Friday  Saints February  17 Tertiodécimo Kaléndas Mártii  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

Weeping Tikhvin Icon of Mt. Athos
found behind the altar in the Prophet Elias Skete





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Acts of the Apostles

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
 
"Servants of Mary, bless all laypeople on their spiritual journey.
Help us look to Mary for examples of faith, service, and humility.
Help us remember that God calls us to love him in his children and our neighbors.
Remind us that it is more important to live for eternity than to die to time. Amen."  Servites

It is necessary, too, that we shun the occasions which have been the cause of sin.
We must have recourse to fervent prayer, receive frequently and worthily the sacraments.
He who does this will be sure to persevere.  -- St John Vianney


Seven Florentine merchants 
February 17 – The seven saints and founders of the Servants of Mary (Servites)
The seven founding saints of the Servite Order were seven Florentine merchants who freed themselves from the constraints of their trade to live in service of the Church, imitating the Mother of God in both prayer and apostolates.

These close friends, between 30 and 35 years of age, chose to retire to a life of silence. They built wooden huts in the forest for themselves, and devoted their time to prayer and manual work. Each one in turn would go out begging to identify with the poorest class and experience humiliation. They had never thought of founding a religious order, but Rome asked them to do so. It was their devotion to the Holy Mother of God that earned them the name of "Servites" or the "Servants of Mary."

Since a bond of true brotherhood had united the seven men during their life, posterity embraced them in the same veneration. In 1888, Pope Leo XIII collectively canonized them. Their names were: Bonfils, Bienvenu, Manet, Amadeus, Hugh, Sosthenes and Alexis. Their bodies are buried at Mount Senario in the same tomb, so that the same shrine encloses the remains of those whose fraternal life in the service of the Virgin Mary kept united
.

February 17 – The arrest of Father Maximilian Kolbe, transferred to Auschwitz on May 28, 1941  
 
If she finds faithful servants, docile to her command…
 
In 1917, Freemasonry celebrated the 200th anniversary of its founding, in Rome. Flags and banners were posted in the city, representing the Archangel Michael defeated by Lucifer. This slogan was shouted on Saint Peter’s Square: "Satan will rule the Vatican, the Pope will be part of the Swiss Guard!"
 
In reaction to these marches that issued threats for the Church, Brother Maximilian Maria Kolbe, then a theology student, asked this question: "Should we do nothing while our enemies are working so hard to dominate us?
Don’t we have more powerful weapons than theirs in the Immaculate and our Lord Jesus Christ? "

Having studied and pondered the dogma of the Immaculate Conception, and the apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Lourdes, Brother Maximilian Kolbe came to this conclusion: "The undefiled Virgin, victorious over all heresies, will not give way to her enemy if she finds faithful servants that are obedient to her command.
She will win victories, larger than we could imagine ..."
 laportelatine.org


1st v  Righteous Mariamne "The Apostolic Virgin" sister of the holy Apostle Philip
102    Saint Auxibius encountered holy Apostle /Evangelist Mark who established Auxibius as bishop in the city of Soli
          miracles and the signs worked
          Commemorateion All the righteous and God-bearing Fathers and Mothers, both known and unknown, who shone forth in asceticism

310    Miracle of the boiled wheat performed by the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit
720   Silvin of Auchy 40 yrs indefatigable preaching Christian truths essential obligations ransomed slaves  held in great honour, not only on account of his charity and holiness, but also for the gift of healing
1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption the 7 single vision to withdraw from world forming new society within the Church devoted to prayer and solitude
1285 Blessed Luke Belludi received the Franciscan habit from Saint Francis himself at Padua worked a great miracle at Luke’s urgent request by restoring a dying child to health.
1362 Saint Theodosius the Bulgarian and disciple Romanus zealous defender of Orthodoxy translated Greek writings into Slavonic founded a monastery Trnovo later called Theodosiev
1820 Blessed Francis Regis Clet Chinese Martyr

February 17- Our Lady of Constantinople (Turkey, 566)                 
The Mother of God Asks for Our Collaboration
Modern times will be dominated by Satan and the future will be even more so.
The combat against Hell cannot be carried out by men and women alone, even the most intelligent ones.
Only the Immaculate has received the Promise of the Victory over the Demon from God.
However, since she was raised to Heaven, the Mother of God asks for our collaboration.
She seeks souls that will be devoted entirely to her and become efficient and sure instruments between her hands,
to inflict Satan’s defeat and establish God’s reign on this earth.               Saint Maximilian Kolbe
February 17 - The Seven Founding Saints of the Servants of Mary 
 By Meditating on the Passion of the Son and the Compassion of the Mother  
 
Is it possible then, that Bethlehem was calling out to Calvary from the beginning! Both at the foot of the cross as in Ephrata, we find the Mother of Divine Grace. Later, the Virgin Mary would give birth in tears to the brothers and sisters of her firstborn, whose birth was perfectly gentle. Since we have tasted her joys, let us also accept to cry and suffer with her.
The seven blessed souls we celebrate today should become models for us. They spent their lives contemplating the sorrows of Our Lady—the mission of the Order they established was to spread the devotion of those unspeakable sorrows.
The founding of the Servants of Mary took place shortly after Saint Francis of Assisi had proudly displayed the sign of the divine Crucified to an indifferent world. Of course, in continuing his redeeming work, just as on the great Good Friday, Jesus could not come to earth without the Virgin Mary. The Servants of Mary completed the work of Francis of Assisi, so to speak, and the disoriented human race regained confidence by meditating on the Passion of the Son and the compassion of the Mother.  Dom Gueranger www.abbaye-saint-benoit.ch 
February 17 - Our Lady of Constantinople - Arrest of Fr. Maximilian Kolbe (1941)
She Offered Me Two Crowns
Father Maximilian Kolbe, born in Poland in a very poor but devout family, was quite a turbulent child until the day his mother cried out, "My poor child, what will become of you?" This question completely overwhelmed Maximilian.

A turning point in Maximilian's life followed that he confessed to his mother: "I prayed so hard and asked the Holy Mother of God to tell me what I would become. Then she appeared to me, holding two crowns, one white and one red. She looked at me with love and offered them both to me. The white one represented that I would always be pure and the red one that I would be a martyr. I accepted both of them!"
On February 17, 1941, the Gestapo arrested Father Maximilian Kolbe and four other brothers, and took them first to the Pawiak prison in Warsaw. The priest was severely beaten as a religious and a priest. He wrote to his congregation left in Niepokalanow: "The loving Immaculate Mother was always with us with her tenderness and will always watch over us. Let her guide us, more and more perfectly wherever she wants us to go and according to her good desire, fulfilling our duties until the end, so that we may save all souls out of love."
A few days later, Father Kolbe was transferred to Auschwitz.

1st v  Righteous Mariamne "The Apostolic Virgin" sister of the holy Apostle Philip
102    Saint Auxibius encountered holy Apostle /Evangelist Mark who established Auxibius as bishop in the city of Soli miracles and the signs worked Commemorateion All the righteous and God-bearing Fathers and Mothers, both known and unknown, who shone forth in asceticism
250    St. Polychronius Martyred bishop of Babylon
304    St. Donatus Martyr with eighty-six companions near Venice
          St. Faustinus & Companions Forty-five martyrs
306    The Holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit (Tyro)
309    Theodulus and Julian of Caesarea, gave God thanks for the honor of martyr
309    St. Julian of Martyr of Caesarea
309    St. Theodulus household member of Palestine governor Martyr crucified at Caesarea begged God would be pleased to accept of his life as a voluntary sacrifice
310    Miracle of the boiled wheat performed by the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit
313    The Holy Martyr Menas Kallikelados (Well Speaking), an Athenian, died as a martyr with Sts Hermogenes and Eugraphus
450    St. Loman Bishop of Trim, in Meath, Ireland
500   St. Habet Deus martyred Bishop of Luna by Arabian heretics Tuscany Italy
603   St. Fintan Abbot 
6th v.
St. Fortchern Bishop of Trim, Ireland Saint  Guevrock, Abbot (AC)
661   Finan of Iona spirit of zeal, erudition, and prudence
6th v. Saint  Guevrock, Abbot (AC)
720   Silvin of Auchy 40 yrs indefatigable preaching Christian truths essential obligations ransomed slaves  held in great honour, not only on account of his charity and holiness, but also for the gift of healing with which he was credited.
1112 St. Benedict of Cagliari Benedictine monk bishop of Dolia
1124 St. Constabilis Benedictine abbot student of St. Leo at Cava Monastery near Salerno
1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption the 7 single vision to withdraw from world forming new society within the Church devoted to prayer and solitude
1165 Blessed Frowin of Bellevaux abbot-founder
1178 Evermod of Ratzeburg evangelized the Wends
1220 BD REGINALD OF ORLEANS taught canon law in Paris 6 years; his tomb was venerated from the beginning as that of a saint, and on this ground his cultus was confirmed in 1875
1282 St. Hugh dei Lippi Uggucioni 1of 7 Servite Order founders
1285 Blessed Luke Belludi received the Franciscan habit from Saint Francis himself at Padua
worked a great miracle at Luke’s urgent request by restoring a dying child to health.
1302 BD ANDREW OF ANAGNI was held in great veneration both in life and after death for the miracles he was believed to work
1310 St. Alexis Falconieri Founder mystic 1233 on the Feast of the Assumption group experienced a vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary
         Saint Theodore the Silent of the Caves
1362 Saint Theodosius the Bulgarian and disciple Romanus zealous defender of Orthodoxy translated Greek writings into Slavonic founded a monastery Trnovo later called Theodosiev
1603 Blessed William Richardson martyred for his priesthood
1612
Hermogenes Hieromartyr Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus stood up against traitors /enemies of the nation who
 wanted to spread Uniatism and Western Catholicism throughout Russia and to wipe out Orthodoxy, while
enslaving the Russian nation
1795
Theodore The Holy New Martyr apotasized then returned to Christianity tortured hanged by Turks
1819 Saint Joseph monk of Dionysiou Monastery on Mt. Athos iconographer he shone forth with the virtues of monastic life.
1820 Blessed Francis Regis Clet Chinese Martyr
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)


1st v Righteous Mariamne "The Apostolic Virgin" sister of the holy Apostle Philip (November 14)
Made a vow of virginity and became the companion of her brother Philip and the holy Apostle Bartholomew (June 11), actively assisting them in their apostolic work.

The Church historian Nicephorus Callistus describes their successful preaching in the Phrygian city of Hieropolis, where they were arrested and locked up in prison.
They put the Apostle Philip to death on a cross, but St Mariamne and St Bartholomew were set free.
St Bartholomew went to preach the Gospel in India.
St Mariamne, after burying the body of St Philip, preached the Gospel at Lykaonia (Asia Minor). She died there in peace.

All the righteous and God-bearing Fathers and Mothers, both known and unknown, who shone forth in asceticism
On this day, we commemorate all the righteous and God-bearing Fathers and Mothers, both known and unknown, who shone forth in asceticism. With these two weeks of Meatfare and Cheesefare, the Church gradually eases us into the full fasting which begins on Monday.

The holy acetics are virtuous men and women who contended against the devil and their own passions. By examining their lives and their struggles against the Enemy, we take courage from the victory they have achieved, and are inspired to imitate their God-pleasing conduct. They also teach us that fasting is not merely abstinence from food, but involves refraining from inappropriate speech and unseemly actions.

Since these holy ascetics share the same human nature that we have, their example is an encouragement to us as we embark on our own spiritual struggles Their lives are a model for us to follow as we seek to acquire and practice the various virtues and to turn away from everything evil. If we undertake these same struggles of prayer, fasting, and good works, we shall receive from God the same reward they did.

Most of the holy ascetics commemorated today have their own separate Feast Day during the year, while some are remembered only on this day.
102 Saint Auxibius encountered holy Apostle /Evangelist Mark who established Auxibius as bishop in the city of Soli miracles and the signs worked
Born at Rome in a rich family he was raised with his brother Tempstagoras, and from an early age he displayed remarkable talents. In the schools of Rome he easily learned the secular sciences. His parents wanted their son to marry. Learning of this, the youth secretly left Rome and journeyed to the East.

Arriving upon the island of Cyprus, he settled in the environs of Limnitis, not far from the city of Soli. By God's dispensation, he encountered the holy Apostle and Evangelist Mark (September 27, October 30, January 4, April 25), preaching the Word of God at Cyprus. St Mark established Auxibius as bishop in the city of Soli, and himself went to preach at Alexandria.

St Auxibius went toward the western gates of the city and settled near the pagan temple of Zeus. Gradually he converted the local pagan priest and other idol-worshippers to Christianity. Once, St Heraklides (September 17) came to St Auxibius. He had been made a bishop in Cyprus earlier by St Mark, and he consulted with St Auxibius to preach the Gospel of Christ

One day, St Auxibius arrived at the marketplace and began to preach to the people about Christ. Many, seeing the miracles and the signs worked by the saint, believed in Christ. Among the converted were many people from the surrounding villages. One man, by the name of Auxinios, remained with St Auxibius and assisted him until the end of his days.

After a certain while Tempstagoras, the brother of St Auxibius, came from Rome. He was baptized with his wife, became a priest, and served in one of the churches. St Auxibius guided his diocese for fifty years and died peacefully in the year 102, leaving his disciple Auxinios upon the cathedra.

313 The Holy Martyr Menas Kallikelados (Well Speaking), an Athenian, died as a martyr with Sts Hermogenes and Eugraphus
in about the year 313 (December 10).

During the reign of Emperor Basil the Macedonian (867-886), the military commander Marcian discovered the saint's relics after St Menas appeared to a certain pious man in a dream to reveal where they were.

1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption the 7 had a single inspiration or vision to withdraw from the world to form a new society within the Church devoted to prayer and solitude.
alexis_falconieri
Can you imagine seven prominent men of Boston or Denver banding together, leaving their homes and professions, and going into solitude for a life directly given to God? That is what happened in the cultured and prosperous city of Florence in the middle of the thirteenth century. The city was torn with political strife as well as the heresy of the Cathari. Morals were low and religion seemed meaningless.

In 1240 seven noblemen of Florence mutually decided to withdraw from the city to a solitary place for prayer and direct service of God. Their initial difficulty was providing for their dependents, since two were still married and two were widowers.  Their aim was to lead a life of penance and prayer, but they soon found themselves disturbed by constant visitors from Florence. They next withdrew to the deserted slopes of Monte Senario.
In 1244, under the direction of St. Peter of Verona, O.P., this small group adopted a religious habit similar to the Dominican habit, choosing to live under the Rule of St. Augustine and adopting the name of the Servants of Mary. The new Order took a form more like that of the mendicant friars than that of the older monastic Orders.
Members of the community came to the United States from Austria in 1852 and settled in New York and later in Philadelphia.

The two American provinces developed from the foundation made by Father Austin Morini in 1870 in Wisconsin.  Community members combined monastic life and active ministry. In the monastery, they led a life of prayer, work and silence while in the active apostolate they engaged in parochial work, teaching, preaching and other ministerial activities.

Comment: The time in which the seven Servite founders lived is very easily comparable to the situation in which we find ourselves today. It is “the best of times and the worst of times,” as Dickens said. Some, perhaps many, feel called to a countercultural life, even in religion. All of us are faced in a new and urgent way with the challenge to make our lives decisively centered in Christ.
Quote: “Let all religious therefore spread throughout the whole world the good news of Christ by the integrity of their faith, their love for God and neighbor, their devotion to the Cross and their hope of future glory.... Thus, too, with the prayerful aid of that most loving Virgin Mary, God’s Mother, ‘Whose life is a rule of life for all,’ religious communities will experience a daily growth in number, and will yield a richer harvest of fruits that bring salvation” (Decree on the Renewal of Religious Life, 25).
Seven Founders of the Order of Servites (RM) 13th century; canonized in 1887 by Pope Leo XIII.
In 1233 seven wealthy councilors of the city of Florence, who had previously joined the Laudesi (Praisers), gave up the pleasures of this world in order to devote themselves to God through particular devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Their previous lives had been by no means lax or undisciplined, even though Florence was then a city filled with factions and immorality, and infected by the Cathar heresy (the belief that the body was evil and we are the souls of angels inserted by Satan into human bodies). Under the direction of James of Poggibonsi, who was the chaplain of the Laudesi and a man of great holiness and spiritual insight, they came to recognize the call to renunciation.
On the Feast of the Assumption, 1233, the seven had a single inspiration or vision to withdraw from the world to form a new society within the Church devoted to prayer and solitude.

Of course, there were difficulties: Four of the men had been married, although two were widowers and the other three celibate. Each of them made provision for their dependents, and with the approval of their bishop withdrew from the world 23 days after the Assumption.
At first they lived just outside the city gates at La Camarzia, humbly obeying the dictates of the bishop of Florence.

As their fame spread the seven moved further away to the wilder hills around Monte Sennario, where they built a church and a hermitage. For seven years they lived there, eating little, fasting and praying and allowing no new recruits to their company. But in 1240 Bishop Ardingo of Florence and Cardinal Castiglione visited them after hearing about the sanctity of the seven. The cardinal was suitably impressed but had one criticism, "You treat yourselves in a manner bordering on barbarity: and you seem more desirous of dying to time than of living for eternity.
Take heed: the enemy of souls often hides himself under the appearance of an angel of light. . . . Hearken to the counsels of your superiors."

Bishop Ardingo went on to explain a vision that they had had of a vine that blossomed with green leaves and fruit in the middle of a cold March day. He told them that this was God's way of leading them to branch out into the world. The prelates insisted that the seven must welcome others who wished to follow so rigorous a life, and gave them rules for their order based on Saint Augustine and the Dominican Constitutions. They were to adopt the black habit of Augustinian monks and to live as mendicant friars.

As always, the hermits prayed for light, and again Our Lady appeared to them. On Good Friday, April 13, 1240, their mission was further defined in what they believed to be a vision of the Blessed Virgin, who they understood to say, "You will found a new order and you will be my witnesses throughout the world. This is your name: Servants of Mary. This is your rule: that of Saint Augustine. And here is your distinctive sign: The Black scapular, in memory of my sufferings." She held in her hand the black habit, while an angel bore a scroll inscribed with the title "Servants of Mary."
From that time they became known as Servites (or 'the Servants of Mary') because they meditated especially on the sorrows in the life of the mother of God.

They were clothed in the habit by their bishop, took new names in religion, and all except Saint Alexis, who in his humility begged to be excused, were ordained as priests. So many joined the Servites that new groups were set up in neighboring Tuscan cities, such as Siena, Pistoia, Arezzo, Carfaggio, and Lucca. In 1250, to commemorate the appearance of the Angel Gabriel to Mary, the seven founders built the superb church of Santissima Annunziata in Florence, which is still served by their order.
The Servites were recognized in 1259 by the papal legate Raniero Cardinal Capocci and solemnly approved by Blessed Benedict XI in 1304.

It has since spread into many parts of the world and continues to attract men and women, devoted to the Blessed Virgin. Many of their houses are dedicated to the education of children and the care of the poor and sick. The Servites fostered the devotion known as the Seven Sorrows of Mary, a development of the late medieval devotion to Our Lady of Pity, which offers a counterpart to the older one of the Seven Joys of Mary.

Of the seven founders, four became priors-general, two founded monasteries in France and Germany, and Alexis, who outlived the others, remained a lay brother his entire life. Short biographies of the seven founders are given for today. Note that some accounts give other names to the founders.
Alexis (Alessio) Falconieri (Born c. 1200; died at Monte Sennario on February 17, 1310).
Son of Bernard Falconieri, a wealthy Florentine merchant and a Guelph, joined the Confraternity of the Blessed Virgin in Florence about 1225. They were all ordained except Alexis, who felt he was not worthy enough to be a priest and devoted himself to the material needs of the community and helped build the Servite church at Cafaggio. He was the only one of the seven still alive when the order was approved by Pope Benedict XI.  
Floréntiæ natális sancti Aléxii Falconérii Confessóris, e septem Fundatóribus Ordinis Servórum beátæ Maríæ Vírginis; qui, décimo supra centésimum vitæ suæ anno, Christi Jesu et Angelórum præséntia recreátus, beáto fine quiévit.  Ipsíus tamen ac Sociórum festum prídie Idus Februárii celebrátur.
       In Florence, the birthday of St. Alexis Falconieri, confessor, one of the seven founders of the Order of the Servites of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  In the one hundred and tenth year of his age, he ended his blessed career in the consoling presence of Christ Jesus and the angels.  His feast, with that of his companions, is kept on the 12th of February.
Bartholomew (Bartholomes, Amadeus) degli Amidei.
Amadeus governed the important convent of Carfaggio, but returned to Monte Sennario to die.
Benedict (Manettus, Manetius, Manetto) dell'Antella (Died August 20, 1268.)
In 1246, he attended the Council of Lyons. When the order was divided into two provinces in 1260, Manettus governed Tuscany. He later introduced the order into France at the invitation of King Saint Louis When Manettus became the fourth prior general, he sent missionaries to Asia. He retired in deference to Saint Philip Benizi, on whose breast he died.
St. Manettus One of the founders of the Servite Order, called Benedict dell’ Antella. He is also listed as Manetto and Manetius. He became general of the Order and in 1246 attended the council of lyons, France. Manettus introduced the Servites into France at the request of King St. Louis IX. He resigned the generalate to St. Philip Benizi and retired to Mount Senario, Italy.
Buonfiglio (Bonfilio) Monaldi (Monaldo) (Died January 1, 1261.) Bonfilio, the eldest of the seven, was the first superior of the Servites, serving until 1256
Gherardino (Gerardino, Sostenes) Sostegni (Sostegno). While Manettus governed the Tuscan province after 1260, Sostenes ruled that of Umbria. He later carried the order into Germany.
John Buonagiunta (Bonaiuncta). The youngest of the seven
 Buonagiunta was elected in 1256 as the second prior general of the Servites. Soon after his election he died in the chapel while listening to the Gospel account of the Passion.
Ricovero (Hugh) dei Lippi-Ugoccioni (Uguccione) (Died at Monte Sennario, Italy, May 3, 1282).
Hugh accompanied Saint Philip Benizi to France and Germany and was vicar-general of the order in the latter for eight years. Hugh and Sosthenes were recalled from foreign lands (France and Germany) in 1276, and died of illness on the same night (Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Walsh).
unattributed prayer for their intercession:
"Servants of Mary, bless all laypeople on their spiritual journey. Help us look to Mary for examples of faith, service, and humility. And help us to remember that God calls us to love him in his children and our neighbors. Remind us that it is more important to live for eternity than to die to time. Amen." 
250 St. Polychronius Martyred bishop of Babylon
 In Pérside natális beáti Polychrónii, Epíscopi Babylónis, qui, in persecutióne Décii, ore lapídibus cæso, mánibus exténsis, ad cælum óculos élevans, emísit spíritum.
       In Persia, during the persecution of Decius, the birthday of blessed Polychronius, bishop of Babylon, who, being struck in the mouth with stones, died with hands outstretched and eyes lifted towards heaven.
He was traditionally thought to have been put to death at Babylon at the order of Emperor Trajanus Decius. This poses certain historical problems as Decius never fought in the East, being other wise occupied with the Goths on the Danube. There is a possibility that he may be the same person as Polychronius the feast for this Polychronius is the result of the translation of the saint’s relics.

Polychronius BM (RM)  Saint Polychronius was a bishop and martyr at Babylon. The Roman Martyrology says that he was put to death by Decius, but that emperor never made an expedition against the Persians. As Saint Polychronius of December 6 had also a feast on February 17, it is suggested that this feast masked the translation of his relics, and there was only one person (Benedictines).

304 St. Donatus Martyr with eighty-six companions near Venice
 Concórdiæ, in Venetórum fínibus, sanctórum Mártyrum Donáti, Secundiáni et Rómuli, cum áliis octogínta sex, ejúsdem corónæ consórtibus.
       At Concordia, the holy martyrs Donatus, Secundian, and Romulus, with eighty-six others, partakers of the same crown.
Romulus, Secundian, and eighty-six companions. They were put to death at Porto Guarro, near Venice, Italy.

St. Faustinus & Companions Forty-five martyrs unknown
Romæ pássio sancti Faustíni, quem álii quadragínta quátuor secúti sunt ad corónam.
       At Rome, the passion of St. Faustinus, whom forty-four others followed to receive the crown of martyrdom.
Forty-five martyrs believed to have been martyred in Rome. No details are extant.

306 The Holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit (Tyro)
A soldier in the city of Alasium of the Pontine district (northeast province of Asia Minor, stretching along the coast of the Euxine, i.e. the Black Sea), under the command of a certain Brincus. They commanded him to offer sacrifice to idols. St Theodore firmly confessed his faith in Christ the Savior in a loud voice. The commander gave him several days to think it over, during which time St Theodore prayed.

They charged him with setting a pagan temple on fire, and threw him into prison to be starved to death. The Lord Jesus Christ appeared to him there, comforting and encouraging him. Brought to the governor, St Theodore boldly and fearlessly confessed his faith, for which he was subjected to new torments and condemned to burning. The martyr Theodore climbed onto the fire without hesitation, and with prayer and gave up his holy soul to God.
This occurred in about the year 306 under the Romanus emperor Galerius (305-311). Unharmed by the fire, the body of St Theodore was buried in the city of Euchaita, not far from Amasium. His relics were afterwards transferred to Constantinople, to a church dedicated to him. His head is in Italy, in the city of Gaeto.

Later on, fifty years after the death of St Theodore, the emperor Julian the Apostate (361-363), wanting to commit an outrage upon the Christians, commanded the city-commander of Constantinople during the first week of Great Lent to sprinkle all the food provisions in the marketplaces with the blood offered to idols. St Theodore appeared in a dream to Archbishop Eudoxius, ordering him to inform all the Christians that no one should buy anything at the marketplaces, but rather to eat cooked wheat with honey (kolyva).
In memory of this occurrence, the Orthodox Church annually celebrates the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit on the first Saturday of Great Lent.
On Friday evening, at the Divine Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts following the prayer at the ambo, the Canon to the holy Great Martyr Theodore, composed by St John of Damascus, is sung. After this, kolyva is blessed and distributed to the faithful. The celebration of the Great Martyr Theodore on the first Saturday of Great Lent was set by the Patriarch Nectarius of Constantinople (381-397).

The Troparion to St Theodore is quite similar to the Troparion for the Prophet Daniel and the Three Holy Youths (December 17, Sunday Before Nativity). The Kontakion to St Theodore, who suffered martyrdom by fire, reminds us that he also had faith as his breastplate (see I Thessalonians 5:8).
We pray to St Theodore for the recovery of stolen articles.
309 Theodulus and Julian of Caesarea , gave God thanks for the honor of martyr MM (RM)
 Cæsaréæ, in Palæstína, sancti Theodúli senis, qui, cum esset ex família Prǽsidis Firmiliáni, et, Mártyrum excitátus exémplo, Christum constánter confiterétur, martyrii palmam, cruci affíxus, nóbili triúmpho proméruit.
       At Caesarea in Palestine, the death of St. Theodulus, in the service of the governor Firmilian, at a great age.  Prompted by the example of the martyrs, he confessed Christ with constancy, and was nailed to a cross.  By this noble victory he merited the palm of martyrdom.

309 SS. THEODULUS AND JULIAN, MARTYRS
ST THEODULUS and St Julian suffered at Caesarea in Palestine im­mediately after the five Egyptians commemorated on the 16th, but they are mentioned under this date in the Roman Martyrology. Theodulus, a wise and pious old man, occupied one of the most honourable positions in the household of Firmilian, the governor of Palestine, who held him in great esteem. After witnessing the fortitude and patience of the five saints, he visited the prison and held the martyrs up as examples to encourage the other confessors and to prepare them for a similar ordeal. Firmilian was so furious at this action on the part of his old servant that he sent for him, reproached him sternly for his ingratitude and, without hearing his defence, condemned him to be crucified. Theodulus received the sentence gladly, and went joyfully to a form of death which so closely resembled that of his Saviour and by means of which he would speedily be united with Him.
<>Julian, who shared his triumph, was only a catechumen, held in great honour by the faithful on account of his exemplary character. He had been absent from Caesarea and had scarcely arrived back when he was informed of the sufferings and of the execution of the martyrs which had just been taking place. At once he ran to the spot, and finding that all was over he expressed his veneration by kissing and embracing the bodies of the saints. The guards apprehended him and took him to the governor, who, perceiving that he was as determined as the rest, wasted no time in useless cross-examination but immediately ordered him to be burnt. Julian thanked God for the honour, and asked Him to accept his life as a voluntary sacrifice. His cheerfulness whilst he was being tortured by slow fire amazed his executioners and the spectators.
As in the case of SS. Elias and his companions, so our knowledge of SS. Theodulus and Julian depends entirely upon Eusebius.This story is one of overwhelming interest for all who are concerned with Christian hagiography, for it is the account given by Eusebius, the father of Church history, who was not only living in Caesarea at the time, but was the intimate friend of the St Pamphilus here named, the principal martyr who suffered on the same occasion. To mark his devotion to his friend, the historian loved to call himself “Eusebius (the disciple) of Pamphilus”. St Pamphilus, however, is commemorated separately on June 1, and will come before us again on that date. The Greek text of Eusebius, with a French translation en face, may conveni­ently be consulted in the edition of E. Grapin (vol. iii, pp. 259—283), forming part of the series of Textes et documents pour l’étude historique die Christianisme. It forms the eleventh chapter of the Book on the Martyrs of Palestine, of which there is an English version, with the Ecclesiastical History, by H. J. Lawlor and J. E. L. Oulton (1929).
309 St. Julian of Martyr of Caesarea
Ibidem sancti Juliáni Cappádocis, qui, exosculátus necatórum Mártyrum córpora, et ídeo ut Christiánus delátus et ad Prǽsidem ductus, lento igne jussus est combúri.
In the same place, St. Julian the Cappadocian, who, because he had kissed the relics of martyrs, was denounced as a Christian.  Being taken to the governor, he was ordered to be burned to death over a slow fire.
He volunteered to join St. Pamphilus and ten companions being martyred in Caesarea in Palestine. Arrested by Roman officials, he was roasted to death.
310 Miracle of the boiled wheat performed by the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit
Today we remember the miracle of the boiled wheat performed by the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit (February 17).
Fifty years after the death of St Theodore, the emperor Julian the Apostate (361-363), wanting to commit an outrage upon the Christians, commanded the city-commander of Constantinople to sprinkle all the food provisions in the marketplaces with the blood offered to idols during the first week of Great Lent. St Theodore, having appeared in a dream to Archbishop Eudoxius, ordered him to inform all the Christians that no one should buy anything at the marketplaces, but rather to eat cooked wheat with honey (kolyva).

In memory of this occurrence, the Orthodox Church annually celebrates the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit on the first Saturday of Great Lent. On Friday evening, at the Divine Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts following the prayer at the ambo, the Canon to the holy Great Martyr Theodore, composed by St John of Damascus, is sung. After this, kolyva is blessed and distributed to the faithful. The celebration of the Great Martyr Theodore on the first Saturday of Great Lent was set by the Patriarch Nectarius of Constantinople (381-397).

450 St. Loman Bishop of Trim, in Meath, Ireland son of Tigris, the sister of St. Patrick. He accompanied St. Patrick to Ireland and converted a local chieftain.
450? ST LOMAN, BISHOP
ACCORDING to Jocelin’s Life of St Patrick, Loman was the son of Patrick’s sister Tigris, and was one of those disciples who accompanied him to Ireland. The story runs that when St Patrick landed to go to Tara, he left St Loman to look after the boat and to navigate it up the Boyne. Fortchern, the son of the chieftain of Trim, heard him singing psalms and chants in the boat, and was so attracted that he came down to the water’s edge to listen. St Loman entered into conversation with him and taught him from the little ship and they began to sing together. Presently they were joined by Fortchern’s mother, a British or Scottish princess, who, being herself a Christian, was overjoyed at the news that the gospel of Christ was being brought to Ireland. Soon Fortchern’s father, Fedelmid, came under instruction and was baptized with all his household. He gave St Patrick land at Trim for a church, of which St Loman was consecrated bishop. In the course of time Fortchern also became a saint and a bishop, apparently succeeding St Loman at Trim.

It has been much contested whether St Loman actually belonged to the times of St Patrick or whether, as there seems some reason to believe, he should rather be identified with a certain Bishop Loman of Trim who is known to have lived in the seventh century.

The account given above seems to be ultimately founded on the Tripartite Life of St Patrick (Rolls Series, vol. i, pp. 66—69), though nothing is there said of “singing psalms” but the writer speaks only of reading the gospel. No great reliance, of course, can be placed upon any of the Celtic legends of this period. Colgan and the Bollandists have connected this commemoration with February 17, which is the common feast of Loman (Lommán) and the other saints of Trim; October 11 is his proper day. See Fr P. Grosjean’s essay in the Journal of Ecclesiastical History, vol. i, no. 2 (1950), pp. 164—1 66.
500 St. Habet Deus martyred Bishop of Luna by Arabian heretics Tuscany Italy
He was martyred by Arabian heretics. Habet Deus is venerated in Sarzana.
Habet-Deus BM (AC) Bishop Habet-Deus governed the diocese of Luna in Tuscany, Italy--a town that is now in ruins. He was probably martyred by the Arian Vandals. Habet-Deus is venerated at Sarzana (Benedictines).

603 St. Fintan Abbot (St. Columba disciple) clairvoyance prophecies miracles very austere penances
In monastério Cluain-ednechénsi, in Hibérnia, sancti Fintáni, Presbyteri et Abbátis.
In the monastery of Cluainedhech in Ireland, St. Fintan, abbot.
Fintan was a hermit in Clonenagh, Leix, Ireland. When disciples gathered around his hermitage he became their abbot.
A wonder worker, Fintan was known for clairvoyance, prophecies, and miracles. He also performed very austere penances.


603 ST FINTAN OF CLONEENAGH, ABBOT even in his boyhood he possessed the gift of prophecy and of a knowledge of distant events
IN a tractate preserved in the Book of Leinster St Fintan is presented as an Irish counterpart of St Benedict, and there can be no question as to the high repute in which his monastery of Cloneenagh in Leix was held by his contemporaries. An early litany speaks of “the monks of Fintan, descendant of Eochaid, who ate nothing but herbs of the earth and water; there is not room to enumerate them by reason of their multitude”. Quite in accord with this is a gloss in the Félire of Oengus: “Generous Fintan never consumed during his time aught save the bread of woody barley and muddy water of clay.” The Latin life bears out this description of extreme asceticism, which indeed St Canice of Aghaboe thought excessive and protested against. It tells us how the saint’s future holiness was foretold to his mother by an angel before his birth, how even in his boyhood he possessed the gift of prophecy and of a knowledge of distant events, how he was trained by St Columba of Tir da Glas, and how in accord with this master’s direc­tion he settled in Cloneenagh, leading an eremitical life of great austerity, but gathering round him eventually a multitude of disciples. Apart from this we have little more than a catalogue of miracles, though the miracles are not so extravagant as those often found in Irish hagiographical documents. The account leaves the impression that Fintan, while extraordinarily severe to himself, was gentle and compassionate in his treatment of others. When the monks of neighbouring com­munities protested that his rule was too austere for human endurance, he consented to allow some mitigation for the benefit of his subjects, but would make no change in his own practice. Not a few characteristic traits of early Irish monasticism are revealed in the narrative. For example, we read of a section of the brethren at Cloneenagh who “ burning with an over-great love of a pilgrim’s like (the Irish peregrini were famous throughout Europe) and unwilling to live in their own native land departed from the monastery without the permission of their holy abbot”, and went to Bennchor and to Britain. Fintan does not seem to have taken a very stern view of their offence, and he even accorded a warm welcome to one at least of the fugitives who subsequently asked to be taken back. Again the lawlessness and violence of those rude times are brought home to us in a story which illustrates his respect for the dead. A band of marauders after making a successful raid against some neighbouring clan returned in triumph, bringing with them the gory heads of the enemies they had slain. They left the heads near the monastery, and St Fintan had them buried in the cemetery of the monks. When asked why he did this, Fintan replied, “We trust in the Lord that at doomsday these men will not suffer torment, in virtue of the merits and the glory of all the saints of this holy spot who themselves will lie here interred and who will pray in their lifetime for the souls of those to be buried in their company. Since the principal part of their bodies reposes here, we hope that they will find mercy.” Whatever theological misconceptions may be detected in this answer, the keen desire to be buried in close proximity to those who were thought to be sure of rising in glory was widely prevalent from the days of the catacombs to the close of the middle ages. Of the triumphant raiders just referred to, one afterwards became a monk at Cloneenagh. St Fintan, it is said, when praying in a lonely spot was surrounded by such a radiance of light that a brother who had followed him out of curiosity to observe what he did was almost blinded by the effulgence which dazzled him. We are also told that every Sunday night St Columba from his island home at Iona beheld in a vision St Fintan standing among the angels before the judgement seat of Christ. Columba told a disciple to seek out the abbot in Ireland, and described him as a man saint-like and comely, with a ruddy face and gleaming eyes, whose hair was flecked with white. The feast of St Fintan is kept throughout Ireland.
See VSH., vol. ii, pp. 96—106 (cf. vol. i, pp. lxx—lxxi), and Colgan, Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae, pp. 349—353. The Bollandist text in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii, pp. 17—21, presents a conflation of two different recensions of the same original. Cf. 3. Ryan, Irish Monasticism (1931), pp. 127—118 and passim.
Fintan of Clonenagh, Abbot (RM) Born in Leinster; died 603. A disciple of Saint Columba (or according to Montague, Saint David), Fintan led the life of a hermit at Clonenagh in Leix. Soon numerous disciples, including Saint Comgal, attached themselves to him, and he became their abbot.
Such was the austerity of the life led at Clonenagh that neighboring monasteries protested. Fintan himself was reputed to live on a diet of barley bread and clayey water; however, he established a less strict rule for some neighboring monks.
One day some soldiers brought the severed heads of their enemies to the monastery. Fintan had these buried in the monks cemetery hoping that by the Judgment Day they would have benefitted from the prayers of generations of monks: "since the principal part of their bodies rest here, we hope they will find mercy."
Fintan's feast is celebrated throughout Ireland (Benedictines, Farmer, Husenbeth, Montague).
6th v.St. Fortchern Bishop of Trim, Ireland
He was converted by St. Loman. Fortchern became a hermit in Meath, retiring from his see after a few years.
Fortchern of Trim (AC) (also known as Forkernus) 6th century. Saint Fortchern is said to have been converted to the faith by Saint Loman, whom he succeeded as bishop of Trim, Ireland, before becoming a hermit (Benedictines).
In art, St. Fortchern pictured as a bishop among bell-founders of whom he is the patron (Roeder).
6th v. Saint  Guevrock, Abbot (AC) (also known as Gueroc, Kerric)
Saint Guevrock was a Briton who followed Saint Tadwal to Brittany and succeeded him as abbot of Loc-Kirec.
He helped Saint Paul of León in the rule of the diocese (Benedictines).

661 Finan of Iona spirit of zeal, erudition, and prudence B (AC)

661  ST FINAN, Bishop OF LINDISFARNE
FINAN, an Irishman by birth and then a monk of Iona, succeeded St Aidan at Lindisfarne, of which he became the second bishop. His huge diocese comprised the whole of the modern counties of Northumberland, Durham and York, but he was a man of strong character as well as of most saintly life, and he appears to have exerted a firm and unquestioned sway over his half-civilized, widely-scattered and somewhat unruly flock.
He was a strenuous upholder of the Celtic tradition in which he had been reared, and opposed the modern innovations introduced from the south of England by the successors of Augustine, who kept in closer touch with Rome. St Finan’s ten years’ rule was a peaceful one, and he lived on terms of friendship with King Oswy of Northumbria. He had the joy of baptizing Peada, prince of the Middle English, at whose request he sent St Cedd and other missionaries to preach to the Mercians. Their labours were crowned
with success, and numbers of souls were converted to Christianity.
After a time another royal penitent came to Finan to ask for baptism this was Sigebert, King of the East Saxons, who had been converted through the efforts of King Oswy. Sigebert also asked for missionaries, particularly for St Cedd of whom he had heard much from Oswy. Eventually St Finan consecrated St Cedd bishop of the East Saxons and Diuma, a Scot, bishop of the Middle English. On Holy Island St Finan built a cathedral: it was of wood, after the Celtic fashion, and the roof was covered with a thatch of bent or sea-grass which is so plentiful along the North­umbrian coast. His feast is observed in the dioceses of Lancaster and Argyll 

Our principal authority is Bede, Hist. Eccles., bk iii, chs. 17, 21, 22, 25.
An Irish monk of Iona, who succeeded Saint Aidan in the governance of the Northumbrian church. He also bore Aidan's spirit of zeal, erudition, and prudence. Finan opposed Saint Ronan's introduction of the Roman liturgical practices in place of the Celtic ones, yet agreed to Saint Wilfrid's going from Lindisfarne to Rome. Attended by Saint Cedd and other missionaries, he evangelized parts of southern England. He became a friend of King Oswy of Northumbria, and baptized King Penda of the Middle Angles and later King Saint Sigebert of the East Saxons, who had been converted to Christianity by King Oswy (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer).
720 Silvin of Auchy 40 yrs indefatigable preaching Christian truths essential obligations ransomed slaves, held in great honour, not only on account of his charity and holiness, but also for the gift of healing with which he was credited. OSB B (RM) (also known as Silvinus)
 In pago Tarvanénsi, in Gállia, sancti Silvíni, Epíscopi Tolosáni.
 In the territory of Terouanne in France, St. Silvinus, bishop of Toulouse.
720 ST SILVIN, Bishop held in great honour, not only on account of his charity and holiness, but also for the gift of healing with which he was credited.
NOTHING is definitely known of the parentage of St Silvin. His early manhood was spent at the court of Kings Childeric II and Thierry III. He was betrothed and was about to be married when he felt the call to abandon the world and to follow Christ in the path of poverty and celibacy, and he accordingly retired from the court. He received holy orders in Rome and afterwards became a bishop. Some accounts say that his diocese was Toulouse, others give it as Thérouanne, but as his name is not found in any register of either of these churches it seems more likely that he was ordained a regionary bishop to preach the gospel to the heathen.

Silvin worked zealously in the north of France, spending most of his time in the region of Thérouanne, which was then full of pagans or of nominal Christians who were not much better than heathens. He was indefatigable in preaching to them and he gained a considerable harvest of souls by his teaching and example.

Much of his private fortune was expended in ransoming slaves from the barbarians, and he devoted the rest to charity and to the building of churches. Although he was endowed with good looks and a courtly address he wore the meanest clothes and practised great austerities; it was remarked that in his humble house he received every stranger as though he were Christ Himself. St Silvin’s biographer says that for forty years he ate no bread, but lived on potherbs and fruit, and the only possession he retained for himself was a horse which he rode when he became too weak to walk. His great wish was to live the life of a hermit, but his bodily in­firmities would have precluded it even had he obtained release from his episcopal duties. He appears to have died at Auchy-les-Moines near Arms, and was cer­tainly buried in that monastery. Even in his lifetime he was held in great honour, not only on account of his charity and holiness, but also for the gift of healing with which he was credited.

There is a Latin life of St Silvin by Bishop Antenor, who must have been a contemporary, but it has undergone revision and amplification at a later date. The text will be found in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii, and in Mabillon. Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. iii, p. 534, thinks that Silvin was probably a “Scot”, and points out that Folcuin makes it clear that he was still living at the time of the battle of Vincy (717).
Born at Toulouse (?), France; died February 15, c. 718-720. Silvinus, a courtier of Childeric II and Theodoric III, gave up his worldly life and became a penitential pilgrim to Jerusalem and other holy sites.
In Rome, he was ordained, then consecrated regional bishop and evangelized in the area around Thérouanne and Toulouse. He was indefatigable in preaching Christian truths and essential obligations; and taught pagans to despise and renounce pleasures of this life, by appearing on all occasions a strong lesson of self-denial and mortification. Thus, instructing them both by words and actions, he gathered a large harvest in a wild and uncultivated field. After some 40 years of missionary activity, which included the ransoming of many slaves, he retired to the Benedictine abbey of Auchy-les-Moines, where he died worn out by evangelizing.
He is commemorated in Usuard, the Belgic, and Roman martyrologies, on February 17, the day of his burial, and at Auchy on February 15. Most of his relics reside now in Saint-Bertin's Church at Saint- Omer, to which they were translated in 951, for fear of the Normans. 
His original vita, which was ascribed to Antenor, a disciple of the saint, is lost; the one that remains was compiled in the ninth century (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
1112 St. Benedict of Cagliari Benedictine monk bishop of Dolia
Sardinia. He was a monk at the abbey of St. Saturninus in that city when he was made bishop in 1107. Serving for five years, Benedict retired to the basilica abbey.
Benedict of Cagliari, OSB B (AC) Died after 1112. Saint Benedict was a monk in Saint Saturninus Basilica monastery at Cagliari, Sardinia, and bishop of Dolia, Sardinia, from 1107 to 1112. In his old age he retired to the abbey, where he died (Benedictines).

1124 St. Constabilis Benedictine abbot student of St. Leo at Cava Monastery near Salerno
Italy. He was born in 1060 in Lucania. In 1122, Constabilis was named the abbot, and he built the town of Castelabte, where he is venerated.

Constabilis of Cava, OSB, Abbot (AC) Born in Lucania, Italy, 1060; died 1124; canonized in 1893. Saint Constabilis was a monk under Saint Leo at La Cava Abbey near Naples, and in 1122, he was chosen as its fourth abbot. Constabilis built the town of Castelabbate, where he is now venerated as patron (Benedictines).

1165 Blessed Frowin of Bellevaux abbot-founder, OSB Cist. Abbot (PC)
Blessed Frowin was a Cistercian at Bellevaux, Savoy, and abbot-founder of Salom in the diocese of Constanz. He was a champion of Saint Bernard when the latter was preaching his crusade (Benedictines).

1178 Evermod of Ratzeburg evangelized the Wends.
O. Praem. B (AC) Saint Evermod a priest under Saint Norbert, who evangelized the Wends eventually chosen abbot of Gottesgnaden, then abbot of Magdeburg, and finally bishop of Ratzeburg (Benedictines).

1178 ST EVERMOD, BISHOP OF RATZEBURG His apostolic energy won the admiration of all, and he is known to posterity as an apostle of the Wends.

WHEN St Norbert was preaching at Cambrai in 1120 his eloquence made a deep impression upon a young man named Evermod, who thereupon forsook the world and joined the Premonstratensian canons under St Norbert’s rule. He accom­panied his beloved superior to Antwerp, where he laboured strenuously to repair the mischief done by the heretical teacher and firebrand, Tanchelm.
In 1134 Evermod succeeded St Norbert as superior of the monastery of Gottesgnaden; but in 1138 the urgent recommendation of Wigger, Bishop of Brandenburg, put him in charge of the abbey dedicated in honour of the Blessed Virgin at Magdeburg. Sixteen years later he was consecrated first bishop of Ratzeburg, on the confines of what is now Schleswig-Holstein, an office which he retained until his death. His apostolic energy won the admiration of all, and he is known to posterity as an apostle of the Wends.

No formal biography of St Evermod seems to have been preserved to us, but an account of his life is furnished from miscellaneous sources in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii. See also C. Hugo, Sancti Ordinis Praemonstratensis Annales, vol. i, p. 766 and vol. ii, pp. 172 and 599 seq
1220 RD REGINALD OF ORLEANS taught canon law in Paris 6 years; his tomb was venerated from the beginning as that of a saint, and on this ground his cultus was confirmed in 1875
Of the sons of St Dominic who have been proposed for the veneration of the faithful, Bd Reginald was the first to pass out of this world. He wore the habit for a very short time, but tradition holds that it was to him, and not to the founder himself, that our Lady appeared and made known her wish that the linen rochet which the saint’s companions had hitherto worn as canons should be exchanged for the white woollen scapular of the friars.

Reginald, who was born in 1183 at Saint­-Gilles in Languedoc, not far from Arles, seems to have been a young man of singular promise. He had taught canon law in the University of Paris from 1206 to 1211, before he was appointed in 1212 dean of the collegiate chapter of Saint­-Aignan at Orleans. In the course of a pilgrimage he came to Rome in 1218, and there met St Dominic, whom he recognized as the spiritual guide who had already been shown to him by our Lady in a time of dangerous illness. He offered himself as a disciple, and Dominic had so much confidence in him that he made him vicar of his rapidly growing religious family during the time that he himself was absent in Spain. Reginald, being bidden in that same year 1218 to betake himself to Bologna, laid the foundations of a great Dominican house in connection with the university there. Both there and at Paris, whither he was sent the next year, he had immense success both in preaching and in gaining recruits for the order. But he was already ripe for Heaven, and dying in Paris, February 1, 1220, he was buried in Notre-Dame-des-Champs. It is said that his tomb was venerated from the beginning as that of a saint, and on this ground his cultus was confirmed in 1875.

Our information about him is derived from the early chronicles of the Dominican Order, such, for instance, as Gerard de Frachet’s Vitae Fratrum and Bartholomew of Trent’s LiberEpilogorum. Memoirs have also been compiled in modern times by E. C. Bayonne, T. A. Karr and A. Gardeil. See also Mortier, Maîtres Généraux O.P., vol. i, pp. 96—100 and 118— 119, and Taurisano, Catalogus Hagiographicus OP., p. 8.
1282 St. Hugh dei Lippi Uggucioni 1282 1of 7 Servite Order founders.
He accompanied St. Philip Benizi to France and Germany, serving as vicar general of the Servites in Germany.
 February 17, 2010 Seven Founders of the Order of Servites (13th century)

Can you imagine seven prominent men of Boston or Denver banding together, leaving their homes and professions, and going into solitude for a life directly given to God? That is what happened in the cultured and prosperous city of Florence in the middle of the thirteenth century. The city was torn with political strife as well as the heresy of the Cathari. Morals were low and religion seemed meaningless.
In 1240 seven noblemen of Florence mutually decided to withdraw from the city to a solitary place for prayer and direct service of God. Their initial difficulty was providing for their dependents, since two were still married and two were widowers.  Their aim was to lead a life of penance and prayer, but they soon found themselves disturbed by constant visitors from Florence. They next withdrew to the deserted slopes of Monte Senario.

In 1244, under the direction of St. Peter of Verona, O.P., this small group adopted a religious habit similar to the Dominican habit , choosing to live under the Rule of St. Augustine and adopting the name of the Servants of Mary. The new Order took a form more like that of the mendicant friars than that of the older monastic Orders.  Members of the community came to the United States from Austria in 1852 and settled in New York and later in Philadelphia. The two American provinces developed from the foundation made by Father Austin Morini in 1870 in Wisconsin.

Community members combined monastic life and active ministry. In the monastery, they led a life of prayer, work and silence while in the active apostolate they engaged in parochial work, teaching, preaching and other ministerial activities.
Comment:  The time in which the seven Servite founders lived is very easily comparable to the situation in which we find ourselves today. It is “the best of times and the worst of times,” as Dickens said. Some, perhaps many, feel called to a countercultural life, even in religion. All of us are faced in a new and urgent way with the challenge to make our lives decisively centered in Christ.
Quote:  “Let all religious therefore spread throughout the whole world the good news of Christ by the integrity of their faith, their love for God and neighbor, their devotion to the Cross and their hope of future glory.... Thus, too, with the prayerful aid of that most loving Virgin Mary, God’s Mother, ‘Whose life is a rule of life for all,’ religious communities will experience a daily growth in number, and will yield a richer harvest of fruits that bring salvation” (Dec ree on the Renewal of Religious Life, 25).
1285 Blessed Luke Belludi received the Franciscan habit from Saint Francis himself at Padua, worked a great miracle at Luke’s urgent request by restoring a dying child to health.OFM (AC)
Born in 1200; died 1285; cultus confirmed in 1927. Blessed Luke received the Franciscan habit from Saint Francis himself at Padua, Italy, and became the intimate friend of Saint Antony of Padua, at whose death he assisted. On his own death, he was laid in the empty tomb from which the body of Saint Antony had been taken (Benedictines).
1285 BD LUKE BELLUDI
THE devotion to St Antony of Padua is so widespread and of such early date that we cannot be surprised if those more intimately associated with him have been irradiated with his glory. Luke Belludi, born in the year 1200  of an opulent family near Padua, received the habit and cord of the Friars Minor in that city when he was twenty years old at the hands of St Francis himself. There also a little later
he became the companion and intimate friend of St Antony, who, as an ancient chronicle attests, worked a great miracle at Luke’s urgent request by restoring a dying child to health.
When St Antony himself in 1231 passed away at Padua in the Franciscan house known as the Aracoeli or “Arcella”, Bd Luke was one of the two friars who tended him in his last moments. Finally it was Luke who, as provincial minister of the order, was mainly instrumental in erecting the magnificent basilica which enshrines the remains of his beloved friend and which perpetuates to this day the glory of the tender-hearted Franciscan. We know little more of Luke beyond the fact that he was active in preaching and good works. When he died in 1285, he was interred in the empty marble tomb which the body of St Antony had first occupied, and the slab which covered it was, it appears, used as an altar upon which Mass was celebrated. In virtue of these and similar facts attesting the honour in which Luke has always been held in Padua, his cultus was confirmed in 1927.

See the decree of confirmation in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xix (1927), pp. 213—216; B. Marinangeli, Cenni sulla vita del b. Luca Belludi (1929) ; and cf. Mazzara, Leggendario Francescano, vol. i, pp. 235—236.
1302 BD ANDREW OF ANAGNI was held in great veneration both in life and after death for the miracles he was believed to work
IN the Franciscan supplement to the Roman Martyrology this servant of God is described as “Beatus Andreas de Comitibus”; but it would seem that the more accurate form of his name is Andrea dei Conti di Segni (Andrew of the Counts of Segni). In Mazzara he is called Andrea d’Anagni, from his birthplace. As we learn from these designations he was of noble family, nephew of the Roland Conti who became Pope Alexander IV and a near kinsman of another native of Anagni, Benedict Gaetani, Pope Boniface VIII.

Laying aside all thought of worldly advancement he gave himself to the Order of Friars Minor, in which he remained a simple brother, not even aspiring to the priesthood.

His reputation for holiness was great, and it is probably true that a cardinalate was at some time offered him, and that he definitely declined to be so honoured. Our sources of information, however, do not seem very trustworthy. One is consequently a little disposed to be sceptical about some incidents recounted in the legend of Bd Andrew. For example “Wadding relates that one day when he was ill and unable to take his ordinary food, a friend brought him some roasted birds. The saint, touched with pity at the sight of the innocent creatures, would not eat, but, making the sign of the cross over them, commanded them to resume their feathers and fly away. He was instantly obeyed, and the little birds, restored to life, took flight with chirps of joy” (Leon, i, 134). There is no doubt that Andrew was held in great veneration both in life and after death for the miracles he was believed to work. He breathed his last on February 1, 1302, and his cult us was formally approved in 1724.

See Léon, L’Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. i Mazzara, Leggendario Francescano (1676), vol. i, pp. 155-156.
1304 BD PETER OF TREIA After a long life of labour, adorned by miracles and the gift of prophecy
THIS Peter was one of the early Franciscans and received the habit from St Francis himself.
He was born at Montecchio, near Treia, of poor parents, and he entered the order when still quite young. He received holy orders, after which he was most devoted in carrying out the duties of the sacred ministry. He preached boldly against licentiousness and converted many sinners. It is related that once, when he was praying in the church of the convent of Ancona, his superiors saw him rapt in ecstasy and lifted from the ground; our Lady, St John the Evangelist and St Francis all manifested themselves to him in visions. He had a particular veneration for the Archangel St Michael, who appeared to him on the last day of the special Lent which he used to keep in his honour and talked with him a long time, promising him the remission of his sins.

He was united by a great bond of friendship to Bd Conrad of Offida, who lived with him for some years in the convent of Torano which St Francis had founded. They worked and preached together and roused each other in noble emulation to higher and higher stages of sanctity, until the fame of their holiness shed a glow of distinction over their simple little community on the feast of the Purification one year Peter had a wonderful vision in which he saw our Lady place her Son in the arms of Bd Conrad. After a long life of labour, adorned by miracles and the gift of prophecy, Bd Peter died at the convent of Sirolo in the Marches. Popular devotion, which had gathered about him from the hour of his death, was sanctioned in the year 1793.

There is a pronounced atmosphere of legend in the accounts given of Bd Peter by Mazzara, Leggendario Francescano, vol. i, pp. 245—246, and the L’Auréole Séraphique of Fr Leon (Eng. trans.), vol. i. They all derive from Wadding, and Wadding used, without discrimination, almost any materials that came to hand. Cf. also A. Canaletti Gaudenti, Il b. Pietro da Treja (1937).
1310 St. Alexis Falconieri Founder mystic 1233 on the Feast of the Assumption group experienced a vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary
 Floréntiæ natális sancti Aléxii Falconérii Confessóris, e septem Fundatóribus Ordinis Servórum beátæ Maríæ Vírginis; qui, décimo supra centésimum vitæ suæ anno, Christi Jesu et Angelórum præséntia recreátus, beáto fine quiévit.  Ipsíus tamen ac Sociórum festum prídie Idus Februárii celebrátur.
       In Florence, the birthday of St. Alexis Falconieri, confessor, one of the seven founders of the Order of the Servites of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  In the one hundred and tenth year of his age, he ended his blessed career in the consoling presence of Christ Jesus and the angels.  His feast, with that of his companions, is kept on the 12th of February.
One of the first Servants of Mary or Servites. The son of a wealthy merchant in Florence, Italy, Alexis and six companions joined the Confraternity of the Blessed Virgin in Florence in 1225.

Gathered together on the Feast of the Assumption in 1233, the group experienced a vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary which inspired them to found a new religious community dedicated to prayer. They founded such a group at La Camarzia, near Florence, moving eventually to Monte Senario, on the outskirts of the city.

Another vision inspired Alexis and his companions to form the Servites, or the Servants of Mary. All in the group were ordained priests, except for Alexis, who believed he was not worthy of such an honor. He helped build the Servite church at Cafaggio, and he managed the day-to-day temporal affairs of the congregation. The Servites received papal approval from Pope Benedict XI in 1304. Alexis was the only founding member still alive. He died at Monte Senario on February 17, 1310, recorded as 110 years old. Alexis and his companions are called the Seven Holy Founders. They were canonized by Pope Leo XIII in 1888.

1310 7 Gründer, Alexius Falconieri Gründer des Servitenordens 1888 wurden die sieben Servitengründer, Bonfilius, Bonajuncta, Manettus, Amideus, Hugo, Sosteneus und Alexius, "als ob sie eine Person wären", von Leo XIII. heiliggesprochen
Katholische Kirche: 17. Februar
Sieben befreundete Kaufleute in Florenz, die einer marianischen Bruderschaft angehörten, beschlossen 1233 ein gemeinsames Leben im Dienst der Armen und Kranken zu führen. Sie versorgten ihre Familien, verschenkten ihre Habe und lebten in einem einfachen Haus am Rande der Stadt Florenz. Sie wurden allgemein Diener Mariens - Servi Mariae - genannt.

1241 gründeten die sieben ein Kloster auf dem Monte Senario nahe Florenz. Sie beschlossen, hier nach der Regel Augustins zu leben und ein schwarzes Ordensgewand zu tragen. Der Orden fand großen Zulauf. 1299 gab es in Deutschland bereits vier Klöster. 1304 wurde der Orden von Papst Benedikt XI. bestätigt. Im Bestätigungsschreiben heißt es: "Ihr pflegt eine besondere Hingabe an die glorreiche und selige Jungfrau Maria; von ihr nahmt ihr euren Namen, indem ihr euch demütig ihre Diener nanntet."

Bei der Anerkennung des Ordens lebte nur noch einer der sieben Gründer, Alexius Falconieri, der am 17. Februar 1310 im Alter von 110 Jahren starb. 1888 wurden die sieben Servitengründer, Bonfilius, Bonajuncta, Manettus, Amideus, Hugo, Sosteneus und Alexius, "als ob sie eine Person wären", von Leo XIII. heiliggesprochen. Diese Heiligsprechung ist ein - bisher - einmaliger Vorgang in der Kirchengeschichte.

1362 Saint Theodosius the Bulgarian and disciple Romanus zealous defender of Orthodoxy translated Greek writings into Slavonic founded a monastery Trnovo later called Theodosiev
St Theodosius began his exploit in the city of Viddino, at the Nikolaev monastery. After the death of the igumen Job he settled near Trnovo, then the capital city of Bulgaria, at the Holy Mountain monastery of the Most Holy Theotokos in search of a spiritual guide.  He left the Holy Mountain monastery and for a long time went from monastery to monastery.
Finally, he learned about the desert monastery called "Concealed" where in pursuit of asceticism St Gregory of Sinai (August 8) had moved from Athos.

St Theodosius found in him an experienced guide of the contemplative life. St Gregory taught, "Before death we lay in Hades; whoever does not recognize sincerely that he is a sinner, and that the beasts and cattle are more pure, is more wicked than the demons, having become their obedient slave."

The wilderness monastery of St Gregory of Sinai suffered often from robbers. The abbot sent St Theodosius to the emperor Alexander with a request to defend the monastery. The pious Bulgarian Tsar, at the request of the ascetic, provided him with the means to surround the monastery with strong walls with towers, and made the monastery secure with land and cattle.
During his final journey to Trnovo on an errand for the abbot to the Tsar, a nobleman asked St Theodosius to take him along to the monastery.
The holy ascetic brought him to St Gregory of Sinai. This was Romanus, who became the sincere and beloved disciple of St Theodosius.

After the death of St Gregory of Sinai (November 27, 1347), St Theodosius refused to become head of the monastery, and he left the monastery with his disciple Romanus for solitary struggles. They founded a monastery on a hill near Trnovo, afterwards called Theodosiev.
St Theodosius was famous as a zealous defender of Orthodoxy against many heresies, especially the Bogomils, Judaizers and Messalians. Their false teachings were especially pernicious. The Patriarch and the Tsar rendered great help to St Theodosius in the struggle with the heretics. In addition to this, the holy ascetic translated Greek writings into Slavonic.

In 1360, he became grievously ill. Wishing to see his friend St Callistus once more, he went to him at Constantinople, entrusting the direction of the monastery to his disciple Romanus.
St Theodosius died at Constantinople on February 17, 1362. His disciple St Romanus became head of the monastery.
1603 Blessed William Richardson martyred for his priesthood M (AC)
Born in Wales near Sheffield; died at Tyburn, England, in 1603; beatified in 1929. William Richardson, also known as William Anderson, was educated for the priesthood at Valladolid and Seville, where he was ordained in 1594. He was martyred for his priesthood (Benedictines).

1603 BD WILLIAM RICHARDSON, MARTYR
THIS priest was the last martyr to suffer death for his religion during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He apparently belonged to a Lancashire family but was born at Wales, near Sheffield. He went to the college at Valladolid in 1592, and from thence to Seville, where he was ordained. It is not known how long he ministered in England (under the name of Anderson); but in February 1603 he was arrested in London, having been betrayed by one whom he had trusted. His trial and condemnation for being a seminary priest were hurried through, and he was executed at Tyburn on the 17th of the same month.

Information about this martyr is very slight. See MMP., p. 269, and Gillow’s Biog. Dict., vol. v, p. 414. There are references in Calendar of State Papers Domestic, 1601—1603, pages 292-302.
1612 Hieromartyr Hermogenes Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus stood up against traitors /enemies of the nation who wanted to spread Uniatism and Western Catholicism throughout Russia and to wipe out Orthodoxy, while enslaving the Russian nation
Born in Kazan around 1530 descended from the Don Cossacks. According to the Patriarch's own testimony, he served as priest in Kazan in a church dedicated to St Nicholas (December 6 and May 9), near the Kazan bazaar. Soon he became a monk, and from 1582 was archimandrite of the Savior-Transfiguration monastery at Kazan.
On May 13, 1589 he was consecrated bishop and became the first Metropolitan of Kazan.

While he was the priest at St Nicholas, the wonderworking Kazan Icon of the Mother of God (July 8) was discovered in Kazan in 1579. With the blessing of Archbishop Jeremiah of Kazan, he carried the newly-appeared icon from the place of its discovery to the Church of St Nicholas. Having remarkable literary talent, the saint in 1594 compiled an account describing the appearance of the wonderworking icon and the miracles accomplished through it.
In 1591 the saint gathered newly-baptized Tatars into the cathedral church and for several days he instructed them in the Faith.

The relics of St Germanus, the second archbishop of Kazan (September 25, November 6, and June 23), who died at Moscow on November 6, 1567 during a plague, were transfered and buried in St Nicholas Church in 1592.
With the blessing of Patriarch Job (1589-1605), St Hermogenes reburied the relics at the Sviyazhsk Dormition monastery.

On January 9, 1592 St Hermogenes addressed a letter to Patriarch Job, in which he asked for permission to commemorate in his See of Kazan those Orthodox soldiers who gave their lives for the Faith and the nation in a battle against the Tatars.
In the past, it was customary to enter into the diptychs the names of all Orthodox warriors who had fallen in battle, and to commemorate them.

At the same time he mentioned three martyrs who had suffered at Kazan for their faith in Christ, one of whom was a Russian named John (January 24) born at Nizhny Novgorod and captured by the Tatars.
The other two, Stephen and Peter (March 24), were newly-converted Tatars.

The saint expressed regret that these martyrs were not inserted into the diptychs read on the Sunday of Orthodoxy, and that "Memory Eternal" was not sung for them. In answer to St Hermogenes, the Patriarch issued a decree on February 25, which said: " to celebrate at Kazan and throughout all the Kazan metropolitanate a panikhida for all the Orthodox soldiers killed at Kazan and the environs of Kazan, on the Saturday following the Feast of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos (October 1), and to inscribe them in the great Synodikon read on the Sunday of Orthodoxy," and also ordered that the three Kazan martyrs be inscribed in the Synodikon, leaving it to St Hermogenes to set the day of their memory. St Hermogenes circulated the Patriarchal decree throughout his diocese, and required all the churches and monasteries to serve Liturgies, Panikhidas and Lityas for the three Kazan martyrs on January 24.
St Hermogenes displayed zeal in the faith and firmness in the observance of Church traditions, and he devoted himself to the enlightenment of Kazan Tatars with the faith of Christ.

In 1595, with the active participation of the St Hermogenes, the relics of the Kazan Wonderworkers St Gurias, the first archbishop of Kazan (October 4, December 5, June 20), and St Barsanuphius bishop of Tver (October 4, April 11) were discovered and uncovered.
Tsar Theodore Ioannovich (1584-1598) had given orders to erect at the Kazan Savior-Transfiguration monastery a new stone church on the site of the first one, where the saints were buried.

When the graves of the saints were discovered, St Hermogenes came with a gathering of clergy. He commanded the graves to be opened and, when he saw the incorrupt relics and clothing of the saints, he notified the Patriarch and the Tsar. With the blessing of Patriarch Job and by order of the Tsar, the relics of the newly-appeared wonderworkers were placed in the new church.
St Hermogenes himself compiled the lives of hierarchs Gurias and Barsanuphius.

Having been found worthy of the patriarchal throne, Metropolitan Hermogenes was elected to the primatial See, and on July 3, 1606 he was installed as Patriarch by the assembly of the holy hierarchs at Moscow's Dormition cathedral. Metropolitan Isidore handed the Patriarch the staff of the holy hierarch Peter, Moscow Wonderworker (October 5, December 21, August 24), and the Tsar gave as a gift to the new Patriarch a panagia, embellished with precious stones, a white klobuk and staff.
In the ancient manner, Patriarch Hermogenes made his entrance riding upon a donkey.

The activity of Patriarch Hermogenes coincided with a difficult period for the Russian state: the appearance of the false Tsarevich Demetrius and the Polish king Sigismund III. The first hierarch devoted all his powers to the service of the Church and the nation.
Patriarch Hermogenes was not alone in this exploit: his self-sacrificing fellow-countrymen followed his example and assisted him. With special inspiration His Holiness the Patriarch stood up against the traitors and enemies of the nation, who wanted to spread Uniatism and Western Catholicism throughout Russia and to wipe out Orthodoxy, while enslaving the Russian nation.

When the imposter arrived at Moscow and settled himself at Tushino, Patriarch Hermogenes sent two letters to the Russian traitors. In one of them he wrote: "...You have forgotten the vows of our Orthodox Faith, in which we are born, baptized, nourished and raised. You have violated your oath and the kissing of the Cross to stand to the death for the house of the Most Holy Theotokos and for the Moscow realm, but have fallen for your false would-be Tsarevich ... My soul aches, my heart is sickened, all within me agonizes, and all my frame shudders; I weep and with sobbing I lament: Have mercy, have mercy, brethren and children, on your own souls and your parents departed and living ... Consider, how our nation is devastated and plundered by foreigners, who offer insult to the holy icons and churches, and how innocent blood is spilled, crying out to God. Think! Against whom do you take up arms: is it not against God, Who has created you? Is it not against your own brothers? Do you not devastate your own country?... I adjure you in the name of God, give up your undertaking, there is yet time, so that you do not perish in the end." In the second document the saint appeals: "For the sake of God, come to your senses and turn around, gladden your parents, your wives and children; and we stand to pray God for you..."

Soon the righteous judgment of God fell upon the "Brigand of Tushino: he was killed by his own close associates on December 11, 1610. But Moscow continued to remain in peril, since the Poles and traitors, loyal to Sigismund III remained in the city. The documents sent by Patriarch Hermogenes throughout the cities and villages, exhorted the Russian nation to liberate Moscow from the enemies and to choose a lawful Russian Tsar.
The Muscovites rose up in rebellion, and the Poles burned the city, shutting themselves up in the Kremlin.
Together with Russian traitors they forcefully seized Patriarch Hermogenes from the patriarchal throne and imprisoned him in the Chudov monastery.

On Bright Monday in 1611, the Russian militia approached Moscow and began the seige of the Kremlin, which continued for several months. Besieged within the Kremlin, the Poles often sent messengers to the Patriarch with the demand that he order the Russian militia to leave the city, threatening him with execution if he refused.
The saint firmly replied, "What are your threats to me? I fear only God. If all our enemies leave Moscow, I shall bless the Russian militia to withdraw from Moscow; but if you remain here, I shall bless all to stand against you and to die for the Orthodox Faith."
While still in prison, the hieromartyr Hermogenes sent a final epistle to the Russian nation, blessing the liberating army to fight the invaders. The Russian commanders could not come to an agreement over a way to take the Kremlin and free the Patriarch. He languished more than nine months in dreadful confinement, and on February 17, 1612 he died a martyr's death from starvation.
The liberation of Russia, for which St Hermogenes stood with such indestructible valor, was successfully achieved. The body of the hieromartyr Hermogenes was buried in the Chudov monastery, but in 1654 was transferred to the Moscow Dormition cathedral. Glorification of Patriarch Hermogenes as a saint occurred on May 12, 1913.
Saint Theodore the Silent of the Caves
chose the exploit of silence, in order to dwell constantly in remembrance of God, and to safeguard himself from temptation even by a word.
He was glorified by the Lord with the gift of wonderworking.
His memory is celebrated also on August 28.

1795 The Holy New Martyr Theodore apotasized then returned to Christianity tortured hanged by Turks
Born of pious parents in Neochorion near Constantinople in 1774. He worked in the palace of the Sultan, where he converted to Islam.
When a plague broke out in Constantinople, he realized the gravity of his sin and returned to Christianity. He went to Chios and then to Mytilene, where he confessed Christ before the Moslem authorities.
He was imprisoned, tortured, then hanged by the Turks in 1795.
1819 Saint Joseph monk of Dionysiou Monastery on Mt. Athos iconographer he shone forth with the virtues of monastic life.
He was an iconographer, and he painted the icon of the holy Archangels on the iconostasis of Dionysiou's main church.
In obedience to the instructions of Igumen Stephen, St Joseph traveled to Constantinople with Eudocimus, who had apostasized from Orthodoxy to become a Moslem. Eudocimus repented, and wished to wipe out his sin through martyrdom.
hen faced with torture and death, however, the unfortunate Eudocimus denied Christ again, blaming Joseph for turning him from Islam.
St Joseph was arrested and threatened with death. In spite of many tortures, he refused to convert to Islam. This holy martyr of Christ was hanged on February 17, 1819, and so he obtained an incorruptible crown of glory.
Some sources list his commemoration on February 17, while others list him on September 14 or October 26.

19th v. THE MARTYRS OF CHINA, first preached in China in the seventh century, then in its heretical Nestorian form. The first mission from the Catholic West was established in 1294 at Khanbaliq (Peiping, Peking) by a Franciscan friar, John of Monte Corvino

So far as is known, Christianity was first preached in China in the seventh century, and then in its heretical Nestorian form. The first mission from the Catholic West was established in 1294 at Khanbaliq (Peiping, Peking) by a Franciscan friar, John of Monte Corvino; the first permanent settlement was made, by the Jesuits, during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; in 1631 they were followed by the Dominicans, two years later by the Franciscans again, in 1680 by the Augustinian friars, and by priests of the Paris Foreign Missions in 1683. This settlement has survived all persecution and other difficulties down to our own time.

In 1900 and 1909 a number of martyrs of the Chinese missions were beatified, of whom two outstanding ones suffered during this month of February. There is something so splendidly heroic in his life, crowned by a cruel martyrdom when seventy-two years old, that BD FRANCIS-REGIS CLET claims some special notice, however brief and inadequate. He was born at Grenoble in 1748, and joined the Congregation of the Mission (Lazarists) at the age of twenty-one. After a brief period during which he acted as professor of theology at Annecy, he was appointed novice-master at Saint-Lazare, Paris, in 1788. During this troubled revolutionary period it was often difficult to maintain the despatch of a regular succession of missionaries to the Far East. An opportunity of securing a passage for two or three to China occurred in 1791, but as one of the priests appointed was accidentally detained, Father Clet offered to supply his place. He reached Macao, and thence, after tedious delays, made his way into the interior of the empire.

It would be difficult to do justice to the arduousness of the life he led there for nearly thirty years. Apart from the language which, beginning as he did when he was over forty, he never was able to learn well, he came into a district in which the existence of much disaffection and even open rebellion had created an atmosphere of suspicion. The officials, at least intermittently, scrutinized all who came and went. His life for long periods was like that described in the Epistle to the Hebrews: “they wandered about in sheepskins, in goatskins, being in want, distressed, afflicted.” The few priests who were in that vast province, then called Hukwang, died or fell into the hands of the persecutors. For three years he carried on his work absolutely alone. Communications were most difficult. Many of his letters both to Europe and to his superiors at Peking went astray, and his health, tried by the climate and the hardships to which he was exposed, constantly broke down. None the less he was beloved, and he often had the consolation of witnessing the most astounding steadfastness, in the face of indescribable torments and brutality, among the converts he had gained.

In 1818 began a period of excep­tional persecution. A strange and inexplicable darkness occurred one morning at Peking. The emperor was frightened and, though he had hitherto been tolerant of Christian teachers, it was put into his head that the local deities were offended and that all foreign religions must be suppressed. He issued a decree of which the effects were widespread. Father Clet for a long time evaded capture, but owing to the malice of a pagan against a Christian convert, and afterwards to the treachery of another convert who betrayed the priest to gain the reward of 1000 taels (nearly £300) which had been offered for his apprehension, the missionary was captured and then had to endure scourgings, cruel confinement and other forms of torment which it is terrible to read of as inflicted on a man of his venerable age. The firmness of his replies only provoked his judges. They ordered him to be repeatedly struck in the face, and in the end he was sentenced to be strangled. This was not the simple punishment which we might suppose but, according to their barbarous custom, after the victim had been rendered unconscious by tightening the noose, the pressure was relaxed until he came to. This was twice repeated, and it was only on the third application of the torture that Father Clet was finally despatched. He suffered at Wuchangfu, just opposite Hankow, the capital of Hupeh. It was February 17, 1820.

Bd Louis GABRIEL TAURIN Dufresse, martyred in 1815 and among those beatified in 1900, was one of the most effective missionaries ever sent out by the Paris Society of Foreign Missions. He went to China as a priest at the age of twenty-six, and worked for seven years in the province of Szechwan, till in 1785 he was denounced and went into hiding. He successfully eluded capture for several months, but being afraid that the search for him would lead to the finding of some of his confréres he gave himself up and was imprisoned at Peking. He was released with other prisoners and deported to Manila, where he remained for four years till he accompanied the vicar apostolic, Mgr de Saint-Martin, back to Szechwan. In 1800 M. Dufresse was consecrated titular bishop of Tabraca as his auxiliary, and in the following year succeeded to the vicariate. For a time perse­cution was lessened and Mgr Dufresse administered his district with great vigour. Forty thousand heathen had been converted and the mission required a complete organization, which was taken in hand by a synod held in 1803. In 1811 a decree was issued ordering a search for foreign preachers. Only seven were found at Peking, three of whom were officials in charge of the observatory (European skill in astronomy and mathematics provided a lever at the imperial court of which missionaries took full advantage). But the inquisition was extended to the pro­vinces and persecution began again in Szechwan worse than ever. On May 28, 1815, Mgr Dufresse was betrayed and taken to Chintai, the capital of the province.

It is satisfactory to be able to record that the venerable bishop, now sixty-four years old, was treated without barbarity and indeed with consideration by the local mandarins. His books were returned to him and he was allowed to speak freely in court, a permission that he availed himself of with such effect that many of his auditors were deeply moved by his passionate plea for Christianity. The several interrogations to which he was submitted were conducted without bullying and the bishop’s replies were courteously listened to: his known character and works were such that his judges were somewhat prejudiced in his favour. On September 14 he was brought before the governor, who sentenced him to death by beheading. According to the law this sentence required the imperial confirmation before it could be carried out, but the governor disregarded this and ordered the execution on the spot, in order, as he hoped, to terrify and weaken the other captive Christians, who were sent for to be present. But the bearing and words of Bd Louis Gabriel had the contrary effect, and as he gave them his last blessing they affirmed aloud that they too would die for Jesus Christ, as in fact many of them did. The head of the martyr was put on a pole and with his trunk was publicly displayed for a week as a warning, guarded day and night by Christians, who when they were allowed gave them decent burial,

For those who are not experts, the map of China is a very bewildering study, and when one learns from one authority that BD JOHN LANTRUA suffered at Shiar-Sa, which is said also to be in the province of Hupé, from another that the scene of his martyrdom was Tchang Cha, the capital of Hou Nan, and from the Franciscan supplement to the martyrology that he was strangled at Chansai, one is inclined to give up in despair any attempt to identify the locality. It appears, however, that the most authorized spelling is Changsha, and that this stands for a town of 500,000 inhabitants in the very centre of the country and south of the great Tungting lake—in fact Hunan, the province of which it is the capital, means nothing but “south of the lake”. Here it was that Father John ended at last by a comparatively merciful death his career of many labours and much suffering.

He was born in 1760 at Triora in Liguria, became a Franciscan at the age of seventeen, taught theology at Corneto in 1784, and was appointed guardian at Velletri in 1785, but after some years of strenuous labour he obtained leave to devote the rest of his life to the foreign missions. He left Italy in 1798, but a year’s delay occurred at Lisbon before he could obtain a passage to Macao. Thence he proceeded into the interior of China, facing many dangers and hardships, for it was a period of almost unremitting persecution, but he brought encouragement to many Christians who were wavering in their faith and himself gained a rich harvest of converts. In the provinces of Hupeh and Hunan he was at that time labouring almost alone. In the end he was delated to the authorities, his little chapel was burnt to the ground, and all his effects seized. To the questions put to him he made answer with all the boldness and resolution of the ancient martyrs. Being then sent in chains a long and weary journey to a court of higher jurisdiction, he got for those who were arrested with him the privilege of being carried in a litter. Finally he was transferred to Changsha, where for six months he was kept in durance under the most intolerable conditions, his neck, feet and hands being secured with fetters. He was dragged by force over the crucifix that it might be said that he had trampled it under foot, but he at once protested, in tones which compelled the attention of all, that this had happened against his will. There remained no alter­native for his judges but to sentence him to death. In the last scene he prayed fervently in public and by giving a bribe to the executioners he saved himself from being stripped naked. Then he was strangled and his body exposed to infamy. He suffered on February 7, 1816. 

Among the later martyrs—he suffered on February 27, 1856—was Bd AUGUSTUS CHAPDELAINE, who was born near Coutances in 1814. His family, mainly by their own labour—he was the ninth child—farmed an estate of many hectares. He was a generous and pious lad, and when he turned his hand to field-work it is recorded of him that he toiled like a galley-slave—il faisait de its besogne pour quatre. Death, however, visited their homestead. Two of the more vigorous sons were taken. The labour of the rest no longer sufficed, and the farm had to be broken up. This set Augustus free to gratify the desire he had long entertained of studying for the priesthood, In due course he was ordained, and became in 1844 curate of a parish in which his zeal worked marvels. However, in 1851 he felt a higher call to the foreign missions, and after a short period of training at the house of the Missions Étrangères he left Paris for China. It was only after many hardships that he eventually reached the destination assigned him. In December 1854 he was denounced to the mandarin governor by the jealous relative of a Christian convert. He was arrested, and for some days spent a most anxious time, but the mandarin proved friendly and no harm befell him. He laboured strenuously, and in spite of his imperfect knowledge of the language made many converts.

Later on, however, another mandarin was appointed to this district. A new denunciation was followed by the apprehension of M. Chapdelaine with a number of his Christians. His brave answers provoked the judge and he was ordered three hundred blows with a rattan, which left him half dead. No cry of pain or word of complaint was heard from him, and in a day or two he seemed to be miraculously restored to health. The mandarin believed that some spell had been employed, and a dog was accordingly killed and its warm blood thrown over him to dispel the magic. At a second hearing of the case the missionary was sentenced to receive three hundred blows in the face with a heavy leather shoe-sole. Many of his teeth were knocked out and his jaw fractured. In the end he was given to understand that he might be released for a payment of 1000 taels, afterwards reduced to 300, but no such sum could be raised. Sentence of death was therefore passed, and he was subjected to slow martyrdom by the torture of the cage. When life was extinct his head was struck off, and we are told that three jets of blood spouted heavenwards and deeply impressed the spectators that something extraordinary had taken place.

Among the others beatified in 1900 and 1909 were the laymen PETER LIEU, strangled after encouraging his sons in prison (1834), PAUL LIEU (1818) and John-BAPTIST Lo (1861); the lay catechist JEROME Lu (1858) and the seminarist JOSEPH SHANG (1861); JOHN PETER NÉEL, a French priest who was beheaded in 1862, together with his Chinese catechist, MARTIN; AGNES SAO KUY, a young maiden killed by torture at Kwangsi (1856); and the school-teacher AGATHA LIN, beheaded at Maoken in 1958.

For other martyrs in China see BB. Francis de Capillas (January 15), Peter Sanz and his companions (May 26), Gregory Grassi and his companions (July 9) and John Perboyre (September 11).

An excellent biography of Clet will be found in an anonymous work called Le disciple de Jésus, first published in 1853. There is another life in French by G. Guitton (1942), and one in English by A. S. Foley (1941). The French life of John of Triora by A. du Lys has been translated into German. See also A. Launay’s works on the Chinese missions, such as Les 52 serviteurs de Dieu… vol. ii, pp. 287—304, and his Salle des martyrs du Séminaire des Missions; H. Leclercq, Les martyrs, vol. x H. Walter, Leben, Wirken und Leiden der 77 sel. Martyrer ton Annam tied China (1903) B. Wolferstan, The Catholic Church in China (c. 1910); and Kempf, The Holiness of the Church in the Nineteenth Century (1916), pp. 304—306. For the early history of the Church in China, Moule’s Christians in China before the year 1550 (1930) is invaluable.

1820 Blessed Francis Regis Clet Chinese Martyr, C.M. M (AC)
Born in Grenoble, France, 1748; died at Hankow, China, 1820; beatified in 1900. Blessed Francis joined the Lazarists and was sent to China in 1791. There he labored in the mission fields for 30 years in the face of many difficulties. At the age of 72, he was captured, tortured, and strangled for the faith (Benedictines).

The Weeping Tikhvin Icon of Mt. Athos is to be found behind the altar in the Prophet Elias Skete
On February 17, 1877 (Thursday of the Second Week of Lent) seven monks remained in the church after the Hours had been read. They were astonished to see tears flowing from the right eye of the icon, and collecting on the frame. Then a single large tear came from the left eye.

The monks wiped the tears from the icon's face, then left the church and locked the doors behind them. Three hours later, they returned for Vespers and saw traces of tears on the icon, and a single tear in the left eye. Again they wiped the tears from the icon, but they did not reappear.

Regarding this manifestation of tears as a sign of mercy from the Mother of God, the monks established an annual commemoration of the icon on February 17.
The weeping Tikhvin Icon of Mt. Athos is not to be confused with the original wonderworking Tikhvin Icon (June 26).

Mary's Divine Motherhood
   Friday  Saints February  17 Tertiodécimo Kaléndas Mártii  
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  February 2017
Comfort for the Afflicted
That all those who are afflicted, especially the poor, refugees,
and marginalized, may find welcome and comfort in our communities.
ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Saints of February 01 mention with Popes
865 St. Ansgar (b. 801) The “apostle of the north” (Scandinavia) had enough frustrations to become a saint—and he did. He became a Benedictine at Corbie, France, where he had been educated. Three years later, when the king of Denmark became a convert, Ansgar went to that country for three years of missionary work, without noticeable success. Sweden asked for Christian missionaries, and he went there, suffering capture by pirates and other hardships on the way. Less than two years later he was recalled, to become abbot of New Corbie (Corvey) and bishop of Hamburg. The pope made him legate for the Scandinavian missions. Funds for the northern apostolate stopped with Emperor Louis’s death. After 13 years’ work in Hamburg, Ansgar saw it burned to the ground by invading Northmen; Sweden and Denmark returned to paganism.
He directed new apostolic activities in the North, traveling to Denmark and being instrumental in the conversion of another king. By the strange device of casting lots, the king of Sweden allowed the Christian missionaries to return.  Ansgar’s biographers remark that he was an extraordinary preacher, a humble and ascetical priest. He was devoted to the poor and the sick, imitating the Lord in washing their feet and waiting on them at table. He died peacefully at Bremen, Germany, without achieving his wish to be a martyr.
Sweden became pagan again after his death, and remained so until the coming of missionaries two centuries later.

1645 St Henry Morse Jesuit fought off the plague returned several times to England ministering.  Born in Broome, Suffolk, England, in 1595; died at Tyburn, England, February 1, 1645; beatified in 1929; canonized in 1970 by Pope Paul VI as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.
Saint Henry, like so many saints of his period in the British Isles, was a convert to Catholicism. He was a member of the country gentry, who studied at Cambridge then finished his study of law at Barnard's Inn, London. In 1614, he professed the Catholic faith at Douai. When he returned to England to settle an inheritance, he was arrested for his faith and spent the next four years in New Prison in Southwark. He was released in 1618 when a general amnesty was proclaimed by King James.

Saints of February 02 mention with Popes
  St. Cornelius sent for Peter First bishop of Caesarea.  1st century. Palestine, who was originally a centurion in the Italica cohort of the Roman legion in the area. Cornelius had a vision instructing him to send for St. Peter, who came to his home and baptized him, as described in Acts, chapter ten.
619 St. Lawrence of Canterbury Benedictine Archbishop scourged by St. Peter physical scars.  England, sent there by Pope St. Gregory I the Great. A Benedictine, Lawrence accompanied St. Augustine to Canterbury in 597 and succeeded him as archbishop in 604.  When the Britons lapsed into pagan customs, Lawrence planned to return to France, but in a dream he was rebuked by St. Peter for abandoning his flock. He remained in his see and converted the local ruler King Edbald to the faith. He died in Canterbury on February 2. Lawrence is commemorated in the Irish Stowe Missal and is reported to have been scourged by St. Peter in his dream, carrying the physical scars on his back.
1365 Blessed Peter Cambiano Dominican martyr.   Born in Chieri, Piedmont, Italy, in 1320; died February 2, 1365; beatified in 1856.
Peter Cambiano's father was a city councillor and his mother was of nobility. They were virtuous and careful parents, and they gave their little son a good education, especially in religion. Peter responded to all their care and became a fine student, as well as a pious and likeable child.
Peter was drawn to the Dominicans by devotion to the rosary. Our Lady of the Rosary was the special patroness of the Piedmont region, and he had a personal devotion to her. At 16, therefore, he presented himself at the convent in Piedmont and asked for the habit.       The inquisition had been set up to deal with these people in Lombardy before the death of Peter Martyr, a century before. So well did young Peter of Ruffia carryout the work of preaching among them that the order sent him to Rome to obtain higher degrees. The pope, impressed both by his talent and his family name, appointed him inquisitor-general of the Piedmont. This was a coveted appointment; to a Dominican it meant practically sure martyrdom and a carrying on of a proud tradition.
1640 St. Joan de Lestonnac Foundress many miracles different kinds occurred at her tomb.   After her children were raised, she entered the Cistercian monastery at Toulouse. Joan was forced to leave the Cistercians when she became afflicted with poor health.
She returned to Bordeaux with the idea of forming a new congregation, and several young girls joined her as novices. They ministered to victims of a plague that struck Bordeaux, and they were determined to counteract the evils of heresy promulgated by Calvinism. Thus was formed the Congregation of the Religious of Notre Dame of Bordeaux. In 1608, Joan and her companions received the religious habit from the Archbishop of Bordeaux. Joan was elected superior in 1610, and many miracles occurred at her tomb. She was canonized in 1949 by Pope Pius XII.

Saints of February 03 mention with Popes
Gregory IV (827-44) # 102
Elected near the end of 827; died January, 844. When Gregory was born is not known, but he was a Roman and the son of John. Before his election to the papacy he was the Cardinal-Priest of the Basilica of St. Mark, which he adorned with mosaics yet visible. For his piety and learning he was ordained priest by Paschal I. This man, of distinguished appearance and high birth, was raised to the chair of Peter, despite his protestations of unfitness, mainly buy the instrumentality of the secular nobility of Rome who were then securing a preponderating influence in papal elections. But the representatives in Rome of the Emperor Louis the Pious would not allow him to be consecrated until his election had been approved by their master. This interference caused such delay that it was not, seemingly, till about March, 828, that he began to govern the Church.
576 St. Lawrence of Spoleto Bishop “the Illuminator.” miracle worker  of Spoleto, Italy, also called “the Illuminator.” He was a Syrian, forced to leave his homeland in 514 because of Arian persecution. He went to Rome and was ordained by Pope St. Hormisdas. He then preached in Umbria and founded a monastery in Spoleto. Named bishop of Spoleto, Lawrence was rejected as a foreigner until the city’s gates miraculously opened for his entrance.
He is called “the Illuminator” because of his ability to cure physical and spiritual blindness. After two decades, Lawrence resigned to found the Farfa Abbey near Rome.
865 St. Ansgar 1st Archbishop of Hamburg & Bremen missionary first Christian church in Sweden Patron of Scandinavia  At Bremen, St. Ansgar, bishop of Hamburg and later of Bremen, who converted the Swedes and the Danes to the faith of Christ.  He was appointed Apostolic Delegate of all the North by Pope Gregory IV.
Ansgar was born of a noble family near Amiens. He became a monk at Old Corbie monastery in Picardy and later at New Corbie in Westphalia. He accompanied King Harold to Denmark when the exiled King returned to his native land and engaged in missionary work there. Ansgar's success caused King Bjorn of Sweden to invite him to that country, and he built the first Christian Church in Sweden. He became Abbot of New Corbie and first Archbishop of Hamburg about 831, and Pope Gregory IV appointed him Legate to the Scandinavian countries. He labored at his missionary works for the next fourteen years but saw all he had accomplished destroyed when invading pagan Northmen in 845 destroyed Hamburg and overran the Scandinavian countries, which lapsed into paganism.
1331 Bl. Odoric of Pordenone Franciscan missionary to Mongol Great Khan in Peking miracles performed . Born Odoric Mattiussi at Villanova, near Pordenone, Italy, he entered the Franciscans in 1300 and became a hermit. After several years, he took to preaching in the region of Udine, northern Italy, attracting huge crowds through his eloquence. In 1316 he set out for the Far East, journeying through China and finally reaching the court of the Mongol Great Khan in Peking. From 1322 to 1328 he wandered throughout China and Tibet, finally returning to the West in 1330 where he made a report to the pope at Avignon and dictated an account of his travels. He died before he could find missionaries to return with him to the East. His cult was approved in 1755 owing to the reports of miracles he performed while preaching among the Chinese.
1450 Blessed Matthew of Girgenti .  Matthew became a Conventual Franciscan in his hometown. Then he turned to the Observants and worked zealously under Saint Bernardino of Siena, with whom he became close friends as they travelled together on Bernardino's preaching missions. He himself gained a reputation as a great preacher. Pope Eugene IV forced him to accept the bishopric of Girgenti. Once he accepted it as God's will, he set about reforming the see. As a result of the opposition the changes raised, he resigned the see. Then he was refused admittance to the friary he himself had founded because he was deemed to be too much of a firebrand. Matthew died in a Franciscan friary at Palermo (Attwater2, Benedictines).

Saints of February 04 mention with Popes
1373 St. Andrew Corsini Carmelite gifts of prophecy, miracles papal legate Apostle of Florence miracles at  death.  He was born in Florence on November 30, 1302, a member of the powerful Corsini family. Wild in his youth, Andrew was converted to a holy life by his mother and became a Carmelite monk. He studied in Paris and Avignon, France, returning to his birthplace. There he became known as the Apostle of Florence. He was called a prophet and miracle worker. Named as the bishop of Fiesole in 1349, Andrew fled the honor but was forced to accept the office, which he held for twelve years. He was sent by Pope Urban V to Bologna to settle disputes between the nobles and commoners, a mission he performed well. Andrew died in Fiesole on January 6, 1373. So many miracles took place at his death that Pope Eugenius IV permitted the immediate opening of his cause.
On Rabanus Maurus “A Truly Extraordinary Personality of the Latin West
784-856 Blessed Maurus Magnentius Rabanus; monk; celebrated theological and pedagogical writer Wrote Veni, Creator Spiritus.  A truly extraordinary personality of the Latin West: the monk Rabanus Maurus. Together with men such as Isidore of Seville, the Venerable Bede and Ambrose Auperto, already spoken in previous catechesis, [Rabanus Maurus] knew how to stay in contact with the great culture of the ancient scholars and the Christian fathers during the centuries of the High Middle Ages.
For this reason, Rabanus Maurus concentrated his attention above all on the liturgy, as the synthesis of all the dimension of our perception of reality. This intuition of Rabanus Maurus makes him extraordinarily relevant to our times. He also left the famous “Carmina” proposals to be used above all in liturgical celebrations. In fact, Rabanus' interest for the liturgy can be entirely taken for granted given that before all, he was a monk. Nevertheless, he did not dedicate himself to the art of poetry as an end in itself, but rather he used art and whatever other type of knowledge to go deeper in the Word of God. Because of this, he tried with all his might and rigor to introduce to his contemporaries, but above all to the ministers (bishops, priests and deacons), to the understanding of the profound theological and spiritual significance of all the elements of the liturgical celebration.

1505 St. Joan of Valois Order of the Annunciation that she founded holiness and spiritual testament.  At Bourges in Aquitaine, St. Jane de Valois, Queen of France, foundress of the Order of Sisters of the Annunciation of the blessed Virgin Mary, renowned for her piety and singular devotion to the Cross, whom Pope Pius XII added to the catalogue of saints.
1693 St. John de Britto Jesuit martyr in India. In Marava Kingdom in India, St. John de Britto, priest of the Society of Jesus, who having converted many infidels to the faith, was gloriously crowned with martyrdom.
He was a native of Lisbon, Portugal, was dedicated at birth to St. Francis Xavier, and was a noble friend of King Pedro. He entered the Jesuits at the age of fifteen. In his effort to promote conversions among the native Indian people as a missionary to Goa, he wandered through Malabar and other regions and even adopted the customs and dress of the Brahmin caste which gave him access to the noble classes. In 1683, John had to leave India but returned in 1691. Arrested, tortured, and commanded to leave India, he refused and was put to death. Pope Pius XII canonized him in 1947.

Saints of February 05 mention with Popes
1005 Saint Fingen of Metz Abbot restoring old abbeys.  Saint Fingen, a celebrated Irish abbot, migrated to the kingdom of Lothaire, where he acquired a reputation for restoring old abbeys. One of them, Saint Symphorien's, was given over to him about 991 by Bishop Saint Adalbero and an Irish community. At the insistence of the dowager Empress Saint Adelaide, Pope John XVII issued a charter that declared that only Irish monks would administer the abbey as long as they could be found. She obtained a similar charter from Otto III in 992.
1597 St. Leo Karasuma Martyr of Japan Korean Franciscan tertiary.  At Nagasaki in Japan, the passion of twenty-six martyrs.  Three priests, one cleric, and two lay brothers were members of the Order of Friars Minor; one cleric was of the Society of Jesus, and seventeen belonged to the Third Order of St. Francis.  All of them, placed upon crosses for the Catholic faith, and pierced with lances, gloriously died in praising God and preaching that same faith.  Their names were added to the roll of saints by Pope Pius IX.
who served the Franciscan mission, Louis was crucified at Nagasaki, Japan, with twenty-five companions. He was canonized in 1867.

Saints of February 06 mention with Popes
891 Saint Photius, Patriarch of Constantinople, "the Church's far-gleaming beacon," The Synod of 861 was called to end the unrest, at which the deposition of Ignatius and the installation of Photius as patriarch were confirmed. Pope Nicholas I, whose envoys were present at this council, hoped that by recognizing Photius as patriarch he could subordinate him to his power. When the new patriarch proved unsubmissive, Nicholas anathematized Photius at a Roman council.
Until the end of his life St Photius was a firm opponent of papal intrigues and designs upon the Orthodox Church of the East.
In 864, Bulgaria voluntarily converted to Christianity. The Bulgarian prince Boris was baptized by Patriarch Photius himself. Later, St Photius sent an archbishop and priests to baptize the Bulgarian people. In 865, Sts Cyril and Methodius were sent to preach Christ in the Slavonic language.  lived during the ninth century, and came from a family of zealous Christians.   His father Sergius died as a martyr in defense of holy icons.
1597 Philip of Jesus martyred in Japan patron of Mexico City  Born in Mexico City, Mexico, May 1, 1571; died in Nagasaki, Japan, 1597; beatified by Pope Urban VIII; canonized by Pope Pius IX in 1862; feast day formerly February 5. The life of Saint Philip points again to the importance of the domestic church--the family. Early in life Saint Philip ignored the pious teachings of his immigrant Spanish family, but eventually he entered the Reformed Franciscan Convent of Santa Barbara at Puebla, Mexico--and soon exited the novitiate in 1589. Grieved at the inconstancy of his son, Philip's father sent him on a business trip to the Philippines.

Saints of February 07 mention with Popes
ST THEODORE OF HERACLEA, MARTYR (No DATE?).  The differentiation of two separate Theodores seems to have occurred somewhat earlier than Father Delehaye supposes. An Armenian homily which F. C. Conybeare believes to be of the fourth century already regards them as distinct and Mgr Wilpert has reproduced a mosaic which Pope Felix IV (526—530) set up in the church of St Theodore on the Palatine, in which our Saviour is represented seated, while St Peter on one side presents to Him one St Theodore and St Paul on the other side presents another.


550 St. Tressan Irish missionary spread the faith in Gaul.   Tressan worked there as a swineherd, but he was ordained to the priesthood by Saint Remigius, who provided the siblings with suitable retreats from which they could spread the faith. Tressan became curate of Mareuil-sur-Marne, and the patron saint of Avenay in Champagne. His cultus is strong and has been continuous in the area of Rheims. More than 1,000 years after his death, Pope Clement VIII and Archbishop Philip of Rheims authorized the publishing of an Office for his feast (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Encyclopedia, Fitzpatrick, Kenney, Montague, O'Hanlon).
1027 ST ROMUALD, ABBOT FOUNDER OF THE CAMALDOLESE BENEDICTINES.    Romuald seems to have spent the next thirty years wandering about Italy, founding hermitages and monasteries. He stayed three years in a cell near that house which he had founded at Parenzo. Here he labored for a time under great spiritual dryness, but suddenly, one day, as he was reciting the words of the Psalmist, I will give thee understanding and will instruct thee “, he was visited by God with an extraordinary light and a spirit of compunction which from that time never left him.
He wrote an exposition of the Psalms full of admirable thoughts, he often foretold things to come, and he gave counsel inspired by heavenly wisdom to all who came to consult him. He had always longed for martyrdom, and at last obtained the pope’s licence to preach the gospel in Hungary; but he was stricken with a grievous illness as soon as he set foot in the country, and as the malady returned each time he attempted to proceed, he concluded it was a plain indication of God’s will in the matter and he accordingly returned to Italy, though some of his associates went on and preached the faith to the Magyars.
1447 St. Colette Poor Clare 17 established monasteries  .   After four years of prayer and penance in this cell, she left it. With the approval and encouragement of the pope, she joined the Poor Clares and reintroduced the primitive Rule of St. Clare in the 17 monasteries she established. Her sisters were known for their poverty—they rejected any fixed income—and for their perpetual fast. Colette’s reform movement spread to other countries and is still thriving today. Colette was canonized in 1807.

Saints of February 08 mention with Popes
485 Martyrs of Constantinople community of monks of Saint Dius  .  At Constantinople, the birthday of the holy martyrs, monks of the monastery of Dius.  While bringing the letter of Pope St. Felix against Acacius, they were barbarously killed for their defence of the Catholic faith.
The community of monks of Saint Dius martyred at the time of the Acacian schism ( first significant break between the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Western Catholic Church) for their fidelity to the Holy See (Benedictines).  Monophysites believed that Christ had only one nature: divine. But orthodox belief held that Christ had two natures: both divine and human expressed at the Council of Chalcedon, an ecumenical council held in 451.

1124 Stephen (Etienne) of Grandmont (of Muret) God give Stephen ability read hearts: deacon austere life little food/sleep for 46 years conversions many obstinate sinners.  At Muret, near Limoges, the birthday of the abbot St. Stephen, founder of the order of Grandmont, celebrated for his virtues and miracles.,
Born in Thiers, Auvergne, France, 1046; died 1124; canonized by Pope Clement III in 1189 at the request of King Henry II of England.
1213 John of Matha hermit first Mass celebrated: vision of angel clothed in white with a red and blue cross on his breast. The angel placed his hands on the heads of two slaves, who knelt beside him.   Pope Innocent III had experienced a similar vision Redemption of Captives (the Trinitarians).     St. John of Matha, priest and confessor, founder of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity for the redemption of captives, who went to repose in the Lord on the 17th of December. (RM) Born in Fauçon, Provence, France, June 23, 1160 (or June 24, 1169, according to Husenbeth, or 1154 per Tabor); died in Rome, Italy, December 17, 1213; cultus approved in 1655 and 1694.
1213 ST JOHN OF MATHA, Co-FOUNDER OF THE ORDER OF THE MOST HOLY  TRINITY
1270 Jacoba de Settesoli She joined the third order of Saint Francis buried in same crypt.  Jacqueline, friend of Saint Francis of Assisi, was born into a noble Italian family descended from the Norman knights who invaded Sicily. She married well to Gratien Frangipani, a family renowned for its charity.  When Jacqueline was about 22 (1212), Saint Francis came to Rome for an audience with the pope. While there, he preached so well that he became famous. When Jacqueline heard Francis praise poverty that opens wide the doors of the Kingdom of Heaven, she realized that charity is not dealt with as one would deal with a servant, and that charity is not a fact, but a state. The next day, Jacqueline sought Francis's direction.   Francis told her to return home, she could not abandon her family. "A perfect life can be lived anywhere. Poverty is everywhere. Charity is everywhere. It is where you are that counts. You have a husband and two children. That is a beautiful frame for a holy life."
And, so, Jacqueline joined the third order of Saint Francis; and because she was masculine and energetic she was nicknamed "Brother Jacoba."
1537 St. Jerome Emiliani devoted himself to poor and suffering special call to help orphans founded orphanages shelter for prostitutes.      At Somascha, in the district of Bergamo, the birthday of St. Jerome Emilian, confessor, who was the founder of the Congregation of Somascha.  Illustrious both during his life and after death for many miracles, he was inscribed in the roll of the saints by Pope Clement XIII.  Pope Pius XI chose and declared him to be the heavenly patron of orphans and abandoned children.  His feast is celebrated on the 20th of July.  b: 1481
Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn't care much about God because he didn't need him -- he had his own strength and the strength of his soldiers and weapons. When Venice's enemies, the League of Cambrai, captured the fortress, he was dragged off and imprisoned. There in the dungeon, Jerome decided to get rid of the chains that bound him. He let go of his worldly attachments and embraced God.
1947 St. Josephine Bakhita slave her spirit was always free c. 1868 .  During his homily at her canonization Mass in St. Peter's Square, Pope John Paul II said that in St. Josephine Bakhita, "We find a shining advocate of genuine emancipation. The history of her life inspires not passive acceptance but the firm resolve to work effectively to free girls and women from oppression and violence, and to return them to their dignity in the full exercise of their rights."

Saints of February 09 mention with Popes
444 ST CYRIL, ARCHBISHOP OF ALEXANDRIA DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH.  ST CYRIL has been called the Doctor of the Incarnation, as St Augustine was styled the Doctor of Divine Grace in the great intercession of the Syrian and Maronite Mass he is commemorated as “a tower of truth and interpreter of the Word of God made flesh”. He was declared a doctor of the Universal Church in 1882  and at the fifteenth centenary of his death in 1944 Pope Pius XII issued an encyclical letter, “Orientalis ecclesiae”, on “this light of Christian wisdom and valiant hero of the apostolate.
    The great devotion of this saint to the Blessed Sacrament is manifest from the frequency with which he emphasizes the effects it produces upon those who receive it worthily. Indeed, he says that by holy communion we are made concorporeal with Christ. And it must surely be difficult for those who profess to hold the same faith as that defined in the first six general councils to shut their eyes to the vigour and conviction with which St Cyril before the year 431 affirmed his Eucharistic doctrine. In a letter to Nestorius, which received the general and formal assent of the fathers at Ephesus, he had written:  Proclaiming the death according to the flesh of the only begotten Son of
            God, that is, Jesus Christ, and confessing His resurrection from the dead and
            ascent into Heaven, we celebrate the bloodless sacrifice in our churches and
            thus approach the mystic blessings, and are sanctified by partaking of the holy
            flesh and the precious blood of Christ the Saviour of us all. And we receive
            it, not as common flesh (God forbid), nor as the flesh of a man sanctified and
            associated with the Word according to the unity of merit, or as having a divine
            indwelling, but as really the life-giving and very flesh of the Word Himself
            (Migne, PG., lxxvii, xii).
            And he wrote to Calosyrius, Bishop of Arsinoë:
              I hear that they say that the sacramental consecration does not avail for
            hallowing if a portion of it be kept to another day. In saying so they are crazy.
            For Christ is not altered, nor will His holy body be changed; but the power
            of the consecration and the life-giving grace still remain in it (Migne, PG.,
            lxxvi, 1073).
           Our knowledge of St Cyril is derived principally from his own writings and from the church historians Socrates, Sozomen and Theodoret. The view of his life and work presented by Butler is the traditional view, and we are not here directly concerned with the discussions which, owing mainly to the discovery of the work known as The Bazaar of Heracleides, have since been devoted to the character of Nestorius and his teaching.
566 Bishop Sabinus of Canosa (Canusium) in Apulia   .  At Canossa in Apulia, St. Sabinus, bishop and confessor.  Blessed Pope Gregory tells that he was endowed with the spirit of prophecy and the power of miracles.  After he had become blind, when a cup of poison was offered to him by a servant who was bribed, he knew it by divine instinct.  He, however, declared that God would punish the one who had bribed the servant, and, making the sign of the cross, he drank the poison without anxiety and without harmful effect.
Bishop Sabinus of the now-destroyed city of Canosa (Canusium) in Apulia was a friend of Saint Benedict. Pope Saint Agapitus I entrusted him with an embassy to Emperor Justinian (535-536). He is the patron saint of Bari, where his relics are now enshrined (Benedictines).
1088 Blessed Marianus Scotus extraordinarily gifted at producing manuscripts.   In 1078, he founded and became the abbot of the abbey of Saint Peter in Regensburg. Having successfully taken charge of the church and abbey attached to it for the task of copying manuscripts, other Irish monks were attracted to the mission. The abbey expanded to the point that, within 10 years, plans were made for another such monastery. In this way, Muirdach originated the congregation of 12 "Scottish," that is, Irish monasteries in southern Germany. (The reason for the term "Scottish" is that it was used from the time of the Romans for the Irish. Even 200 years after the establishment of the Scottish monarchy, the term was commonly used for things Irish. Although Scottish monks pressured Pope Leo XIII, who did permit them in 1515 to take possession of Saint James in Regensburg and the abbeys at Constanz and Erfurt. In Germany, the 12 are still known as the Schottenklöster. )
1430 Bl. Alvarez of Córdoba Dominican Confessor preacher born in Cordoba.  
When the antipope Benedict XIII came on the scene in 1394-1423, Alvarez opposed him successfully. Alvarez died about 1430. Blessed Alvarez is probably best remembered as a builder of churches and convents, an activity which was symbolic of the work he did in the souls of those among whom he preached. He founded, in one place, a convent to shelter a famous image of Our Lady, which had been discovered in a miraculous manner. Near Cordova he built the famous convent of Scala Coeli, a haven of regular observance. It had great influence for many years. His building enterprises were often aided by the angels, who, during the night, carried wood and stones to spots convenient for the workmen.The austerities of Alvarez were all the more remarkable in that they were not performed by a hermit, but by a man of action. He spent the night in prayer, as Saint Dominic had done; he wore a hairshirt and a penitential chain; and he begged alms in the streets of Cordova for the building of his churches, despite the fact that he had great favor at court and could have obtained all the money he needed from the queen. He had a deep devotion to the Passion, and had scenes of the Lord's sufferings made into small oratories in the garden of Scala Coeli.
1537 St. Jerome Emiliani b. 1481? in 1928 Pius Xl named him the patron of orphans and abandoned children.        At Somascha, in the district of Bergamo, the birthday of St. Jerome Emilian, confessor, who was the founder of the Congregation of Somascha.  Illustrious both during his life and after death for many miracles, he was inscribed in the roll of the saints by Pope Clement XIII.  Pope Pius XI chose and declared him to be the heavenly patron of orphans and abandoned children.  His feast is celebrated on the 20th of July.  b: 1481. Around 1532 Jerome and two other priests established a congregation dedicated to the care of orphans and the education of youth. Jerome died in 1537 from a disease he caugh t while tending the sick. He was canonized in 1767.
1910 St. Michael Cordero Ecuadorian de La Salle Brother first native vocation there.  Michael of Ecuador (RM) (also known as Miguel of Ecuador and Miguel or Francisco Febres Cordero Muñoz)
Born at Cuenca, Ecuador, on November 7, 1854; died near Barcelona, Spain, on February 9, 1910; beatified with fellow Christian Brother Mutien-Marie by Pope Paul VI on October 30, 1977; canonized by Pope John Paul II on April 7, 1984 (the feast of the order's founder).
  "The heart is rich when it is content, and it is always content when its desires are set upon God." --Saint Miguel of Ecuador.

Saints of February 10 mention with Popes
304 Soteris of Rome the Aureli family martyred for Jesus   . Also at Rome, on the Appian Way, St. Soter, virgin and martyr, descended of a noble family, but as St. Ambrose mentions, for the love of Christ she set at naught the consular and other dignitaries of her people.  Upon her refusal to sacrifice to the gods, she was for a long time cruelly scourged.  She overcame these and various other torments, then was struck with the sword; and joyfully went to her heavenly spouse. Two passages of St Ambrose for our knowledge of this martyr. He speaks of her In his De virginibus, iii, 7, and in his Exhortatio virginis, c. 12. At the same time we know from the Hieronymianum” that she was
         originally buried at Rome on the Via Appia. One of the catacombs, the location of which
         it is difficult to determine, afterwards bore her name. Her body was later on translated by
         Pope Sergius II to the church of San Martino di Monti. See the Acta Sanctorum, February,
         vol. ii, and the
mische Quartalschrift, 1905, pp. 50—63 and 105—133.
1157 St. William of Maleval Hermit licentious military life conversion of heart  gift of working miracles and  prophecy In Stábulo Rhodis, in territorio Senénsi, sancti Guiliélmi Eremítæ.  At Malavalle, near Siena, St. William, hermit.  A native of France, he led a dissolute early and maritial life but underwent a conversion through a pilgrimage to Rome, where he was forced to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land (at the command of Pope Eugenius Ill, r. 1145-1153). Upon his return, he lived as a hermit and then became head of a monastery near Pisa. As he failed to bring about serious reforms among the monks there or on Monte Pruno (Bruno), he departed and once more took up the life of a hermit near Siena. Attracting a group of followers, the hermits received papal sanction. They later developed into the Hermits of St. William (the Gulielmites) until absorbed into the Augustinian Canons. In his later years, William was noted for his gifts of prophecy and miracles.
William of Maleval, OSB Hermit (RM) (also known as William of Malval or Malvalla) Born in France; died at Maleval, Italy, February 10, 1157; canonized by Innocent III in 1202. After carefree years of licentious military life, William experienced a conversion of heart of which we are told nothing. The first real piece of information we have is that the penitent Frenchman made a pilgrimage to the tombs of the apostles at Rome. Here he begged Pope Eugenius III for pardon and to set him on a course of penance for his sins. Eugenius enjoined him to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1145. William followed his counsel and spent eight years on the journey, returning to Italy a changed man.
1960 Blessed Aloysius Stepinac, Cardinal demonstrating the importance of faith, charity and virtue.   (also known as Louis or Alojzije of Zagreb) Born at Brezaric near Krasic, Croatia, on May 8, 1898; died at Krasic, on February 10, 1960; beatified on October 3, 1998, by Pope John Paul II at the Marian shrine of Marija Bistrica.  Aloysius Stepinac, the eighth of 12 children of a peasant family, was always the special object of his mother's prayers to he might be ordained. In 1916, he was conscripted into the Austro-Hungarian army and fought on the Italian front until he was taken prisoner. Upon his return to civilian life in 1919, Stepinac entered the University of Zagreb to study agriculture, but soon recognized his call to the priesthood. In 1924, he was sent to Rome for his seminary studies leading to his ordination on October 26, 1930.
He returned to Zagreb in July 1931 with doctorates in theology and philosophy.
Soon afterwards, Stepinac was chosen to become secretary to Archbishop Antun Bauer. On June 24, 1934, he was nominated as coadjutor to the Archbishop of Zagreb. After this nomination, Stepinac stated: "I love my Croatian people and for their benefit I am ready to give everything, as well as I am ready to give everything for the Catholic Church." After Bauer's death on December 7, 1937, Stepinac became the Archbishop of Zagreb. He took as his motto, "In You, O Lord, I take refuge!" (Psalm 31:1), which was the inspiration for his service to the Church.
During the Second World War, Stepinac never turned his back on the refugees, or the persecuted.


Saints of February 11 mention with Popes
350 St. Lucius Martyred bishop of Adrianople opposed Arianism.  Lucius BM and Companions MM (RM) Died 350. Lucius, who succeeded Eutropius as bishop of Adrianople, was driven from his see to Gaul for having opposed Arianism. He played a leading role in the Council of Sardica in 347. Under the protection of Pope Saint Julius I, he returned to Adrianople, but refused to be in communion with the Arian bishops condemned at Sardica. On this account he was arrested and died in prison. A group of his faithful Catholics, who had been siezed with him, were beheaded by order of the Emperor Constantius (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson).
6th v Saint Gobnata (meaning Honey Bee) of Ballyvourney the angels spoke of 9 deer gift of healing, and there is a story of how she kept the plague from Ballyvourney.  The round stone associated with her is still preserved. Several leading families of Munster have a traditional devotion to this best-known and revered local saint. The devotion of the O'Sullivan Beare family may have been the reason that Pope Clement VIII honored Gobnata in 1601 by indulgencing a pilgrimage to her shrine and, in 1602, by authorizing a Proper Mass on her feast. About that time the chieftains of Ireland were making a final struggle for independence and the entire clan migrated to the North having dedicated their fortunes to Gobnata in a mass pilgrimage that included O'Sullivan Beare, his fighting men, and their women, children, and servants (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Farmer, Montague, Neeson, O'Hanlon, Sullivan).
608 St. Desiderius martyred Bishop of Vienne  France, murdered by the Frankish queen Brunhildis and her followers, and is revered as a martyr. Born at Autun, he is also called Didier. As bishop, he attacked Queen Brunhildis for immorality. She accused him of paganism, but he was cleared by Pope St. Gregory the Great. Desiderius was then banished from his see. He was slain upon his return four years later at Saint-Didier-sur-Chalaronne.
731 Gregory II, 89th Pope educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian (RM).   Born in Rome, Italy; sometimes celebrated also on February 13. The 89th pope, Saint Gregory, became involved in church affairs in his youth, was educated at the Lateran, became a subdeacon under Pope Saint Sergius, served as treasurer and librarian of the Church under four popes, and became widely known for his learning and wisdom.
In 710, now a deacon, he distinguished himself in his replies to Emperor Justinian when he accompanied Pope Constantine to Constantinople to oppose the Council of Trullo canon that had declared the patriarchate of Constantinople independent of Rome and helped to secure Justinian's acknowledgment of papal supremacy.
On May 19, 715, Gregory was elected pope to succeed Constantine, put into effect a program to restore clerical discipline, fought heresies, began to rebuild the walls around Rome as a defense against the Saracens, and helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petronax, which had been destroyed by Lombards about 150 years previously.
 He sent missionaries into Germany, among them Saint Corbinian and Saint Boniface in 719, whom he consecrated bishop.
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817.  Paschal was the son of Bonosus, a Roman. He studied at the Lateran, was named head of St. Stephen's monastery, which housed pilgrims to Rome, and was elected Pope to succeed Pope Stephen IV (V) on the day Stephen died, January 25, 817. Emperor Louis the Pious agreed to respect papal jurisdiction, but when Louis' son Lothair I came to Rome in 823 to be consecrated king, he broke the pact by presiding at a trial involving a group of nobles opposing the Pope. When the two papal officials who had testified for the nobles were found blinded and murdered, Paschal was accused of the crime. He denied any complicity but refused to surrender the murderers, who were members of his household, declaring that the two dead officials were traitors and the secular authorities had no jurisdiction in the case. The result was the Constitution of Lothair, severely restricting papal judicial and police powers in Italy.
Paschal was unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.
Paschal built and redecorated many churches in Rome and transferred many relics from the catacombs to churches in the city. Although listed in the Roman Martyrology, he has never been formally canonized.


Saints of February 12 mention with Popes
381 St. Meletius of Antioch Patriarch of Antioch presided Great Council of Constantinople, in 381 .  In 374, the situation was further complicated when Pope Damasus recognized Paulinus as archbishop, appointed him papal legate in the East, and Saint Jerome allowed himself to be ordained a priest by Paulinus. In 378, the death of the avidly pro-Arian Valens led to the restoration of the banished bishops by Emperor Gratian, and Meletius was reinstated. He was unable to reach an agreement with Paulinus before his death in Constantinople in May while presiding at the third General Council of Constantinople. His funeral was attended by all the fathers of the council and the faithful of the city.
Saint Gregory of Nyssa delivered his funeral panegyric (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Walsh).
Saint Meletius, Archbishop of Antioch, was Bishop of Sebaste in Armenia (ca. 357), and afterwards he was summoned to Antioch by the emperor Constantius to help combat the Arian heresy, and was appointed to that See.
St Meletius struggled zealously against the Arian error, but through the intrigues of the heretics he was thrice deposed from his cathedra. Constantius had become surrounded by the Arians and had accepted their position. In all this St Meletius was distinguished by an extraordinary gentleness, and he constantly led his flock by the example of his own virtue and kindly disposition, supposing that the seeds of the true teaching sprout more readily on such soil.
St Meletius was the one who ordained the future hierarch St Basil the Great as deacon. St Meletius also baptized and encouraged another of the greatest luminaries of Orthodoxy, St John Chrysostom, who later eulogized his former archpastor.
After Constantius, the throne was occupied by Julian the Apostate, and the saint again was expelled, having to hide himself in secret places for his safety. Returning under the emperor Jovian in the year 363, St Meletius wrote his theological treatise, "Exposition of the Faith," which facilitated the conversion of many of the Arians to Orthodoxy.
900 St. Benedict Revelli Benedictine bishop monk of Santa Maria dei Fonte .  Benedict Revelli, OSB B (AC) Died c. 900; cultus confirmed by Pope Gregory XVI. Benedict is said to have been a Benedictine monk of Santa Maria dei Fonti, and then a hermit on the island of Gallinaria in the Gulf of Genoa. In 870, he was chosen bishop of Albenga towards the western end of the Ligurian Riviera (Benedictines).

1584 Bl. Thomas Hemerford English martyr priest native of Dorsetshire .   IT was the name of Thomas Hemerford, with his companions, that distinguished and identified the cause of all the second group of English and Welsh martyrs (beatified in 1929) while that cause was under consideration in Rome. But actually, of the four secular priests who suffered at Tyburn on February 12, 1584, he is the one of whom least is known.  He was born somewhere in Dorsetshire and was educated at St John’s College and Hart Hall in the University of Oxford, where he took the degree of bachelor of law in 1575. He went abroad to Rheims, and thence to the English College at Rome, being ordained priest in 1583 by Bishop GoIdwell of St Asaph, the last bishop of the old hierarchy. A few weeks later he left Rome for the English mission, but shortly after landing he was arrested, tried for his priesthood and sentenced to death. For six days before execution he lay loaded with fetters in Newgate jail, and then met the savagery of hanging, drawing and quartering with calm fortitude. Bd Thomas was a man “of moderate stature, a blackish beard, stern countenance, and yet of a playful temper, most amiable in conversation, and in every respect exemplary”. There suffered with him BD. JAMES FENN, JOHN NUTTER and JOHN MUNDEN, and GEORGE HAYDOCK.These four martyrs, together with the Venerable George Haydock, were all condemned and put to death ostensibly for high treason. What contemporaries thought is shown by the chronicler Stow, when he writes that their treason con­sisted “in being made priests beyond the seas and by the pope’s authority”. And that was the view that the Church took when she beatified them among the other English martyrs in 1929.
1584 St. James Feun, Blessed  English Martyr in Born in Somerset
1584 Bl. John Nutter & John Munden English martyrs 

Saints of February 13 mention with Popes

590 St Stephen of Rieti Abbot admirable sanctity despised all things for the love of heaven extreme poverty privation of all conveniences of life In his agony angels seen surrounding him conducting soul to bliss .  Pope St Gregory the Great in his writings speaks several times of this holy man “whose speech was so rude, but his life so cultured”, and he quotes an instance of his patience. Prompted by the Devil, a wicked man burnt down his barns with the corn that constituted the whole means of subsistence of the abbot and his household. “Alas,” cried the monks, “alas, for what has come upon you!” “Nay,” replied the abbot, “say rather, ‘Alas, for what has come upon him that did this deed’, for no harm has befallen me.” St Gregory also relates that eye­witnesses testified that they saw angels standing beside the saint on his death-bed ,and that these angels afterwards carried his soul to bliss—whereupon the watchers were so awe-stricken that they could not remain beside his dead body.

616 ST LICINIUS, OR LESIN, BISHOP OF ANGERS by the example of his severe and holy life and by miracles which were wrought through him he succeeded in winning the hearts of the most hardened and in making daily conquests of souls for God.. There is, however, no reason to doubt the existence of St Licinius or his episcopate or the reverence in which he was held. Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux (vol. ii, p. 354), while treating the life as a very suspicious document, points out that a letter was written to Licinius in 601 by Pope Gregory the Great and that he is also mentioned in the will of St Bertram, Bishop of Le Mans, which is dated March 27, 616.
1237 Blessed JORDAN of Saxony noted for his charity to the poor from an early age  brought Saint Albert the Great into the Order  Spiritual director of Blessed Diana d'Andalo.   A noted and powerful preacher; one of his sermons brought Saint Albert the Great into the Order. Wrote a biography of Saint Dominic. His writings on Dominic and the early days of the Order are still considered a primary sources. Spiritual director of Blessed Diana d'Andalo.
Born c.1190 at Padberg Castle, diocese of Paderborn, Westphalia, old Saxony; rumoured to have been born in Palestine while his parents were on a pilgrimage, and named after the River Jordan, but this is apparently aprochryphal
drowned 1237 in a shipwreck off the coast of Syria while on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land
Beatified 1825 (cultus confirmed) by Pope Leo XII

1589 St. Catherine de Ricci miracles the "Ecstacy of the Passion" she was mystically scourged & crowned with thorns.  Her patience and healing impressed her sisters. While still very young, Catherine was chosen to serve the community as novice- mistress, then sub-prioress, and, at age 30, she was appointed prioress in perpetuity, despite her intense mystical life of prayer and penance. She managed the material details of running a large household were well, and became known as a kind and considerate superior. Catherine was particularly gentle with the sick. Troubled people, both within the convent and in the town, came to her for advice and prayer, and her participation in the Passion exerted a great influence for good among all who saw it. Three future popes (Cardinals Cervini later known as Pope Marcellus II, Alexander de Medici (Pope Leo XI), and Aldobrandini (Pope Clement VIII)) were among the thousands who flocked to the convent to beseech her intercession.
1812 St. Giles Mary of St. Joseph “Consoler of Naples.” served 53 years at St. Paschal’s Hospice in Naples various roles cook porter most often as official beggar for that community.  People often become arrogant and power hungry when they try to live a lie, for example, when they forget their own sinfulness and ignore the gifts God has given to other people. Giles had a healthy sense of his own sinfulness—not paralyzing but not superficial either. He invited men and women to recognize their own gifts and to live out their dignity as people made in God’s divine image. Knowing someone like Giles can help us on our own spiritual journey.
Quote:  In his homily at the canonization of Giles, Pope John Paul II said that the spiritual journey of Giles reflected “the humility of the Incarnation and the gratuitousness of the Eucharist” (L'Osservatore Romano 1996, volume 23, number 1).


Saints of February 14 mention with Popes
269 Valentine of Terni Valentine patron of beekeepers engaged couples travellers youth.  Valentine was a holy priest in Rome, who, with St Marius and his family, assisted the martyrs in the persecution under Claudius II. He was appre­hended, and sent by the emperor to the prefect of Rome, who, on finding all his promises to make him renounce his faith ineffectual, commanded him to be beaten with clubs, and afterwards to be beheaded, which was executed on February 14, about the year 270. Pope Julius I is said to have built a church near Ponte Mole to his memory, which for a long time gave name to the gate now called Porta del Popolo, formerly Porta Valentini. The greatest part of his relics are now in the church of St Praxedes His name is celebrated as that of an illustrious martyr in the sacramentary of St Gregory, the Roman Missal of Thomasius, in the calendar of F. Fronto and that of Allatius, in Bede, Usuard, Ado, Notker and all other martyrologies on this day. To abolish the heathen’s lewd superstitious custom of boys drawing the names of girls, in honour of their goddess Februata Juno, on the 15th of this month, several zealous pastors substituted the names of saints in billets given on this day.
869 Sts. Cyril and Methodius.  The holy brothers were then summoned to Rome at the invitation of the Roman Pope. Pope Adrian received them with great honor, since they brought with them the relics of the Hieromartyr Clement. Sickly by nature and in poor health, St Cyril soon fell ill from his many labors, and after taking the schema, he died in the year 869 at the age of forty-two. Before his death, he expressed his wish for his brother to continue the Christian enlightenment of the Slavs. St Cyril was buried in the Roman church of St Clement, whose own relics also rest there, brought to Italy from Cherson by the Enlighteners of the Slavs.
1325 Blessed Angelus of Gualdo Camaldolese lay-brother lived 40 years a hermit walled up in his cell OSB Cam. (AC).  In early life he made many pilgrimages, travelling in particular barefoot from Italy to St James of Compostela in Spain. On his return he offered himself as a lay-brother to the Camaldolese monks, but after a very short time received permission to lead a solitary life according to his desire. In this vocation he faithfully persisted for nearly forty years. When he died on January 25, 1325 it is said that the church bells in the neighbouring district rang of themselves: the people scoured the country to discover the cause, and coming to his little cell they found him dead, kneeling in the attitude of prayer. The miracles wrought at his tomb brought many to do him honour, and Pope Leo XII approved the cultus in 1825.

Saints of February 15 mention with Popes
695 St. Decorosus 30 years Bishop of Capua, Italy Council of Rome in 680 .  He attended the Council of Rome in 680 in the reign of Pope St. Agatho.. (The council, attended in the beginning by 100 bishops, later by 174, was opened 7 Nov., 680, in a domed hall (trullus) of the imperial palace and was presided over by the (three) papal legates who brought to the council a long dogmatic letter of Pope Agatho and another of similar import from a Roman synod held in the spring of 680. )
1045 ST SIGFRID, BISHOP OF Växjö: a spring bore Sigfrid’s name was the channel of many miracles.  After a time, St Sigfrid entrusted the care of his diocese to these three and set off to carry the light of the gospel into more distant provinces. During his absence, a troop, partly out of hatred for Christianity and partly for booty, plundered the church of VaxjO and murdered Unaman and his brothers, burying their bodies in a forest and placing their heads in a box which they sank in a pond. The heads were duly recovered and placed in a shrine, on which occasion, we are told, the three heads spoke. The king resolved to put the murderers to death, but St Sigfrid induced him to spare their lives. Olaf compelled them, however, to pay a heavy fine which he wished to bestow on the saint, who refused to accept a farthing of it, notwithstanding his extreme poverty and the difficulties with which he had to contend in rebuilding his church. He had inherited in an heroic degree the spirit of the apostles, and preached the gospel also in Denmark. Sigfrid is said, but doubtfully, to have been canonized by Pope Adrian IV, the Englishman who had himself laboured zealously for the propagation of the faith in the North over one hundred years after St Sigfrid. The Swedes honour St Sigfrid as their apostle.
1237 Bl. Jordan of Saxony thousand novices to the Dominicans established new foundations Germany and Switzerland
        
It was a sermon of Jordan’s that decided Albertus Magnus to enter the order.  Blessed Jordan of Saxony, OP (AC) Born in Germany, 1190; died 1237; cultus confirmed in 1828.
Men prayed for strength to resist Jordan's burning eloquence, and mothers hid their sons when Master Jordan came to town. Students and masters warned each other of the fatal magnetism of his sermons. The sweetness of his character and the holiness of his life shone through his most casual words in a flame that drew youth irresistibly to the ideal to which he had dedicated his own life. In his 16 years of preaching, Jordan is said to have drawn more than a thousand novices to the Dominican Order, among whom were two future popes, two canonized saints (e.g., Albert the Great), numerous beati, and countless intellectual lights of his dazzling century.
1682 St. Claude la Colombière special day for the Jesuits spiritual companion, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque. This is a special day for the Jesuits, who claim today’s saint as one of their own. It’s also a special day for people who have a special devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus—a devotion Claude la Colombière promoted, along with his friend and spiritual companion, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque. The emphasis on God’s love for all was an antidote to the rigorous moralism of the Jansenists, who were popular at the time.
     Claude showed remarkable preaching skills long before his ordination in 1675. Two months later he was made superior of a small Jesuit residence in Burgundy. It was there he first encountered Margaret Mary Alacoque. For many years after he served as her confessor.
     He was next sent to England to serve as confessor to the Duchess of York. He preached by both words and by the example of his holy life, converting a number of Protestants. Tensions arose against Catholics and Claude, rumored to be part of a plot against the king, was imprisoned. He was ultimately banished, but by then his health had been ruined. He died in 1682.
Pope John Paul the Second canonized Claude la Colombière in 1992.

Saints of February 16 mention with Popes
305 St. Juliana of Cumae Christian virgin martyred for the faith refused Roman prefect marriage.   Only after Juliana's death, thanks to the renewed efforts of Bl.  Eva, was the feastday of Corpus Christi accepted by the Latin Rite of the Church.  The pope who authorized the festival was none other than James Pantaleon, now Pope Urban IV, who had earlier confirmed Juliana's inquiry whether such a feast was feasible.  Urban commissioned St. Thomas Aquinas to compose the office of the feastday.  Aquinas's beautiful composition included those ever-popular Eucharistic hymns: the "Lauda Sion", the "Pange Lingua", the "O Salutaris", and the "Tantum Ergo." This feast was long a holy day of obligation.
When miracles were reported in connection with Juliana's tomb, she came to be venerated as a saint.  A local feast in her honor was allowed by Pius IX in 1869, but her feastday has not yet been extended to the whole church.
Thanks to St. Juliana's reverence for the Holy Eucharist, the dark line on the moon of her vision was eliminated.
May we imitate her in our love--and respect--for the real Eucharistic presence of Christ in our tabernacles.
--Father Robert F. McNamara
1189 St. Gilbert of Sempringham priest shared wealth with the poor miracles wrought at his tomb built 13 monasteries (9 were double).  ST GILBERT was born at Sempringham in Lincolnshire, and in due course was ordained priest. For some time he taught in a free school, but the advowson of the parsonages of Sempringham and Terrington being in the gift of his father, he was presented by him to the united livings in 1123. He gave the revenues of them to the poor, reserving only a small sum for bare necessaries. By his care, his parishioners were led to sanctity of life, and he drew up a rule for seven young women who lived in strict enclosure in a house adjoining the parish church of St Andrew at Sempringham. This foundation grew, and Gilbert found it necessary to add first lay-sisters and then lay-brothers to work the nuns’ land. In 1147 he went to Citeaux to ask the abbot to take over the foundation. This the Cistercians were unable to do, and Gilbert was encouraged by Pope Eugenius III to carry on the work himself. Finally Gilbert added a fourth element, of canons regular, as chaplains to the nuns.
1468 BD EUSTOCHIUM OF MESSINA, VIRGIN authority of her virtues was increased by fame of her miracles—the sick being healed even by the kerchief which had been bathed by her tears of penitence. She died at the age of thirty-five.  After eleven years spent at Basico, Bd Eustochium felt that she desired a stricter rule, and Pope Callistus III allowed her to found another convent to follow the first rule of St Francis under the Observants. In 1458—1459 her mother and sister built the convent which was called Maidens’ Hill (Monte Vergine). There she received, amongst others, her sister and her niece Paula, who was only eleven years of age. The foundation passed through many trials during its early years. When Eustochium became thirty—the legal age—she was elected abbess and gathered around her crowds of fervent souls. The authority of her virtues was increased by the fame of her miracles—the sick being healed even by the kerchief which had been bathed by her tears of penitence. She died at the age of thirty-five, her cultus being subsequently approved in 1782.
1940 St. Philip Siphong 7 Thai Catholics martyred for the faith "white-robed army of martyrs."    On October 22, 1989, Pope John Paul II formally beatified the seven Thai Catholics.  Deeply touched by their fidelity, the pope said that Blessed Philip ("the great tree" as he was called at Songkhon) exemplified the missionary zeal that is incumbent upon all of us by virtue of our baptism.  He quoted Sister Agnes' letter to the policeman: "We rejoice in giving back to God the life that He has given us.... We beseech you to open to us the doors of heaven… You are acting according to the orders of men, but we act according to the commandments of God." Sentiments like these, said John Paul II, resembled those of the Christian martyrs of antiquity.  Indeed, their very names were those of ancient saints: Agnes, Lucy, Agatha, Cecilia, Bibiana....
The Blessed Martyrs of Thailand, in "giving back to God the life that He had given them", were therefore contemporary soldiers in the age-old "white-robed army of martyrs." - -Father Robert R McNamara

Saints of February 17 mention with Popes
603   St. Fintan Abbot  .  In the monastery of Cluainedhech in Ireland, St. Fintan, abbot.
Fintan was a hermit in Clonenagh, Leix, Ireland. When disciples gathered around his hermitage he became their abbot.
A wonder worker, Fintan was known for clairvoyance, prophecies, and miracles. He also performed very austere penances.
603 ST FINTAN OF CLONEENAGH, ABBOT even in his boyhood he possessed the gift of prophecy and of a knowledge of distant events.  
IN a tractate preserved in the Book of Leinster St Fintan is presented as an Irish counterpart of St Benedict, and there can be no question as to the high repute in which his monastery of Cloneenagh in Leix was held by his contemporaries. An early litany speaks of “the monks of Fintan, descendant of Eochaid, who ate nothing but herbs of the earth and water; there is not room to enumerate them by reason of their multitude”. Quite in accord with this is a gloss in the Félire of Oengus: “Generous Fintan never consumed during his time aught save the bread of woody barley and muddy water of clay.” The Latin life bears out this description of extreme asceticism, which indeed St Canice of Aghaboe thought excessive and protested against.

Seven Founders of the Order of Servites (RM) 13th century; canonized in 1887 by Pope Leo XIII.
1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption the 7 single vision to withdraw from world forming new society within the Church devoted to prayer and solitudeIn 1233 seven wealthy councilors of the city of Florence, who had previously joined the Laudesi (Praisers), gave up the pleasures of this world in order to devote themselves to God through particular devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Their previous lives had been by no means lax or undisciplined, even though Florence was then a city filled with factions and immorality, and infected by the Cathar heresy (the belief that the body was evil and we are the souls of angels inserted by Satan into human bodies). Under the direction of James of Poggibonsi, who was the chaplain of the Laudesi and a man of great holiness and spiritual insight, they came to recognize the call to renunciation.
On the Feast of the Assumption, 1233, the seven had a single inspiration or vision to withdraw from the world to form a new society within the Church devoted to prayer and solitude.
1302 BD ANDREW OF ANAGNI was held in great veneration both in life and after death for the miracles he was believed to work.   IN the Franciscan supplement to the Roman Martyrology this servant of God is described as “Beatus Andreas de Comitibus”; but it would seem that the more accurate form of his name is Andrea dei Conti di Segni (Andrew of the Counts of Segni). In Mazzara he is called Andrea d’Anagni, from his birthplace. As we learn from these designations he was of noble family, nephew of the Roland Conti who became Pope Alexander IV and a near kinsman of another native of Anagni, Benedict Gaetani, Pope Boniface VIII.

Laying aside all thought of worldly advancement he gave himself to the Order of Friars Minor, in which he remained a simple brother, not even aspiring to the priesthood.

Saints of February 17 mention with Popes


 
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.