Thursday Saints of this Day February  18 Duodécimo Kaléndas Mártii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

St. Simon or Simeon 110
Father was Cleophas St. Joseph's brother: mother was our Lady's sister 8 yrs older than Jesus

SCRIPTURE
My power is made perfect in weakness. -- 2 Corinthians 12:9


Day 9 40 Days for Life

40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Saint Bernadette's Silence (I) February 18 - Saint Bernadette Soubirous (1844 - 1879)
Bernadette was born in a mill, among the noise of grinding wheat.
Her cries disturbed the baptism ceremony held on January 9, the day after her birth.
Was this an omen of the suffering that life had in store for her? Should we at least see it as a symbol?
Her godfather was baffled. On the way home from church he said, "She cries all the time. She will be naughty." But the wailing of a new born baby is not yet speech... Afterwards, many years passed before we can find the slightest echo of her voice. Bernadette did not leave us any of those admirable or silly childish words...
Adapted from Father René Laurentin, Bernadette vous parle (Bernadette Speaks), Mediaspaul, 1972, p. 11

February 18 - Saint Bernadette Soubirous (d. 1879)  
 
“After one has seen her once, one would wish to die to see her again”
 
Bernadette Soubirous was 14 when she saw the Virgin for the first time. In February 1858, when she was collecting wood with two other girls, the Virgin Mary appeared to her in the hollow of the rock of Massabielle, near Lourdes (south of France). Eighteen apparitions took place between February and July 1858.

During the third apparition, on February 18, 1858, the 'beautiful lady' who appeared to Bernadette, spoke. Bernadette held up a writing tablet to her and asked her to write down her name. The Lady said: "It is not necessary," and she added: "I do not promise to make you happy in this world but in the other.
Would you do me the favor of coming here for 15 days?"

Charged with transmitting the message of the Virgin Mary, but not to make people believe it, Bernadette suffered many accusations made by her contemporaries. On July 7, 1866, she joined the Congregation of the Sisters of Charity in Nevers (central France).

It was something to hear her say: "Mary is so beautiful that when one has seen her once, one would wish to die to see her again." She died on April 16, 1879, in Nevers at the age of 35. Her coffin was subsequently opened 3 times and each time her body was found incorrupt.
 
notredamedesneiges.over-blog.com


Thursday, February 18, 2016
Esther C:12, 14-16, 23-25 ; Psalms 138:1-3, 7-8 ;  Matthew 7:7-12 ;
Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.
107 St. Simon or Simeon father was Cleophas St. Joseph's brother. Mother was our Lady's sister 8 yrs older than Jesus
203 St. Charalampias priest Martyr of Magnesia Asia Minor with companions
260 St. Leo & Paregorius Martyrs of Patara in Lycia
295 St. Maximus Martyr with Alexander & others
354 Constance, Attica & Artemia VV MM (RM)
449 St. Flavian of Constantinople martyr Patriarch succeeding St. Proclus cum fidem cathólicam Ephesi propugnáret
632 Helladius of Toledo native minister court of Visigoth kings B (RM)
676 St. Colman of Lindisfarne Irish bishop chief defender of Celtic customs
814 St. Angilbert Benedictine abbot advisor to Charlemagne body was found to be incorrupt  
1166 St. Theotonius Augustinian, trusted canon; royal advisor, all forms of royal corruption opponent  
1455 Blessed John of Fiesole patron of Christian artists  
        St. Lucius African martyr with Classicus & others  
1594 Bl. William Harrington priest Martyr of England
1601 Bl. John Pibush English martyr solely for his priesthood
        Bl. Martin Martyr of China native
        Blessed Agnes De martyred native cradle Christian VM (AC)
1855 Blessed Andrew Nam-Thung native catechist of Cochin-China M (AC)
1858 St. Agatha Lin Chinese martyr
1862 Blessed John Peter French missionary priest & Martin native catechist MM (AC)
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)

Day 9 40 Days for Life
Dear Readers,
Have you ever prayed outside an abortion facility at midnight? What about 2 am? Or 3 am? Right now, there are many 40 Days for Life vigils that take place 24 hours every day.
If you’ve never been to an overnight vigil ... or just want to see what it’s like ... watch this short video, featuring Steve Karlen, our North American campaign director, that was recorded at a 24-hour vigil in Wisconsin.
 
Click on the Link  ... or go to: https://40daysforlife.com/2016/02/18/day-9-sleep-is-overrated/
The natural question can be, “What possible good are you doing out there in the middle of the night? The place is closed … and nobody sees you!” The abortion facility is closed ... but God doesn’t hear or answer prayers based on their business hours. Abortion survives on distraction in our busy world ... and there are no distractions in the still and silent hours of the night.
We saw the power of all-day, all-night prayer during the first 40 Days for Life campaign in Texas in 2004 ... when the Knights of Columbus created the Knight Shift. They committed to pray on the sidewalks outside the abortion business – every night – from 11 pm to 7 am.
There’s something special about the non-stop prayer witness that’s hard to explain. I encourage you to watch this video ... and if you're able, pray at your closest vigil – night or day.
Tempe, Arizona
When pro-abortion Planned Parenthood supporters came to protest the 40 Days for Life vigil, at first glance it looked like a circus had come to town. Lisa in Tempe said the demonstrators included a woman in a pink bikini (it’s Arizona; it’s warm there) and a man in a pink tutu, and their event featured lots of loud music and profanity. Other women danced and jumped while shouting vulgarities about God and religion.
The vigil participants’ only response was continued peaceful prayer – “united in prayer and not divided; all one body, one in hope and one in charity.”
Lisa said the demonstration appeared to be a last-chance effort by Planned Parenthood. “We are making a big difference in Tempe. The Planned Parenthood supporters do not want us there. We will continue on … with prayer and fasting as our only weapons until the battle is won, for the glory of God.”
 
Spring Valley, New York
 “Bitter cold temperatures and winds could not deter those brave people who came every hour on the hour to stand for protecting the most innocent among us,” said Eileen from Spring Valley. This vigil is across from a Planned Parenthood abortion center.
Fortunately, there are life-affirming services that volunteers can rely on to assist women who need help. A pregnancy care center is located nearby … and there’s also a 24-hour hotline available for women looking for options that Planned Parenthood is unwilling to provide. Eileen said these resources “can make all the difference between life and death.”
 
She said the vigil participants “are called to witness with love” – fasting and praying that a predatory business will soon leave their community – and bringing about “the conversion to life of all those involved in this dark culture of death.”
 
Here's today's devotional from Day Gardner, president of the National Black Pro-life Union.
Day 9 intention
May we grow in joy, knowing we serve a living God.
Scripture
And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth. — John 1:14
Reflection from Day Gardner
The Word of God came to us in human form in Jesus Christ. Every time I contemplate this fact I get chills! And I think it is something that we, as Christians, tend to gloss over. I can only imagine how the first disciples felt when they were looking into the eyes of the one and only Almighty God who created them.
The first disciples developed a close relationship with Him as they daily walked and talked with Him. They ate with Him, prayed with Him and rested when He rested. As they listened to the Word of God, who was and is  Jesus....they believed and "beheld His glory."
Today, this is something we can still do because we serve a living God. Remember, Jesus died on the cross but rose from the dead in victory! Jesus is every bit as real and alive for all of us as He was to the first disciples. He wants us to develop a close relationship with Him in the very same way. Jesus wants us to know Him personally. He wants us to walk with Him and talk with Him on a daily basis.
Prayer
Dear Heavenly Father, I thank you for your love and saving grace in Christ Jesus. Help us to realize every day the great blessing we have in our Savior.
I pray that we will rise every morning with excitement and zeal, looking forward to walking another day in your footsteps fully knowing that you continue to dwell among us. Amen.
Printable devotional
To download today's devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share with friends:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day09.pdf
107 St. Simon or Simeon father was Cleophas St. Joseph's brother. Mother was our Lady's sister 8 yrs older than Jesus
Hierosólymis natális sancti Simeónis, Epíscopi et Mártyris; qui fílius Cléophæ et propínquus Salvatóris secúndum carnem fuísse tráditur.  Hic, Hierosolymórum Epíscopus post Jacóbum, fratrem Dómini, ordinátus, et, in Trajáni persecutióne, multis supplíciis afféctus, martyrio consummátus est, ómnibus qui áderant et Júdice ipso mirántibus ut centum vigínti annórum senex fórtiter constantérque supplícium crucis pertulísset.
      At Jerusalem, the birthday of St. Simeon, bishop and martyr, who is said to have been the son of Cleophas, and a relative of the Saviour according to the flesh.  He was consecrated bishop of Jerusalem after St. James, the cousin of our Lord.  In the persecution of Trajan, after having endured many torments, his martyrdom was completed.  All who were present, even the judge himself, were astonished that a man one hundred and twenty years of age could bear the torment of crucifixion with such fortitude and constancy.
In St. Matthew's Gospel, we read of St. Simon or Simeon who is described as one of our Lord's brethren or kinsmen.

His father was Cleophas, St. Joseph's brother and his mother, according to some writers, was our Lady's sister.  He would therefore be our Lord's first cousin and is supposed to have been about eight years older than He. No doubt he is one of those brethren of Christ who are  mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles as having received the Holy Spirit on Pentecost.  Some think that Simeon was the bridegroom for which Jesus changed the water into wine at Cana.
St. Epiphanius says that when the Jews massacred St. James the Lesser, his brother Simeon upbraided them for their cruelty.

The apostles and disciples afterwards met together to appoint a successor to James as bishop of Jerusalem, and they unanimously chose Simeon, who had probably assisted his brother in the government of that church. 
In the year 66 civil war broke out in Palestine, as a consequence of Jewish opposition to the Romans. Christians in Jerusalem were warned of the impending destruction of the city and appear to have been divinely ordered to leave it.
Accordingly that same year, before Vespasian entered Judaea, they retired with St. Simeon at their head to the other side of the Jordan, occupying a small city called Pella. After the capture and burning of Jerusalem, the Christians returned and settled among the ruins until the Emperor Hadrian afterwards entirely razed it.
We are told by St. Epiphanius and by Eusebius that the church here flourished greatly, and that many Jews were converted by the miracles wrought by the saints.
When Vespasian and Domitian had ordered the destruction of all who were of the race of David, St. Simeon had escaped their search; but when Trajan gave a similar injunction, he was denounced as being not only one of David's descendants, but also a Christian, and he was brought before Atticus, the Roman governor. He was condemned to death and, after being tortured, was crucified. Although he was extremely old - tradition reports him to have attained the age of 120 - Simeon endured his sufferings with a degree of fortitude which roused the admiration of Atticus himself.

107 ST SIMEON, Bishop AND MARTYR
IN St Matthew’s Gospel, ch. xiii, we read of St Simon or Simeon who is described as one of our Lord’s brethren or kinsmen. His father was Cleophas, St Joseph’s brother, and his mother, according to some early writers, was our Lady’s sister. He would therefore be our Lord’s first cousin and is supposed to have been about eight years older than He. No doubt he was one of those brethren of Christ who are mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles as having received the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost. St Epiphanius says that when the Jews massacred St James the Lesser, his brother Simeon upbraided them for their cruelty. The apostles and disciples afterwards met together to appoint a successor to James as bishop of Jerusalem, and they unanimously chose Simeon, who had probably assisted his brother in the government of that church.

In the year 66 civil war broke out in Palestine, as a consequence of Jewish opposition to the Romans. The Christians in Jerusalem were warned of the impending destruction of the city and appear to have been divinely ordered to leave it. Accordingly that same year, before Vespasian entered Judaea, they retired with St Simeon at their head to the other side of the Jordan, occupying a small city called Pella. After the capture and burning of Jerusalem, the Christians returned and settled among the ruins until the Emperor Hadrian afterwards entirely razed it. We are told by St Epiphanius and by Eusebius that the church here flourished greatly, and that many Jews were converted by the miracles wrought by the saints.

When Vespasian and Domitian had ordered the destruction of all who were of the race of David, St Simeon had escaped their search but when Trajan gave a similar injunction, he was denounced as being not only one of David’s descendants but also a Christian, and he was brought before Atticus, the Roman governor. He was condemned to death and, after being tortured, was crucified. Although he was extremely old—tradition reports him to have attained the age of 120—Simeon endured his sufferings with a degree of fortitude which roused the admiration of Atticus himself.

The above account of St Simeon, which follows in substance the elogium printed in the Roman Martyrology, is by no means free from difficulty. See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii, and Eusebius, Hist. Eccl., bk iii. No final solution can be arrived at determining the identity of our Lord’s “brethren”. See, e.g. Comely, Introduct. in S. Scrip., vol. iii, 2nd  edn., pp. 595 seq.
Simeon of Jerusalem BM (RM) (also known as Simon of Jerusalem). Not all of Jesus's relatives understood His teaching or recognized His divinity. One who did was Simeon, His first cousin. Tradition says that Simeon was the son of Cleophas (Alpheus, brother to Saint Joseph) and Mary (sister-in-law of the Blessed Virgin).  Some think that Simeon was the bridegroom for which Jesus changed the water into wine at Cana.
Some Christians believe that this Simeon was the same person as Jesus's disciple who was nicknamed 'the Zealot' because he belonged to a party of strongly nationalistic Jews. If Simeon and Simon are one, he was also brother to Saint James the Lesser and Saint Jude, apostles, and of Joseph. If they are identical, Simeon was among the band of followers, who, after His Resurrection, devoted themselves to prayer in Jerusalem until the descent of the Holy Spirit to bless and inspire them all.

Saint Epiphanius relates in Panarion seu adversus LXXX haereses (78, c. 14) that when the Jews massacred Saint James the Lesser in 62 AD, Simeon reproached them for their atrocious cruelty. Simeon was unanimously chosen successor to his brother as patriarch of Jerusalem. He was the natural choice because he had probably assisted his brother in the government of that church.
Tradition says that, like Lot in Sodom, Simeon was supernaturally warned of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in AD 66, and withdrew with many fellow-Christians to the small city of Pella, where they remained until it was safe for them to return to Jerusalem after its destruction in AD 70.
Epiphanius and Eusebius assure us, that the church flourished at Pella, and that multitudes of Jews were converted by the great number of prodigies and miracles wrought in it.

Nevertheless, already during this early period the Church saw the rise of heresy in the form of the Nazareans, who thought Jesus to be the greatest of prophets but only a man, and the Ebonites and Docetists, which seems to be gnostic sects.
The Nazareans joined all the ceremonies of the old law with the new, and observed both the Jewish Sabbath and the Lord's Day (Sunday).

Ebion added other errors to these, which Cerenthus had also espoused, and taught many superstitions, permitted divorces, and allowed of the most infamous abominations.

The authority of Simeon kept the heretics in some awe during his life, which was the longest upon earth of any of our Lord's disciples. But, as Eusebius says, he was no sooner dead than a deluge of execrable heresies broke out of hell upon the Church, which durst not openly appear during his life.

Simeon's life was never free of danger. He escaped the death ordered by Emperors Vespasian and Domitian when they decreed that all of Jewish origin were to be executed, but finally, during the persecutions of Atticus under the Emperor Trajan in 107, Simeon was caught, tortured, and crucified like his Lord. Reputedly, he was well over 100 (120 by most accounts) years old at the time of his death. Atticus and the executioners expressed admiration of Simeon's fortitude and strength in martyrdom. Tradition places the site of his martyrdom in far-flung Persia, Egypt, or the British Isles (Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
In art, Saint Simeon is portrayed as an ancient bishop being crucified (easily confused with Saint Nestor) (Roeder).
203 St. Charalampias priest Martyr of Magnesia Asia Minor with companions
He was a priest taken in the persecution of Emperor Septimius Severus. He was martyred with two soldiers and three women.

Charalampias and Companions MM (AC) Died 203. Saint Charalampias was a priest who was martyred in Magnesia, Asia Minor, together with two soldiers and three women during the persecution of Septimius Severus (Benedictines).

260 St. Leo & Paregorius Martyrs of Patara in Lycia

SS. LEO AND PAREGORIUS, MARTYRS
ACCORDING to their legend these two were close friends, and when Paregorius had suffered martyrdom at Patara in Lycia, Leo was disconsolate at being deprived of the happiness of sharing his victory. But Lollian, the governor of Lycia, published an edict obliging all men to offer sacrifice on the festival of Serapis. Now the mysteries celebrated in honour of this deity were of such a licentious character that the Roman senate had at one time ordered them to be abolished. St Leo, on his way to the martyr’s tomb, had to pass the temple of Serapis, and was greatly distressed to see amongst the crowds some whom he knew to be Christians, but who were led by fear to join in the worship of the false god. Soon after his return from his friend’s tomb he fell asleep and had a dream in which it was revealed to him that God was calling him to a conflict similar to that which St Paregorius had endured. Filled with exultation, he determined that the next time he visited the martyr’s grave he would not go through by-roads, but would make his way openly through the city. As he crossed the market-place, he saw that the Tychaeum or Temple of Fortune was illuminated with lanterns and candles. In his zeal for God he did not scruple to pull down all the lanterns he could reach and to trample the tapers under foot. When the priest cried out to the people, “If this sacrilege is not punished, the goddess Fortune will withdraw her protection from the city.”
St Leo exclaimed, “Let the idol take vengeance if it can!”
The report of these proceedings soon reached the governor, who commanded that St Leo should be brought before him, and charged him with impiety to the gods and to the emperors. The martyr replied calmly, “You are mistaken in supposing that there are many gods: there is only one God, who is Lord of Heaven and earth and who does not require men to worship Him in the gross way that men worship idols”—“Answer the charges that are brought against you “, said the governor, “this is not the time to preach your Christianity. Either sacrifice to the gods or else suffer the punishment due to impiety.” Leo answered, “The fear of torment shall never deter me from my duty. I am quite prepared to suffer whatever you may inflict: all your tortures cannot reach beyond death. Eternal life can only be won through tribulation, for, as the Holy Scriptures teach us, narrow is the way that leadeth to life.”—“Since you own that the path you tread is narrow,” retorted the governor, “exchange it for ours which is broad and easy.”—“I called it narrow” said the saint, “because it is hard to enter and because at the beginning it is often beset with afflictions and persecution. But when once it has been entered, it can be kept to without great difficulty through the practice of virtue which helps to widen it and makes it easier—as many have discovered.”

The people cried out to the judge to silence him, but Lollian protested that he was willing to allow him liberty of speech and would even befriend him if he would only sacrifice. The confessor replied, “Would you have me acknowledge as a god that which has nothing divine about it?” Then the governor, losing patience, ordered Leo to be scourged. Whilst the executioners were tearing his body, Lollian, who pitied his old age, continued to urge him at least to say that the gods were great. Leo retorted, “If I say they are great, it is only with reference to their power to destroy their worshippers”. The judge threatened to have him dragged over rocks and stones, but the martyr said, “You do nothing but threaten: why do you not carry out your threats?” By this time the mob had become clamorous, and Lollian sentenced Leo to be tied by the feet, dragged to the torrent and there executed. Before he died, the martyr thanked God that he was not long separated from Paregorius, commended his soul to the care of the angels, and prayed for his enemies. After his death the executioners threw the body down a precipice but the Christians recovered it, unbruised and entire. It was noticed that his face was quite peaceful and appeared to be smiling.

This passion has been included by Ruinart in his collection of Acta sincera. Later criticism has not endorsed this favourable view. The story must probably be classed among the historical romances which were so widely disseminated both in East and West from the fifth century onwards (Delehaye, Les Légendes Hagiographiques, 1927, p. 114). Lollian was, no doubt, an historical personage, but that does not make the story true. A Latin rendering of the “acts” will be found in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii. The original Greek may be consulted in Migne, PG., vol. cxiv, cc. 1452—1461.
Paregorius was martyred first, and when Leo protested a pagan festival near Paregorius’ grave, he was martyred.
Leo and Paregorius MM (AC) Died c. 260. Saint Leo witnessed the martyrdom of Saint Paregorius at Patara, Lycia, and found his heart divided between joy for his friend's glorious victory, and sorrow to see himself deprived of the happiness of sharing in it.  In the absence of the proconsul of Asia, the governor of Lycia demonstrated his piety to the gods by publishing an order obliging all citizens to offer sacrifice to Serapis. Leo, sad to see both the pagans and some Christians going to adore the idol, went to the tomb of Saint Paregorius and passed the temple of Serapis en route.

The heathens that saw him knew that his was a Christian because of his modesty. From his youth, Leo had practiced austerity and the devotions of an ascetic life. Returning home he fell asleep and dreamed that God was calling him to martyrdom, too.

The next time he visited Paregorius's tomb he walked boldly through the market place and passed the temple of Fortune, which he saw illumined by lanterns. He pitied their blindness and, moved with zeal for the living God, broke many of the lanterns and trampled on the tapers, saying, "Let your gods revenge the injury if they are able to do it." The priest of the temple cried out, "Unless this impiety be punished, the goddess Fortune will withdraw her protection from the city."

An account of the affair soon reached the governor's ears. He ordered the saint brought before him, and said: "Wicked wretch, your sacrilegious action surely bespeaks that you are either ignorant of the immortal gods, or downright mad, in flying in the face of our most divine emperors, whom we justly regard as secondary deities and saviors."

The martyr replied, "You are under a great mistake, in supposing a plurality of gods; there is but one, who is the God of heaven and earth, and who does not stand in need of being worshipped after that gross manner that men worship idols. The most acceptable sacrifice we can offer him is that of a contrite and humble heart."

Offered the choice of sacrificing or dying, Leo chose the narrow way rather than the broad, commodious path offered by the governor. "When I called it narrow," said the martyr, "this was only because it is not entered without difficulty, and that its beginnings are often attended with afflictions and persecutions for justice' sake. But being once entered, it is not difficult to keep in it by the practice of virtue, which helps to widen it and render it easy to those that persevere in it, which has been done by many."

After continued debate, the saint was mercilessly scourged. The governor relented because of Leo's venerable age and told him he would only have to acknowledge the gods and not sacrifice, but still Leo refused. He was then dragged by his feet to his place of execution. After his death his executioners threw his body over a precipice into a deep pit, but it received only a few bruises. The Christians recovered Leo's body and found it of a lively color, and entire, and his face appeared comely and smiling, and they buried it in the most honorable manner they could (Benedictines, Husenbeth).

295 St. Maximus Martyr with Alexander & others
Apud Ostia Tiberína sanctórum Mártyrum Máximi et Cláudii fratrum, et Præpedígnæ, uxóris Cláudii, cum duóbus fíliis Alexándro et Cútia; qui, cum essent præclaríssimi géneris, omnes, jubénte Diocletiáno, tenti atque in exsílium deportáti sunt, ac deínde, incéndio concremáti, Deo ipsi odoríferum martyrii sacrifícium obtulérunt.  Eórum relíquiæ, in flumen projéctæ et a Christiánis perquisítæ, juxta eándem civitátem sepúltæ sunt.
      
At Ostia, the holy martyrs Maximus and his brother Claudius, and Praepedigna, the wife of Claudius, with her two sons Alexander and Cutias.  Although all of a noble birth, by the order of Diocletian, they were apprehended and sent into exile.  Afterwards being burned alive, they offered to God the sweet sacrifice of martyrdom. 
Their remains were cast into the river, but the Christians found them and buried them near the city.
Claudius, Cutias, and Praepedigna. Nothing can be documented about their sufferings under Emperor Diocletian.
295 St. Lucius African martyr with Classicus & others
In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Lúcii, Silváni, Rútuli, Clássici, Secundíni, Frúctuli et Máximi.
In Africa, the holy martyrs Lucius, Sylvanus, Rutulus, Classicus, Secundinus, Fructulus, and Maximus. 
Fructulus, Maximus, Rutulus, Secundinus, and Silvanus.

Lucius, Silvanus, and Companions (RM) Dates unknown. Lucius, Silvanus, Tutilus, Classicus, Secundinus, Fructuosus, and Maximus were African martyrs whose names were inserted in the Roman Martyrology by Baronius on the authority of a reliable manuscript (Benedictines).

Maximus, Claudius, Praepedigna, Alexander & Cutia MM (RM) Died 295. Praepedigna was the wife of Claudius; Alexander and Cutia, their children. They were said to have been martyred in Ostie (Ostia) under Diocletian but their legend seems to be no more than a pious fiction (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

354 Constance, Attica & Artemia VV MM (RM)
Constance was engaged to be married to Saint Gallican, the brother of Attica and Artemia (Encyclopedia).

449 St. Flavian of Constantinople martyr Patriarch  succeeding St. Proclus cum fidem cathólicam Ephesi propugnáret,
Constantinópoli sancti Flaviáni Epíscopi, qui, cum fidem cathólicam Ephesi propugnáret, ab ímpii Dióscori factióne pugnis et cálcibus percússus est, et, in exsílium actus, ibídem post tríduum vitam finívit.
  At Constantinople, St. Flavian, bishop, who, for having defended the Catholic faith at Ephesus, was attacked with slaps and kicks by the faction of the impious Dioscorus, and then driven into exile where he died within three days.

449 ST FLAVIAN, PATRIARCH OF CONSTANTINOPLE, MARTYR
ST Flavian, priest and treasurer of the church of Constantinople, succeeded St Proclus as patriarch or archbishop in 447. The chamberlain Chrysaphius, a special favourite with the Emperor Theodosius II, suggested to his master that he should require a present of Flavian as an expression of gratitude to the emperor for his promotion. The bishop sent him some blessed bread, according to the custom of the Church at that time, as a benediction and symbol of communion. Chrysaphius intimated that it was a very different sort of present which was expected. St Flavian answered resolutely that the revenues and treasure of the Church were designed for other uses. From that moment the favourite resolved to compass his ruin. Chrysaphius persuaded the emperor, through his wife Eudocia, to order the patriarch to make St Pulcheria, sister to Theodosius, a deaconess of his church, and so get rid of her influence over her brother. Flavian’s avoidance of this was a second offence in the eyes of Chrysaphius, who was still further incensed by the saint’s condemnation of the errors of Eutyches, abbot of a monastery near the city. The abbot, in his excessive zeal against Nestorius’s heresy of two distinct persons in Christ, had rushed to the other extreme and, denying that our Lord had two distinct natures after the Incarnation, was the protagonist of the monophysite heresy. In a synod held by St Flavian in 448, Eutyches was accused of this error by Eusebius of Dorylaeum, and the opinion was there condemned as heretical, Eutyches being cited to appear before the council to give an account of his faith. He eventually did so, and was deposed and excommunicated. Whereupon he declared that he appealed to the bishops of Rome, Egypt and Jerusalem; and he addressed a letter to St Leo I in which he complained of the way he had been treated and stated his case. But the pope was not misled. In a carefully-worded letter to Flavian, famous in ecclesiastical history as his “Tome” or “Dogmatic Letter”, Leo set out the orthodox faith upon the principal points in dispute.

A further council having confirmed the findings of the first one, Chrysaphius, baffled but not beaten, sought to gain his ends by other means. He wrote to Dioscorus, St Cyril’s successor in the see of Alexandria, promising him his friend­ship and support if he would undertake the defence of the deposed abbot against Flavian and Eusebius. Dioscorus fell in with the proposal, and they used their interest with the Empress Eudocia, who hoped that by striking at Flavian she would mortify her sister-in-law Pulcheria. Theodosius was prevailed on to summon another council which should be held at Ephesus. Dioscorus of Alexandria was invited by the emperor to preside, and with him came a number of his bishops and also of lay supporters who, it seems, were simply an organized gang of roughs. Other Eastern bishops were present, and Pope St Leo sent legates.

This assembly at Ephesus, which is commonly called by the name Leo after­wards gave it, the Latrocinium or Robber Synod, on account of the violence that accompanied it, opened on August 8, 449.  Eutyches was there, and two officials from the emperor with a considerable body of soldiers. Everything was carried on by violence and open faction in favour of Eutyches, and the pope’s legates were not allowed to read his letters to the council. Amidst wild disorder the result of these proceedings was a sentence of deposition against Flavian and Eusebius. The papal legates protested. When Dioscorus began to read the sentence he was interrupted by several of the bishops, who besought him to proceed no further in so unwarrantable a course. Dioscorus started up and called loudly for Elpidius and Eulogius, the imperial commissioners, who without more ado ordered the church doors to be opened, thus giving admittance to Proclus, the proconsul of Asia, who entered surrounded by soldiers and followed by a mob with clubs. The assembly was so intimidated that, when the bishops were required to subscribe, few or none had the courage to withstand the threats of Dioscorus except the pope’s legates who loudly protested and left in disgust.

St Flavian was able to appeal to Pope Leo and the other bishops in the West, and to deliver his written acts of appeal to the legates. But during the confusion and disorder he was thrown to the ground and, egged on it is said by Dioscorus himself and the abbot Barsumas, he was kicked and beaten so severely by the soldiers and roughs that he died very shortly after—not at Ephesus as some have supposed but in his place of exile near Sardis in Lydia. The triumph of Chrysa­phius was short-lived. The Emperor Theodosius died in the following year, and Chrysaphius was executed by order of Marcian, whose consort St Pulcheria had St Flavian’s body brought to Constantinople with great honour to be buried among his predecessors in the see. He was vindicated at the great Council of Chalcedon in 451, when Eusebius of Dorylaeum was reinstated and Dioscorus of Alexandria deprived of his see and exiled.

Despite the copious materials, supplemented in recent years by fresh Syriac documents, which we possess regarding St Flavian and the “Robber Council” of Ephesus, some of the evidence is contradictory and many points still remain obscure. A very full discussion of these matters will be found in the text and notes of Hefele.-Leclercq, Histoire des Conciles, vol. ii, pp. 499—880. The Roman Martyrology does not explicitly call St Flavian a martyr, but it says that he was attacked “by the faction of the impious Dioscorus with blows and kicks and driven into exile where after three days he died”. There is, however, some conflict of evidence as to the occasion and manner of his death.
At Constantinople, St. Flavian, bishop, who, for having defended the Catholic faith at Ephesus, was attacked with slaps and kicks by the faction of the impious Dioscorus, and then driven into exile where he died within three days.
from 446 or 447, succeeding St. Proclus. Refusing to give Em­peror Theodosius II a bribe upon becoming patriarch and making the emperor’s sister Pulcherius a deaconess, Flavian received hostile treat­ment from the imperial court. Flavian also started the condemnation of Eutyches, who began the heresy of Monophysitism. This led to his being deposed and exiled at the so-called “Robber Synod” at Ephesus in 449, whereupon the famous “Tome” of dogmatic letters of Pope Leo I the Great was ignored. Appealing to the Pope, Flavian was beaten so mercilessly that he was mortally wounded and died three days later in exile. He was proclaimed a saint and martyr by the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

Flavian of Constantinople BM (RM) Died in Hypepe, Lydia, 449. Appointed patriarch of Constantinople to succeed Saint Proclus in 447, Flavian incurred the enmity of Chrysaphius, chancellor of Emperor Theodosius III, by withholding the customary bribe on his accession to the see and that of the emperor himself by refusing to make his sister, Pulcheria, a deaconess. It was not long before Flavian crowned these political nightmares by denouncing the heresy of Eutyches, abbot of a nearby monastery and a favorite of the imperial court (he was godfather to Chrysaphius).
Flavian maintained that Jesus was fully human against those like Eutyches who taught that he had only a divine nature. The condemnation was repeated by Eusebius of Dorylaeum at a synod called by Flavian in 448, and Eutyches was deposed and excommunicated. In this Flavian was supported by Pope Leo the Great who sent Flavian a letter, which we now call the 'Tome of Leo,' asserting that in Jesus Christ 'there was born true God in the entire and perfect nature of true man.'

Chrysaphius persuaded Theodosius to convene a council at Ephesus (the 'Robber Synod') in 449. Dioscorus of Alexandria presided, and in meetings characterized by violence and intimidation, the emperor's soldiers refused to allow Leo's letter to be read. Eusebius and Flavian were deposed and Dioscorus was declared patriarch. The order was enforced by the soldiers who required each bishop present to sign the deposition order. Flavian was so badly beaten that he died three days later in prison.

the acts of this 'robber synod' were reversed when Theodosius died in 450 and the Council of Chalcedon in 451 reinstated Eusebius, deposed and exiled Dioscoros, and proclaimed Flavian a saint and a martyr. Upon his accession to the throne in 451, Emperor Marcian had Chrysaphius executed (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia)

632 Helladius of Toledo native minister court of Visigoth kings B (RM)
 Toléti, in Hispánia, sancti Helládii, Epíscopi et Confessóris, qui a sancto Ildefónso, Toletáno Episcopo, multis láudibus celebrátur.
       At Toledo, Spain, St. Helladius, bishop and confessor, who received much praise from St. Ildefonse, Bishop of Toledo.
Helladius, a native of Toledo, Spain, and a minister of the court of the Visigoth kings, loved to pay frequent visits to the abbey of Agali (Agallia) near Toledo on the banks of the Tagus River. One day he joined the community and eventually in 605 was made its abbot. In 615, he was promoted to archbishop of Toledo (Benedictines).
633 ST HELLADIUS, ARCHBISHOP OF TOLEDO
ST HELLADIUS in early life as a layman was attached to the court of the Visigothic kings. Not only was he a learned man but he was also an able diplomatist; he became a royal official, and in that capacity he attended the Council of Toledo in 589 and was one of its signatories. Even at that period he had aspirations after the religious life, and St Ildephonsus, who was afterwards ordained deacon by him, describes how he loved to slip away to the monastery of Agali near the banks of the Tagus. There he would assist the brethren in their labours and help them to carry home the sheaves of corn. After some time, the call became so insistent that he abandoned the world altogether and entered the monastery. In 605 he was elected abbot and when, after the death of Archbishop Aurasius in 615, the vacant see was pressed upon him, he accepted with the greatest reluctance. He showed boundless generosity to the poor, but we have few, if any, other details of his episcopate. Some writers have conjectured that it was Helladius who instigated King Sisebut to expel the Jews from his kingdom, but there is no positive evidence to go upon. He died in 633.

See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii, and cf. Gams, Kirchengeschichte von Spanien, vol. ii, Pt 2, pp. 82 seq.
676 St. Colman of Lindisfarne; Irish bishop of Lindisfarne; chief defender of Celtic customs
England a disciple of St. Columba. He was born in Connaught, Ireland. At the Synod of Whitby Colman defended the Celtic ecclesiastical practices against St. Eilfrid and St. Agilbert.
When King Oswy introduced the Roman rites, Colman refused to accept the decision and led a group of Irish and English monks to the Isle of Innishboffin, near Connaught. In time he moved the English monks to Mayo. Colman was praised by Blessed Alcuin and St. Bede.
676 ST COLMAN, BISHOPof LINDISFARNE
ST COLMAN, the third bishop of Lindisfarne, equalled St Aidan and St Finan in piety and zeal; like them, he was a native of Ireland and had been a monk of St Columba’s on the island of Iona. His short episcopal rule of three years’ duration is, however, chiefly remembered from the part he took in the Synod of Whitby. Differences of discipline and custom between the adherents of the Celtic tradition in the Church and those who followed the Roman use had been the cause of disputes for some years, but the question came to a head when King Oswy of Northumbria found that one year when he and his subjects were keeping Easter, his wife Eanfleda and her Kentish chaplain were observing the day as Palm Sunday. This question of the date of Easter was the burning one. To settle the matter once for all, a synod was in 663 or 664* [*Following Bede, the date of the important synod of Whitby is generally given as 664. According to our system of reckoning it was perhaps in the autumn of 663: see F. M. Stenton, Anglo-Saxon England, p. 129. But cf. W. Levison, England and the Continent (1946), pp. 265 seq.] called at Whitby at the instance of King Oswy, and whilst St Wilfrid and the Frankish bishop St Agilbert defended the Roman cause St Colman upheld the Scottish use. Colman alleged the example of his predecessors and of St Columba himself, and claimed that practice to have been established in Asia by St John the Evangelist: which assertion it would have been a difficult task to prove, as Alban Butler gently observes. Agilbert, pleading himself unpractised in English, asked St Wilfrid to reply for him. He accordingly pointed out to the assembly at some length that Colman and his followers would be at fault did they refuse to follow the instructions of the Apostolic See, and claimed that the whole of the rest of the Church followed the Roman use: “Only these people [i.e. the Irish] with their confederates the Picts and the Britons, inhabitants of two islands in the farthest west—and not even all of them—persistently stand out against the whole world.” It is so that Bede reports Wilfrid’s somewhat intemperate words, St Wilfrid concluded his fighting speech by quoting our Lord’s commission to Peter “Thou art Peter...” Oswy asked Colman if it were true that these words were spoken. “It is true,” answered Colman. Then said the king, “Can you show any such power given to your Columba?” “None.”—“Do you all”, asked Oswy, “on both sides admit that our Lord said this particularly to Peter, and that the Lord gave him the keys of the kingdom of Heaven?” They replied: “We do,” “Then”, he concluded, “I declare that I will not oppose this keeper of the gate of Heaven, and that I will obey his orders to the utmost of my power lest he shut that gate against me.”
This resolution of the king was approved by the assembly.* [*The form of the tonsure was also discussed the Celtic monks shaved the part of the head in front of a line drawn over the crown from ear to ear. There was also supposed to be something the matter with the way they baptized. The synod of Whitby marked the end of the paschal controversy in the West, but as in other like disputes there was more than matters of discipline at stake. St Wilfrid definitely led the churches of the British Isles towards closer dependence on Rome. Had both “Celts” and “Romans” previously shown more of the Roman tolerance, the acerbities and damage of their controversy would have been considerably less. Some of the arguments used on either side would not hold water. Italy, Gaul and Egypt all kept Easter on different dates at the end of the fourth century, to name no other variations even today some Eastern Catholics celebrate the feast by the discarded Julian computation.]

St Colman, however, could not bring himself to accept the decision, and he preferred to resign his bishopric. With all the Irish monks of Lindisfarne and thirty of the Englishmen he withdrew, first to Iona and then to Ireland, where he founded a monastery on the Isle of Inishbofin, off the coast of Connacht. Here they could continue to carry out their traditional use, for the authorities in Rome were not disposed to press a point which involved no question of doctrine they trusted that time would bring about the gradual adoption of the practice of the rest of the Church—and the event proved their wisdom.

Even now, St Colman’s troubles were not over, for his English and Irish monks could not get on together. The Englishmen complained that the Irishmen left them to do the work of har­vesting and then expected to enjoy the fruit of their labours. The saint decided to found a second house, and built a monastery at Mayo on the mainland to which he transferred the English monks. He remained abbot over the two communities until his death in 676.

St Bede could not bear the “strange practices” of the Celtic churchmen, but neither could he resist the fragrant memory of St Colman and his monks, and he wrote a long generous tribute to them. “The whole care of those teachers was to serve God, not the world, to feed the soul rather than pamper the belly . . . so that wherever any priest or monk went all gladly received him as God’s servant.”   St Colman’s feast is observed in the diocese of Argyll and the Isles.

The story is told in Bede, Eccl. Hist., bk iii, caps 25 and 26, and bk iv, cap. 4. On the paschal controversy among the Celts, see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lxiv (1946), pp. 200~244 ; and cf. MacNaught’s Celtic Church and the See of Peter (1927), pp. 68—93. The Colmans in the Irish martyrologies are innumerable, and it does not seem quite certain that the “chaste Colman” who left his native land and who is commemorated in the Félire of Oengus on February 18 is to be identified with this Colman. We are told in the Life of St Carthage that some of his monks were working beside a stream. The one in charge called out, “Colman, get into the water”. Twelve jumped in.
Colman of Lindisfarne B (AC) Born in Connaught, Ireland, c. 605; died on Inishbofin, 676 (some chronicles give it as 672, 674, or 675; some parts of Ireland celebrate his feast on August 8.  Saint Colman became a monk at Iona under Saint Columba and c. 661 succeeded Saint Finan as the third abbot-bishop of Lindisfarne, the most important monastery in Northumbria, England, close to the royal castle at Bamburg. At that time the disagreement in Northumbria about the date of Easter, style of tonsure, the role of the bishop, and other Celtic ecclesiastical usages had reached a critical stage, and in 664 a synod met at Whitby Abbey under Saint Hilda to settle the matter.

Saint Colman was the chief defender of the Celtic customs; Saints Wilfrid and Agilbert those of Rome. King Oswy of Northumbria came favoring the Irish view, but accepted Wilfrid's argument in favor of adopting the practice of the rest of the known contemporary Church. Thereupon Colman, refusing to accept the king's ruling in a spiritual matter, resigned his bishopric and retired, first to Iona and then (c. 667) to Inishbofin off the Connaught coast. All his Irish monks and 30 English monks went with him and brought with them some of the relics of Saint Aidan.

But the two elements of the community disagreed among themselves because, as Saint Bede reports, the English complained that all the work of the harvest was left to them. Apparently, each summer the Irish monks went off, leaving the Anglo-Saxons to plant and harvest the fields. So, Colman made a separate foundation for the English monks on the mainland called Mayo of the Saxons. The first abbot of Mayo after Colman was an Englishman, Saint Gerald, who lived until 732. Bede praises the fact that the abbots of Mayo were elected, rather than following the Celtic custom as a "hereditary" monastery.

Saint Bede, who was not in sympathy with the distinctively Celtic practices, gives a glowing account of the church of Lindisfarne under Saint Colman's rule. He emphasizes the example of frugality and simplicity of living set by the bishop and the complete devotion of his clergy to their proper business of imparting the word of God and ministering to their people.

Blessed Alcuin also praised the monks of the Mayo of the Saxons for leaving their homeland in voluntary exile, where they shone by their learning among a "very barbarous nation" (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Montague).

814 St. Angilbert Benedictine abbot advisor to Charlemagne body was found to be incorrupt

814 ST ANGILBERT, ABBOT.  There is no satisfactory evidence that at that time he was either monk or priest it is indeed not certain that he ever was a priest.
THE early career of St Angilbert gave no indication of the sanctity to which he afterwards is said to have attained. Brought up at the court of Charlemagne and educated by Alcuin, he grew up a brilliant and able but worldly young man. Classical nicknames were in vogue amongst the aristocratic young highbrows of the time, and Angilbert was known as “Homer”. His Latin verses were greatly admired by his contemporaries, and they prove that he possessed something of the poetic genius; but he was far removed from Homer. So greatly was he loved by Charlemagne, that it was said of him that he was the monarch’s second self. Al­though destined eventually for an archbishopric, he is stated by his biographer Anscher to have married Bertha, a daughter of the king, and the monk Nithard distinctly claimed that he and his brother Harnid were the sons of Angilbert and Bertha. On the other hand Eginhard never even mentions Angilbert in his Life of Charlemagne—a strange omission if he had been Charlemagne’s son-in-law, but natural enough if the union had been a mere intrigue, as it may well have been in that licentious court.

   According to his biographer it was a dangerous illness that first turned Angil­bert’s thoughts towards the religious life. Amongst the offices he is said to have held was that of count or protector of the maritime provinces against the Northmen, who were a constant menace. We are told that on one occasion he had to cope with a most dangerous invasion when the Danes actually sailed up the Somme. On the eve of battle, St Angilbert went to implore aid at the tomb of St Riquier in the monastery of Centula, near Amiens, and he then vowed that, if successful, he would himself become one of the monks. His prayer was answered by a violent storm which utterly disorganized the enemy’s fleet and made the defeat of the invaders an easy matter. Angilbert carried out his vow, and Bertha also entered a convent. It must be confessed, however, that the whole story is very doubtful. In any case the king continued to shower favours upon him: he invested him with the revenues of Centula and helped him to rebuild the abbey with great magnificence, and he made him his privy councillor as well as chief court chaplain, and entrusted him with important missions to Rome and elsewhere. Angilbert did, however, spend his last years as a monk of Centula, of which he soon became abbot. He built a fine library, and instituted amongst his monks the laus perennis, or continuous choir service whereby the praise of God never ceased by day or night. He lived to a great age, but managed to travel to court to append his signature to the last will and testament of his great earthly patron, who made him one of his executors. But Angilbert took to his bed immediately after his return, and died twenty-two days after the death of Charlemagne.

The two late medieval biographies of Angilbert, by Hariulf and by Anscher, are not very reliable, but they supply a certain amount of detail and they may be supplemented from contemporary letters and chronicles. The lives will be found in Mabillon, vol. iv. A good account of Angilbert is given in the Kirchenlexikon, vol. i, cc. 849—851 see also DHG., vol. iii, cc. 520—523. Modern writers are apt to set Angilbert’s lapses in a very misleading light. In the Cambridge Medieval History (vol. ii, p. 663) Prof. C. Seeliger remarks that Charlemagne’s daughter Bertha “had two sons by the pious Abbot Angilbert of St Riquier.”  There is no satisfactory evidence that at that time he was either monk or priest it is indeed not certain that he ever was a priest.

He was raised in the court of Emperor Charlemagne, and studied under the great English scholar, Alcuin. Receiving minor orders, Angilbert accompanied King Pepin to Italy in 782. Returning to the court, he became known as "Homer" because of his literary and language skills. He also served as an envoy of the court to the pope. In 790, Angilbert was named the abbot of Saint-Riquier in Picardy, France. Angilbert either rebuilt or restored the abbey and endowed it with two hundred books. In the year 800, Charlemagne came to visit him. Angilbert also fathered two children, having had an affair with Bertha, Charlemagne's daughter. Angilbert did penance for this relationship, and Bertha entered a convent. Nithard, a noted historian of the era and Angilbert's son, wrote of the penance's and austerities undertaken. Angilbert died on February 18, 814. Some years after his burial, his body was found to be incorrupt.

Angilbert of Centula, OSB, Abbot (AC)  Died 814. Nicknamed "Homer" because of his Latin verses, he was raised at the court of Charlemagne and studied under Alcuin. He married Charlemagne's daughter, Bertha (some scholars believe it was an affair rather than a marriage), but turned to religious life when prayers for a successful resistance to a Danish invasion were answered when a storm scattered the Danish fleet.
Bertha entered a convent and he became a monk, excelled as a minister, and filled several important offices. As a reward Charlemagne gave Angilbert the abbey of Saint Riquier (Centula) and Angilbert became a model abbot. He established a library at Centula and also introduced continuous chanting in the abbey, using his three hundred monks and 100 boys in relays to do so. He was a close friend and confidante of Charlemagne, was his court chaplain and privy councilor, undertook several diplomatic missions for the emperor, and was one of the executors of the emperor's will (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

1166 St. Theotonius Augustinian, trusted canon; royal advisor all forms of royal corruption opponent
Born in Gonfeo, Spain, in 1088, he studied at Coimbra, Portugal, and served for a time as archpriest of Viseu. After undertaking a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, he returned home and entered the Augustinian Canons at Coimbra. He held a trusted position as advisor to King Alfonso I Henriquez of Portugal (r. 1128-1181) and was a dedicated opponent of all forms of royal corruption. Theotonius rebuked the queen for an adulterous affair and refused a bishopric from her.
1166 ST THEOTONIUS
ST THEOTONIUS is held in great honour in Portugal. A nephew of Cresconius, Bishop of Coimbra, he had been destined for the priesthood from his earliest years after his ordination he was appointed to Viseu, and in a short time the spiritual charge of all in that township was entrusted to him. A man of true holiness and austerity of life, he was also a great preacher whose fame spread far and wide. He resigned his office of archpriest to visit the Holy Land, but on his return continued to work at Viseu. The queen and her husband, Henry, Count of Portugal, repeatedly urged him to accept a bishopric, but he always refused. He had a great love for the poor and for the souls in Purgatory, for whom he used to sing solemn Mass every Friday. This was followed by a procession to the cemetery in which the whole population joined and in the course of which large sums of money were given in alms: these he invariably distributed amongst the poor. He was out­spoken in rebuking vice, and the greatest in the land feared and respected him. When the widowed queen and Count Ferdinand (whose association with her was causing scandal) were present at one of his sermons, St Theotonius uttered from the pulpit stern words so obviously aimed at them that they were filled with con­fusion and beat a hasty retreat. On another occasion he was vested and about to celebrate a Mass of our Lady when he received a message from the queen, who was at the church, asking him to shorten the time he usually took. He sent back word that he was offering Mass in honour of a sovereign who was greater than any royal personage on earth, and that the queen was quite at liberty to stay or to go. Far from resenting this, she was filled with penitence and waited till after the service was over to ask pardon and to receive the saint’s reprimand.

    After a second pilgrimage to the Holy Land, St Theotonius found that his former preceptor, Tellus, was busied with a scheme of a new monastery at Coimbra to be composed of Canons Regular of St Augustine; and Theotonius decided to join them, being the twelfth on the original foundation, of which he soon became prior. King Alphonsus, who greatly venerated him, heaped gifts on this monastery of the Holy Cross, as did also Queen Mafalda, although she sought in vain to be permitted to cross the threshold. In a careless age, St Theotonius was remarkable for his insistence on the exact and reverent recitation of the daily offices : he would never allow them to be gabbled or hurried. The king attributed to the holy man’s prayers his victories over his enemies and recovery from illness, and in his gratitude granted the saint’s request that he should liberate all his Mozarabic Christian captives. Theotonius rose to be abbot of the monastery, where he spent the last thirty years of his life, dying at the age of eighty. When Alphonsus heard of his death, he exclaimed, “His soul will have gone up to Heaven before his body is lowered into the tomb. 
The Life of St Theotonius, written by a contemporary who was one of the com­munity of the Holy Cross which he governed so wisely, leaves the impression of an ex­ceptionally sane and trustworthy document. There are no extravagant miracles, but there breathes in every line a true and reverent affection for the saint which it commemorates. It is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii. Cf. also Florez, España Sagrada, vol. xxiii, pp. 105 seq., and Carvalho da Silva, Vida do admiravel Padre S. Theotonio (1764).
Theotonius of Coimbra, OSA, Abbot (AC) Born in Spain; died 1166; cultus approved by Benedict XIV. Theotonius, nephew of Bishop Cresconius of Coimbra, Portugal, was educated in Coimbra and became an archpriest of Viseu. He proved himself to be an outstanding preacher as well as a man of holiness and austerity. He resigned that office to go on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. On his return, he continued to work at Viseu. While the queen and her husband, Henry, Count of Portugal, repeatedly urged him to accept a bishopric, he was contemplating retiring further from the world.
Theotonius had a tremendous love of the poor and the souls in purgatory, for whom he sang solemn Mass every Friday. This would be followed by a procession to the cemetery in which to whole city joined and in the course of which large sums of money were given in alms for him to distribute among the poor.

But he was no wimp. He was outspoken in rebuking vice, and the greatest in the land feared and respected him. When the widowed queen and Count Ferdinand (whose alliance with her was causing scandal) were present at one of his sermons, Saint Theotonius uttered stern words so obviously directed at them that they were both filled with confusion and retreated hastily. Another time, he was vested to begin the celebration of the Mass of the Blessed Virgin, when he received a message from the queen, who was at the church, asking him to shorten the time he usually took. He sent back word that he was offering Mass in honor of a sovereign who was greater than any royal personage on earth, and that the queen was free to leave or stay.

After a second pilgrimage to the Holy Land, he found that his former preceptor, Tellus, was founding a new Augustinian monastery at Coimbra, and Theotonius decided to join them. He became its 12th prior. Theotonius was highly esteemed by King Alphonsus of Portugal and his Queen Matilda, who lavished gifts on the monastery of the Holy Cross. He was fearless in rebuking vice and exact in the performance of divine service. He was remarkable for his insistence on the exact and reverent recitation of the daily offices; he would never allow them to be garbled or hurried. The king attributed victory over his enemies and recovery from illness to the prayers of Saint Theotonius, and in his gratitude granted the saint's request that he should liberate all his Mozarabic Christian captives. When Alphonsus heard of Theotonius's death, he exclaimed, "His soul will have gone up to heaven before his body is lowered into the tomb." This saint is still highly venerated in Portugal (Benedictines, Walsh).

1455 Blessed John of Fiesole patron of Christian artists
b 1400
The patron of Christian artists was born around 1400 in a village overlooking Florence. He took up painting as a young boy and studied under the watchful eye of a local painting master. He joined the Dominicans at about age 20, taking the name Fra Giovanni. He eventually came to be known as Fra Angelico, perhaps a tribute to his own angelic qualities or maybe the devotional tone of his works.

He continued to study painting and perfect his own techniques, which included broad-brush strokes, vivid colors and generous, lifelike figures. Michelangelo once said of Fra Angelico: “One has to believe that this good monk has visited paradise and been allowed to choose his models there.” Whatever his subject matter, Fra Angelico sought to generate feelings of religious devotion in response to his paintings. Among his most famous works are the Annunciation and Descent from the Cross as well as frescoes in the monastery of San Marco in Florence.

He also served in leadership positions within the Dominican Order. At one point Pope Eugenius approached him about serving as archbishop of Florence. Fra Angelico declined, preferring a simpler life. He died in 1455.

1594 Bl. William Harrington priest Martyr of England
Born at Mt. St. John, Yorkshire, he studied for the priesthood after meeting St. Edmund Campion and was ordained at Reims, France, in 1592. William returned to England to work in the English mission. Arrested in London in 1593 for being a priest, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered atTyburn.
1594 BD WILLIAM HARRINGTON, MARTYR
A curious fact about this martyr is that after his death he was accused by a woman of having had a child by her before he was ordained. She was an apostate Catholic, of disorderly life, and this was only one charge among others made by her against Harrington and Catholics in general, some of them of such a kind that her testimony about anything is discredited from the start. The baselessness of the particular accusation against Harrington has been shown by Father Morris in his Troubles of our Catholic Forefathers. Father Pollen has noted that, at a time when Catholics were subjected to the most outrageous charges, this is the only one of its kind on record as having been made against one who died for his faith.

William Harrington was born in 1566 at Mount St John, Felixkirk, in the North Riding. When he was a youth of fifteen he met Bd Edmund Campion who was a guest in his father’s house, and under the force of that example he went abroad to become a priest, first to the college at Rheims and then to the Jesuits at Tournai. But here his health gave way; he had to give up any idea of joining that order, and for half-a-dozen or more years he returned home. Then he went back to Rheims, and was ordained in 1592. In midsummer of that year Mr Harrington came on the mission, and in the following May was apprehended in London, where he had been ministering. For nine months he was kept in prison, and bore its rigours with notable fortitude and constancy. His demeanour at his trial made a deep impres­sion; but he was condemned for his priesthood, and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

The sentence was carried out on February 8, 1594. Stow in his Chronicle recording that, “Harrington, a seminary priest, was drawn from Newgate to Tyburn, and there hanged, cut down alive, struggled with the hangman, but was bowelled and quartered”. Of which Bishop Challoner pertinently remarks that it  “cannot be drawn to an argument of his not being resigned to die, but only shows the efforts which nature will be sure to make in a man whose senses are stunned by having been half hanged, and therefore, by the motions of his hands and body, strives to resist that unnatural violence which is offered by the hands and knife of the executioner”. Bd William Harrington was only twenty-seven years old at his death. 

See MMP., p. 197; Morris, Troubles… pp. 104—107; Gillow, Biog. Dict. Pollen in the Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v., and The Month for April, 1874. The source for the slander on Barrington’s memory is Harsnet, Declaration of egregious Popish Impostures (London, 1603). The poet John Donne’s brother, Henry, was imprisoned in 1593 for harbouring Barrington, and died of jail-fever.

Blessed William Harrington M (AC) Born at Mount Saint John, Felixkirk, Yorkshire, England; died at Tyburn, 1594; beatified in 1929. William was educated and ordained in 1592 at Rheims. He was only 27 when he was hanged, drawn, and quartered for his priesthood (Benedictines).
1601 Bl. John Pibush English martyr solely for his priesthood
born in Thirsk, Yorkshire. He went to Reims and was ordained in 1587. Returning to England in 1589, John was arrested at Gloucestershire in 1593 and kept in prison in London. He escaped but was recaptured and then tried and condemned. He was executed at Southwark. His beatification took place in 1929.

1601 BD JOHN PIBUSH, MARTYR

This martyr was born at Thirsk in the North Riding and was made priest at Rheims in 1587. After ministering in England for four years he was arrested at Moreton-in-the-Marsh in Gloucestershire in 1593, and taken to London, where he was confined without trial in the Gatehouse for a year. Then he was brought up at the Gloucester assizes and convicted of being a seminary priest, but was sent back to the local jail without being sentenced. In the following February he took advantage of a break-out by other prisoners to escape himself, but was careless enough to walk openly on the highway and so was retaken the next day, at Matson. He was then sent to London again, retried, and sentenced to death, on July 1, 1595.  But in fact the sentence was not carried out for another five years and more. In the meantime Mr Pibush was left to suffer in the filth and brutality of the Queen’s Bench prison. Not only was his health undermined, so that his lungs rotted with tuberculosis, but he was subjected to ill-treatment from his fellow prisoners, especially when he tried to bring them to a more godly frame of mind. However, in the long run he seems to have softened both them and his jailers, for he was allowed some little privacy and was even able to celebrate Mass occasionally. His name was on the list of those imprisoned Catholics to be sent to Wisbech castle, but at the last moment it was struck off; and after all this time in prison Mr Pibush was put to death at twenty-four hours’ notice.
On February 17, 1601, he was brought before Popham, L.C.J. (who had removed his name from the Wisbech list) and asked for any reason why his sentence should not be carried out. He replied that he had never in his life done anything for which he could justly be put to death; that he was condemned simply for being a Catholic priest; and that he was willing to lay down his life several times over for that cause. He was then told to prepare for death, which took place the next day at St Thomas’s Waterings in Southwark, a spot whose very name spoke of pilgrims to the shrine of another martyr, Thomas Becket.

See MMP., pp. 152—153 Gillow, Biog. Dict. Pollen, Acts of the English Martyrs, pp. 335—336 Catholic Record Society’s publications, vol. v, pp. 337—340.
Blessed John Pibush M (AC) Born at Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 1601; beatified in 1929. John was educated at Rheims and ordained in 1587. He was sent to the English mission where he spent his time mostly in prison until he was finally executed at Southwark, solely for his priesthood (Benedictines).
1855 Blessed Andrew Nam-Thung native catechist of Cochin-China M (AC)
Born c. 1790; beatified 1909. Andrew was a native catechist of Cochin-China and mayor of his village. He died on the way to exile at Mi-Tho, eastern Cochin-China (Benedictines).

Bl. Martin Martyr of China native Chinese
who sheltered Blessed John Peter Neel. Martin was beheaded and beatified in 1909.

Blessed Agnes De martyred native cradle Christian VM (AC)
Born in Bai-den, West Tonkin (Vietnam); died at Nam-dinh July 12, 1841; beatified 1909. Agnes was born into a Christian family and died in prison for the faith (Benedictines).

1858 St. Agatha Lin Chinese martyr
She was born in 1817 at Ma-Tchang, China. A teacher at a Christian school, Agatha was beheaded for the faith in Mao-kin on January 28, 1858. She was beatified on May 2, 1909.

Blessed Agatha Lin VM (AC) Born at Ma-Tchang, China, in 1817; died at Mao-ken, China, January 28, 1858; beatified on May 2, 1909. Agatha was a Chinese school teacher, who was beheaded for the faith (Benedictines).

1862 Blessed John Peter French missionary priest & Martin native catechist MM (AC)
(also known as Jean-Pierre Néel) beatified in 1909. A French missionary priest who was martyred because he baptized too many Chinese. He was arrested, tied by his hair to a horse's tail, dragged, then beheaded at Kuy- tsheu. Three of his converts were beheaded at the same time as he was. Martin (1815-1862) was one of Jean-Pierre's native catechists and his host, who was among those beheaded (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).


On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Day 6 40 Days for Life


40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015

We are the defenders of true freedom.
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005
 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Popes mentioned in articles of todays Saints
Pope Leo XIII.  1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption ; canonized in 1887 by Pope Leo XIII.

Clement VII in 1533 approved The cultus of Bd Verdiana who appears in the habit of a Vallombrosan nun, carrying a basket with two snakes in it. It seems certain she was associated with the Vallombrosan Order, but her connection with the Franciscan third order is by no means so clearly established.

Pope Callistus III allowed BD EUSTOCHIUM OF MESSINA, VIRGIN to found another convent to follow the first rule of St Francis under the Observants. 

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy, but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

"To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

731 Pope Gregory II, 89th Pope: educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian    (RM)

824 Pope St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.   Popes Html link here: 

731 Gregory II, 89th Pope educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian (RM)
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817
Pope Innocent III had experienced a similar vision. Without hesitation Innocent provided papal approval for the Order of the Most Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives (the Trinitarians), with John of Matha as superior.
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
1198 - 1216 Pope Innocent III;
One of the greatest popes of the Middle Ages;
a learned theologian; one of the greatest jurists of his time; held various ecclesiastical offices during short reigns of Lucius III, Urban III, Gregory VIII, and Clement III; re-established papal authority in Rome; scarcely a country in Europe over which Innocent III did not in some way or other assert supremacy he claimed for the papacy;
During his reign two great founders of the mendicant orders, St. Dominic and St. Francis, laid before him their scheme of reforming the world. Innocent was not blind to the vices of luxury and indolence which had infected many of the clergy and part of the laity.
In Dominic and Francis he recognized two mighty adversaries of these vices and he sanctioned their projects with words of encouragement.  He wrote "De quadripartita specie nuptiarum" (P. L., CCXVII, 923-968), an exposition of the fourfold marriage bond, namely, between man and wife, between Christ and the Church, between God and the just soul, between the Word and human nature - - entirely based on passages from Holy Scripture.  Popes Html link here: 

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Gregory IV (827-44) # 102
Elected near the end of 827; died January, 844. When Gregory was born is not known, but he was a Roman and the son of John. Before his election to the papacy he was the Cardinal-Priest of the Basilica of St. Mark, which he adorned with mosaics yet visible. For his piety and learning he was ordained priest by Paschal I. This man, of distinguished appearance and high birth, was raised to the chair of Peter, despite his protestations of unfitness, mainly buy the instrumentality of the secular nobility of Rome who were then securing a preponderating influence in papal elections. But the representatives in Rome of the Emperor Louis the Pious would not allow him to be consecrated until his election had been approved by their master. This interference caused such delay that it was not, seemingly, till about March, 828, that he began to govern the Church.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Clement IX 1667-1669: 1670 St. Charles of Sezze Franciscan Pope Clement IX called Charles to his bedside for a blessing;