Thursday  Saints of this Day December  22 Undécimo Kaléndas Januárii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Mary Mother of GOD
 
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
The Feast of the Patronage of the Most Blessed Mary ever Virgin A totum duplex feast.

Fourth Week of Advent

Pope Authorizes 12 14 2015 Promulgation of Decrees Concerning 17 Causes,
Including Servant of God William Gagnon
November 23 2014 Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King

CAUSES OF SAINTS

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .


Pope Benedict XVI to  Catholic Church In China {whole article here}
The saints “a cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

December 22 – Our Lady of Milk (Italy) 
 
The Blessed Virgin Mary’s place of refuge
 Outside the city of Bethlehem, near the Church of the Nativity, is the "Milk Grotto" (in Latin Crypta lactea or Cyptea lactationis, in Arabic Meharet-es Sitti or the Grotto of the Virgin). It was formerly known as the "Church of Saint Nicolas," which is the name of the chapel above it that used to be a monastery run by Orthodox Greeks. The Blessed Virgin took refuge for some time in this grotto (ten to fifteen days according to the Greeks), just before the flight into Egypt, during the Massacre of the Innocents. Some said that it was also here where the Adoration of the Magi took place—many wonderful things have been said about this grotto. According to Armenian tradition, the Virgin Mary often came to this place which was safer and more remote than the grotto of the Nativity, to hide from Herod's soldiers and be able to nurse her Divine Child in safety. A legend says that a few drops of her milk fell on the stone, softened the rock, and whitened the whole grotto hence its name. The Mary of Nazareth Team
 
December 22 - 4th Sunday of Advent
   Mary is Expecting the Word of God

In the message of hope that Jesus had the mission of bringing to all nations, belief in the Incarnation comes first and foremost in the Christian faith and defines its very character. (…)
The Person of the Word is united to a human body and soul. According to Saint Ambrose of Milan's almost crude expression, Mary is “pregnant the Word of God.” Do we understand that henceforth the face of the world was different, and that the distance between those who believe in God without Christ and those of us who believe in God made flesh in Christ lies utterly in the fact that the face of the world has changed?

“It was necessary,” wrote Saint Irenaeus (second bishop of Lyons), “for the Mediator between God and men, to restore friendship and concord between them, by his relationship with both parties …”

In the Virgin’s womb, the human race came into contact with the living God.
Father Ambroise Marie Carré, O.P.
In Marie, mère du Christ et des hommes, (Mary, Mother of Christ and of Mankind), Foi Vivante, Ed du Cerf, 1970.
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners now, and at the hour of death.
Amen.
 Join the Mary of Nazareth Project and help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth.


December 22 - Our Lady of Chartres, Mother of Youth (France, 1935)
Mary in the Midst of Israel's Waiting (XIII) "A virgin shall conceive, and bear a son" (Is 7:14)
All throughout tradition, saints and mystics have also been unanimous in believing that the very humble Virgin never imagined she might be the mother of the Savior. This certainly was the great sign of the coming of the Messiah foretold by the prophet Isaiah: "The Lord himself will give you a sign: behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel" (Is 7:14).

The Hebrew text speaks of a "girl" and the Greek translation of the Septuagint a "virgin", but we often forget the important Aramaic translation, that today's Jews regard as canonical and more respectable than the Septuagint.

This translated into the "language of humanity" that the Talmuds translated directly in a Hebrew text,
"God's language", in order to understand it better, takes a precise term from the prophecy of Isaiah,
which designates "an engaged girl not yet married."

By becoming the mother of this Child, Mary becomes the "City of the great King" (Ps 48.3) where God lives and protects. Within her, "generation after generation will proclaim their joy, and the name of her who is Elect will endure through the generations to come" (Tb 13:11).

December 22 - Our Lady of Chartres, Mother of Youth (France, 1935)
O Desired of Nations!
O King of nations, you come closer and closer to Bethlehem where you will be born.
The journey is drawing nigh and your august mother, consoled and strengthened by your delightful weight,
does not cease to converse with you on the way. She adores your divine majesty, she gives thanks for your mercy,
she rejoices to have been chosen for the sublime ministry of serving as God's mother.

She longs for and fears at the same time the moment when her eyes will contemplate you.
How will she be able to serve your sovereign greatness worthily, she who regards herself as the least of your creatures? How will she dare to carry you in her arms, press you against her bosom, nurse you upon her mortal breast?
And yet, she comes to reflect that the hour is approaching when, without ceasing to be her son,
you will leave her womb and claim all the cares of her tenderness.
Then her heart fails her and motherly love is blended with her love for her God.
She almost dies in the unequal struggle between her weak human nature
and the stronger and mightier feelings in her heart.

But you sustain her, O Desired of Nations, for you wish that she may arrive at the time of that blessed birth that must give the earth its Savior and men the cornerstone which will make of them one family.
Dom Guéranger Liturgical Year - December 22

“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God,
as John the theologian and evangelist says:
‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God...’

Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory”
(Exposition of the Orthodox Faith).

It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Forth week of Advent
Everyday the Church offers us riches   December 22, 2016

1 Samuel 1:24-28  ; 1 Samuel 2:1, 4-8 ;   Luke 1:46-56 ;

The Virgin Mary of Nazareth
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  December 2015
Universal:    Universal: That all may experience the mercy of God, who never tires of forgiving.
Evangelization: That families, especially those who suffer, may find in the birth of Jesus a sign of certain hope.

When faith is strong it works wonders ( Mk 16:17 ).
 Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.

THE PRECIOUS BLOOD OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
Forefeast of the Nativity of the Lord begins on December 20. From now on, most of the liturgical hymns will be concerned with the birth of the Savior. 
 250 St. Chaeromon Bishop of Nilopolis Egypt
 303 St. Zeno Martyred soldier at Nicomedia (modern Turkey)
188 to 231 St. Demetrius Bishop of Alexandria; Martyr with Honoratus and  Florus
         St. Demetrius Martyr with Honoratus and Florus
4th v. Anastasia the Deliverer from Potions, The Great Martyr fed, doctored and often ransomed captives distribute
          her property to the poor and suffering
4th v. Saint Chrysogonus Martyr at Aquileia teacher of Great Martyr St Anastasia
4th v. Saint Theodota young widow with 3 children she raised in piety visited imprisoned Christians took care of them
4th v. Saint Evodus eldest son of St Theodota. He, his mother, and his two brothers stood bravely before the judge
         endured beatings without protest
4th v. Saint Eutychianus one of the prisoners sentenced drown with St Anastasia St Theodota appeared, steered ship to
         shore
120 believed in Christ baptized by Sts Anastasia and Eutychianus All captured and martyred
         St. Chaeremon, bishop of Nilopolis, and many other martyrs  In Egypt
        Thirty holy martyrs At Rome, on the Lavican Way,
        St. Ischyrion, At Alexandria,  martyr
  362 St. Flavian Prefect of Rome arrested for being a Christian
 
540 St. Barsanuphius Martyrd by muslims; monk in the early days of the Islamic era in Egypt; Coptic
        St. Abracius (Apraxios); from upper Egypt became a monk in one of the monasteries when he was 20; Coptic
       
St. Misaeal (Misayil), the Anchorite; Consecration of the Church; Coptic
  866 St. Hunger Bishop of Utrecht
  982 St. Amaswinthus Abbot 44 yrs in Andalusia
1136 Bd Jutta of Diessenberg, Virgin; led life of a recluse next to the monastery founded by St Disibod on the Diessenberg; the “noble woman” to whom was confided care of St Hildegard, when a child, Jutta who first taught her Latin, to read and to sing; many startling miracles
1210 Bd Adam of Loccum;  St Mary laid her hand on his head, and when he had done as he was told his complaint was cured never to return. “It is clear that there is nothing more efficacious and no remedy more sure than the medicine of the Blessed Virgin”, observes the novice in the Dialogue. To which the monk replies: “And no wonder. For it was she who brought to us the medicine of the whole human race, as it is written, ‘Let the earth bring forth the living creature’, that is to say, let Mary bring forth the man Christ.”  Bd Adam told other marvels to Caesarius, but these were not written down for our delectation and improvement.
1306 Blessed Jacopone da Todi  wrote Stabat Mater dolorosa -- The sorrowful mother stood
1899 Dwight Lyman Moody; Evangelische Kirche: 1856 nach Chicago begann dort evangelistisch zu arbeiten; 1889
        eröffnete er ein Bibelinstitut in Chicago

1917 St. Frances  Cabrini, virgin, foundress Congregation of Missionaries of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, At Chicago

Leo XIII {1878-1903} said, “Not to the East, but to the West”, to St Francis Cabrini. 

The United States at all times attracted the attention and admiration of Pope Leo. 

December 22 - OUR LADY OF CHARTRES - MOTHER OF THE YOUTH (France, 1935)
Advent's Great O Antiphons (VI): O Rex gentium
O King of nations! You are getting close to this Bethlehem where you must be born. The journey draws to its end, and your august Mother, consoled and strengthened by such a sweet burden, doesn't stop conversing with you on the way. She adores your divine majesty, she gives thanks for your mercy; she rejoices to have been chosen for the sublime ministry of serving as the Mother of a God.
She desires and fears at the same time the moment when her eyes will finally contemplate you. How will she be able to serve you in a manner worthy of your sovereign greatness, when she thinks of herself as the last of all creatures? How will she dare to pick you up in her arms, press you against her heart, nurse you with her mortal breast?
And yet, when she comes to think about the impending time when, without ceasing to be her son, you will come out of her and demand the cares of her tenderness, her heart fails her, and maternal love becoming mixed up with the love she feels for her God, she is about to expire in this too unequal fight between her weak human nature and the strongest and mightiest of all affections gathered in a single heart.
But you hold her up, O Desired of nations! For you want her to arrive to that happy term which must give the earth its Savior and to men the Cornerstone which will gather them up in a unique family.
Dom Gueranger The Liturgical Year - Advent - December XXII



The Forefeast of the Nativity of the Lord began December 20. From now on, most of the liturgical hymns will be concerned with the birth of the Savior.
At Vespers for this third day of the prefeast of the Nativity we sing, "Christ is born on earth to crush the power of evil, to enlighten those in darkness, and to free the captives. Let us go forth to meet Him."
231 St. Demetrius Bishop of Alexandria from 188 to 231; Martyr with Honoratus and  Florus
 Apud Ostia Tiberína sanctórum Mártyrum Demétrii, Honoráti et Flori.
      At Ostia, the holy martyrs Demetrius, Honoratus, and Florus.
They died at Ostia, Italy. Possibly the same as Sts. Demetrius and Honorius of November 21
Julius Africanus, who visited Alexandria in the time of Demetrius, places his accession as eleventh bishop after St. Mark in the tenth year of Commodus (tenth of Severus, Eus. His. Eccl., VI, ii, is a slip). A legendary history of him is given in the Coptic "Synaxaria", in an Abyssinian poem cited by the Bollandists, and in the "Chronicon Orientale" of Abraham Ecchellensis the Maronite. Three of their statements, however, may have some truth: one that he died at the age of 105 (born, therefore, in 126); another, found also in the Melchite Patriarch Eutychius [Sa'id Ibn Batrik, (d. about 940), Migne, P.G., CXI, 999], that he wrote about the calculation of Easter to Victor of Rome, Maximus (i.e. Maximinus) of Antioch and Gabius or Agapius (?) of Jerusalem (cf. Eus., H.E., V, xxv). Eutychius relates that from Mark to Demetrius there was but one see in Egypt, that Demetrius was the first to establish three other bishoprics, and that his successor Heraclas made twenty more.

At all events Demetrius is the first Alexandrian bishop of whom anything is known. St. Jerome has it that he sent Pantaenus on a mission to India, but it is likely that Clement had succeeded Pantaenus as the head of the famous Catechetical School before the accession of Demetrius. When Clement retired (c. 203-4), Demetrius appointed the young Origen, who was in his eighteenth year, in Clement's place. Demetrius encouraged Origen when blamed for his too literal execution of an allegorical counsel of our Lord, and is said to have shown him great favor. He sent Origen to the governor of Arabia, who had requested his presence in letters to the prefect of Egypt as well as to the bishop. In 215-16 Origen was obliged to take refuge in Caesarea from the cruelty of Caracalla. There he preached at the request of the bishops present. Demetrius wrote to him complaining that this was unheard of presumption in a layman. Alexander of Jerusalem and Theoctistus of Caesarea wrote to defend the invitation they had given, mentioning precedents; but Demetrius recalled Origen.
  In 230 Demetrius gave Origen a recommendation to take with him on his journey to Athens. But Origen was ordained priest at Caesarea without leave, and Demetrius with a synod of some bishops and a few priests condemned him to banishment, then from another synod sent a formal condemnation of him to all the churches. It is impossible to doubt that heresy, and not merely unauthorized ordination, must have been alleged by Demetrius for such a course. Rome accepted the decision, but Palestine, Phoenicia, Arabia, Achaia rejected it, and Origen retired to Caesarea, whence he sent forth letters in his own defense, and attacked Demetrius. The latter placed at the head of the Catechetical School the first pupil of Origen, Heraclas, who had long been his assistant. But the bishop died very soon, and Heraclas succeeding him, Origen returned to Alexandria.

250 St. Chaeromon Bishop of Nilopolis Egypt
When the persecution was instituted by Emperor Trajanus Decius, Chaeromon was quite elderly. He and several companions fled into the Arabian desert and were never seen again. The bishop and his companions are listed as martyrs.
250 Ss. Chaeremon, Ischyrion and other martyrs

St Dionysius of Alexandria in his letter to Fabian of Antioch, speaking of the Egyptian Christians who suffered in the persecution under Decius, refers to the many who were driven or fled into the desert, where they perished from hunger, thirst and exposure, by wild beasts and by men as wild many also were seized and sold into slavery, of which only some had been ransomed at the time he wrote. He singles out for mention by name Chaeremon, a very old man and bishop of Nilopolis, who with one companion had taken refuge in the mountains of Arabia and had never been seen or heard of again search was made by the brethren but not even their bodies were found. St Dionysius also mentions Ischyrion, who was the procurator of a magistrate in some city of Egypt, traditionally Alexandria. His master ordered him to sacrifice to the gods, but he refused and neither abuse nor threats could move him. So the enraged magistrate had him mutilated and impaled. Both these martyrs are named in the Roman Martyrology today.
These again are martyrs whose names are only rescued from oblivion by an extract that Eusebius (bk vi, ch. 42) made from a letter of St Dionysius of Alexandria.
303 St. Zeno Martyred soldier at Nicomedia (modern Turkey)
 Nicomedíæ sancti Zenónis mílitis, qui, cum Diocletiánum Céreri immolántem derisísset, proptérea, maxíllis confráctis dentibúsque excússis, cápite truncátus est.
       At Nicomedia, St. Zeno, a soldier who mocked Diocletian for sacrificing to Ceres, wherefore his jawbones were broken, his teeth knocked out, and his head struck off.
He was seized and condemned to death for laughing while Emperor Diocletian offered a sacrifice to the Roman god Ceres. Zeno had his jaws shaffered and was then beheaded.
4th v. Anastasia the Deliverer from Potions, The Great Martyr fed, doctored and often ransomed captives distribute her property to the poor and suffering
Roman by birth, suffered for Christ at the time of Diocletian's persecution of Christians. Her father was a pagan, but her mother was secretly a Christian. St Anastasia's teacher in her youth was an educated and pious Christian named Chrysogonus. After the death of her mother, her father gave St Anastasia in marriage to a pagan named Publius, but feigning illness, she preserved her virginity.

Clothing herself in the garb of a beggar, and accompanied by only one servant, she visited the prisons. She fed, doctored and often ransomed captives who were suffering for their faith in Christ. When her servant told Publius about everything, he subjected his wife to a beating and locked her up at home. St Anastasia then began to correspond secretly with Chrysogonus, who told the saint to be patient, to cleave to the Cross of Christ, and to accept the Lord's will. He also foretold the impending death of Publius in the sea. After a certain while Publius did indeed drown, as he was setting out with a delegation to Persia. After the death of her husband, St Anastasia began to distribute her property to the poor and suffering.

Diocletian was informed that the Christians who filled the prisons of Rome stoically endured tortures. He gave orders to kill them all in a single night, and for Chrysogonus to be sent to him at Aquileia. St Anastasia followed her teacher at a distance.

The emperor interrogated Chrysogonus personally, but could not make him renounce his faith. Therefore, he commanded that he be beheaded and thrown into the sea. The body and severed head of the holy martyr were carried to shore by the waves. There by divine Providence, the relics were found by a presbyter named Zoilus who placed them in a coffer, and concealed them at his home.

St Chrysogonus appeared to Zoilus and informed him that martyrdom was at hand for Agape, Chione and Irene (April 16), three sisters who lived nearby. He told him to send St Anastasia to them to encourage them. St Chrysogonus foretold that Zoilus would also die on the same day. Nine days later, the words of St Chrysogonus were fulfilled. Zoilus fell asleep in the Lord, and St Anastasia visited the three maidens before their tortures. When these three martyrs gave up their souls to the Lord, she buried them.

Having carried out her teacher's request, the saint went from city to city ministering to Christian prisoners. Proficient in the medical arts of the time, she zealously cared for captives far and wide, healing their wounds and relieving their suffering. Because of her labors, St Anastasia received the name Deliverer from Potions (Pharmakolytria), since by her intercessions she has healed many from the effects of potions, poisons, and other harmful substances.

She made the acquaintance of the pious young widow Theodota, finding in her a faithful helper. Theodota was taken for questioning when it was learned that she was a Christian. Meanwhile, St Anastasia was arrested in Illyricum. This occurred just after all the Christian captives there had been murdered in a single night by order of Diocletian. St Anastasia had come to one of the prisons, and finding no one there, she began to weep loudly. The jailers realized that she was a Christian and took her to the prefect of the district, who tried to persuade her to deny Christ by threatening her with torture. After his unsuccessful attempts to persuade St Anastasia to offer sacrifice to idols, he handed her over to the pagan priest Ulpian in Rome.

The cunning pagan offered St Anastasia the choice between luxury and riches, or grievous sufferings. He set before her gold, precious stones and fine clothing, and also fearsome instruments of torture. The crafty man was put to shame by the bride of Christ. St Anastasia refused the riches and chose the tools of torture.

But the Lord prolonged the earthly life of the saint, and Ulpian gave her three days to reconsider. Charmed by Anastasia's beauty, the pagan priest decided to defile her purity. However, when he tried to touch her he suddenly became blind. His head began to ache so severely that he screamed like a madman. He asked to be taken to a pagan temple to appeal to the idols for help, but on the way he fell down and died.

St Anastasia was set free and she and Theodota again devoted themselves to the care of imprisoned Christians. Before long, St Theodota and her three sons accepted a martyrdom. Her eldest son, Evodus, stood bravely before the judge and endured beatings without protest. After lengthy torture, they were all thrown into a red-hot oven.

St Anastasia was caught again and condemned to death by starvation. She remained in prison without food for sixty days. St Theodota appeared to the martyr every night and gave her courage. Seeing that hunger caused St Anastasia no harm whatsoever, the judge sentenced her to drowning together with other prisoners. Among them was Eutychianus, who was condemned for his Christian faith.

The prisoners were put into a boat which went out into the open sea. The soldiers bored holes in the boat and got into a galley. St Theodota appeared to the captives and steered the ship to shore. When they reached dry land, 120 men believed in Christ and were baptized by Sts Anastasia and Eutychianus. All were captured and received a martyr's crown. St Anastasia was stretched between four pillars and burned alive. A certain pious woman named Apollinaria buried her body, which was unharmed by the fire, in the garden outside her house.

In the fifth century the relics of St Anastasia were transferred to Constantinople, where a church was built and dedicated to her. Later the head and a hand of the Great Martyr were transferred to the monastery of St Anastasia [Deliverer from Potions], near Mount Athos.
4th v. Saint Chrysogonus Martyr at Aquileia teacher of Great Martyr St Anastasia
When Diocletian learned that the prisons of Rome were overcrowed with Christians who resisted torture, he ordered them all to be killed in a single night, and for Chrysogonus to be sent to him at Aquileia. St Anastasia followed her teacher at a distance.

The emperor interrogated Chrysogonus personally, but could not make him renounce his faith. Therefore, he had him beheaded and thrown into the sea. The body and severed head of the holy martyr were carried to shore by the waves. There by divine Providence, the relics were found by a presbyter named Zoilus who placed them in a coffer, and concealed them at his home.

St Chrysogonus appeared to Zoilus and informed him that Sts Agape, Chione and Irene (April 16), three sisters who lived nearby, would soon endure martyrdom. He told him to send St Anastasia to them to encourage them. St Chrysogonus foretold that Zoilus would also die on the same day. Nine days later, the words of St Chrysogonus were fulfilled. Zoilus fell asleep in the Lord, and St Anastasia visited the three maidens before their torture. When these three martyrs gave up their souls to the Lord, she buried their bodies.

4th v. Saint Theodota a young widow with three children, whom she raised in piety visited Christians in prison and took care of them.
The Great Martyr St Anastasia lived with her in Macedonia, and the two women visited Christians in prison and took care of them.
Arrested as a Christian, Theodota was sent to Nicetas, the governor of Bithynia, for interrogation. Since she refused to deny Christ, she and her three children were sentenced to death, beaten, and thrown into a fiery furnace.

4th v. Saint Evodus eldest son of St Theodota. He, his mother, and his two brothers stood bravely before the judge and endured beatings without protest. After lengthy torture, they were all thrown into a fiery furnace and so received the crown of martyrdom.
4th v. Saint Eutychianus one of the prisoners sentenced to be drowned with the Great Martyr St Anastasia St Theodota appeared to the captives and steered the ship to shore 120 men believed in Christ and were baptized by Sts Anastasia and Eutychianus. All were captured and received a martyr's crown.
Before he was imprisoned, he had endured tortures because he was a Christian, and his wealth had been confiscated.

The prisoners were put into a boat which went out into the open sea. The soldiers bored holes in the boat and got into a galley. St Theodota appeared to the captives and steered the ship to shore. When they reached dry land, 120 men believed in Christ and were baptized by Sts Anastasia and Eutychianus. All were captured and received a martyr's crown.

     St. Chaeremon, bishop of Nilopolis, and many other martyrs  In Egypt.  While the persecution of Decius was raging, some of them were dispersed in flight, and wandering through deserts were killed by wild beasts; others perished by famine, cold, and sickness; others again were murdered by barbarians and robbers, and thus all were crowned with a glorious martyrdom.
      In Ægypto sanctórum Chærémonis, Epíscopi Nilópolis, et aliórum plurimórum Mártyrum.  Horum álii, sæviénte Décii persecutióne, fuga dispérsi, in solitúdinis errántes, a béstiis interémpti sunt; álii fame, frígore ac languóre consúmpti; álii a bárbaris et latrónibus necáti; atque ita omnes, divérso mortis génere, eádem martyrii glória coronáti sunt.
        St. Ischyrion, At Alexandria,  martyr.  Because he despised all the injuries he was made to suffer in attempts to force him to sacrifice to idols, his bowels were pierced with a sharp stake, bringing his death.
  
Alexandríæ sancti Ischyriónis Mártyris, qui, cum ad sacrificándum convíciis et injúriis cogerétur atque contémneret, ídeo, præacúta sude per média víscera transverberátus, neci tráditur.
362 St. Flavian Prefect of Rome arrested for being a Christian.
 Item Romæ sancti Flaviáni Expræfécti, viri beátæ Mártyris Dafrósæ atque patris beatárum Vírginum et Mártyrum Bibiánæ ac Demétriæ; qui, sub Juliáno Apóstata, pro Christo inscriptióne damnátus, et ad Aquas Taurínas, in Etrúria, in exsílium missus, illic in oratióne spíritum Deo réddidit.
       In the same city, St. Flavian, an ex-prefect, the husband of the blessed martyr Dafrosa, and the father of the holy virgin martyrs, Bibiana and Demetria.  He was condemned under Julian the Apostate to be branded for Christ, and was exiled to Aquæ Taurinæ, where he gave up his soul to God in prayer.
He was branded on the forehead and exiled to Aquapendente in the Tuscany region. He died there in prayer.
 Thirty holy martyrs At Rome, on the Lavican Way, between the two laurels, the birthday of who were all crowned with martyrdom on the one day in the persecution of Diocletian.
  Romæ, via Lavicána, inter duas Lauros, natális sanctórum trigínta Mártyrum, qui omnes una die, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, martyrio coronáti sunt.      

540 St. Barsanuphius Martyred by muslims; monk in the early days of the Islamic era in Egypt; Coptic

This day marks the martyrdom of St. Barsanuphius the monk in the early days of the Islamic era in Egypt. He lived in the church of Mari Mina in the old district of Cairo (Fum-El-Khaleeg). He worshipped God with dedication and piety. He fasted two days at a time, praying incessantly with numerous metanias.
Some wicked people accused him of cursing the judges and the Muslim sheikhs. They brought him and tortured him severely, then they finally cut off his head, thus St. Barsanuphius received the crown of martyrdom.

Barsanuphius of Palestine (Italian: Barsonofio, Barsanofrio, Barsanorio) (d. ca. 540 AD), also known as Barsanuphius of Gaza, was a hermit of the sixth century. Born in Egypt, he lived in absolute seclusion for fifty years at, and then near the monastery of Saint Seridon of Gaza in Palestine. He wrote many letters, 800 of which have survived. He corresponded mainly with John the Prophet, abbot of the monastery of Merosala and teacher of Dorotheus of Gaza.
At the old age he convinced the emperor to renew the concordant relationship with the Church of Jerusalem
His relics arrived in Oria with a Palestinian monk in 850 AD and placed in the present-day church of San Francesco da Paola by Bishop Theodosius. During a Moorish siege and taking of the city, the relics were lost but then later rediscovered and placed in the city's basilica.

At Oria he is considered to have saved the city from destruction wrought by foreign invaders. A legend states that he repelled a Spanish invasion by appearing before the Spanish commander armed with a sword.
During World War II, he is said to have spread his blue cape across the sky, thus causing a rainstorm, and preventing an air bombing by Allied Forces.
St. Abracius (Apraxios) Departure of; from upper Egypt; became a monk in one of the monasteries when he was 20
He fought a perfect fight until Satan grew tired of tempting him. Satan faced him saying, "You still have 50 more years to live in this world," wishing by these words to cast the saint into despair. The saint replied, "You have made me sorrowful for I have thought that I had another hundred years to live and I have slackened in my fight and in my worship. If this is the case, I have to fight harder before I die." In this way, he overcame the devil that tried to put slackness in his heart.
He fought strenuously and departed in peace in the same year after spending 70 years of worship and asceticism.
His prayers be with us. Amen.

St. Misaeal (Misayil), the Anchorite; Consecration of the Church

While Abba Isaac, the head of El-Qualamoon monastery, was sitting in the monastery a young man came to him. Abba Isaac made the sign of the cross over his face as is the custom of the monks (1)and allowed him to draw near. The young man came closer and prostrated himself before the saint and told him, "My father, Abba Isaac, accept my weakness for the sake of the Lord Christ. Help me to save my soul and count me among your children." The abbot marvelled, for he called him by his name and asked him, "Who told you about my name?" The young man replied, "The grace that dwells in you informed me."

The abbot asked Misaeal to sit down and he told him, "May God Almighty make you a holy temple. And now tell me about yourself." The young man replied, "My name is Misaeal. My father loved the world which kept him from worshipping God and he was sad because he did not have children. One day he hosted a holy old monk and expressed to him his sorrow for not having a child to inherit his wealth. The monk told him, 'Reform your way with the Lord, the Lover of mankind, Who will give you a blessed son.' He asked the monk, 'How can I go about that?' The holy old monk replied, 'Live a perfect life and live according to the commandments of the church that are required of the believers; do not stay away from the holy church and have a priest to consult with, in all your affairs. If you do that, you and your wife will have what you wish.'" St. Misaeal said, "My father did all that the holy old monk commanded, and his words were fulfilled and my mother gave birth to a son, me."

"When I was six years old, my parents departed. The father, the bishop, took care of raising me, he also took care of my education and of managing my money. When I studied the Scripture, I longed for the monastic life, so I came here."
   The abbot was pleased as a result of what the young man, Misaeal, told him. He entrusted him to one of the elders in the monastery who trained him in asceticism, in worship and in the fight in the spiritual life. Afterwards, they put on him the garb of the monastic life and the holy Eskeem. From there on, he lived a solitary life in worship and asceticism.

One day, one of the brothers in the monastery came to Abba Misaeal. He found him standing up praying and when he knocked at the door of his cell, he opened it to him. They prayed together, blessed each other and sat discussing the ways to overcome the evil enemy. St. Misaeal told him, "The devil flees away when our spiritual prayers are sincere and warm." After they ended their spiritual talk, they praised God and the brother left him. After a while that brother came to Abba Misaeal and found him praying saying, "O Lord save me, look upon my meekness; wash me of my iniquities, for my mother and father have forsaken me but the Lord accepted me." When the brother saw how thin he was and how his skin cleaved to his bones, he cried and told Abba Miseael, "Your body looks like it has been burnt." The saint told him, "I thank my God for he has given me my eyesight and my hearing to read the Scriptures (Holy Books) and hear the word of God and he also gave me the strength to stand as I pray."

When the abbot of the monastery heard about St. Miseael's asceticism, he came to visit him. St. Misaeal told the abbot, "My holy father, after three days some people looking like soldiers will come and ask you about me. Do not keep me away from them. Do not be afraid or sorrowful for it is the Will of God. Also you should know that a famine will happen next year and I shall come back to see you at that time." After a while, the people resembling soldiers came, took the saint and left.

The abbot listened to what the saint said and he bought much of the grain. As St. Misaeal predicted, the famine took place and wheat was in shortage. The Governor came with his men to take whatever grains he might find in the monastery. Soldiers appeared and prevented him from doing so and he went back empty handed. The abbot welcomed those soldiers, thanked them and offered them food to eat. They told him, "We do not need any of that food." One of the them came forward, took the abbot's hand, and took him aside and told him, "I am your son Misaeal and those people who look like soldiers are hermits who came last year and took me with them. I ask you now to go to Abba Athanasius, the bishop of my town where I was raised; tell him about me, and ask him for my father's money with which you should build a church in my name. Then call our father, the bishop, to consecrate it."

The abbot did as St. Misaeal asked. He went to the bishop and took the gold, the silver, many books and 500 heads of sheep from him. Besides, he also received fabrics, jewels and utensils that belonged to the saint. The abbot tore down the saint's old house, bought the land next to the house and built the church there. While the father, the Bishop, was celebrating the consecration of the church, St. Misaeal and the fathers, the hermits, came and attended the consecration prayers. St. Misaeal told the abbot of the monastery, Abba Isaac, that he would depart from this world in the following year. Then they went back to wherever they came from.
The prayers of these saints be with us and Glory be to our God forever. Amen.

(1)The custom was if one monk meets another, they kiss each other's hands, then they sit together to talk about the glory of God and the spiritual fight. One time the devil, disguised as an old monk, met another monk and when they kissed each other's hands, the devil went away laughing at the monk. The Fathers then stipulated that when the monk sees someone coming toward him, he should make the sign of the cross over his face just in case the one who arrived is a devil.
He will not be able to stand before the sign of the cross.

866 St. Hunger Bishop of Utrecht.
Netherlands, who fled the diocese during an invasion by Normans. He died in Prum, Germany.

982 St. Amaswinthus Abbot 44 years in Andalusia Spain.
All that is recorded of him is that he was a monk and abbot for forty-four years in the Andalusian monastery of Silva de Malaga.

1136 Bd Jutta of Diessenberg, Virgin; led life of a recluse next to the monastery founded by St Disibod on the Diessenberg; the “noble woman” to whom was confided care of St Hildegard, when a child, Jutta who first taught her Latin, to read and to sing; many startling miracles
Bd Jutta was sister to Count Meginhard of Spanheim, and she led the life of a recluse in a small house next to the monastery founded by St Disibod on the Diessenberg. She was the “noble woman” to whom was confided the care of St Hildegard, when she was a child, and it was Jutta who first taught her Latin,  to read and to sing. Other disciples came to her, and these were formed into a community over which she presided as prioress for some twenty years. “This woman”, says St Hildegard, “overflowed with the grace of God like a river fed by many streams. Watching, fasting, and other works of penance gave no rest to her body till the day that a happy death set her free from this mortal life. God has given testimony to her holiness by many startling miracles.” The relics of Bd Jutta drew crowds of pilgrims to the Diessenberg, and their forthcoming removal was one of the grounds of the opposition of the monks to St Hildegard’s transference of her community to Bingen. 
No life of Bd Jutta seems to have been printed, but a manuscript account is in existence copied from the great legendarium of the Augustinian canons of Bödeken. See the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxvii (1908), p. 341; and also J. May, Die hl. Hildegard (1911).
1210 Bd Adam of Loccum;  St Mary laid her hand on his head, and when he had done as he was told his complaint was cured never to return. “It is clear that there is nothing more efficacious and no remedy more sure than the medicine of the Blessed Virgin”, observes the novice in the Dialogue. To which the monk replies: “And no wonder. For it was she who brought to us the medicine of the whole human race, as it is written, ‘Let the earth bring forth the living creature’, that is to say, let Mary bring forth the man Christ.”  Bd Adam told other marvels to Caesarius, but these were not written down for our delectation and improvement.
This monk, with others of the name, is called Blessed in menologies of the Cistercian Order. The little that is known of him is derived from the Dialogue of Visions and Miracles of his fellow Cistercian, Caesarius of Heisterbach. Adam was priest and sacristan of the abbey of Loccum in Hanover, and while still a schoolboy was twice miraculously delivered from ill-health, as he related to Caesarius. While he was at Loccum the church of the monastery was being repaired, and Adam began to carve a piece of the stone that was lying among the builder’s materials. His schoolmaster saw him and, after the manner of many of his kind, peremptorily told him to put the stone down or he would be excommunicated. Young Adam was so frightened by this threat that he was taken ill, and even believed to be dying. However, he saw in a vision St Nicholas and St Paternian, who decided that he should not die just then, and he was well in the same hour. Another time he was at school at Munster in Westphalia and got up one morning to go to church, when he found he had made a mistake in the time and the church was not yet open. He therefore knelt down and said the Angelical Salutation thrice according to his custom when entering a church, and upon looking up saw that the door was open and seven beautiful women sitting therein. Adam was at that time suffering from eczema, and one of them asked him why he didn’t look after his head. He replied that he did but the physicians had not done it any good. Then the lady told him that she was the Mother of Christ and that she knew his devotion to her, and commanded him to approach. He was to wash his head in a decoction of the wood of the spindle-tree three times before Mass, in the name of the Holy Trinity. She laid her hand on his head, and when he had done as he was told his complaint was cured never to return.
“It is clear that there is nothing more efficacious and no remedy more sure than the medicine of the Blessed Virgin”, observes the novice in the Dialogue. To which the monk replies: “And no wonder. For it was she who brought to us the medicine of the whole human race, as it is written, ‘Let the earth bring forth the living creature’, that is to say, let Mary bring forth the man Christ.”
Bd Adam told other marvels to Caesarius, but these were not written down for our delectation and improvement.
This holy Cistercian is spoken of by Caesarius in his Dialogus de Miraculis in bk vii, chs. 17 and 25, as well as in bk viii, ch. 74. Nothing more seems to be known of Bd Adam than Caesarius tells us. There is an English translation of the Dialogus (2 vols., 1929). The monastic buildings at Loccum are now a Protestant seminary, and the Lutheran land-bishop of Hanover has the official title “Abbot of Loccum”.
1306 Blessed Jacopone da Todi wrote Stabat Mater
Jacomo, or James, was born a noble member of the Benedetti family in the northern Italian city of Todi. He became a successful lawyer and married a pious, generous lady named Vanna.  His young wife took it upon herself to do penance for the worldly excesses of her husband. One day Vanna, at the insistence of Jacomo, attended a public tournament. She was sitting in the stands with the other noble ladies when the stands collapsed. Vanna was killed. Her shaken husband was even more disturbed when he realized that the penitential girdle she wore was for his sinfulness. On the spot, he vowed to radically change his life.

He divided his possessions among the poor and entered the Third Order of St. Francis. Often dressed in penitential rags, he was mocked as a fool and called Jacopone, or "Crazy Jim," by his former associates. The name became dear to him.
After 10 years of such humiliation, Jacopone asked to be a member of the Franciscan Order. Because of his reputation, his request was initially refused. He composed a beautiful poem on the vanities of the world, an act that eventually led to his admission into the Order in 1278. He continued to lead a life of strict penance, declining to be ordained a priest. Meanwhile he was writing popular hymns in the vernacular.
Jacopone suddenly found himself a leader in a disturbing religious movement among the Franciscans. The Spirituals, as they were called, wanted a return to the strict poverty of Francis. They had on their side two cardinals of the Church and Pope Celestine V. These two cardinals, though, opposed Celestine’s successor, Boniface VIII.
At the age of 68, Jacopone was excommunicated and imprisoned. Although he acknowledged his mistake, Jacopone was not absolved and released until Benedict XI became pope five years later. He had accepted his imprisonment as penance. He spent the final three years of his life more spiritual than ever, weeping "because Love is not loved." During this time he wrote the famous Latin hymn, Stabat Mater.
On Christmas Eve in 1306 Jacopone felt that his end was near. He was in a convent of the Poor Clares with his friend, Blessed John of La Verna. Like Francis, Jacopone welcomed "Sister Death" with one of his favorite songs. It is said that he finished the song and died as the priest intoned the Gloria from the midnight Mass at Christmas. From the time of his death, Brother Jacopone has been venerated as a saint.
Comment:  “Crazy Jim,” his contemporaries called Jacopone. We might well echo their taunt, for what else can you say about a man who broke into song in the midst of all his troubles? We still sing Jacopone’s saddest song, the Stabat Mater, but we Christians claim another song as our own, even when the daily headlines resound with discordant notes.
Jacopone’s whole life rang our song out: “Alleluia!” May he inspire us to keep singing.    
1899 Dwight Lyman Moody; Evangelische Kirche: 1856 nach Chicago begann dort evangelistisch zu arbeiten;  1889 eröffnete er ein Bibelinstitut in Chicago
Dwight Lyman Moody wurde am 5.2.1837 in Northfield, Massachusetts, geboren. Nach seiner Bekehrung zog er 1856 nach Chicago und begann dort evangelistisch zu arbeiten. 1863 baute er eine eigene Kirche mit 1.500 Plätzen. Auch engagierte er sich im CVJM. 1867 reiste er nach England. Zur Abschiedsveranstaltung dort kamen 20.000 Menschen. Bei einer weiteren Evangelisation in England 1875 versammelten sich in London etwa 50.000 Menschen. Diese großen Erfolge bestärkten die Evangelisationsarbeit in den USA. Sein größter Plan war die Nutzung der Weltausstellung in Chicago zur Evangelisation. 1879 gründete Moody ein erstes Seminar für Schülerinnen in Northfield. Seminare für junge Männer folgten. 1889 eröffnete er ein Bibelinstitut in Chicago. Seit 1876 lebte er in seiner Heimatstadt Northfield. Dort sammelte er neue Kräfte, doch mit zweiundsechszig Jahren hatte er seine Kräfte verbraucht. Er starb am 22.12.1899 in Northfield.

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, virgin, foundress of the Congregation of Missionaries of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, At Chicago,  distinguished for charity, humility, and invincible fortitude. Pope Pius XII added her to the catalogue of saints, and named her as the heavenly patroness of all emigrants.
   
Chicágiæ sanctæ Francíscæ Xavériæ Cabríni, Vírginis, Institúti Missionariárum a Sacratíssimo Corde Jesu Fundatrícis, exímia caritáte, invícta ánimi fortitúdine et humilitáte insígnis, quam Pius Papa Duodécimus, Sanctárum catálogo adscrípsit, et ómnium emigrántium cæléstem apud Deum Patrónam constítuit.
1917 St Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin, Foundress The Missionary Sisters of The Sacred Heart
In a Motu Pro prio of John XXIII dated 25 July, 1960, this feast was transferred to 3 January. In the United States this feast is celebrated on 13 November.
AUGUSTINE CABRINI appears to have been what in England of the past was called a very substantial yeoman, who owned and farmed land around Sant’ Angelo Lodigiano, between Pavia and Lodi; his wife, Stella Oldini, was a Milanese; and they had thirteen children, of whom the youngest was born on July 15, 1850, and christened Maria Francesca (later she was to add Saverio to the second name, which is what Xavier becomes in Italian).

The Cabrini were a solidly religious family—everything about them was solid—and little Frances came particularly under the strict care of her sister Rosa, who had been a school-teacher and had not escaped all the dangers of that profession. But the child profited by Rosa’s teaching, and suffered no harm from her unbending discipline. There was perhaps a certain precocity about the child’s religion, but it was nonetheless real. Family reading aloud from the “Annals of the Propa­gation of the Faith” inspired her with an early determination to go to the foreign missions—China was the country of her predilection. She dressed her dolls as nuns, made paper boats and floated them down the river manned with violets to represent missionaries going to foreign parts, and she gave up sweets, for in China there would be no sweets so she had better get used to it.

   Her parents, however, had decided on Frances being a school-teacher, and when old enough she was sent to a convent boarding-school at Arluno. She duly passed her examina­tions when she was eighteen, but then came a great blow: in 1870 she lost both parents.

   During the two years that followed she lived on quietly with Rosa, her unassum­ing goodness making a deep impression on all who knew her. Then she sought admittance to the religious congregation at whose school she had been, and was refused on the ground of poor health; she tried another—with the same result. But the priest in whose school she was teaching at Vidardo had his eye on her. In 1874 this Don Serrati was appointed provost of the collegiate church at Codogno, and found in his new parish a small orphanage, called the House of Providence, whose state left much to be desired. It was managed, or rather mismanaged, by its eccentric foundress, Antonia Tondini, and two other women. The Bishop of Lodi and Mgr Serrati invited Frances Cabrini to help in this institution and to try to turn its staff into a religious community, and with considerable unwillingness she agreed.

Thus she entered upon what a Benedictine nun has called “a novitiate of sorts, compared to which one in a regular convent would have been child’s play”. Antonia Tondini had consented to her coming, but instead of co-Operation gave her only obstruction and abuse. Frances stuck to it, however, obtained several recruits, and with seven of them in 1877 took her first vows. At the same time the bishop put her in charge as superioress. This made matters much worse. Sister Tondini’s behaviour was such that it became an open scandal—indeed, she seems to have become somewhat insane. But for another three years Sister Cabrini and her faithful followers persevered in their efforts to build up the House of Providence, patiently hoping for better times, till the bishop himself gave up hope and ordered the place to be closed. He sent for Sister Cabrini and said to her, “You want to be a missionary sister. Now is the time. I don’t know any institute of missionary sisters, so found one yourself.” And quite simply she went out to do so.
   There was an old, disused and forgotten Franciscan friary at Codogno, and into this Mother Cabrini and her seven faithful followers moved, and as soon as they were fairly settled in she set herself to draw up a rule for the community. Its work was to be principally the Christian education of girls, and its name The Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart. During the same year the bishop of Lodi approved these constitutions. Within two years the first daughter house was opened, at Grumello, and soon there was another, at Milan.
The above few sentences are easily written; the actuality was rather different. There were such tiresome obstructions as objection to the word  “Missionary” in the sisters’ title (“Inappropriate to women”), and the mother who invoked the law because of the  “enticement” of her daughter. But the general progress of the congregation and the trust of Mother Cabrini were such that in 1887 she went to Rome to ask the Holy See’s approbation of her little congregation and permission to open a house in Rome. Influential efforts were made to dissuade her from this enterprise—seven years’ trial was far too little: and the first interview with the cardinal vicar of the City, Parocchi, confirmed the prudence of her advisers. But only the first. The cardinal was won over; Mother Cabrini was asked to open not one but two houses in Rome, a free school and a children’s home, and the decree of first approval of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart was issued within a few months.
We have seen that from early days Frances Cabrini’s eyes had been turned towards China. But now people were trying to make her look the other way. The bishop of Piacenza, Mgr Scalabrini, who had established the Society of St Charles to work among Italian immigrants in America, suggested she should go out there to help the work of those priests.
She would not entertain the idea. The archbishop of New York, Mgr Corrigan, sent her a formal invitation. She was worried: everyone—except her old friend Mgr Serrati—was pointing in the same direction. Then she had a very impressive dream, and she determined to consult the pope himself. And Leo XIII said, “Not to the East, but to the West”. When a child Frances Cabrini once fell into a river, and ever afterwards she had a fear of water. She now, with six of her sisters, set out on the first of many voyages across the Atlantic; and on March 31, 1889, they landed in New York.
Everybody knows the huge numbers of Italians, Poles, Ukrainians, Czechs, Croats, Slovaks and others that have emigrated to the United States in relatively recent times. The religious history of these immigrations has yet to be properly written. It is enough to say here that at that time there were 50,000 Italians in and around New York City alone. The majority of them seem never to have learned the elements of Christian doctrine; not more than 1200 of them ever assisted at Mass; ten of the twelve priests of their own nationality had left Italy  on account of misbehaviour. It was much the same in northwestern Pennsylvania. For most of them their economic and social conditions were to match. No wonder that the third plenary council of Baltimore and Archbishop Corrigan and Pope Leo XIII were very perturbed.
Nor was the sisters’ reception in New York much more encouraging. They had been asked to organize an orphanage for Italian children and to take charge of an elementary school: but on arrival, though warmly welcomed, they found no home ready for them, and had to spend the first night at least in lodgings that were filthy and verminous. And when Mother Cabrini met Archbishop Corrigan she learned that, owing to disagreements between himself and the benefactress concerned, the orphanage scheme had fallen through, and the school consisted of pupils but no habitable building. The archbishop wound up by telling her that he could see nothing for it but that the sisters should go back to Italy. To which St Frances replied with characteristic firmness and definiteness, “No, Monsignor, not that. The pope sent me here, and here I must stay”. This straightforward little woman from Lombardy impressed the archbishop, and also by her credentials from Rome; moreover, it must be admitted he was a man of no great firmness of policy, liable to change his mind quickly and often. He now raised no objection to their staying, and arranged for them to be temporarily accommodated by the Sisters of Charity.

   Within a few weeks St Frances Cabrini had made friends with the benefactress, Countess Cesnola, reconciled her with Mgr Corrigan, found a house for the sisters, and made a start with the orphanage on a modest scale. By July 1889 she was able to revisit Italy, taking with her the first two Italo-American recruits to her congregation.
    Nine months later she returned to America with reinforcements to take over West Park, on the Hudson river, from the Society of Jesus. The growing orphanage was transferred to this house, which also became the motherhouse and novitiate of the congregation in the United States. Its work was prospering, both among immigrants in North America and among the people at home in Italy, and soon Mother Cabrini had to make a trying journey to Managua in Nicaragua where, in difficult and sometimes dangerous circumstances, she took over an orphanage and opened a boarding-school. On her way back she visited New Orleans at the request of its archbishop, the revered Francis Janssens. Here the scattered Italians, mostly from the south and Sicily, were in a specially sad state: they included some wild, lawless elements, and only a little time before eleven of them had been lynched by infuriated but no less lawless Americans. The upshot of St Frances’s visit was that she was able to make a foundation in New Orleans.
   That Frances Cabrini was an extraordinarily able woman needs no demonstration: her works speak for her. Like Bd Philippine Duchesne before her, she was slow in learning English and never lost her strong accent; but this apparently was no handicap in successful dealings with people of all kinds, and those with whom she had financial business (necessarily many and important) were particularly impressed. In only one direction did her tact fail, and that was in relation to non-Catholic Christians. She met such in America for the first time in her life— and that was the root of the trouble: it took her a long time to recognize their good faith and to appreciate their good lives. Her rather shocking remarks in this connection in earlier days were the fruit of ignorance and consequent lack of understanding. But she was far-seeing and ready to learn, and did not reject things simply because they were new, as her ideas about children’s education show. 
It is obvious that Mother Cabrini was a born ruler, and she was as strict as she was just. Sometimes she seems to have been too strict, and not to have seen where her inflexibility was leading. It is not clear, for instance, how she thought she was upholding sexual morality when she refused to take illegitimate children in her fee-paying schools: it would appear to be a gesture that penalized only the innocent. But love ruled all, and her strictness was no deterrent to the affection she gave and received. “Love one another”, she urged her religious. “Sacrifice yourselves for your sisters, readily and always. Be kind to them, and never sharp or harsh. Don’t nurse resentment, but be meek and peaceable.”

The year 1892, fourth centenary of the discovery of the New World, was also marked by the birth of one of the best known of St Frances’s undertakings, the Columbus Hospital in New York. Actually it had been begun in a small way by the Society of St Charles a little before, and the “take-over
was attended by difficulties that left with some a legacy of resentment against Mother Cabrini. Then, after a visit to Italy, where she saw the start of a “ summer house near Rome and a students’ hostel at Genoa,*{ * On the way back Mother Cabrini went ashore at Gibraltar and recorded seeing the “English canon of incredible size”. Undoubtedly a “big gun”}  she had to go to Costa Rica, Panama, Chile, across the Andes into Brazil, and so to Buenos Aires—a very different journey in 1895 from what it is today, though Mother Cabrini’s love of natural scenery did much to compensate for its rigours. In Buenos Aires she opened a high-school for girls: and of those who pointed out the difficulties and hazards of what she was doing, she enquired, “Are we doing this? —or is our Lord?”
   After another voyage to Italy, where she had to cope with a long lawsuit in the ecclesiastical courts and face riots in Milan, she went to France and made there her first European foundations outside Italy; and the autumn of 1898 saw her in England. Mgr (later cardinal) Bourne, then bishop of Southwark, had already met St Frances at Codogno and asked her to open a convent in his diocese, but no foundation was made at this time.
   And so it went on for another dozen years. Surely were a patron saint more recent and less nebulous than St Christopher required for travellers, St Frances Cabrini would be first on the short list. Her love for all the children of God took her back and forth over the western hemisphere from Rio to Rome, from Sydenham to Seattle; by the time the constitutions of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart were finally approved in 1907 the eight members of 1880 had increased to over a thousand, in eight countries; St Frances had made more than fifty foundations, responsible for free-schools and high-schools and hospitals and other establishments, no longer working in America for Italian immigrants alone—did not the prisoners in Sing-Sing send her an illuminated address at the congregation’s jubilee ?
   Of the later foundations only two can be named here: the great Columbus Hospital at Chicago and, in 1902, the school at Brockley, now at Honor Oak. Nor can the attendant trials and troubles be dwelt on, such as the difficulties caused by the Bishop of Vitoria (St Frances was first invited to Spain by Queen Maria Christina) or the opposition of factions in Chicago, Seattle and New Orleans, which last the sisters later repaid with their heroic work during the yellow-fever epidemic of 1905.

From 1911 Mother Cabrini’s health was failing: she was then sixty-one and physically worn out. But it was not till six years later that she was seen to be failing alarmingly. And then the end came with extreme suddenness. No human person was present when St Frances Xavier Cabrini died in the convent at Chicago on December 22, 1917. Mother Cabrini was canonized in 1946; her body is enshrined in the chapel of the Cabrini Memorial School at Fort Washington, N.Y. No doubt there were many saints in the United States before her, no doubt there have been, and will be, many after. But she was the first citizen of that country to be canonized, to have her sanctity publicly recognized by the Church of Christ. Her glory belongs to Italy and to America, to the Church and to mankind. It is hardly conceivable that anybody should do what she did, in the way she did it, without having been a saint, one who lived with heroic goodness: Pope Leo XIII saw this, and more, nearly fifty years before her canonization, when he said, “Mother Cabrini is a woman of fine understanding and great holiness ... she is a saint”.

The first standard life of Mother Cabrini was La Madre Francesca Saverio Cabrini, written by one of her congregation (Mother Xavier de Maria) and published in 1928. Ten years later appeared La Beata Francesca Saverio Cabrini by Emilie de Sanctis Rosmini, and there are other biographies in Italian. Viaggi della Madre Cabrini, narrati in vane sue lettere has been translated into English. A short and characteristic study by Father Martindale was published in 1931, and a life by the Rev. B. J. McCarthy at Chicago in 1937. Frances Xavier Cabrini: the Saint of the Emigrants (1944), by a Benedictine dame of Stanbrook, is a model of excellence as a life of a saint intended for general readers. For a short and unambiguous reference to the state of Italian immigrants in U.S.A., see Zwierlein, Life and Letters of Bishop McQuaid, vol. ii, pp. 333—335, and for their statistics, etc., the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. viii, pp. 202—206. Another American biography is Too Small a World, by Theodore Maynard (1948).  

 Thursday  Saints of this Day December  22 Undécimo Kaléndas Januárii.  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  December 2016
Universal: End to Child-Soldiers.
That the scandal of child-soldiers may be eliminated the world over.
Evangelization: Europe  That the peoples of Europe may rediscover the beauty, goodness, and
truth of the Gospel which gives joy and hope to life.
   `   

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      
 
                                                                           
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


        We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.