Friday Saints of this Day February  19 Undécimo Kaléndas Mártii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum,
atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.




Day 10 40 Days for Life Dear Readers
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

February 19 – 4th apparition of Lourdes (France)
The apparitions of Pellevoisin continue (France, 1876)  
 
She wrote a letter to the Virgin Mary
In 1875, a 32-year-old woman from Pellevoisin (central France) named Estelle Faguette, was suffering from an incurable illness. She wrote a letter to Mary, with a child's heart and great confidence, in which she asked her to intercede with her divine Son for her recovery, so she would be able to financially support her elderly parents.
Mary answered this letter by fifteen apparitions, from February to December 1876, during which she educated Estelle in holiness and issued a message of mercy.
On February 19, 1876, Estelle was fully healed. In 1877, the Archbishop of Bourges allowed public devotion to Our Lady of Pellevoisin, and Estelle’s bedroom was transformed into a chapel.
In April 1900, Pope Leo XIII formally recognized the Scapular of the Sacred Heart that Estelle saw worn by the Virgin Mary, and encouraged all the faithful who wished to wear it. Estelle’s healing was officially declared miraculous in 1983 by Bishop Vignancour, then Archbishop of Bourges.
www.pellevoisin.net


February 19 – 4th apparition of Lourdes – The rest of the apparitions in Pellevoisin (1876)   
 
“I am all-merciful”
 
The Shrine of Our Lady of Mercy in Pellevoisin (department of Indre, France), was built after the apparitions of the Virgin to Estelle Faguette. From 1875, the Blessed Virgin appeared to her 15 times, teaching her and healing her when she was at death's door.

During her third apparition, the Virgin said of herself: "I am all merciful," showing Estelle her infinite mercy and all the love of her divine Son for repentant sinners. Mary then revealed her most precious possession: the Sacred Heart of her Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. Indeed the Heart of Jesus is inextricably linked to that of his Mother.

Our Lady presented the Scapular of the Sacred Heart to Estelle Faguette.
"The scapular is the Heart of Jesus that dresses the heart of Mary. This is why Our Lady of Mercy of Pellevoisin is connected to the devotion to the Sacred Heart radiating from Paray-le-Monial."
 
pelerinagesdefrance.fr



SCRIPTURE There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and lived in luxury every day. At his gate was laid a beggar named Lazarus, covered with sores and longing to eat what fell from the rich man's table.
Even the dogs came and licked his sores.

The time came when the beggar died and the angels carried him to Abraham's side. The rich man also died and was buried. In hell, where he was in torment, he looked up and saw Abraham far away, with Lazarus by his side. So he called to him, "Father Abraham, have pity on me and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue, because I am in agony in this fire." But Abraham replied, "Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, while Lazarus received bad things, but now he is comforted here and you are in agony.
"And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, so that those who want to go from here to you cannot, nor can anyone cross over from there to us." -- Luke 16:19-31

With those who are perfect and walk with simplicity, there is nothing small and contemptible, if it be a thing that pleases God;
 for the pleasure of God is the object at which alone they aim, and which is the reason, the measure, and the reward of all their occupations, actions, and plans; and so, in whatever they find this, it is for them a great and important thing. -- St. Alphonsus Rodriguez


Mary's Divine Motherhood
1st v St. Auxibius Bishop  baptized a Christian by St. Mark ordained by St. Paul 1st century
 Solis, in Cypro, sancti Auxíbii Epíscopi.

Saint Bernadette's Silence (II) February 19 - 4th Apparition in Lourdes (France, 1858)  
Bernadette left home in a peaceful and quiet mood on Friday the 19th for the fourth apparition.
This time, she was obliged to bring some family members.
Her aunt Bernarde said, "You need to take some blessed object." And Bernadette requested her to ask Aunt Lucile for her special congregational candle. This is the same candle she took along with her until March 3rd.
Adapted from Father René Laurentin, Bernadette vous parle (Bernadette Speaks), Mediaspaul, 1972, p. 51

Forgiveness Sunday Mark 6:14-15
1st v St. Auxibius Bishop  baptized a Christian by St. Mark ordained by St. Paul 1st century
295 Gabinus of Rome Pope Caius brother father of Saint Suzanne M (RM)
      In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Públii, Juliáni, Marcélli et aliórum.
304 St. Zambdas 37th Bishop of Jerusalem martyred
441 Mesrob the Teacher  government official in Armenia Georgia translation of the Bible B (AC)
450 St. Valerius Bishop of Antibes, France
452 St. Odran  Martyr in place of St. Patrick
509 Martyrs of Palestine Saracen tribes under Persian rule (RM)   In Palæstína commemorátio sanctórum
      Monachórum, et aliórum Mártyrum, qui a Saracénis, sub Duce Alamúndaro, ob Christi fidem, sævíssime cæsi sunt
682 St. Barbatus Bishop Benevento innocence, simplicity, and purity of heart
690 Mansuetus of Milan treatise against the Monothelites B (RM) Born in Rome  
798 St. Beatus Monk author foe Adoptionist heresy foe commentary on the book of Revelation
884 George of Lodève, OSB (AC) Born at Rodez, Spain
11th v Neápoli, in Campánia, sancti Quod-vult-Deus, Carthaginénsis Epíscopi, qui, una cum Clero, a Rege Ariáno Genseríco in fractas et absque remígiis ac velis naves impósitus, præter spem Neápolim áppulit, ibíque, in exsílio pósitus, Conféssor occúbuit.
1135 St. Belina Virgin martyr of Troyes, France died in defense of her virginity
1265 St. Boniface of Lausanne Bishop publicly scolded emperor local clergy for corruption
1350 St. Conrad of Piacenza reputation for holiness
1400 + St. Alvarez confessor Queen Catherine adviser tutor King John II teaching preaching asceticism holiness
1862  Bl. Lucy Martyr of China Catholic schoolteacher
 Neápoli, in Campánia, sancti Quod-vult-Deus, Carthaginénsis Epíscopi, qui, una cum Clero, a Rege Ariáno Genseríco in fractas et absque remígiis ac velis naves impósitus, præter spem Neápolim áppulit, ibíque, in exsílio pósitus, Conféssor occúbuit.
      At Naples in Campania, St. Quodvultdeus, bishop of Carthage.  The Arian king Genseric placed him together with his clergy into boats which were broken and without oars and sails, but they unexpectedly reached Naples.  He died in exile as a confessor.
Christ said his coming would bring not peace but a sword (see Matthew 10:34).
The Gospels offer no support for us if we fantasize about a sunlit holiness that knows no problems.

Christ did not escape at the last moment, though he did live happily ever after —after a life of controversy, problems, pain and frustration.
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)


Day 10 40 Days for Life Dear Readers
This just in – it’s cold!
Well, it’s certainly cold for many 40 Days for Life locations where extreme temperatures are requiring lots of sacrifice and lots of clothes.  I’m reminded of what Brian Gibson, the leader in St. Paul Minnesota, said prior to a really chilly campaign in 2008:
 “It’s not cold; it’s just inadequate clothing!”
40 Days for Life CEO David Bereit did a short audio interview with Brian before that campaign. We’ve posted a portion of that interview that is still timely, especially if you’re in an area that experiences such frigid weather occasionally, but not on a regular basis.
To listen, go to:
https://40daysforlife.com/2016/02/19/day-10-in-the-winter/
In the interview, Brian shared a remarkable observation: “We save more babies during the winter than we do during the summer.” He said when people see the sacrificial dedication of volunteers out praying in the cold and wind and snow, it shows how much you really care about the innocent lives that are on the line.
Now that’s something to think about the next time you think it might be too cold to pray!
 (And if you’re in Australia, New Zealand or South Africa … I hope you’re enjoying summer!)
Ithaca, New York
There was snow on the ground when Mary Anne, the 40 Days for Life leader in Ithaca, left home on her way to the vigil site. When she arrived, there were a dozen people in prayer at what they call their “street chapel” outside Planned Parenthood.
 “It was so touching to me to see that,” she said. She’s also seeing changing attitudes towards life in Ithaca, with more churches – and more pastors – taking part in the vigils. 
That in turn is impacting the community. “We saw that,” Mary Anne said, “with cars honking for life.”
Planned Parenthood now has two escorts instead of one. Still, she said, “This is Ithaca, a culturally diversity community coming together in unity, breaking through the barriers … we are all in this together.”
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Nikki in Pittsburgh says she was humbled that volunteers vowed to keep their commitments in extreme cold conditions – especially one particular shift manager.
 “I sent her a text message around 9 am, asking if she wanted to reconsider closing early,” Nikki said, “and she texted me back that she is fine and would stay all day. Wow!”
The cold weather may be helping to warm hearts.
Two passersby told vigil participants that they supported the “right” to abortion. One said she had never been able to discuss abortion so calmly and logically, and her talk with volunteers gave her something to think about. The other actually said he could be changing his mind on the issue.
 “The most encouraging thing to happen today,” said another volunteer, “was that a couple who were about to enter Planned Parenthood noticed us praying.” They slowed down … turned around … and then left. “Thank God for this opportunity!”
Today's devotional is from Rev. John Ensor of PassionLife.
Day 10 intention
Pray for your local pregnancy help center: for those who answer calls from women considering abortion, those who provide ultrasounds, and those who personally help mothers prepare to parent or place for adoption.
Scripture
Rescue the weak and the needy; deliver them from the hand of the wicked.
—Psalm 82:4
Reflection from Rev. John Ensor
When a woman arrives at her local pregnancy help center, the hard work of "rescuing the weak" begins. They listen to her. What desperate circumstance is driving her?
They act. A professional ultrasound and medical care is provided.
They pray, "God use us." Then, they take up her burdens and work towards life.
It is cross-bearing for the child-bearing.
Recently, I prayed for one volunteer who was working with one mother in her struggle. Here is what "rescue the weak" looked like in this one case:
•    Aug 3: She made an appointment for Thursday to get an abortion and while she feels terrible about it, she also feels like she has no choice. Pray that her heart is changed!
•    Aug 10: She is 12 weeks along but missed her appointment. She had some good conversations with people at the pregnancy center. She is now considering adoption.
•    Aug 13: Things are down again. She now has an abortion scheduled for Monday. Pray!
•    Aug 17: Missed appointment! God is working in her life.
•    Sept 1: We've hit another rocky period. She has an abortion scheduled for tomorrow. She found out today that her parents are planning a trip to visit her and she is panicking.
•    Sept 15: Missed third appointment. But feels like she has no choice. Please pray today
•    Sept 20: She fears her parents but has agreed to another ultrasound (a breakthrough).
•    Sept 22: I was there with her for her ultrasound. She saw her baby moving and made the realization that she wants to carry her baby.
Please keep praying against attack by the enemy. We are overwhelmed by seeing God's hand move in this situation and are so very thankful for the prayers lifted up by each one of you. God is good!
Prayer
Father, we praise you for this one sister who gave herself, heart and soul, to rescue this one mother and baby. O may you empower the hundreds more today who are serving in our pregnancy help centers. Grant those answering calls, providing ultrasound and following up with a bold spirit of truth, love and perseverance.
Printable devotional
To download today's devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share with friends:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day10.pdf
Forgiveness Sunday Mark 6:14-15
In the Orthodox Church, the last Sunday before Great Lent - the day on which, at Vespers, Lent is liturgically announced and inaugurated - is called Forgiveness Sunday. On the morning of that Sunday, at the Divine Liturgy, we hear the words of Christ:
"If you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, but if you forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses…" (Mark 6:14-15).

Then after Vespers - after hearing the announcement of Lent in the Great Prokeimenon": Turn not away Thy face from Thy child, for I am afflicted! Hear me speedily! Draw near unto my soul and deliver it!", after making our entrance into Lenten worship, with its special melodies, with the prayer of St Ephraim the Syrian, with its prostrations - we ask forgiveness from each other, we perform the rite of forgiveness and reconciliation. And as we approach each other with words of reconciliation, the choir intones the Paschal hymns, filling the church with the anticipation of Paschal joy.

What is the meaning of this rite? Why is it that the Church wants us to begin the Lenten season with forgiveness and reconciliation? These questions are in order because for too many people Lent means primarily, and almost exclusively, a change of diet, the compliance with ecclesiastical regulations concerning fasting. They understand fasting as an end in itself, as a "good deed" required by God and carrying in itself its merit and its reward. But the Church spares no effort in revealing to us that fasting is but a means, one among many, towards a higher goal: the spiritual renewal of man, his return to God, true repentance and, therefore, true reconciliation. The Church spares no effort in warning us against a hypocritical and pharisaic fasting, against the reduction of religion to mere external obligations. As a Lenten hymn says:

"In vain do you rejoice in not eating, O soul! For you abstain from food, But from passions you are not purified. If you persevere in sin, you will perform a useless fast!"

Now, forgiveness stands at the very center of Christian faith and of Christian life because Christianity itself is, above all, the religion of forgiveness. God forgives us, and His forgiveness is in Christ, His Son, whom He sends to us so that by sharing in His humanity we may share in His love and be truly reconciled with God. Indeed, Christianity has no other content but love. And it is primarily the renewal of that love, a growth in it, that we seek in Great Lent, in fasting and prayer, in the entire spirit and the entire effort of that season. Thus, truly forgiveness is both the beginning of, and the proper condition for, the Lenten season.

One may ask, however: Why should I perform this rite when I have no "enemies?" Why should I ask forgiveness from people who have done nothing to me, and whom I hardly know? To ask these questions is to misunderstand the Orthodox teaching concerning forgiveness. It is true that open enmity, personal hatred, real animosity may be absent from our life, though if we experience them, it may be easier for us to repent, for these feelings openly contradict Divine commandments. But the Church reveals to us that there are much subtler ways of offending Divine Love. These are indifference, selfishness, lack of interest in other people, of any real concern for them - in short, that wall which we usually erect around ourselves, thinking that by being "polite" and "friendly" we fulfill God's commandments. The rite of forgiveness is so important precisely because it makes us realize - be it only for one minute - that our entire relationship to other men is wrong, makes us experience that encounter of one child of God with another, of one person created by God with another, makes us feel that mutual "recognition" which is so terribly lacking in our cold and dehumanized world.

On that unique evening, listening to the joyful Paschal hymns we are called to make a spiritual discovery: to taste of another mode of life and relationship with people, of life whose essence is love. We can discover that always and everywhere Christ, the Divine Love Himself, stands in the midst of us, transforming our mutual alienation into brotherhood. As I advance towards the other, as the other comes to me - we begin to realize that it is Christ who brings us together by His love for both of us.

And because we make this discovery - and because this discovery is that of the Kingdom of God itself: the Kingdom of Peace and Love, of reconciliation with God and, in Him, with all that exists - we hear the hymns of that Feast, which once a year "opens to us the doors of Paradise." We know why we shall fast and pray, what we shall seek during the long Lenten pilgrimage.

Forgiveness Sunday: the day on which we acquire the power to make our fasting - true fasting; our effort - true effort; our reconciliation with God - true reconciliation.  - Father Alexander Schmemann
1st v St. Auxibius Bishop  baptized a Christian by St. Mark ordained by St. Paul 1st century
 Solis, in Cypro, sancti Auxíbii Epíscopi.       At Soli in Cyprus, St. Auxibius, bishop.

Auxibius was baptized a Christian by St. Mark. St. Paul appointed him the bishop of Soli, on Cyprus.

Auxibius of Cyprus B (RM) 1st century. It is said that Saint Auxibius was baptized by Saint Mark and consecrated by Saint Paul as the first bishop of Soli, Cyprus (Benedictines).
295 Gabinus of Rome Pope Caius brother father of Saint Suzanne M (RM)
 Romæ natális sancti Gabíni, Presbyteri et Mártyris, qui fuit frater beáti Caji Papæ, atque, a Diocletiáno diu in custódia vínculis afflíctus, pretiósa morte sibi cæli gáudia comparávit.
     
At Rome, the birthday of St. Gavinus, priest and martyr, brother of blessed Pope Caius.  After being chained in prison for a long time by Diocletian, he obtained the joys of heaven by his esteemed death.
Saint Gabinus was a Roman Christian, brother of Pope Caius and father of the beautiful Saint Suzanne. He also seems to have been related to Emperor Diocletian. Gabinus was ordained a priest and died as a martyr of starvation under Diocletian. His acts are very untrustworthy (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). Saint Gabinus can be identified in art as a prisoner with the doors open to the cell (Roeder)
.
  In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Públii, Juliáni, Marcélli et aliórum.
       In Africa, the holy martyrs Publius, Julian, Marcellus, and others.

 In Palæstína commemorátio sanctórum Monachórum, et aliórum Mártyrum, qui a Saracénis, sub Duce Alamúndaro, ob Christi fidem, sævíssime cæsi sunt.
      In Palestine, the commemoration of the holy monks and other martyrs who were barbarously massacred for the faith of Christ by the Saracens, under their leader Almondhar.

304 St. Zambdas martyred 37th Bishop of Jerusalem
 Hierosólymis sancti Zambdæ Epíscopi.       At Jerusalem, St. Zambdas, bishop.
He was martyred during the persecutions under Emperor Diocletian. Zambdas is also listed as Bazas Or Zabdas, and he is associated in tradition with the Theban Legion.
Zambdas of Jerusalem B (RM) (also known as Zabdas, Bazas) Died c. 304. Zambdas was said to have been the 37th bishop of Jerusalem. He has been connected with the legend of the Theban legion (Benedictines).

441 Mesrob the Teacher  government official in Armenia Georgia translation of the Bible B (AC)
 (also known as Mesrop) Born at Taron, Armenia, c. 345; died at Valarshapat, February 19, ; feast day formerly November 25.

441 ST MESROP, BISHOP
IN the account of St Isaac the Great on September 9 mention is made of his work in unifying the Armenian people and laying the foundations of a literature in the national tongue, and that his chief helper therein was St Mesrop (Mashtots), who for a time had been a “civil servant”. When Armenia was partitioned between the Empire and Persia Mesrop retired to a solitary life, becoming a priest and pursuing his studies in the Greek, Syriac and Persian languages. He then became a missionary among his own people, and found himself handicapped by the fact that the Bible and the liturgy were in Syriac and that there was no adequate way of writing them in Armenian. He therefore decided in consultation with St Isaac to revive and remake an Armenian alphabet, which in due course was done with the help of other scholars, the chief basis being the small letters of the Greek alphabet.
Some years later the first Armenian translation of the Bible was completed from Syriac, St Mesrop being said to be responsible for the New Testament and the book of Proverbs. This version was soon after revised at Edessa by two of his pupils, and eventually the final revision of the Old Testament was made from the Septuagint.* [*The Armenian Bible has roused the interest not only of scriptural and linguistic scholars, but of Lord Byron. He seems to have contemplated making aa English version from it, but did not get further than an apocryphal letter from the church of Corinth to St Paul and the apostle’s equally apocryphal reply which are found in some editions. Cf. The Commonweal, August 29, 1941, pp. 441-442. The Armenian Bible was first printed at Amsterdam, in 1666; the Psalter only at Venice a hundred years earlier.]
The liturgy also was translated into Armenian. Mesrop preached and taught throughout Armenia and into Georgia, setting up schools and creating
a Georgian alphabet; he then returned to his own part of the country, where with the encouragement of St Isaac he established a school of his own. It was here, and under the direction of these two, that numerous translations from Greek and Syriac were made. St Mesrop died at the age of over eighty at Valarshapat on February 19, 441. “Mesrop the Teacher” is named in the intercession of the Mass of the Armenian rite.

There is an Armenian life of St Mesrop by his disciple Koriun or Goriun. It exists in at least two recensions (numbered in the BHO. 755 and 756). The former of these has been translated into German by Canon S. Weber in vol. i of Ausgewählte Schriften de l’Armenischen Kirchenväter (1927). With regard to the life and activities of St Mesrop, consult Tourne­bize Histoire politique et religieuse de l’Armenie (1910), especially pp. 503—513 and 633—636 and also Weber, Die Katholische Kirche in Armenien (1903), pp. 393—42 1. Fr P. Peeters has expressed a high opinion of the value of Koriun’s biography, so far at least as regards its broader issues of fact, and St Mesrop’s claim to have created the Georgian alphabet. See the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. liii (1935), pp. 148—150, p. 298, with its references, and Recherches d’histoire et de philologie orientales (1951), vol. i, pp. 171—207. Some discussion of a divergent view will be found in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. liv (1936), pp. 339—401.
Saint Mesrob 'the Great' was a government official in Armenia, then a hermit and a disciple of Saint Nerses the Great. Mesrob was ordained and devoted himself to the study of Greek, Syriac, and Persian because Armenia had recently been partitioned between Persia and the Empire.
With Saint Isaac the Great, Mesrob was the founder of the Armenian church through his missionary efforts.

He is credited with inventing the Armenian alphabet and translating the New Testament and Proverbs into Armenian from the Syriac version.  Mesrob's missionary activities took him into Georgia, where he also had a literary influence, and is said to have sent students as far as Rome in search of manuscripts.  He also organized schools in Armenia and Georgia and created a Georgian alphabet.
Mesrob and Isaac began the formation of a distinctly Armenian liturgy of worship based on that of the mother church at Caesarea in Cappadocia. He also founded his own school in Armenia, and continued preaching until his death at Valarshapat aged of 80. The Armenian translation of the Bible has a special value for scholars (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).
450 St. Valerius Bishop of Antibes, France
He worked throughout southern France to evangelize the region and to increase the monastic presence.
Valerius of Antibes B (AC) Died after 450. Bishop of Antibes in southern France (Benedictines).
452 St. Odran  Martyr in place of St. Patrick
According to tradition, he drove Patrick’s chariot. Odran died when he changed places with Patrick in the vehicle just before an ambush by pagans was sprung.
Saint Odran was the chariot-driver for Saint Patrick. He was assassinated in place of his master because he changed places with Patrick in the chariot when he knew that an ambush awaited them (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

509 Martyrs of Palestine Saracen tribes under Persian rule (RM)
 In Palæstína commemorátio sanctórum Monachórum, et aliórum Mártyrum, qui a Saracénis, sub Duce Alamúndaro, ob Christi fidem, sævíssime cæsi sunt.
       In Palestine, the commemoration of the holy monks and other martyrs who were barbarously massacred for the faith of Christ by the Saracens, under their leader Almondhar.
Saracen tribes under Persian rule invaded Palestine about this time and martyred the hermits they found there, out of hatred for Rome and Christianity (Benedictines).
682 St. Barbatus Bishop Benevento innocence, simplicity, and purity of heart
 Apud Benevéntum sancti Barbáti Epíscopi, qui, sanctitáte célebris, Longobárdos et eórum Ducem convértit ad Christum.  At Benevento, St. Barbatus, a bishop illustrious for sanctity, who converted the Lombards and their chief to the faith of Christ.

682 ST BARBATUS, Bishop of Benevento
We know nothing definite about the parentage and youth of St Barbatus, although a late tradition declares him to have been a native of Benevento and to have minis­tered after his ordination in the church of St Basil at Morcona. He was afterwards transferred to the neighbouring Benevento, and for the remainder of his life we have a not very trustworthy biography of the ninth century. When St Barbatus began his ministry, he found even the nominal Christians steeped in pagan superstitions, including Duke Romuald, whose father Grimoald, King of the Lombards, had edified all Italy by his conversion to Christianity. They venerated a golden viper and worshipped at a tree on which they hung the skin of a wild beast. The ceremonies in honour of these terminated with public games in which the skin served for a mark at which bowmen shot arrows over their shoulders. St Barbatus preached boldly against these abuses and laboured long to no purpose, although he supplemented his exhortations with fervent prayer and rigorous fasting for the conversion of the deluded people. At length he roused them from their indiffer­ence by vividly portraying the calamities their city was bound to suffer from the army of the Emperor Constans II, who, landing soon afterwards in Italy (A.D. 663), laid siege to Benevento. In their distress and alarm they listened to the preacher and renounced their errors and pagan practices. Thereupon St Barbatus consoled them by his assurance that the siege would be raised and the emperor worsted—as actually happened. The saint with his own hand felled the tree which had been the object of their veneration and melted down the golden viper, of which he made a chalice. Hildebrand, Bishop of Benevento, had died during the siege, and St Barbatus was chosen as his successor. He was able to complete the good work he had begun and stamped out heathenism throughout the state. In the year 680 he attended the sixth general council, which was held at Constantinople against the monothelites. He did not long survive this assembly, for he died on February 29, 682, at the age of seventy years.

See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii. A more correct text of the life has been edited by Waitz in the MGH., Scriptores rerum Langobardorum pp. 556—563. The life is not older than the beginning of the ninth century.

He was born in Italy about 612 and was ordained in Marcona. Sent to Benevento, Barbatus evangelized and converted many. When the city was put under siege by Byzantine Emperor Constans II in 663, Barbatus predicted that the assault would end. When peace came, Barbatus was named bishop of Benevento.
He attended the Council of Constantinople in 680. He died in Benevento on February 29.

Barbatus of Benevento B (RM) (also known as Barbas) Born in the area of Benevento, Italy. Born of Christian parents, Barbatus was raised to sanctity. Devout meditation on the holy scriptures was his chief entertainment.
His innocence, simplicity, and purity of heart qualified him for the service of the altar, to which he was ordained as soon as the canons of the church would allow it.

Barbatus was immediately employed by the bishop in preaching because he had an extraordinary talent for it. Later he was made curate of Saint Basil's in Morcona near Benevento, a typical parish where the people hesitated to change their sinful ways. As they desired only to slumber on in their sins, they could not bear the remonstrations of their pastor who endeavored to wake them to a sense of their miseries and to sincere repentance.
They, in turn, treated him as a disturber of the peace and violently persecuted him.

Their malice was answered by Barbatus's patience and humility, and his character shining still more brightly was an even greater reproach. Finally, he was forced to withdraw from them.
But by these fiery trials, God purified his heart from all earthly attachments, and perfectly crucified it to the world.

Barbatus returned to Benevento were he was received with joy by those who were acquainted with his innocence and sanctity. Barbatus was the enemy of superstition, which still prevailed among the Lombards even after the conversion of the Arian king Grimoald. The people expressed a religious veneration for a golden viper and prostrated themselves before it.
They also paid superstitious honor to a tree on which they hung the skin of a wild animal.

Barbatus preached zealously against these abuses, and added fervent prayer and rigorous fasting for the conversion of his people. At length he roused their attention by foretelling the calamities they were to suffer from the army of Emperor Constans, who, soon after landing in Italy, besieged Benevento. Soon they were listening to the preacher and renounced their errors and idolatrous practices. Then Barbatus assured them that the siege would be ended and it so happened.
Upon their repentance the saint cut down the tree with his own hand and melted down the golden viper to make a chalice for the altar.

Ildebrand, bishop of Benevento, died during the siege. Once the peace was restored, Saint Barbatus was consecrated bishop on March 10, 663.
As bishop he completed the work of eradicating every trace of superstition in the state.

In 680, Barbatus assisted in a council called by Pope Agatho at Rome and the following year attended the Sixth General Council held at Constantinople against the Monothelites.
He died shortly after the council about age 70. He is honored as one of the chief patrons of Benevento (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
690 Mansuetus of Milan treatise against the Monothelites B (RM) Born in Rome
 Medioláni sancti Mansuéti, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Milan, St. Mansuetus, bishop and confessor.
Mansuetus was appointed to the see of Milan around 672 and ruled it with vigor and wisdom.
He wrote a treatise against the Monothelites (Benedictines).
798 St. Beatus Monk author foe Adoptionist heresy foe commentary on the book of Revelation
A member of St. Martin's Monastery, in Liebana, near Santander, Spain, Beatus opposed the Adoptionist theories of Archbishop Elipandus of Toledo. He worked with Etherius, the bishop of Osma, in converting Elipandus' followers. Both wrote the Liber Adversus Elipandum, a defense against the archbishop's censure.

When the Adoptionist heresy was condemned, Beatus retired to the monastery of Valcavado, where he wrote commentaries and hymns. Beatus of Liébana, OSB Monk (AC) (also known as Bie) Born in Austurias, Spain. Beatus, monk and priest of Liébana, was a defender of the faith in Spain. He was famous for his firm stand against Helipandus, archbishop of Toledo and other Adoptionists. When the Adoptionists were condemned, the saint retired to the monastery of Valcavado, where he wrote his commentary on the book of Revelation (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
798 ST BEATUS OF LIEBANA
IN the latter part of the eighth century there was at Toledo an aged archbishop called Elipandus, who had been infected by that subtle revival of the Nestorian heresy which asserted that Christ was only the adopted son of the Eternal Father. This false doctrine Elipandus taught openly and disseminated far and wide. Against this Goliath, God raised up another David in the form of a priest called Beatus, a monk of Liebana in the Asturian mountains. When he heard the errors of Elipandus he at once set himself to counteract his teaching, both by speech and by writing, and he was joined by Etherius, who afterwards became bishop of Osma in Catalonia. They were very successful, and won back multitudes to the true faith. This soon reached the ears of the archbishop, who was furious and wrote a scathing letter to Abbot Fidelis, apparently a dignitary of great importance in the Asturias. In it he denounced Beatus as a vagrant mountaineer (and worse things) who dared set himself against the archbishop of Toledo and the Church. As for Etherius, he was a mere youth who had been led away by the bombast of this adventurer, but Beatus must be shown his error, and if he persisted he must be delivered up for correction. This letter the abbot showed to Beatus, and the saint’s reply was to publish a book with Etherius in which they set forth, none too clearly, the orthodox teaching. Beatus was influenced and praised by Alcuin, who called him “a learned man, as holy in his life as in his name.”

Ten years before the Liber adversus Elipandum, St Beatus had in 776 published a Commentary on the Apocalypse, of which a number of illuminated manuscripts of artistic interest exist, of ninth-century date onwards. It is likely that he was also the author of several of the hymns of the Mozarabic liturgy. Through a confusion of names, it has been mistakenly asserted that St Beatus was buried at Valcavado; his monastery at Liebana, near Santander, was probably St Martin’s, later called Santo Toribio.

See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii; Florez, España Sagrada, vol. xxxiv, pp. 378—389; Gams, Kirchengeschichte von Spanien, vol. ii, Pt 2, pp. 275—28 ; and DHG., vol. vii, cc. 889-90. And also Mateo del Alamo, “Los comentarios de Beato al Apocalipsis y Elipando” in Miscellanea Giovanni Mercati, vol. ii (Studi e Testi, vol. cxxii, 1946); and H. A. Sanders, Beati in Apocalipsim libri duodecim (American Academy in Rome, 1930).
884 George of Lodève, OSB (AC) Born at Rodez, Spain
Saint George was a Benedictine at Sainte-Foi-de-Conques in Rouergue. After the destruction of the monastery by the Norsemen in 862, he migrated to Vabres in his home diocese.
When George was quite old, he was elected bishop of Lodève (Benedictines).
 11th v Neápoli, in Campánia, sancti Quod-vult-Deus, Carthaginénsis Epíscopi, qui, una cum Clero, a Rege Ariáno Genseríco in fractas et absque remígiis ac velis naves impósitus, præter spem Neápolim áppulit, ibíque, in exsílio pósitus, Conféssor occúbuit.
       At Naples in Campania, St. Quodvultdeus, bishop of Carthage.  The Arian king Genseric placed him together with his clergy into boats which were broken and without oars and sails, but they unexpectedly reached Naples.  He died in exile as a confessor.
1135 St. Belina Virgin martyr of Troyes, France died in defense of her virginity
A peasant, Belina was threatened by the feudal lord of the district. Belina refused his advances and died in defense of her virginity. She was canonized in 1203.
Belina of Troyes VM (AC)  A peasant girl of the district of Troyes, France, who died in defense of her chastity when it was threatened by the feudal lord of the territory (Benedictines).
1265 St. Boniface of Lausanne Bishop publicly scolded emperor local clergy for corruption
He was born in Brussels, Belgium, and educated by the Cistercian nuns of La Cambra nearby. After studying in Paris, France, he taught dogma there and at Cologne, Germany. In 1230, he was made the bishop of Lausanne, Switzerland.  He served nine years and then resigned to live at the Cistercian convent at La Cambra as chaplain because of an assault by agents of Emperor Frederick II after he had publicly scolded the emperor and the local clergy for their corruption.

1260 ST BONIFACE, BISHOP OF LAUSANNE
ST Boniface was born in Brussels and was sent at the age of seventeen to study at Paris, where he in due course became one of the best-known lecturers in the university. He remained in Paris for seven more years, but disputes arose between the masters and the students, and his pupils struck and would not attend his lectures any longer. This decided him to leave Paris and he betook himself to Cologne, where a post was assigned to him in the cathedral school. He had been there only two years when he was elected bishop of Lausanne. He went to his diocese full of zeal and laboured indefatigably, but he found himself continually opposed and misunderstood throughout the eight years of his episcopate. Perhaps his long connection with the University of Paris unfitted him for dealing tactfully with his difficult people; he appears to have publicly denounced from the pulpit the weaknesses of the clergy. Having incurred the enmity of the Emperor Frederick II, Boniface was set upon and badly wounded in 1239. Convinced that he was unfit for his office, he went to the pope and begged to be released, and his request was granted. The saint went back to Brussels, to the Cistercian nunnery at La Cambre, where the abbess invited him to stay amongst them. This he seems to have done, donning the Cistercian habit if he did not actually take the vows, and living the rest of his life within the precincts of the abbey. His cultus was approved in 1702.
Apart from the two short Lives of Boniface which have been printed in the Acta Sanc­torum, February, vol. iii, a great deal of information concerning him may be gleaned from contemporary chronicles, charters, etc. All this has been turned to account by J. F. Kieckens, Étude historique sur St Boniface (1892) ; by Fr Rattinger in two articles in the Stimmen aus Maria Laach, 1896; and by A. Simon and R. Aubert; Boniface de Bruxelles (1945). Boniface has been claimed as the first “Weihbischof”, a type of prelate without definite see, analogous to the chorepiscopi of the early middle ages. We have abundant evidence that during the eighteen years or more that he resided at La Cambre, he went about consecrating churches and altars and discharging other episcopal functions.
Boniface of Lausanne, O. Cist. B (AC) Born in Brussels, Belgium; cultus approved in 1702. Boniface was educated by the nuns of La Cambre (Camera Santa Mariae) near Brussels. Thereafter he studied in Paris, where he taught dogma and became one of the best-known lecturers in the university. He left the university during a student strike, when his pupils no longer came to his classes, and transferred his chair to the University of Cologne. About 1230, he was consecrated bishop of Lausanne, Switzerland, but found that his zeal and frankness was met by misunderstanding and resentment. Having incurred the enmity of Emperor Frederick II, Boniface was attacked and badly wounded in 1239. Convinced he was unfit for office, he begged the pope to release him. The Holy Father agreed. Boniface resigned to live at the Cistercian convent of La Cambre as chaplain to the nuns. It is uncertain whether he actually became a Cistercian or simply lived out his life among them (Benedictines, Walsh).
Saint Boniface is portrayed as a Cistercian bishop with an image of the Virgin and Child on a book. Venerated in Brussels, Cologne, Lausanne, and Paris (Roeder)
1350 St. Conrad of Piacenza reputation for holiness
Born 1290 of a noble family in northern Italy, Conrad as a young man married Euphrosyne, daughter of a nobleman.

One day while hunting he ordered attendants to set fire to some brush in order to flush out the game. The fire spread to nearby fields and to a large forest. Conrad fled. An innocent peasant was imprisoned, tortured to confess and condemned to death. Conrad confessed his guilt, saved the man’s life and paid for the damaged property. Soon after this event, Conrad and his wife agreed to separate: she to a Poor Clare monastery and he to a group of hermits following the Third Order Rule. His reputation for holiness, however, spread quickly. Since his many visitors destroyed his solitude, Conrad went to a more remote spot in Sicily where he lived 36 years as a hermit, praying for himself and for the rest of the world.  Prayer and penance were his answer to the temptations that beset him. Conrad died kneeling before a crucifix. He was canonized in 1625.
 
1351 ST CONRAD OF PIACENZA
THIS Conrad belonged to a noble family of Piacenza, where he lived with his wife, to whom he was much attached. One day when he was out hunting he ordered his attendants to fire some brushwood to drive out the game. This they did, but a strong wind drove the flames into the cornfields, and the conflagration spread to the neighbouring villages. Conrad, unable to check the fire, returned home secretly with his beaters, and they said nothing about their share in the disaster. A poor man who was found picking up sticks near the fire, was accused of incendiar­ism and sentenced to death. Upon hearing this, Conrad was filled with remorse and hastened to exculpate the accused and to give himself up, explaining how it had all come about. He was ordered to make good the damage which his careless­ness had caused. The fine thus inflicted swallowed up nearly all his possessions as well as his wife’s dowry. This caused them to think very seriously, and they came to the conclusion that the finger of God was to be seen in what had happened. They agreed to give away to the poor whatever was left them, and, whilst his wife entered a convent of Poor Clares, Conrad put on the garb of a pilgrim and attached himself to some hermits who lived under the rule of the third order of St Francis, to which he was admitted. From that time he led a life of extraordinary piety, and soon his fame began to bring him visits from his former fellow-citizens. To avoid this publicity he decided to leave the neighbourhood; he crossed over to Sicily and took up his abode in the valley of Noto, where he dwelt for thirty years, partly in the Hospital of St Martin and partly in a hermitage founded by William Bocherio, another nobleman who had become an anchorite. Towards the end of his life St Conrad, to obtain more complete solitude, betook himself to the grotto of Pizzoni, three miles from Noto.
In spite of all attempts to hide himself, the fame of his sanctity spread far and wide, and when a famine occurred numbers of people came to him to implore his help. Through his prayers relief came at once to the stricken inhabitants, and from that time his cell was besieged by sufferers of all kinds. The Bishop of Syracuse himself visited him, and it was told afterwards that while his attendants were preparing to unpack the provisions they had brought, the bishop had asked St Conrad with a smile whether he had nothing to offer his visitors. The holy man replied that he would go and look in his cell, from which he emerged carrying became a favourite shrine at which many miraculous cures took place. He is more particularly invoked for ruptures on account of the large number of people who owed their recovery from hernia to his intercession. The cultus of St Conrad has been approved by three popes.

See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii; Mazzara, Leggendario Francescano, vol. pp 246—254; and Leon, L’Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. I. The many marvels of which these accounts are full do not seem to be borne out by any reliable evidence.
Comment: Francis of Assisi was drawn both to contemplation and to a life of preaching; periods of intense prayer nourished his preaching. Some of his early followers, however, felt called to a life of greater contemplation, and he accepted that.Though Conrad of Piacenza is not the norm in the Church, he and other contemplatives remind us of the greatness of God and of the joys of heaven.
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage: "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).
Conrad of Piacenza, OFM Tert. (AC) Born in 1290; died 1351 or 1354; cultus approved with the title of saint by Paul III. The nobly born Conrad loved hunting. One day on Conrad's orders, his beaters set light to the undergrowth to flush out the game that their master wished to kill. The fire spread to neighboring cornfields and even damaged several houses. Unable to control the fire, Conrad and his beaters quickly returned home and said nothing.  A poor man who had been collecting faggots nearby was unjustly accused of starting the fire and condemned to death. Conrad's conscience was stirred, and he confessed to being responsible for the fire, in order to save the poor man's life.

The compensation he had to pay for the damage caused by the fire was enormous. Conrad and his wife were virtually impoverished. But the experience had enriched him spiritually. It seemed to both of them that God was calling them to abandon a life devoted to selfish pleasures. The couple gave their remaining possessions to the poor. Saint Francis and Saint Clare had established orders for those who voluntarily embraced poverty; Conrad became a hermit under the rule of Saint Francis, and his wife joined the Poor Clares.

Nothing could keep away men and women attracted by the great austerity of the rest of Conrad's life. He withdrew more and more into solitude, finally spending thirty years in the valley of Noto in Sicily. He spent part of his time in the Hospital of Saint Martin, and the rest in the hermitage founded by William Bocherio, another noble who had become an anchorite.
Seeking still more solitude, he hid himself in the grotto of Pizzoni near Noto. Yet his prayers brought blessings to men, sometimes healing their diseases, and thousands flocked to him. When a famine struck, people came to him to beg for help. Through his prayers, relief was said to come at once.
Even the bishop of Syracuse travelled to seek his blessing towards the end of Conrad's life. It was reported that as the bishop's attendants were preparing to unpack provisions they had brought, the bishop asked Conrad smilingly whether he had anything to offer his guests. Conrad replied that he would go and look in his cell. He returned carrying newly made cakes, which the bishop accepted as a miracle.
Conrad returned the bishop's visit and made a general confession to him. As he arrived, he was surrounded by fluttering birds, who escorted him back to Noto.
He died still praying for others in the church of Saint Nicholas in Noto, where his tomb became the goal of many pilgrimages because of the miraculous cures that occurred there (Benedictines, Bentley, Encyclopedia, White).
In art, Conrad is a Franciscan hermit with a cross upon which birds perch. Sometimes he is portrayed as a bearded, old man with a tau staff, bare feet, Franciscan cincture, with small birds fluttering around him (Roeder), or with stags and animals about him (White). He is invoked against hernias (Encyclopedia, White).

February 19, 2010 St. Conrad of Piacenza (1290-1350) 
Born of a noble family in northern Italy, Conrad as a young man married Euphrosyne, daughter of a nobleman.
One day while hunting he ordered attendants to set fire to some brush in order to flush out the game. The fire spread to nearby fields and to a large forest. Conrad fled. An innocent peasant was imprisoned, tortured to confess and condemned to death. Conrad confessed his guilt, saved the man’s life and paid for the damaged property.
Soon after this event, Conrad and his wife agreed to separate: she to a Poor Clare monastery and he to a group of hermits following the Third Order Rule. His reputation for holiness, however, spread quickly. Since his many visitors destroyed his solitude, Conrad went to a more remote spot in Sicily where he lived 36 years as a hermit, praying for himself and for the rest of the world.
Prayer and penance were his answer to the temptations that beset him. Conrad died kneeling before a crucifix. He was canonized in 1625.
Comment: Francis of Assisi was drawn both to contemplation and to a life of preaching; periods of intense prayer nourished his preaching. Some of his early followers, however, felt called to a life of greater contemplation, and he accepted that. Though Conrad of Piacenza is not the norm in the Church, he and other contemplatives remind us of the greatness of God and of the joys of heaven.
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this: "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).
1400 + St. Alvarez confessor Queen Catherine adviser tutor King John II teaching preaching asceticism holiness
 was born in either Lisbon, Portugal, or Cordova, Spain. He entered the Dominican convent at Cordova in 1368. He became known for his preaching prowess in Spain and Italy, was confessor and adviser of Queen Catherine, John of Gaunt's daughter, and tutor of King John II in his youth.
He reformed the court, and then left the court to found a monastery near Cordova. There the Escalaceli (ladder of heaven) that he built became a center of religious devotion. He successfully led the opposition to antipope Benedict XII (Peter de Luna), and by the time of his death was famous all over Spain for his teaching, preaching, asceticism, and holiness. His cult was confirmed in 1741.
1430 BD ALVAREZ OF CORDOVA
THE birthplace of Bd Alvarez is uncertain: some authorities give it as Lisbon and others Cordova, where the greater part of his life was spent. He entered the Dominican convent of St Paul there in 1368. He became a wonderful preacher and laboured with great success first in Andalusia and afterwards in Italy. On the death of King Henry II of Castile, Alvarez became confessor and adviser of the Queen-mother Catherine (who was the daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster), and directed the early training of the young King John II. He com­pletely reformed the court, but when, owing to political dissensions, the regency was divided he withdrew from court and resumed his former work as a preacher.

Bd Alvarez had long formed the design, which he proceeded to carry out, of found­ing a Dominican house which, in accord with the reform already begun by Bd Raymund of Capua, should follow strictly the rule of St Dominic. He chose a mountainous region not far from Cordova, and there he erected the Escalaceli, Ladder of Heaven, which became a centre of piety and learning, to which men flocked from all parts of Spain.

Alvarez exercised a great influence in resisting the papal claimant Benedict XIII”, Peter de Luna, and in bringing the people and—what was much more difficult—the grandees, to acknowledge the legitimate pope.

In spite of advancing age Bd Alvarez continued his work of catechizing, teaching and preaching: he would spend his whole day in such tasks, and when he returned at night to his monastery he would devote nearly all the night to prayer. He and his brethren depended upon alms for their food, and sometimes he went to the market-place in Cordova and addressed the people, ending up by saying, “My dear brethren, the poor friars of St Dominic in the mountain recommend themselves to your charity”. His practices of penance grew ever more severe; he crawled on his knees to a chapel dedicated to our Lady of Pity, taking the discipline as he went, and a picture still at Cordova represents him thus kneeling, his shoulders covered with blood and accompanied by angels, some of whom are clearing away little rocks from his path. He built several chapels in the monastery grounds, each one representing a “station” or scene of our Lord’s passion, doubtless suggested to him by his experiences as a pilgrim in Jerusalem. It was told that one night when he had been praying in one of these, a violent storm made the brook which separated it from the monastery quite impassable. When the bell rang for Matins the holy man lifted his eyes to God, took off his black cloak, spread it on the water and walked safely across to dry land; he resumed his cloak and returned to his place in choir as usual. The cultus of Bd Alvarez was confirmed in 1741.

See Touron, Les Hommes illustres de l’Ordre de St Dominique, vol. iii, pp. 98—110 Procter, Dominican Saints, pp. 42—44 ; Mortier, Maîtres Généraux OP., vol. iv, pp. 210—214. Mortier points out that the date 1420 usually assigned for the death of Alvarez cannot possibly be correct, for documentary evidence shows that he was living in 1423. The same historian seems to claim for Bd Alvarez that he was the originator in the West of the devotion of the Stations of the Cross. But the idea of a series of such shrines may be traced as far back as St Petronius of Bologna in the fifth century, and the Augustinians, Peter and John da Fabriano, erected similar stations shortly before the time of Alvarez. The idea at this period was becoming very general

1862  Bl. Lucy Martyr of China Catholic schoolteacher.
She was a Catholic schoolteacher in China, where she was beheaded. Lucy was beatified in 1909.


On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Day 6 40 Days for Life


40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015

We are the defenders of true freedom.
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Pope Leo XIII.  1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption ; canonized in 1887 by Pope Leo XIII.

Clement VII in 1533 approved The cultus of Bd Verdiana who appears in the habit of a Vallombrosan nun, carrying a basket with two snakes in it. It seems certain she was associated with the Vallombrosan Order, but her connection with the Franciscan third order is by no means so clearly established.

Pope Callistus III allowed BD EUSTOCHIUM OF MESSINA, VIRGIN to found another convent to follow the first rule of St Francis under the Observants. 

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy, but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

"To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

731 Pope Gregory II, 89th Pope: educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian    (RM)

824 Pope St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.   Popes Html link here: 

731 Gregory II, 89th Pope educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian (RM)
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817
Pope Innocent III had experienced a similar vision. Without hesitation Innocent provided papal approval for the Order of the Most Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives (the Trinitarians), with John of Matha as superior.
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
1198 - 1216 Pope Innocent III;
One of the greatest popes of the Middle Ages;
a learned theologian; one of the greatest jurists of his time; held various ecclesiastical offices during short reigns of Lucius III, Urban III, Gregory VIII, and Clement III; re-established papal authority in Rome; scarcely a country in Europe over which Innocent III did not in some way or other assert supremacy he claimed for the papacy;
During his reign two great founders of the mendicant orders, St. Dominic and St. Francis, laid before him their scheme of reforming the world. Innocent was not blind to the vices of luxury and indolence which had infected many of the clergy and part of the laity.
In Dominic and Francis he recognized two mighty adversaries of these vices and he sanctioned their projects with words of encouragement.  He wrote "De quadripartita specie nuptiarum" (P. L., CCXVII, 923-968), an exposition of the fourfold marriage bond, namely, between man and wife, between Christ and the Church, between God and the just soul, between the Word and human nature - - entirely based on passages from Holy Scripture.  Popes Html link here: 

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Gregory IV (827-44) # 102
Elected near the end of 827; died January, 844. When Gregory was born is not known, but he was a Roman and the son of John. Before his election to the papacy he was the Cardinal-Priest of the Basilica of St. Mark, which he adorned with mosaics yet visible. For his piety and learning he was ordained priest by Paschal I. This man, of distinguished appearance and high birth, was raised to the chair of Peter, despite his protestations of unfitness, mainly buy the instrumentality of the secular nobility of Rome who were then securing a preponderating influence in papal elections. But the representatives in Rome of the Emperor Louis the Pious would not allow him to be consecrated until his election had been approved by their master. This interference caused such delay that it was not, seemingly, till about March, 828, that he began to govern the Church.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Clement IX 1667-1669: 1670 St. Charles of Sezze Franciscan Pope Clement IX called Charles to his bedside for a blessing;

Pope Pius XI -- 1888 ST JOHN BOSCO, FOUNDER OF THE SALESIANS OF DON Bosco
“IN his life the supernatural almost became the natural and the extraordinary ordinary.” These were the words of Pope Pius XI in speaking of that great lover of children, Don Bosco.


At Paris St. Thomas was honored with the friendship of the King, St. Louis, with whom he frequently dined. In 1261, Urban IV called him to Rome where he was appointed to teach, but he positively declined to accept any ecclesiastical dignity. St. Thomas not only wrote (his writings filled twenty hefty tomes characterized by brilliance of thought and lucidity of language), but he preached often and with greatest fruit. Clement IV offered him the archbishopric of Naples which he also refused. He left the great monument of his learning, the "Summa Theologica", unfinished, for on his way to the second Council of Lyons, ordered there by Gregory X, he fell sick and died at the Cistercian monastery of Fossa Nuova in 1274.
St. Thomas declared Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius V.

Romæ sancti Vitaliáni Papæ.       At Rome, St. Vitalian, pope.

Whereas in the Lord's Prayer, we are bidden to ask for 'our daily bread,' the Holy Fathers of the Church all but unanimously teach that by these words must be understood, not so much that material bread which is the support of the body, as the Eucharistic bread, which ought to be our daily food. -- Pope St. Pius X





Then in 1525, since it was a Holy Year of Jubilee, Angela Merici went as a pilgrim to Rome to gain the great jubilee indulgence. When she had an audience with the Pope Clement VII, he tried to persuade her to stay at Rome and head a congregation of nursing sisters. But she was still convinced of her calling to education work. In fact, years before, she had experienced a vision in which she saw a group of young women ascending to heaven on a ladder of light. A voice had then said:
“Take heed, Angela; before you die you will found at Brescia a company of maidens similar to those you have just seen.
     It was April 1533 that she made this prophecy come true. The Ursalines

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Pope Gregory IX 1227-1241 , having called St Raymund to Rome in 1230, nominated him to various offices and took him likewise for his confessor, in which capacity Raymund enjoined the pope, for a penance, to receive, hear and expedite im­mediately all petitions presented by the poor. Gregory also ordered the saint to gather into one body all the scattered decrees of popes and councils since the collection made by Gratian in 1150. In three years Raymund completed his task, and the five books of the “Decretals” were confirmed by the same Pope Gregory in 1234. Down to the publication of the new Codex Juris Canonici in 1917 this compilation of St Raymund was looked upon as the best arranged part of the body of canon law, on which account the canonists usually chose it for the text of their commentaries.