who was to be ordained to the priesthood, consecrated as a bishop, and then to be sent to Elesbaan. The patriarch did this.
During the service a miracle took place. St Gregory's face shone with the grace of the Holy Spirit,
and from his vestments came a sweet fragrance like myrrh or incense, filling the whole church with the scent.
Arriving in Homer, St Gregory began to set the Church in order, preaching to both pagans and Jews. After three years Elesbaan returned to Ethiopia, leaving the noble Abramius behind as King of Homer. St Gregory crowned and anointed Abramius as king. Soon he issued a decree that all his subjects be baptized. Then certain prominent Jews turned to the emperor saying that it was better for people to believe willingly rather than under compulsion. They requested that he should permit a debate on faith to be held between them and the Christians, vowing that if the Christians proved victorious in this debate, the Jews would then accept Baptism.
The Jews were given forty days to prepare for the debate, which lasted for several days. St Gregory refuted all the arguments of the head of the Hebrew elder, Rabbi Ervan, using only texts from the Old Testament. In a vision Ervan beheld the holy Prophet Moses, who worshipped the Lord Jesus Christ. The prophet told Ervan that Ervan was in opposition to the truth and would be defeated.
By the grace of God Christian truth prevailed in the debate, but Ervan would not acknowledge his defeat. He made a last desperate attempt. He said, "If you want me to believe in your Christ, and to acknowledge that yours is the true God, then show Him to me, bishop!" The saint replied: "Your request is impertinent. It is not with man that you contend now, but with God. However, the Lord can do what you have asked in order to convince you.
Everyone waited to see what would happen. St Gregory, having steadfast faith in God and trusting in Him, began to pray aloud. He recalled the mystery of the Incarnation of God the Word, the miracles of His earthly life, the Three-day Resurrection and the Ascension into Heaven, and he invoked the power of the Life-Creating Cross. "Show Thyself to these people, O Lord," he prayed, "and glorify Thy holy Name!" When he finished the prayer, the earth quaked, and in the east the heavens were opened, and in a radiant cloud of light the Lord Jesus Christ came down on earth, and the Voice of the Lord was heard: "Through the prayers of Bishop Gregory, He Whom your fathers put to death will heal you." 
Like Saul, who was struck blind by the Heavenly light on the road to Damascus, the Jews were struck blind. Then they believed in Christ and they implored the holy bishop to heal them. Upon receiving holy Baptism, all of them were healed. Rabbi Ervan received the Christian name Leo (meaning "lion").  After this most extraordinary miracle, St Gregory guided the flock of Homer for another thirty years. He reposed in the year 552 and was buried in a crypt in the cathedral of Afar.
6th c. Samthana of Meath Irish abbess-founder of Cluain- Bronach in Meath V (AC).
Samthana is the Irish abbess-founder of Cluain- Bronach in Meath (Benedictines).

790 St. Ribert Revered abbot of the monastery of Saint Oyend.
also called Ribarius. Ribert (Ribarius) of Saint-Oyend, OSB Abbot (AC)  In Franche-Comté, Ribert is much venerated as the 17th abbot of Saint-Oyend (Benedictines).

St. Manirus Bishop an apostle to Scotland kindness - goodwill
He evangelized the Highlanders in the northern regions and was revered for his kindness and goodwill.
Manirus of Scotland B (AC) Date unknown. Manirus is venerated as one of the apostles of northern Scotland. His work seems to have concentrated on encouraging the newly converted Highlanders in their faith (Benedictines).

1122 St. Bernard Valeara patron of Teramo
Italy, Bernard was a Benedictine monk at Monte Cassino, appointed the bishop of Teramo in 1115.
Bernard (Berard) Paleara, OSB B (AC).
Bernard was chosen bishop of Teramo in 1115, after educated Monte Cassino. He is principal patron of Teramo (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

1153 Blessed Macarius of Würzburg first abbot of Saint James monastery, OSB Abbot (AC)
(also known as Macarius the Scot)  Macarius was either a Scottish or Irish monk who travelled to Würzburg, Germany, which attracted Irish pilgrims from the time of Saint Kilian in the 7th century. Apparently the Irish Abbey at Ratisbon (Regensburg) had requested that Macarius open an Irish abbey in Würzburg. He was elected the first abbot of Saint James monastery, which was founded by Bishop Embricho (1125-1146). Macarius is highly venerated in his adopted town and, in 1818, his relics were enshrined in the Marienkapelle there (Benedictines, Montague).

1188 Saint Elias Muromets of the Caves, nicknamed "Shoemaker" or "Cobbler,"
was from the city of Murom. Popular legend identifies him with the famous warrior hero Elias Muromets, who was the subject of Russian ballads and of Gliere's Symphony No. 3.

St Elias died with the fingers of his right hand formed to make the Sign of the Cross in the position accepted even today in the Orthodox Church: the first three fingers together, and the two outermost fingers folded onto the palm [in contrast to the Sign of the Cross used by the "Old Ritualists"]. During the struggle with the Old Ritualist Schism (seventeenth-nineteenth centuries). This information about the saint served as a powerful proof in favor of the present positioning of the fingers
.
1205 Blessed William of Fenoli Carthusian lay-brother many miracles both during his life and after his death.
at the charterhouse Casularum in Lombardy  O. Cart. (AC)

1205 BD WILLIAM OF FENOLI many miracles both during his life and after his death
INFORMATION is lacking about this holy Carthusian lay-brother, whose cultus was confirmed by Pope Pius IX in 1860. It is known that he belonged to the charter-house Casularum in Lombardy and as he was in charge of the external business of the monastery his sanctity was a matter of more public knowledge than is usually the case among Carthusian monks. “He was untutored in theology, in philosophy and in worldly knowledge, but in spiritual life and good works he was most learned. His holiness was made known by very many miracles both during his life and after his death.” Accounts of some of the miracles attributed to him have been pre­served. One preposterous marvel is stated to have happened during his lifetime. When returning from his field work leading a mule William was attacked by robbers. Having no weapon to defend himself, he seized the leg of the mule, pulled it out of its socket, and brandishing it against his assailants, put them all to flight. This done he restored the leg to its place and the mule went on uninjured. It seems to be certain that in still existing paintings Bd William is represented with the leg of a mule or donkey in his hand.

An account of this good brother is given both in Le Couteulx, Annales Ordinis Cartusiensis vol. iii, pp. 293—302 and in the Analecta Juris Pontificii, vol. v, 1861, cc. 129-134. In both, the greater part of the space is taken up with attestations of miracles alleged to have been worked at the intercession of Bd William many centuries after his death.

cultus confirmed in 1860. William was a Carthusian lay-brother at the charterhouse Casularum in Lombardy (Benedictines).
1220 St. Adjutus abbot, famous for the spirit of prophecy.
  Aureliánis, in Gállia, sancti Adjúti Abbátis, prophético spíritu illústris.
      At Orleans in France, St. Adjutus, abbot, famous for the spirit of prophecy.

St. Bernard, St. Peter, St. Otto, St. Accursius, and St. Adjutus, who shed their blood for the Catholic Faith in the year 1220,
1370 Blessed Pope Urban V deeply spiritual Benedictine monk canon lawyer reformer
 Avenióne beáti Urbáni Papæ Quinti, qui, Sede Apostólica Romæ restitúta, Græcórum cum Latínis conjunctióne perfécta, infidélibus coércitis, de Ecclésia óptime méritus est.  Ejus cultum pervetústum Pius Nonus, Póntifex Máximus, ratum hábuit et confirmávit.
      At Avignon, blessed Urban V, who deserved well of the Church by restoring the Apostolic See to Rome, by bringing about a reunion of the Latins and the Greeks, and by suppressing heretics.  Pius IX approved and confirmed the veneration which had long been paid to him.

1370 BD URBAN V, POPE
WILLIAM DE GRIMOARD was born at Grisac in Languedoc in 1310, his father being a local nobleman and his mother a sister of St Elzear de Sabran. He was educated in the universities of Montpellier and Toulouse and became a Benedictine after his ordination he returned to his old universities and then went on to Paris and Avignon to study for his doctor’s degree. He taught in those places, and was appointed abbot of St Germain’s at Auxerre in 1352. At this time the popes were residing at Avignon and for the next ten years Abbot William was constantly called on to undertake diplomatic missions for Pope Innocent VI, who in 1361 made him abbot of St Victor’s at Marseilles and sent him to Naples as legate to Queen Joanna. While he was there he heard that Innocent was dead and that he had been elected in his place. He returned at once to Avignon, where he was consecrated and crowned, and took the name of Urban because “all the popes called Urban had been saints”. He was the best of the Avignon popes, though like most of them he was too much of a “nationalist” (as we should say now) to be a really satisfactory pontiff of the Universal Church, and the abuses by which he was surrounded were beyond his strength to eradicate.

The great event of his pontificate was his attempt, abortive though it was, to restore the papacy to Rome. In 1366, ignoring the opposition of the French king and the French cardinals, he informed the emperor of his intention to return to the City, and in April of the following year he set out. At Carneto he was met by a host of envoys, ecclesiastical and lay, by a Roman embassy bearing the keys of Sant’ Angelo, and by Bd John Columbini and his Gesuati waving palms and singing hymns. Four months later he entered Rome in state, the first pope it had seen for over half a century, and when he looked upon the state of the City he wept.

The great churches, even the Lateran, St Peter’s and St Paul’s, were almost in ruins, and he at once set to work to restore them and to make the papal residences habitable. Immediate steps were taken to revive the discipline of the clergy and the fervour of the people, work was soon found for all, and food was distributed freely to the destitute.

In the following year Urban met the Emperor Charles IV, a new alliance was made between the empire and the Church, and Charles entered Rome leading the mule on which the pope rode. Twelve months later the emperor of the East, John V Palaeologus, also came, disclaiming schism and seeking help against the Turks. Urban received him on the steps of St Peter’s, but he could give him no help: it was more than he could do to maintain his own position. He had failed to crush the condottieri, Perugia had revolted, France was at war with England, his French court was restless and discontented, his health was failing: Urban prepared to go back to France. The Romans implored him to stay; Petrarch made himself the mouthpiece of Italy to keep him in Rome, St Bridget of Sweden rode out to Montefiascone on her white mule to warn him that if he left Italy his death would swiftly follow. But it was all to no purpose. In June 1370 he declared to the Romans that he was leaving them for the good of the Church and to help France; on September 5, “sorrowful, suffering and deeply moved”, he embarked at Carneto; and on December 19 he was dead. Petrarch wrote, “Urban would have been reckoned among the most glorious of men if he had caused his dying bed to be laid before the altar of St Peter’s and had there fallen asleep with a good conscience, calling God and the world to witness that if ever the pope had left this spot it was not his fault but that of the originators of so shameful a flight.” But this one weakness was forgiven him, and a chronicler of Mainz sums up contemporary opinion: “He was a light of the world and a way of truth; a lover of righteousness, flying from wickedness and fearing.”

Urban V was entirely free from the prevailing vices of his age and worked hard for the reform of the clergy, beginning with his own court, where the venality of the officials was notorious.* He maintained many poor students and encouraged learning by his support of universities, e.g. Oxford, and his encouragement of the foundation of new ones, e.g. at Cracow and Vienna. He awarded the custody of the relics of St Thomas Aquinas to the Dominicans of Toulouse, and instructed the university of that city that: “We will and enjoin on you that you follow the teaching of the blessed Thomas as true and Catholic teaching, and promote it to the utmost of your power.” Pilgrims came to Urban’s tomb in the abbey church of St Victor at Marseilles, his canonization was asked for and Pope Gregory XI promised the King of Denmark that it should be undertaken. The times were too troubled; but the cultus continued, and in 1870 it was confirmed by Pope Pius IX, the feast of Bd Urban being added to the calendar of Rome and of several French dioceses.

From the point of view of this pontiff’s personal holiness the most important sources will be found collected in the volume of J. H. Albanes and U. Chevalier, Actes ancient et documents concernant le B. Urbain V (1897). This includes the ancient lives, of which there are several, and the evidence, reports of miracles, etc., presented in view of his canonization as early as 1390. There is besides this a very considerable literature, of which an excellent bibliography is provided in G. Mollat, Las popes d’Avignon (1912), pp. 102-103. See further G. Schmidt in Sdralek’s Kirchengeschichtliche Abhandlungen, vol. iii, pp. 157—173, and E. Hocedez in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxvi (1907), PP. 305—316. There is a life by L. Chaillan (1911) in the series “Les Saints”, but the best account is that of G. Mollat in his work mentioned above.

* Among the cardinals he made was Simon Langham, Archbishop of Canterbury, who was promptly turned out of his see by King Edward III because he had not asked the king’s leave to accept the honour.

In 1362, the man elected pope declined the office. When the cardinals could not find another person among them for that important office, they turned to a relative stranger: the holy person we honor today.
The new Pope Urban V proved a wise choice.
A Benedictine monk and canon lawyer, he was deeply spiritual and brilliant. He lived simply and modestly, which did not always earn him friends among clergymen who had become used to comfort and privilege. Still, he pressed for reform and saw to the restoration of churches and monasteries.
Except for a brief period he spent most of his eight years as pope living away from Rome at Avignon, seat of the papacy from 1309 until shortly after his death.

He came close but was not able to achieve one of his biggest goals—reuniting the Eastern and Western churches.
As pope, Urban continued to follow the Benedictine Rule. Shortly before his death in 1370 he asked to be moved from the papal palace to the nearby home of his brother so he could say goodbye to the ordinary people he had so often helped.

Blessed Urban V OSB, Pope (RM) Born in Grisac, Languedoc, France, 1310; died in Avignon, France, December 19, 1370; cultus confirmed by Pope Pius IX on March 10, 1870.

William (Guillaume) de Grimoard, later Pope Urban V, was born in a chateau and given his name by his godfather Elzear de Sabran. His mother, Amphelise de Montferrand, remarked: "My son, I don't understand you!...But God does."

William had a most distinguished academic career, both studying philosophy, letters and law at Montpellier and Toulouse, and teaching canon law at four universities: Montpellier, Toulouse, Avignon, and Paris. The Benedictines pleased him. He entered the Chirac abbey and followed his vocation, which included ordination as a priest. His serious smile won all hearts; his diplomas opened doors. He was vicar general at Clermont and Uzés. Pope Clement VI appointed him abbot of St. Germain, Auxerre, in 1352, and nine years later Pope Innocent VI appointed him abbot of St. Victor, Marseilles, and legate to Queen Joanna of Naples. He retained such fond memories of St. Victor's that he asked to be buried there.

Popes Clement VI and Innocent VI used his services as a diplomat. The latter sent him all over as papal legate to obtain the submission of the Italian cities and the little republics that had so clamorously broken loose and, in the disorder of temporal authority, more and more contested the authority of the Holy See.

William succeeded, not by the ruses of diplomats or severity, but by negotiations and candor. He had no enemies. On September 28, 1362, he was on a papal mission to Naples when he learned that Innocent VI had died and that he himself had been elected pope, though he was not a cardinal. Together with his new name Urban, he took on his new mission without any pomp for he had a horror of all display. He prayed the way everyone prayed. He ate and died as the common folk.

He immediately began to reform the Church. Because his studies had served him well, he came to the aid of students with all his might, creating thousands of scholarships, reforming or creating new universities. He said, "The first sin of Christians is their ignorance." He restored churches and monasteries that had fallen into disorder. He made peace with Barnabo Visconti in 1364, though he was unsuccessful in his attempts to suppress the marauding condottieri in France and Italy. Through Peter de Lusignan, Urban temporarily occupied Alexandria in 1365, but his crusade against the Turks did not succeed.

For 50 years the papacy had been based at Avignon but in 1366 Urban decided to bring back the papacy to Rome. Unfortunately, the French court and cardinals opposed this move. Once in Rome, he set about restoring the dilapidated city, tightening clerical discipline, and reviving religion. The Emperor Charles IV was won over to a new treaty with the papacy. After Urban crowned Charles' consort German Empress, Charles agreed to respect the rights of the Church in Germany.

Because the split church seemed to him a permanent injury to Jesus Christ, he made advances to the Christians of the East. Even the Greek emperor, John V Palaeologus, was reconciled to Rome, in an attempt to heal the deep rift between the Eastern and Western Church. It is sad that the emperor was unable to win over the hearts of his people to reconcile with Rome.

But many princes remained hostile. Because he knew how to live modestly, Urban demanded the same of his entourage. Because he did not value money, he made no economies and condemned the clergy who made profit and business from their positions. If the goodness of Pope Urban has any defect, it is that he didn't hide it under his hat. He did everything in all innocence. Though he was pope, he remained a monk and continued to follow the Benedictine Rule.

The condottieri, led by Barnabo Visconti, were once again his implacable enemies. The Perugians rose against him. The leaders of France threatened the stability of the Church. Sadly, Urban left Rome on September 5, 1370, and returned to Avignon, despite the prediction of Saint Bridget that he would die an early death if he left Rome. He died less than four months later.

On Tuesday Urban had a premonition that he would not finish his mission and that he was not the man to reconcile the French and the British. He made them remove him from the Papal Palace at Avignon to his brother's house at the foot of the hill. He did not want to die in fine sheets. He had all the door to the street opened, for many of the people whom he used to help wanted to say goodbye to him (Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

 Blessed Pope Urban V (1310-1370) 
In 1362, the man elected pope declined the office. When the cardinals could not find another person among them for that important office, they turned to a relative stranger: the holy person we honor today.

The new Pope Urban V proved a wise choice. A Benedictine monk and canon lawyer, he was deeply spiritual and brilliant. He lived simply and modestly, which did not always earn him friends among clergymen who had become used to comfort and privilege. Still, he pressed for reform and saw to the restoration of churches and monasteries. Except for a brief period he spent most of his eight years as pope living away from Rome at Avignon, seat of the papacy from 1309 until shortly after his death.
He came close but was not able to achieve one of his biggest goals—reuniting the Eastern and Western churches.
As pope, Urban continued to follow the Benedictine Rule. Shortly before his death in 1370 he asked to be moved from the papal palace to the nearby home of his brother so he could say goodbye to the ordinary people he had so often helped.  
1511 Blessed Caecilia of Ferrara, OP V (PC).
 Caecilia married a very virtuous husband. By mutual consent they separated to become religious; she entered the Dominican convent at Ferrara (Benedictines)
.
1839 St. Francis Xavier Mau Martyr of Vietnam.
He was a native catechist who was strangled, as were his four companions.

1839 St. Thomas De & Companions Vietnamese martyrs
Thomas was a Vietnamese tailor who entered the Dominicans as a tertiary. Arrested on the charge of giving aid and shelter to foreign missionaries, he was strangled. Four other Catholic Vietnamese died with Thomas. They were canonized in 1988.
Blessed Thomas De and Companions, OP Tert. MM (AC) beatified in 1900. There is little known of the many Vietnamese natives who died during the several persecutions of Christians. During the first 20 years of the 19th century, Christianity made steady progress that was dramatically halted by renewed persecutions under the Annamite king Minh-Mang (1820-41). From 1832 Minh excluded all foreign missionaries and ordered Vietnamese Christians to renounce Christianity by trampling on the crucifix. Meanwhile churches were destroyed and teaching Christianity was forbidden. Some of the victims seem to have been induced by drugs to make temporary retractions; others endured fearsome tortures, including cutting off the limbs, joint by joint.

Thomas De, a Dominican tertiary and a tailor by profession, suffered the fate of many: execution by strangulation for giving shelter to the missionaries. Martyred with him were the Dominican tertiaries and catechists Dominic Uy, a 26-year-old; Francis Xavier Mau; the peasant Stephen Vinh; and one other (Benedictines, Farmer).

1839 Bl. Francis Man Dominican tertiary martyr of Vietnam.
Francis was serving as a catechist when arrested.
He and four companions were strangled. He was beatified in 1900.

1839 St. Augustine Moi martyr of Vietnam Dominican tertiary
Augustine worked as a day laborer. When the persecution of the faith started, he was ordered to trample a crucifix, an act he refused. Augustine's tormentors strangled him for his loyalty to Christ. He was beautified in 1900 and canonized in 1988 by Pope John Paul II.

Avitus (Adjutus) of Micy, Abbot (RM)
This is a confusing entry in the Roman Martyrology. There is another Avitus or Avy, who was also abbot of Micy monastery near Orleans about the same time and whose feast day is June 17. It's impossible to know whether these are or are not two separate individuals. Roeder, in describing the saint of June 17, calls him by all three names. She says that he is portrayed as a bishop using an axe to drive off the devil who is attacking Avitus with a pick-axe (Benedictines, Roeder).


 Monday  Saints of this Day December  19 Quartodécimo Kaléndas Januárii.  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  December 2016
Universal: End to Child-Soldiers.
That the scandal of child-soldiers may be eliminated the world over.
Evangelization: Europe  That the peoples of Europe may rediscover the beauty, goodness, and
truth of the Gospel which gives joy and hope to life.
   `   

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      
 
                                                                           
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.