Saturday Saints of this Day February  20 Décimo Kaléndas Mártii.  
Day 11 40 Days for Life Dear Readers
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.


Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here

Acts of the Apostles
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

February 20 - Blessed Jacinta Marto, Visionary of Fatima (d. 1920)  
 Then the Virgin came and took Jacinta’s soul to Heaven  
 On February 20, 1920, around 6 o’clock pm, the young patient said she did not feel well and wanted to receive the last rites. So they called the priest from the parish church of the Angels, Father Pereira dos Reis (…). The priest thought that the child looked quite well and he refused to give her the sacrament (…). However, the little girl insisted on receiving Holy Communion, claiming that she was about to die. In fact, near 10:30 pm, little Jacinta died peacefully, all alone (…).

Then the Virgin came one last time to see the young patient of bed #60 (where she had been carried after the operation), and took Jacinta’s soul to Heaven, leaving behind only her mortal remains…

(…) During the first exhumation, someone took a photograph of the young shepherdess' face, and the Bishop of Leiria sent that photo to Lucia. In her letter to thank the Prelate, (…) the nun wrote, among other things: "(…) For my part, I owe the preservation of my innocence to her friendship. She understood amazingly well the spirit of prayer and sacrifice that the Blessed Virgin Mary recommended to us."  www.fatima.be
 
Be firm in your resolutions; stay in the ship in which I placed you and let the storm come. Long live Jesus. You will not perish.
Walk the way of the Lord in simplicity; do not torment your spirit. Say the truth, always the truth. -- Saint Pio of Pietrelcina


February 20 – Madonna dei Campiveri (Italy, 1862) - Jacinthe Marto, seer of Fatima (d. 1920)
7th apparition of Banneux (Belgium)   
 
“I am not complaining anymore! Our Lady told me that she will come for me”
 
Jacinta Marto, one of the three young children to whom the Virgin Mary appeared in Fatima (Portugal), had been ill since December 1918. She had surgery on February 10, 1920, and suffered a lot after that. The sharp pain came back every time the bandage was changed. Her groan was, "Ouch! ouch! ... O Our Lady!"
She said to Jesus, "You can convert many sinners, because I suffer so much!"

Some days later, the Virgin Mary came to the hospital, at the foot of her bed, to comfort the girl, telling her that soon she would come and take her to Heaven. From that moment, Jacinta no longer showed signs of suffering. She confided to Mother Godinho: "I am not complaining anymore! Our Lady said that she will come for me, and that she is already taking away all my sufferings. "

The doctor confirmed that the pain of his little patient had disappeared and that she could pass the time pleasantly by looking at holy pictures, including one of Our Lady of Sameiro, the famous shrine of the Immaculate Conception near Braga. The child said it was one that reminded her most of the Virgin who appeared to her.
On February 20, 1920, around 10:30 pm, little Jacinta died quietly, in the odor of sanctity.
 
www.fatima.be



February 20 - Jacinta Marto, seer of Fatima (d. 1920)
- 5th Apparition in Lourdes (France, 1858) Saint Bernadette's Silence (III)
On February 20th, the group had grown larger. Thirty people witnessed Bernadette's silent ecstasy. As she returned to the village, she saw her aunt Basile in the street, who had been waiting impatiently for Bernadette's return. Aunt Basile invited her inside her house and Bernadette's composure was peaceful and joyful.
But Basile had prepared her reprimand.
"People are talking too much about you, my girl! Don't go back there!" Bernadette replied, "Too bad for them. Let the people talk." Then she added, "If you want to come with me tomorrow morning you can?..."
Aunt Basile hated to admit it, but she was longing to accompany her niece. "What annoys me," she answered, "is the crowd. So let's go either earlier or later, when there is not so much of a crowd."

Adapted from Father René Laurentin, Bernadette vous parle (Bernadette Speaks), Mediaspaul, 1972, p. 53
1920 Blessed Jacinta & Francisco Marto
Between May 13 and October 13, 1917, three children, Portuguese shepherds

 February 20 - Jacinta Marto, seer of Fatima (d. 1920) - 5th Apparition in Lourdes (France, 1858)
  Saint Bernadette's Silence (III)
On February 20th, the group had grown larger. Thirty people witnessed Bernadette's silent ecstasy. As she returned to the village, she saw her aunt Basile in the street, who had been waiting impatiently for Bernadette's return. Aunt Basile invited her inside her house and Bernadette's composure was peaceful and joyful. But Basile had prepared her reprimand.
"People are talking too much about you, my girl! Don't go back there!" Bernadette replied, "Too bad for them. Let the people talk." Then she added, "If you want to come with me tomorrow morning you can?..."
Aunt Basile hated to admit it, but she was longing to accompany her niece. "What annoys me," she answered, "is the crowd. So let's go either earlier or later, when there is not so much of a crowd."
Adapted from Father René Laurentin, Bernadette vous parle (Bernadette Speaks), Mediaspaul, 1972, p. 53
 

Saint Maruthas, who wrote Sadoth's act
a
Ancient Chaldaic writers quoted by Assemani say that Simeon Barsabba'e was Sadoth's maternal uncle
Saint Maruthas, who wrote Sadoth's acta, meditated:
"A man that is guided by the Spirit fears not death. He loves God and goes to him with an incredible ardor
but he who lives according to the desires of the flesh, trembles, and is in despair at its approach:
he loves the world, and it is with grief that he leaves it."


Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:
"To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1). 
      Pothmius and Nemesius martyrs in Cyprus MM (RM) 
302-310 Marytrs of Tyre wild animals couldn't approach the Christians: beheaded instead
310 Eleutherius of Byzantium bishop BM (RM)
     St. Valerius The first bishop of Conserans, France 
345 St. Sadoth Martyr with 128 fellow Christians in Persia 
480 St. Bolcan Bishop disciple of St. Patrick & Baptized by
512 Falco of Maastricht Bishop of Maastricht from 495 until his death B (AC)
532 St. Eleutherius of Tournai Bishop of Tournai, Belgium martyred by Arian heretics
703 Leo of Catania 'il Maraviglioso' ('the Wonder- Worker') in Sicily B (RM)
743 ST. EUCHERIUS, Bishop Charles Martel reproved encroachments miracles.
787 St. Leo of Catania Bishop of Catania, Sicily  
796 St. Colgan Abbot of Clanmacroise “the Wise”, in Offaly, Ireland 
1154 + St. Wulfric  hermit Many miracles were attributed to his intercession, both in this life and after his death
        numerous between 1185 to 1235
1250 St. Amata Poor Clare niece of St. Clare of Assisi
1304 Blessed Peter of Treja early Franciscans associated with Blessed Conrad of Offida in his apostolate
1468 Blessed Elisabeth Bartholomea Picenardi, OSM V (AC)  many miracles were said worked at her tomb
1920 Blessed Jacinta & Francisco Marto Between May 13 and October 13, 1917, three children, Portuguese shepherds

Christ said his coming would bring not peace but a sword (see Matthew 10:34).  The Gospels offer no support for us if we fantasize about a sunlit holiness that knows no problems. Christ did not escape at the last moment, though he did live happily ever after—after a life of controversy, problems, pain and frustration.
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)

Day 11 40 Days for Life Dear Readers
  Abortion hurts women, families ... and, ultimately, communities.   It is a local problem ... and it has a local solution. We take abortion personally because it goes on in our neighborhood ... just around the corner from where we live or work. That is why 40 Days for Life has grown from that first campaign in one community in Texas ... spreading to 607 cities worldwide.
 
From now until March 20, 40 Days for Life campaigns are going on in 23 different countries around the world ... and the only plausible reason why 40 Days for Life has spread so far is the grace of God. These are His children, His women – and He wants us to be His light to give hope, no matter where we live. Whether you’re in Romania, Colombia, New Zealand – or anywhere else – you can find the 40 Days for Life location nearest you at:
  https://40daysforlife.com/browse-campaigns/
 
Bogota, Colombia
 “It was worth it!” said one of the team leaders in Bogota. In the city’s first campaign last year, vigil participants knew of at least 12 babies that were saved from about. And now – they’ve learned of one child spared during the first week of this campaign. Six volunteers were in prayer in front of the abortion center. As they stood below a “pray for an end to abortion” banner, they saw a young woman – perhaps in her mid-20s – leaving the building.
 
She held her head down. She carried a document in her hands … and she had tears in her eyes. One of the vigil participants stepped up to offer her information about life-affirming options that were available at pregnancy help centers in the area. The young woman gratefully accepted a glass of water, and slowly started to calm down. She agreed to go to the help center for the assistance she needed to continue with her pregnancy in spite of the obstacles she was facing. “For now,” said the Bogota team member, “we give thanks to God for that baby that will bring blessings and changes to this young woman and her family – and in the future, for many people more. Human life is a gift from God. We pray that the whole world says yes to life!”

Auckland, New Zealand
40 Days for Life is going on – and going strong – in New Zealand, at locations in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington. Family Life International, which has helped tremendously in this outreach, has put together a video called “How 40 Days for Life Saved an Auckland Family.”
 
This is the amazing success story of how a young mother who sought a late term abortion was able to choose life for her baby as a direct result of the 40 Days for Life prayer vigil in Auckland, New Zealand. It’s really worth a few minutes of your day! It shows how prayer works – no matter where in the world you are. go to:
https://40daysforlife.com/2016/02/20/auckland-new-zealand-2/
 
Here's today's devotional from Carmen Pate of Alliance Ministries.
Day 11 intention
Pray that when those representing Planned Parenthood and other abortion groups see volunteers for 40 Days for Life, they see ambassadors of Christ, and may each volunteer be consciously aware at all times we represent Him.
 
Scripture
I...beseech you to walk worthy of the calling with which you were called, with all lowliness, and gentleness, with longsuffering, bearing with one another in love. — Ephesians 4:1-2
 
Reflection from Carmen Pate
When a former abortionist and post-abortive woman, Carol Everett, was asked what turned her heart from death to life in Christ, she replied, "It was unconditional love" shown by a man who prayed daily for her in front of the facility where she worked.

He told Carol that "God had sent him" because there was someone in there that God wanted out. She left 27 days later and now serves as Christ's ambassador to help others. We too have been sent by Christ as an ambassador to love unconditionally those God seeks to "get out" of their bondage and sin.

In his book, "Fishers of Men," Dr. Sumner Wemp describes what it means to be an ambassador of Christ, the King of Kings:
•    God has chosen us (John 15:16)
•    We are sent into a world that is not our home (1 Peter 2:11)
•    Our walk must match our talk (1 Timothy 3:7)
•    We must abide in Him for daily instruction (John 15:5)
•    Know our purpose -- to seek and to save that which is lost (Luke 19:10)
•    We are to reconcile others to God with His authority (Matthew 28:19-20)
•    Our service is to be grounded and rooted in love (Ephesians 3:17)
Pray that we each will walk worthy of the calling with which we were called!
 
Prayer
Dear Heavenly Father, we are humbled that you have called us and appointed us to be ambassadors of Christ in a world that is not our home. It is a calling much higher and grander than our finite minds can imagine.
We pray that your Holy Spirit will empower us to walk worthy of the calling. We pray that Your unconditional love will flow through us onto those who desperately need Your saving grace. In the name of Christ who is worthy, Amen.
 
Printable devotional
To download today's devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share with friends:
  http://40daysforlife.com/media/day11.pdf
Pothmius and Nemesius martyrs in Cyprus MM (RM)
 In Cypro sanctórum Mártyrum Potámii et Nemésii.  In island of Cyprus, the holy martyrs Pothamius and Nemesius.
302-310 Marytrs of Tyre wild animals couldnt approach the Christians: beheaded instead unknown number martyrs suffered in Tyre modern Lebanon

Tyri, in Phœnícia, commemorátio beatórum Mártyrum, quorum númerum solíus sciéntia Dei cólligit.  Hi omnes, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, a Vetúrio, mílitum magístro, multis tormentórum genéribus, sibi ínvicem succedéntibus, occísi sunt; nam, primo quidem flagris toto córpore dilaniáti, inde divérsis bestiárum genéribus tráditi, sed ab illis divína virtúte nil læsi, post, áddita feritáte ignis ac ferri, martyrium consummárunt.  Eórum vero gloriósam multitúdinem ad victóriam incitábant Epíscopi Tyránnio, Silvánus, Péleus et Nilus, ac Presbyter Zenóbius, qui, felíci agóne, una cum illis, martyrii palmam adépti sunt.
       At Tyre in Phoenicia, the commemoration of many blessed martyrs, whose number is known to God alone.  Under Emperor Diocletian, they were put to death after a long and varied series of torments by the military commander Veturius.  They first had their bodies torn with scourges, then delivered to several different kinds of beasts.  Providence prevented their injury throughout all this, but their martyrdom was granted by means of fire and the sword.  Tyrannio, Sylvanus, Peleus, and Nilus, all bishops, and Zenobius, a priest, urged the gloriously assembled multitude to victory, and they all endured the test successfully to win the palm of martyrdom.
304 AND 310 SS. TYRANNIO, ZENOBIUS AND OTHER MARTYRS
EUSEBJUS, an eyewitness of what he relates concerning these martyrs, gives the following account of them: “Several Christians of Egypt, some of whom had settled in Palestine, others at Tyre, gave astonishing proofs of their patience and constancy in the faith. After innumerable stripes and blows, which they cheerfully endured, they were exposed to wild beasts such as leopards, wild bears, boars and bulls. I myself was present when these savage beasts, accustomed to human blood, were let out upon them, and, instead of devouring them or tearing them to pieces as might naturally be expected, they stood off, refusing to touch or approach them, but turned on their keepers and any that came in their way. It was only the soldiers of Christ that they refused to attack, although these martyrs, in obedience to an order given them, tossed about their arms—which was thought to be a sure way of provoking the beasts against them. Sometimes indeed the animals were seen to rush towards them with their usual impetuosity, but they suddenly withdrew, held back by a divine power: this happened several times, to the wonder of all the onlookers. This happened in the year 304, and the Church on this day commemorates also the bishop of Tyre, St Tyrannio, who had been present at the triumph of the earlier martyrs and had encouraged them in their conflict. He had not the comfort of following them till six years later, when he was arrested, conducted from Tyre to Antioch in the company of St Zenobius, a priest and physician of Sidon, and, after suffering many torments, was thrown into the river Orontes.
Zenobius died on the rack. Some time after, under Maximinus, St Silvanus, Bishop of Emesa, in Phoenicia, was devoured by wild beasts in his own city, together with two companions. Peleus and Nilus, two Egyptian priests in Palestine, were consumed by fire with several others. St Silvanus, Bishop of Gaza, was condemned to the copper mines of Phaenon near Petra in Arabia, and afterwards beheaded there with thirty-nine companions.
Whilst St Tyrannio is commemorated on this day with those who perished at Tyre in 304, St Zenobius, who suffered with him, is assigned to October 29, St Silvanus of Emesa to February 6 and St Silvanus of Gaza to May 29.

Eusebius, Hist. Eccles., bk viii, cap. ij, is the principal authority, but the Acta Sanctorum and Le Quien, Oriens Christianus, supply some further discussion of geographical details, etc.

The first relay having done no execution, a second and a third was loosed upon them, but all in vain. Meanwhile the martyrs stood there unshaken, although some of them were very young. Amongst them was a youth not yet twenty who remained quite still in one position, undaunted and not trembling, with his eyes uplifted to heaven and his arms extended in the form of a cross, whilst the bears and leopards with wide-open jaws threatening immediate death seemed on the point of tearing him to pieces: but by a miracle, not being suffered to touch him, they withdrew. Others were exposed to a furious bull which had already gored and tossed into the air several infidels who had ventured too near and had left them half dead. It was only the martyrs that he could not approach: he would stop and stand scraping the dust with his hoofs, though endeavouring to rush forward, he would butt with his horns in all directions and paw the ground whilst he was being urged on by red-hot goads, but it was all in vain. After repeated trials with other wild beasts with no better success, the saints were slain by the sword and their bodies cast into the sea. Others who refused to sacrifice were beaten to death or burned or executed in some other way.”

Martyrs of Tyre (RM). The historian Eusebius relates: "Several Christians of Egypt, whereof some had settled in Palestine, others at Tyre, gave astonishing proofs of their patience and constancy in the faith. After innumerable blows, which they cheerfully underwent, they were exposed to wild beasts, such as leopards, wild bears, boars, and bulls. I myself was present when these savage creatures, accustomed to human blood, being let out upon them, instead of devouring them or tearing them to pieces, as it was natural to expect, stood off, refusing even to touch or approach them, at the same time that they fell foul on their keepers, and others that came in their way.
"The soldiers of Christ were the only persons they refused, though these martyrs, pursuant to the order given them, tossed about their arms, which was thought a ready way to provoke the beasts, and stir them up against them.
Sometimes, indeed, they were perceived to rush towards them with their usual impetuosity, but, withheld by a divine power, they suddenly withdrew; and this many times to the great admiration of all present.

"The first having done no execution, others were a second and a third time let out upon them, but in vain; the martyrs standing all the while unshaken, though many of them very young. Among them was a youth not yet twenty, who had his eyes lifted up to heaven, and his arms extended in the form of a cross, not in the least daunted, nor trembling, nor shifting his place, while the bears and leopards, with their jaws wide open, threatening immediate death, seemed most ready to tear him to pieces; but, by a miracle, not being suffered to touch him, they speedily withdrew.

"Others were exposed to a furious bull, which had already gored and tossed into the air several infidels who had ventured too near, and left them half dead: only the martyrs he could not approach; he stopped, and stood scraping the dust with his feet, and though he seemed to endeavor it with his utmost might, butting with his horns on every side, and pawing the ground with his feet, being also urged on by red-hot iron goads, it was all to no purpose.

"After repeated trials of this kind with other wild beasts, with as little success as the former, the saints were slain by the sword, and their bodies cast into the sea. Others who refused to sacrifice were beaten to death, or burned, or executed diverse other ways." This happened in 304 under Veturius, a Roman general, in the reign of Diocletian. Other martyrs from Tyre include Tyrannio et al. (Husenbeth).
310 Eleutherius of Byzantium bishop BM (RM)
 Constantinópoli sancti Eleuthérii, Epíscopi et Mártyris.       At Constantinople, St. Eleutherius, bishop and martyr
Eleutherius is said to have been bishop of Byzantium and a martyr. Most writers, following the lead of the Bollandists, identify him with the Saint Eleutherius commemorated on August 4 (Benedictines).
St. Valerius The first bishop of Conserans, France.
He was mentioned in the writings of St. Gregory of Tours.

Pothmius and Nemesius martyrs in Cyprus MM (RM)
(also known as Potamius) Date unknown. Potamius and Nemesius was martyrs in Cyprus. Nothing else is known of them. Eusebius attaches them to the Church of Alexandria (Benedictines).

345 St. Sadoth {meaning friend of the king in Persian); Martyr with 128 fellow Christians in Persia
In Pérside natális sancti Sadoth Epíscopi, et aliórum centum vigínti octo; qui, sub Rege Persárum Sápore, cum Solem adoráre renuíssent, crudéli nece præcláras sibi corónas comparárunt.
In Persia, in the time of King Sapor, the birthday of St. Sadoth, bishop, and one hundred and twenty-eight others who refused to adore the sun, but who by a cruel death purchased shining crowns.

342 ST SADOTH, BISHOP OF SELEUCIA-CTESIPHON, MARTYR

ST SADOTH (Shadost, Sadosh, Shiadustes) appears to have acted as deacon to the bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, whom he represented at the Council of Nicaea in 325. When the bishop St Simeon Barsabae suffered martyrdom during the terrible persecution by Sapor II, Sadoth was chosen to succeed him in the see, the most important in the Persian kingdom but the most exposed to the storm. This grew more violent, and for a short time Sadoth and some of his clergy took refuge in a hiding-place from which they could give assistance and encouragement to their distressed flock. During this period St Sadoth had a vision which seemed to indicate that the time had come for him to seal his faith with his blood. He described the dream to his assembled priests and deacons: “I saw in my sleep a ladder surrounded with light and stretching from the earth to heaven. At the top stood the holy Simeon in great glory. He beheld me at the bottom and said with a smile, ‘Climb up, Sadoth: do not be afraid. I mounted yesterday and it is your turn to-day.’ This means that as he was slain last year, I am to follow him this year.”

King Sapor having come to Seleucia, St Sadoth was apprehended with many clergy and others, 128 persons in all. They were cast into dungeons, where for five months they suffered incredible misery and torments. Three times they were put to the rack: their legs were bound with cords which were drawn with so much force that their breaking bones were heard to crack like sticks in a faggot. In the midst of these tortures the officers cried out to them, “Worship the sun and obey the king if you would save your lives”. Sadoth answered in the name of all that the sun was but a creature, the work of God, made for mankind, and that they would worship none but the Creator. The officers said, “Obey or death is certain and immediate.” The martyrs cried with one voice, “We shall not die but live and reign eternally with God and His Son, Jesus Christ”. They were chained in couples and led out of the city, singing joyfully as they went, and their prayer and praise did not cease till the death of the last of the blessed company. St Sadoth himself, however, was separated from his flock and taken to Bait-Lapat, where he was beheaded after being bishop for less than a year.

See Assemani, Bibliotheca orientalis, vol. i, p. 188 and vol. iii, pp. 399, 613 Gregory Barhebraeus, Chronicon, ii, 38 and Le Quien, Oriens christianus, vol. ii, p. 1108.
Also called Schadost. Sadoth was the metropolitan of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, Persia, and he attended the Council of Nicaea in 325. He headed the Christian community during the severe persecution of the Church in Persia under the Sassanid Persian ruler Shapur II.   Arrested with many other believers, Sadoth and eight of his flock were cruelly imprisoned at Bei-Lapat and tortured prior to execution; Sadoth was beheaded.
Sadoth BM & Comp. MM (RM) (also known as Shahdost, Schadost, Schiadustes) Died c. 342. Sadoth, meaning friend of the king in Persian, succeeded Saint Simeon Barsabba'e as bishop of Seleucia-Ctesiphon, the two main cities of Persia situated on the Tigris River. A new persecution of Christians by King Shapur II began soon after his election. Sadoth and his clergy hid, although they remained in close contact with their flock.
During this time, Sadoth had a vision the God was calling him to shed his blood. He called his clergy together to relate the message: "I saw in my sleep, a ladder environed with light and reaching from earth to the heavens. Saint Simeon was at the top of it, and in great glory. He beheld me at the bottom, and said to me, with a smiling countenance: 'Mount up, Sadoth, fear not. I mounted yesterday, and it is your turn today': which means, that as he was slain last year, so I am to follow him this." He urged them to serve God with increased zeal to ensure they were ready to take possession of their inheritance.
They did not seek death be were ready to embrace it.

Saint Maruthas, who wrote Sadoth's acta, meditated: "A man that is guided by the Spirit, fears not death. He loves God, and goes to him with an incredible ardor; but he who lives according to the desires of the flesh, trembles, and is in despair at its approach: he loves the world, and it is with grief that he leaves it."
During the second year of the persecution, Sadoth and 128 others were arrested.
Most of these were martyred immediately after their arrest, but Sadoth and eight others were detained for five months in a filthy dungeon at Bei-Lapat and tortured before being executed. Three times they were racked and questioned. Amid the sound of bones being broken and urgings to apostatize, Sadoth answered in the name of all, that the sun was but a creature, the work of God, made for the good of mankind; that they would pay supreme adoration to none but the Creator of heaven and earth, and never be unfaithful to him; that it was indeed in their power to take away their lives, but that this would be the greatest favor they could do them. And the soldiers urged them to renounce Christ
As with one voice the martyrs cried: "We shall not die, but live and reign eternally with God and his Son Jesus Christ. Kill us as soon as you please; for we repeat it to you that we will not adore the sun." The king sentenced them to death. The martyrs thanked God and encouraged one another. They were chained two and two together, and led out of the city to execution, singing psalms and canticles of joy as they went. At the place of their martyrdom they sang louder and even more joyfully, giving thanks to God for his mercy, and begging for the grace of perseverance and that by this baptism of their blood they might enter into his glory.
These prayers and praises of God did not cease but until the last of this blessed company was beheaded.

Shapur II ordered that Sadoth be separated from his flock and sent into the province of the Huzites, where he was beheaded and rejoined his happy flock in the kingdom of glory. Ancient Chaldaic writers quoted by Assemani say that Simeon Barsabba'e was Sadoth's maternal uncle (Attwater, Benedictines, Husenbeth). In art, Saint Simeon appears on a ladder and invites Sadoth to ascend to heaven (Roeder).
480 St. Bolcan Bishop disciple of St. Patrick & Baptized by
also called Olcan of Kilmayle. Baptized by St. Patrick, Bolcan was sent to France for priestly studies and ordained. St. Patrick then named him the bishop of Derban in northern Ireland. He built a fine school there.
Bolcan of Derken B (AC) (also known as Olcan) Died after 480. Bolcan was baptized by Saint Patrick, who sent him to study in Gaul. Patrick later consecrated him bishop of Derkan in northern Ireland. Bolcan's school there was one of the best equipped in the island. Another Saint Bolcan (Olcan of Kilmoyle) is venerated in the diocese of Elphin (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

512 Falco of Maastricht Bishop of Maastricht from 495 until his death B (AC) (Benedictines).
532 St. Eleutherius of Tournai Bishop of Tournai, Belgium martyred by Arian heretics
532 ST ELEUTHERIUS, BISHOP OF TOURNAI
A GREAT fire which destroyed Tournai Cathedral in 1092 is responsible for the loss of the relics of its first bishop, St Eleutherius, and of all the most ancient records of his life. Very little is known about him, although many legends grew up about his life and death. He is said to have been born at Tournai of Christian parents whose family had been converted by St Fiat one hundred and fifty years before; and to have been made bishop in 486, ten years before the baptism of King Clovis at Rheims. He appears to have been a zealous preacher and to have converted to Christianity a great part of the Franks in his diocese. He also vigorously opposed certain heretics who denied the mystery of the Incarnation, and was attacked by some of them as he was leaving the church one day after Mass. He was so severely wounded in the head that he died five weeks later. The legend of the raising to life of the governor’s daughter is recounted in the ninth-century biography of the saint. According to this extravagant fiction, the girl fell in love with the youthful bishop, and, finding him at prayer, revealed her passion. He fled from her presence and she fell lifeless to the ground. Eleutherius undertook to restore her life if her father would become a Christian. He promised, but without meaning to fulfil his promises, and the saint’s prayers were unavailing. On the third day the governor was moved to contrition, and Eleutherius was then able to raise the girl from the tomb, and he then baptized her. The governor, however, would not keep his promise, and even withdrew the girt from the hands of the Christians, until so terrible a plague broke out that he was humbled, sought instruction and was himself baptized.

See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii. A long list of quasi-biographical materials is given in BHL, nn. 2455-2470, but they are none of them reliable. The châsse of St Eleutherius is archaeologically interesting and has often been discussed from the point of view of medieval art.
Born in Tournai, France or Belgium, he became the bishop in 486. A group of Arians enraged by his preaching beat him severely He died some weeks later.
703 Leo of Catania 'il Maraviglioso' ('the Wonder- Worker') in Sicily B (RM).
Born in Ravenna, Italy, in ; died in Catania, Sicily, 787. Saint Leo is known as 'il Maraviglioso' ('the Wonder- Worker') in Sicily, where he was bishop in Catania and highly esteemed for his learning. His Vita has been embellished with many delightful, though unreliable, fioretti' (Benedictines).
743 ST. EUCHERIUS, Bishop Charles Martel reproved encroachments; miracles.
 Eódem die sancti Euchérii, Aurelianénsis Epíscopi, qui eo magis miráculis cláruit, pro plúribus invidórum calúmniis fuit oppréssus.
       The same day, St. Eucherius, bishop of Orleans, who, the more he was oppressed by the calumnies of the envious, the more he impressed them with his miracles.

THIS Saint was born at Orleans, of a very illustrious family. At his birth his parents dedicated him to God, and set him to study when he was but seven years old, resolving to omit nothing that could be done toward cultivating his mind or forming his heart His improvement in virtue kept pace with his progress in learning: he meditated assiduously on the sacred writings, especially on St. Paul's manner of speaking on the world and its enjoyments as mere empty shadows that deceive us and vanish away. These reflections at length sank so deep into his mind that he resolved to quit the world. To put this design in execution, about the year 714 he retired to the abbey of Jumiége in Normandy, where he spent six or seven years in the practice of penitential austerities and obedience. Suavaric, his uncle, Bishop of Orleans, having died, the senate and people, with the clergy of that city, begged permission to elect Eucherius to the vacant see. The Saint entreated his monks to screen him from the dangers that threatened him; but they preferred the public good to their private inclinations, and resigned him for that important charge. He was consecrated with universal applause in 721.

743 ST EUCHERIUS, BISHOP OF ORLEANS

ACCORDING to his biographer, apparently a contemporary, St Eucherius led a holy life from earliest childhood. He was born at Orleans, and entered the Benedictine abbey of Jumièges about the year 714. After he had spent six or seven years there, Soavaric, Bishop of Orleans, who was his uncle, died, and the senate and people with the clergy of the city sent a deputation to Charles Martel, mayor of the palace, to ask his permission to elect Eucherius to fill the vacant see. Charles consented, and charged one of his officers of state to conduct the young monk from his monas­tery to Orleans. The saint was filled with dismay and entreated the monks to save him from the dangers that threatened him in the world. In spite of their reluctance they urged him to depart, setting the public good above their own desires. He was consecrated in 721. Unwilling as he had been to take office, he proved himself an exemplary pastor and devoted himself entirely to the care of his people, who loved and venerated him.

Eucherius did not, however, retain the favour of Charles Martel. To defray the expenses of his wars and other undertakings, and to recompense those who served him, it was the practice of that prince to seize the revenues of churches and he encouraged others to do the same. It would appear that St Eucherius strenu­ously opposed these confiscations, and certain persons represented this to Charles as an insult offered to his person. In the year 737, when he was returning to Paris after having defeated the Saracens in Aquitaine, Charles took Orleans on the way and ordered Eucherius to follow him to Verneuil-sur-Oise, and then exiled him to Cologne. Here the saint became so popular on account of his piety and charming character that Charles ordered him to be transferred to a fortified place near Liege, where he would be under the observation of the governor of the district. Here again the bishop won all hearts, and the governor made him distributor of alms and allowed him to retire to the monastery of Saint-Trond near Maestricht, where he spent the rest of his life in prayer and contempla­tion.

The legend that St Eucherius saw Charles Martel burning in hell is an interpolation which does not belong to the primitive biography, but it is worth mentioning because the incident is sometimes depicted in representations of the saint in art.

The biography is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii, and in Mabillon. See also Duchesse (Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, p. 458), who points out that whereas the author of the life makes Eucherius the immediate successor of Soavaric, the episcopal lists of Orleans mention two or three bishops as intervening. There are also other difficulties about the chronology of the life which suggest serious doubts as to its being the work of a contemporary. See “Saints de Saint-Trond” in Analecta Bollandiana. vol. lxxii (1954).
   Charles Martel, to defray the expenses of his wars and other undertakings, often stripped the churches of their revenues. St. Eucherius reproved these encroachments with so much zeal that, in the year 737, Charles banished him to Cologne. The extraordinary esteem which his virtue procured him in that city moved Charles to order him to be conveyed thence to a strong place in the territory of Liege. Robert, the governor of that country, was so charmed with his virtue that he made him the distributor of his large alms, and allowed him to retire to the monastery of Sarchinium, or St. Tron's. Here prayer and contemplation were his whole employment till the year 743, in which he died, on the 20th of February.

Reflection.—Nothing softens the soul and weakens piety so much as frivolous indulgence. God has revealed what high store He sets by "retirement" in these words: "I will lead her into solitude, and I will speak to her heart."

787 St. Leo of Catania Bishop of Catania, Sicily
called ii Maravigloso, “the Wonder-Worker.” He was revered for his holiness and learning.
 Cátanæ, in Sicília, sancti Leónis Epíscopi, qui virtútibus atque miráculis coruscávit.
      At Catania in Sicily, St. Leo, bishop, illustrious for virtues and miracles.

796 St. Colgan Abbot of Clanmacroise “the Wise”, in Offaly, Ireland
A friend of Blessed Alcuin, Colgan was called “the Wise” and “ the Chief Scribe of the Scots.”
Colgan of Clonmacnoise, Abbot (AC) (also known as Colchu, Colgu). Colgan, surnamed 'the Wise' and 'the Chief Scribe of the Scots,' was abbot of Clonmacnoise in Offaly.
He was a friend and teacher of the Blessed Alcuin. Colgan is noted for the influence he exerted on the imperial schools in France, through his students (Benedictines, Montague).
1154 + St. Wulfric hermit; Many miracles were attributed to his intercession in this life and after death gift of prophecy numerous between 1185 to 1235
Born at Compton Martin, near Bristol, England, he became a priest and was excessively materialistic and worldly. After meeting with a beggar, he underwent a personal conversion and became a hermit at Haselbury; Somerset, England. For his remaining years, he devoted himself to rigorous austerities and was known for his miracles and prophecies. While he was never formally canonized, Wulfric was a very popular saint during the Middle Ages, and his tomb was visited by many pilgrims.
1154 ST WULFRIC
THE burial-place of St Wulfric at Haselbury Plucknett was a popular place of pilgrimage in the middle ages. Born at Compton Martin, eight miles from Bristol, and trained for the priesthood, Wulfric lived a careless life even after his ordination, being engrossed with hawking and hunting. But while priest at Deverill, near Warminster, he was suddenly touched by divine grace, and his conversion was popularly attributed to a chance interview he had with a beggar. The man asked him if he had any of the new coins which had recently been minted and were still rare. Wulfric replied that he did not know: he would see. “You have two and a half”, said the stranger, and sure enough, when the saint opened his purse, there they lay. He gave them to him as an alms, and the beggar said, “

God reward thee for thy charity I tell thee that soon thou shalt depart from here to go to a place where at last thou shalt find rest, If thou wilt persevere, thou shalt ere long be admitted to the fellowship of the saints.”

St Wulfric was casting about for a solitary spot in which he might devote himself entirely to the service of God when a knight offered him a cell adjoining the church at Haselbury in Somerset. Here he gave himself up to great austerities, and by fasting and scourging reduced himself to skin and bone. He wore chain-mail next his skin, and a curious miracle is recounted in detail of the cutting of the iron links with an ordinary pair of scissors or shears as if they were so much linen. The reason why Wulfric wanted his cuirass shortened was that it prevented him from making the innumerable prostrations which formed, perhaps as a survival of Celtic influences, so favourite a type of penitential exercise at that period. It was practised especially by St Thomas of Canterbury and by St Gilbert of Sempringham, to take two prominent English examples.

We are told that sometimes Wulfric would at night, summer or winter, strip and get into a tub of cold water, remaining there till he had recited the whole psalter at other times he would spend the night in prayer in the church, where he offered Mass daily and was served by a boy named Osbern, afterwards parson of Haselbury, to whom we owe valuable information about the anchoret. One Easter eve Wulfric was troubled in sleep by a sensual illusion; he was so distressed thereby that the next day he made open confession of it before the whole congregation in church. When a certain cleric from Cirencester tried to tempt him to avarice with the offer of two silver pennies, Wulfric pointed to the window-sill: “Put them there”, he said, “Somebody will come and take them.” And so it happened, to the confusion of the tempter. Wulfric employed himself in the copying of books (he sometimes had a secretary to help him), which he bound himself, and it looks as if he also made things for the church. The many wonders attributed to Wulfric show the veneration in which he was held, but it seems that it was for prophecy more than anything else that he was famous, even to far parts of the land: among his visitors were King Henry I and King Stephen.

St Wulfric (there is no reason to suppose that he was ever canonized) died on February no, 1154, and was buried in the cell in which he had lived: the vestry of the present church at Haselbury stands on its site. Later the body was moved for safety to an unmarked grave, where it probably still rests. Wulfric had a great regard for the Cistercian Order, but the idea that he belonged to it is now rejected.

St Wulfric ought to be better known than he is, for what we read of him comes to us upon the authority of contemporaries. There is an excellent work by Dom M. Bell, Wulfric of Haselbury (1933) which gives the text of the life by Abbot John of Ford, with apparatus criticus, introduction and notes. Fr Bell adds the text of the first life in English, by Jerome Porter, printed at Douay in 1642 in the rare Flowers of the Lives of the . . . Saints of the three Kingdoms. See also the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii and R. M. Clay, Hermits and Anchorites of England (1914). Wulfric’s name is spelt in several ways.
Wulfric of Haselbury, Hermit (AC) (also known as Ulfrick, Ulric) Born at Compton Martin (near Bristol), England; died at Haselbury, Somerset, England, in February 20, 1154. Saint Wulfric was an ordained priest, but not because he felt a religious vocation. He like to hunt and eat and party with the lords of the manors near Deverill, Wiltshire, England. He performed all the functions of a priest, but he did not have his heart in them.
Legend reports that, one day in the early 1120's while he was a priest at Deverill, near Warminster, he was suddenly touched by divine grace. Some say that he had underwent a metanoia during a chance encounter with a beggar. Other say that Wulfric was converted to a life of penance one day upon recitation of the Lavabo verse: "I will wash my hands among the innocent." It was as if all the easy ways of his past rose up at once to torment him, and he fled immediately to a place in search of solitude.

We don't know how long he remained a hermit, but there are seemingly endless reports of his austerities and arduous mortifications: going down in the icy waters to recite the Psalms, flagellations, prostrations, mail-shirts. When Wulfric finally returned to his flock, he was a new man. He ministered to his flock until 1125.

A knight offered him a cell adjoining a church at Haselbury- Plunkett (Plucknett) near Exeter in Somerset. He had no official episcopal authorization, but was supported by the neighboring Cluniac monks of Montacute. There he lived the remainder of his life, starving himself until his body was skin and bones. He was famous for his gift of prophecy and for his priestly care of all who sought his counsel, including Kings Henry I and Stephen. In 1130, Henry and Queen Adela obtained through his intercession the healing of the knight Drogo de Munci from paralysis. In 1133, Wulfric prophesied the death of the king which occurred in 1135. Stephen visited him with his brother, Henry of Blois, bishop of Winchester, when Wulfric greeted him as king even before his disputed accession. On another occasion, Wulfric reproached him for misgovernment.

A curious story is recounted in detail that he cut the iron links of his mail-shirt with ordinary scissors as if they were only linen in order to shorten it to permit the numerous prostrations that were a part of the penitential exercises of that era. He said Mass daily with the assistance of a boy named Osbern, who later became a priest and who recorded Wulfric's vita. The near- contemporary life of Wulfric by Abbot John of Ford is accurate and informative.
The saint employed himself primarily in copying books, which he bound himself.  He also made elements for the celebration of Mass.

Many miracles were attributed to his intercession, both in this life and after his death. (Although the first miracle at his tomb is not recorded to have occurred until 1169; they were numerous 1185 to 1235.
The Cistercians lay claim to Wulfric, as did the monks of Montacute, but he was unaffiliated with an religious order.
Wulfric's cultus was slow to develop.

He was mentioned favorably by Henry of Huntingdon, Roger of Wendover, and Matthew Paris. William Worcestre and John Leland also mention his tomb. In 1633, John Gerard recorded that his cell was still standing as was his memory. A 16th-century martyrology and a French menology include Saint Wulfric. He is venerated at Haselbury, where he is buried in the cell in which he lived, which is now the site of the church's vestry (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth, Walsh).
1250 St. Amata Poor Clare; niece of St. Clare of Assisi
Amata was miraculously cured of an illness by St. Clare. She entered a Poor Clare monastery as a result.
Amata of Assisi, OP Poor Clare V (PC) Died c. 1250; feast day formerly June 9.
Amata was sister to Blessed Diana and Cecilia in the community of Saint Agnes at Bologna, a niece of Saint Clare, and a good friend of Saint Dominic. Saint Clare healed Amata of a disease and thereby converted her heart to the life of the cloister. According to legend, Dominic give her the moniker "Amata," meaning 'beloved,' and very probably sent her to the convent. There is a Sister Amata from whom Saint Dominic is said to have cast out seven devils, but it is probably not this one. This is all that is known of her. Amata is in the Franciscan martyrologies (Benedictines, Dorcy, Encyclopedia).
1304 Blessed Peter of Treja early Franciscans associated with Blessed Conrad of Offida in his apostolate, OFM (AC)
Died at Sirolo, Piceno, Italy, cultus approved 1793. Peter was one of the early Franciscans associated with Blessed Conrad of Offida in his apostolate. They preached with great success throughout Italy (Benedictines).

1468 Blessed Elisabeth Bartholomea Picenardi, many miracles were said worked at her tomb; OSM V (AC) 
Born in Mantua, Italy, in 1428; beatified in 1804. After her mother's death, Elisabeth joined the Third Order of Servites. Several young noblewomen of Mantua banded together to live in community under Elisabeth's direction (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

1468 BD ELIZABETH OF MANTUA, VIRGIN

VERY little incident marks the career of Bd Elizabeth Picenardi. Her parents were people of consideration in Mantua, and she received a very religious education. Her father taught her Latin so that she was able to read daily the Little Office of our Lady, and her mother encouraged her in the practice of meditation. She would not contemplate the idea of marriage, and after her mother’s death both she and one of her sisters obtained permission to enter the third order of the Servites. We are told, but the authority for the statement does not seem very reliable, that Elizabeth made a practice of confessing and communicating daily, a thing almost unheard of in the fifteenth century. The example of her humility and gentleness, together with the supernatural gifts with which she was credited, made a deep impression upon several young girls of her own age, and they banded themselves together to form a community of the Servite third order under Elizabeth’s direction. She is said to have prophesied her own death a year before it happened. At the age of forty, worn out by a painful internal complaint, “she rested in the Lord so the Servite Martyrology states, “while sweetly contemplating Jesus and his Mother amid the choirs of angels”. Extraordinary crowds attended her funeral and many miracles were said to have been worked at her tomb. She was beatified in 1804.

See Bianchi, Memorie storiche intorno alla Vita di Elizabetta Picenardi (1803) and J. E. Stadler, Heiligen-Lexikon.

1920 Blessed Jacinta & Francisco Marto Between May 13 and October 13, 1917, three children, Portuguese shepherds
(1910-1920; 1908-1919)  Between May 13 and October 13, 1917, three children, Portuguese shepherds from Aljustrel, received apparitions of Our Lady at Cova da Iria, near Fatima, a city 110 miles north of Lisbon. At that time, Europe was involved in an extremely bloody war. Portugal itself was in political turmoil, having overthrown its monarchy in 1910; the government disbanded religious organizations soon after.
At the first appearance, Mary asked the children to return to that spot on the thirteenth of each month for the next six months. She also asked them to learn to read and write and to pray the rosary “to obtain peace for the world and the end of the war.” They were to pray for sinners and for the conversion of Russia, which had recently overthrown Czar Nicholas II and was soon to fall under communism. Up to 90,000 people gathered for Mary’s final apparition on October 13, 1917.

Less than two years later, Francisco died of influenza in his family home. He was buried in the parish cemetery and then re-buried in the Fatima basilica in 1952. Jacinta died of influenza in Lisbon, offering her suffering for the conversion of sinners, peace in the world and the Holy Father. She was re-buried in the Fatima basilica in 1951. Their cousin, Lucia dos Santos, became a Carmelite nun and was still living when Jacinta and Francisco were beatified in 2000. Sister Lucia died in February 2005 at the age of 97. The shrine of Our Lady of Fatima is visited by up to 20 million people a year.
Comment:  The Church is always very cautious about endorsing alleged apparitions, but it has seen benefits from people changing their lives because of the message of Our Lady of Fatima. Prayer for sinners, devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary and praying the rosary—all these reinforce the Good News Jesus came to preach.
Quote:  In his homily at their beatification, Pope John Paul II recalled that shortly before Francisco died, Jacinta said to him, “Give my greetings to Our Lord and to Our Lady and tell them that I am enduring everything they want for the conversion of sinners.”

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Day 6 40 Days for Life


40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015

We are the defenders of true freedom.
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Pope Leo XIII.  1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption ; canonized in 1887 by Pope Leo XIII.

Clement VII in 1533 approved The cultus of Bd Verdiana who appears in the habit of a Vallombrosan nun, carrying a basket with two snakes in it. It seems certain she was associated with the Vallombrosan Order, but her connection with the Franciscan third order is by no means so clearly established.

Pope Callistus III allowed BD EUSTOCHIUM OF MESSINA, VIRGIN to found another convent to follow the first rule of St Francis under the Observants. 

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy, but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

"To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

731 Pope Gregory II, 89th Pope: educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian    (RM)

824 Pope St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.   Popes Html link here: 

731 Gregory II, 89th Pope educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian (RM)
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817
Pope Innocent III had experienced a similar vision. Without hesitation Innocent provided papal approval for the Order of the Most Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives (the Trinitarians), with John of Matha as superior.
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
1198 - 1216 Pope Innocent III;
One of the greatest popes of the Middle Ages;
a learned theologian; one of the greatest jurists of his time; held various ecclesiastical offices during short reigns of Lucius III, Urban III, Gregory VIII, and Clement III; re-established papal authority in Rome; scarcely a country in Europe over which Innocent III did not in some way or other assert supremacy he claimed for the papacy;
During his reign two great founders of the mendicant orders, St. Dominic and St. Francis, laid before him their scheme of reforming the world. Innocent was not blind to the vices of luxury and indolence which had infected many of the clergy and part of the laity.
In Dominic and Francis he recognized two mighty adversaries of these vices and he sanctioned their projects with words of encouragement.  He wrote "De quadripartita specie nuptiarum" (P. L., CCXVII, 923-968), an exposition of the fourfold marriage bond, namely, between man and wife, between Christ and the Church, between God and the just soul, between the Word and human nature - - entirely based on passages from Holy Scripture.  Popes Html link here: 

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Gregory IV (827-44) # 102
Elected near the end of 827; died January, 844. When Gregory was born is not known, but he was a Roman and the son of John. Before his election to the papacy he was the Cardinal-Priest of the Basilica of St. Mark, which he adorned with mosaics yet visible. For his piety and learning he was ordained priest by Paschal I. This man, of distinguished appearance and high birth, was raised to the chair of Peter, despite his protestations of unfitness, mainly buy the instrumentality of the secular nobility of Rome who were then securing a preponderating influence in papal elections. But the representatives in Rome of the Emperor Louis the Pious would not allow him to be consecrated until his election had been approved by their master. This interference caused such delay that it was not, seemingly, till about March, 828, that he began to govern the Church.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Clement IX 1667-1669: 1670 St. Charles of Sezze Franciscan Pope Clement IX called Charles to his bedside for a blessing;

Pope Pius XI -- 1888 ST JOHN BOSCO, FOUNDER OF THE SALESIANS OF DON Bosco
“IN his life the supernatural almost became the natural and the extraordinary ordinary.” These were the words of Pope Pius XI in speaking of that great lover of children, Don Bosco.


At Paris St. Thomas was honored with the friendship of the King, St. Louis, with whom he frequently dined. In 1261, Urban IV called him to Rome where he was appointed to teach, but he positively declined to accept any ecclesiastical dignity. St. Thomas not only wrote (his writings filled twenty hefty tomes characterized by brilliance of thought and lucidity of language), but he preached often and with greatest fruit. Clement IV offered him the archbishopric of Naples which he also refused. He left the great monument of his learning, the "Summa Theologica", unfinished, for on his way to the second Council of Lyons, ordered there by Gregory X, he fell sick and died at the Cistercian monastery of Fossa Nuova in 1274.
St. Thomas declared Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius V.

Romæ sancti Vitaliáni Papæ.       At Rome, St. Vitalian, pope.

Whereas in the Lord's Prayer, we are bidden to ask for 'our daily bread,' the Holy Fathers of the Church all but unanimously teach that by these words must be understood, not so much that material bread which is the support of the body, as the Eucharistic bread, which ought to be our daily food. -- Pope St. Pius X





Then in 1525, since it was a Holy Year of Jubilee, Angela Merici went as a pilgrim to Rome to gain the great jubilee indulgence. When she had an audience with the Pope Clement VII, he tried to persuade her to stay at Rome and head a congregation of nursing sisters. But she was still convinced of her calling to education work. In fact, years before, she had experienced a vision in which she saw a group of young women ascending to heaven on a ladder of light. A voice had then said:
“Take heed, Angela; before you die you will found at Brescia a company of maidens similar to those you have just seen.
     It was April 1533 that she made this prophecy come true. The Ursalines

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Pope Gregory IX 1227-1241 , having called St Raymund to Rome in 1230, nominated him to various offices and took him likewise for his confessor, in which capacity Raymund enjoined the pope, for a penance, to receive, hear and expedite im­mediately all petitions presented by the poor. Gregory also ordered the saint to gather into one body all the scattered decrees of popes and councils since the collection made by Gratian in 1150. In three years Raymund completed his task, and the five books of the “Decretals” were confirmed by the same Pope Gregory in 1234. Down to the publication of the new Codex Juris Canonici in 1917 this compilation of St Raymund was looked upon as the best arranged part of the body of canon law, on which account the canonists usually chose it for the text of their commentaries.