Sunday  Saints of this Day January  08 Sexto Idus Januárii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum
Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Mary Mother
of GOD

Relátio púeri Jesu de
Ægypto. The return of the Child Jesus from Egypt.



The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

January 8 – Our Lady of Prompt Succor (New Orleans, USA, 1809) 
 
One day, while praying before a statue of the Virgin ...
 
In 1803, Mother Saint Andrew Madier, an Ursuline sister in New Orleans, Louisiana, called to her side one of her cousins who also was an Ursuline nun in France and whom the Reign of Terror had forced to leave her monastery. Her name was Sister Saint Michael Gensoul. Her bishop, Bishop Fournier, refused her request to leave France, saying that only the Pope, who was then Napoleon's prisoner, could grant that permission.

One day, while praying before a statue of the Virgin, Mother Saint Andrew was inspired to say: "O Blessed Virgin Mary, if you obtain a quick and favorable response to my letter, I promise to honor you in New Orleans under the title of Our Lady of Prompt Succor."

The response was both quick and positive (the letter left France on March 19, 1809, and arrived on April 28, 1809). Surprised by the result, Bishop Fournier blessed the statue that Mother Saint Michael had ordered from a sculptor.

Since then, the devotion to Our Lady of Prompt Succor in New Orleans has spread throughout Louisiana,
the United States and beyond.  louisiane.blogs.sudouest.fr



Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }

Hold firmly that our faith is identical with the ancients.
Deny this, and you dissolve the unity of the Church. -- St. Thomas Aquinas


Pope Authorizes 12 14 2015 Promulgation of Decrees Concerning 17 Causes,
Including Servant of God William Gagnon
November 23 2014 Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List
Acts of the Apostles
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
How do I start the Five First Saturdays?
Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .

Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.
400+? Saint Domnica came from Carthage to Constantinople By her miracles the saint moved inhabitants of the
       capital towards concerns about life eternal and the soul

712 St. Gudula Patroness of Brussels, Belgium daughter of St. Amalberga, educated by St. Gertrude of Nivelles
     
was known for her great charity.
923 St. Athelm Benedictine Archbishop of Canterbury uncle of St. Dunstan
1002 St. Wulsin Benedictine bishop monk St. Dunstan disciple abbot of Westminster
1309 Blessed Angela of Foligno dedicated to prayer and works of charity; her Book of Visions and Instructions
        Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693. 

1456 St. Lawrence Justinian first Patriarch of Venice the death of Eminent for learning, abundantly filled with
       the heavenly gifts of divine wisdom
the 5th of September, on which day he ascended the pontifical throne.

  For the Redemption of Captives
Among the religious orders that were founded under the patronage of the Queen of Angels, one of the most illustrious is the Order of Our Lady of Mercy (also known as Our Lady of Ransom). The Blessed Virgin herself expressed her wish to establish this Order by appearing to Saint Peter Nolasco, Saint Raymond of Pennafort and King James I of Aragon.
At the beginning of the 13th century, most of Spain was under the yoke of the Saracens who held scores of Christians captive in order to make them renounce their faith.
So as to stop this calamity Mary established the work of the Redemption of Captives. On August 1, 1218, the Queen of Heaven appeared to Saint Peter Nolasco in prayer. The next day, Peter Nolasco recounted his vision to Saint Raymond of Pennafort, his confessor, who told him: “I had the same vision that you had.”
Fr. L. Jaud, Vie des Saints pour tous les jours de l'année, Tours, Mame, 1950
http://magnificat.ca/cal/fr/saints/notre-dame_de_la_merci.html

 
Our Lady of Egypt Recalling the Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord
Just as she presented Jesus to the Magi, so the Virgin continues to offer Him to all humanity.
Let us accept Him from her hands:
Christ fulfils the most profound longings of our hearts and gives meaning to all out plans and actions.
May He be present in families and reign everywhere with the power of His love.

Pope Benedict XVI, Address to the Pontifical Household, January 5, 2006

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.).
In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh,
was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

The great psalm of the Passion, Chapter 22, whose first verse "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him" For kingship belongs to the LORD, ruler over the nations.
All who sleep in the earth will bow low before God; All who have gone down into the dust will kneel in homage.
And I will live for the LORD; my descendants will serve you. The generation to come will be told of the Lord, that they may proclaim to a people yet unborn the deliverance you have brought.

Saint John, Son of Mary (VII) January 7 - Our Lady of Egypt
When the persecution ended, the Apostles made their way back to Jerusalem in 41 A.D., but John's brother James, the other son of Zebedee, was taken by surprise and decapitated by Herod Agrippa. He was the first Apostle to give his life for the Christian faith, and it surely must have made a deep impression on John, to whom Jesus promised "you shall drink my cup."
The Apostles eventually joined up again in 48 A.D., and then around the year 49, this time with Paul for the so-called Council of Jerusalem (or Apostolic Conference), the first known meeting of the new community's leaders. The purpose of the meetings was to resolve the disagreement about circumcision and the Gospel was reviewed and verified. It was probably at this time that the Blessed Virgin Mary, with John, transmitted the events of Jesus' childhood, the Parables and the Passion narrative, before joining her Son Jesus in Heaven by her Assumption some time later.
Pope John Paul II explained that "the first Christian communities gathered Mary's recollections together about Our Lord's mysterious conception and birth. In particular, the Annunciation responds to the disciples' desire to have the deepest knowledge of the events connected with the beginning of the Risen Christ's earthly life.
In actual fact, Mary was at the origin of the revelation of the virginal conception by the power of the Holy Spirit.
This truth, included among the key affirmations of their faith showing Jesus' divine origin,
was immediately grasped by the first Christians for its great significance."
Pope John Paul II Adapted from the General Audience 13 September 1995
The second day of the Afterfeast of Theophany.
175 St. Apollinaris appologist bishop of Hierapolis in Phrygia
290 St. Lucian Martyred missionary with companions, Julian, /Maximian; relics were famous for miracles.
304 St. Carterius Priest martyr of Caesarea in Cappadocia.
400+? Saint Domnica came from Carthage to Constantinople By her miracles the saint moved inhabitants of the capital towards concerns about life eternal and the soul
491 St. Patiens Archbishop of Lyons, Gaul best known for his immense efforts at charitable work. He constantly gave aid and comfort to the poor, devoting the resources of the diocese to feed those left starving by the Gothic and Germanic invasions and to rebuilding and repairing burned and looted churches
425 St. Atticus Bishop converted opponent of St. John Chrysostom then called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I.
482 St. Severinus Monk hermit founded Danube monasteries comfort to refugees /victims of Attila many miracles
5th v. St. Ergnad Irish nun who received the veil from St. Patrick. She followed the monastic tradition of performing prayer and penance in seclusion.
511 St. Maximus Bishop of Pavia, Italy. attended the councils of Rome convened by Pope Symmachus.
550 ST SEVERINUS, legend BISHOP OF SEPTEMPEDA
7v Saint George the Chozebite example in fasting, vigil and physical efforts lived as angel on the earth, died in peace Theophilus, deacon, and Helladius In Libya, the holy martyrs
673 St. Frodobert Benedictine abbot-founder monk, trained by St. Waldebert. He was a monk at Luxeuil, France. He founded MoutierlaCelle Abbey near Troyes.
686 St.  Erhard Irish Bishop missionary to Bavaria baptized St Odilia, who, though born blind, recovered her sight on receiving the sacrament.
712 St. Gudula Patroness of Brussels, Belgium daughter of St. Amalberga, educated by St. Gertrude of Nivelles was known for her great charity.
719 ST PEGA, VIRGIN; Ordericus Vitalis says her relics were honoured with miracles, and kept in a church which bore her name at Rome, but this church is not now known
762 St. Garibaldus Benedictine bishop of Regensburg ordained by St. Boniface He was also a noted scholar.
800 St. Albert Patron saint of Cashel English in Ireland and Bavaria
923 St. Athelm Benedictine Archbishop of Canterbury uncle of St. Dunstan
1002 St. Wulsin Benedictine bishop monk St. Dunstan disciple abbot of Westminster
1285 St. Thorfinn miracles reported at his tomb 50 yrs after death
        St. Theophilus deacon & Helladius a layman martyrs  in Libya
1309 Blessed Angela of Foligno dedicated to prayer and works of charity; her Book of Visions and Instructions Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693. 
1456 St. Lawrence Justinian first Patriarch of Venice the death of Eminent for learning, and abundantly filled with the heavenly gifts of divine wisdom the 5th of September, on which day he ascended the pontifical throne.

The second day of the Afterfeast of Theophany falls on January 8.
 At Vespers we repeat a hymn which has already been sung at Compline for Theophany. In the hymn St John wonders in whose name he should baptize Christ. Should he baptize Him in the name of the Father? The Lord Jesus Christ already bears Him in Himself. Of the Son? He Himself is the incarnate Son of God. Of the Holy Spirit? Christ Himself sends the Spirit.
175 St. Apollinaris appologist bishop of Hierapolis in Phrygia
 Hierápoli, in Asia, sancti Apollináris Epíscopi, qui, sub Marco Antoníno Vero, sanctitáte atque doctrína flóruit.
        At Hierapolis in Asia, St. Apollinaris, bishop, who was conspicuous for sanctity and learning under Marucs Antoninus Verus.
St. Apollinaris was one of the most illustrious bishops of the second century. Eusebius, St. Jerome, Theodoret, and others speak of him in the highest terms, and they furnish us with the few facts that are known of him. He addressed an "Apology," that is, a defense, of the Christian religion to the emperor Marcus Aurelius, who, shortly before, had obtained a signal victory over the Quadi, a people inhabiting the country now called Moravia. One of his legions, the twelfth, was composed chiefly of Christians. When the army was perishing for want of water, the soldiers of this legion fell upon their knees and invoked the assistance of God. The result was sudden, for a copious rain fell, and, aided by the storm, they conquered the Germans. The emperor gave this legion the name "Thundering Legion" and mitigated his persecution.

It was to protect his flock against persecution that St. Apollinaris, who was bishop of Hierapolis in Phrygia, addressed his apology to the Emperor to implore his protection and to remind him of the favor he had received from God through the prayers of the Christians.
The date of the death of St. Apollinaris probably occurred before that of Marcus Aurelius, about the year 175.

179 ST APOLLINARIS, Bishop of Hieropolis
CLAUDIUS APOLLINARIS, Bishop of Hieropolis in Phrygia, called “the Apologist”, was a famous Christian teacher in the second century. Notwithstanding the encomiums bestowed on him by Eusebius, St Jerome, Theodoret and others, we know but little of his life, and his writings, which then were held in great esteem, seem now to be all lost. Photius, who had read them and who was a very good judge, commends them both for their style and matter. He wrote against the Encratites and other heretics, and pointed out, as St Jerome testifies, from what philosophical sect each heresy derived its errors. His last work was directed against the Montanists and their pretended prophets, who began to appear in Phrygia about the year 171. But nothing rendered his name so illustrious as his apology for the Christian religion, which he addressed to the Emperor Marcus Aurelius soon after the victory that prince had obtained over the Quadi by the prayers, it is alleged, of the Christians, of which the saint made mention.

Marcus Aurelius having long attempted without success to subdue the Germans by his generals, resolved in A.D. 174 to take the field against them himself. He was beyond the Danube when the Quadi, a people inhabiting that territory later called Moravia, surrounded him in a very disadvantageous situation: so that there was no possibility that either he or his army could escape out of their hands or maintain themselves long where they were for want of water.
 The twelfth legion was chiefly composed of Christians. When the army was drawn up, exhausted with thirst, the Christians fell upon their knees, “as we are accustomed to do at prayer”, says Eusebius, and earnestly besought God’s aid. Then on a sudden the sky was darkened with clouds, and a heavy rain poured down just as the barbarians began their attack. The Romans fought and drank at the same time, catching the rain as it fell in their helmets, and often swallowing it mingled with blood. Their assailants would still have been too strong for them, but that the storm being driven by a violent wind into their faces, and accompanied with flashes of lightning and loud thunder, the Germans, unable to see, were terrified to such a degree that they took to flight. Both heathen and Christian writers give this account of the victory. 

The heathens ascribed it, some to the power of magic, others to their gods, but the Christians accounted it a miracle obtained by the prayers of this legion. St Apollinaris apparently referred to it in his apology to this very emperor, and added that as an acknowledgement the emperor gave it the name of the “Thunder­ing Legion”. From him it is so called by Eusebius, Tertullian, St Jerome and St Gregory of Nyssa.

The Quadi surrendered the prisoners whom they had taken, and begged for peace on whatever conditions it should please the emperor to grant it them. Marcus Aurelius hereupon, out of gratitude to his Christian soldiers, published an edict, in which he confessed himself indebted for his delivery “to the shower obtained, perhaps, by the prayers of the Christians”. In it he forbade, under pain of death, anyone to accuse a Christian on account of his religion; yet by a strange incon­sistency, being overawed by the opposition of the senate, he had not the courage to abolish the laws already in force against Christians. Hence, even after this, in the same reign, many suffered martyrdom, though their accusers, it is asserted, were also put to death.

The deliverance of the emperor is represented on the Columna Antoniniana in Rome by the figure of a Jupiter Pluvius, being that of an old man flying in the air with his arms extended, and a long beard which seems to waste away in rain. The soldiers are there represented as relieved by this sudden tempest, and in a posture partly drinking of the rainwater and partly fighting against the enemy, who, on the contrary, are represented as stretched out on the ground with their horses, and the dreadful part of the storm descending upon them only. The credibility of the story, which Eusebius apparently derived from the Apology of St Apollinaris, still remains a matter of discussion. On the one hand, it is certain that the “Thunder­ing Legion” (legio fulminata) did not obtain this title from Marcus Aurelius, for it belonged to them from the time of Augustus; on the other, there is nothing violently incredible in the facts themselves. Contemporary Christians might easily attribute such a surprising victory to the prayers of their fellow believers. There is no confirmation among pagan authorities for the text of the supposed edict of toleration. Those scholars who defend the general accuracy of the facts believe it to be at least interpolated.

St Apollinaris may have penned his apology to the emperor about the year 175 to remind him of the benefit he had received from God by the prayers of the Christians, and to implore his protection. We have no account of the time of this holy man’s death, which probably happened before that of Marcus Aurelius.

For the “Thundering Legion” see Tertullian, Apologeticum, cap. 5, and Ad Scapulam, cap. 4 Eusebius, Hist. eccl., bk v, cap. 5; J. B. Lightfoot, St Ignatius, vol. i (1889), pp. 469 seq.; Mommsen in Hermes, 1895, pp. 90—106; Allard, Histoire des persecutions, vol. i (1903), pp. 394—396. For St Apollinaris, see Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. ii, pp. 4—8. His name was added to the Roman Martyrology by Baronius, but there is no evidence of any early cultus in either the East or West. 

290 St. Lucian Martyred missionary with companions, Julian, /Maximian; relics were famous for miracles.
 Bellóvaci, in Gálliis, sanctórum Mártyrum Luciáni Presbyteri, Maximiáni et Juliáni. Horum duo últimi a persecutóribus gládio perémpti sunt; beátum autem Luciánus, qui, una cum sancto Dionysio, in Gálliam vénerat, et ipse, post nímiam cædem, cum Christi nomen viva voce confitéri non timuísset, priórum senténtiam excépit.
       At Beauvais in France, the holy martyrs Lucian, priest, Maximian and Julian.  The last two were killed with the sword by the persecutors; but blessed Lucian, who had come to France with St. Denis, after the slaughter of his companions, not fearing to confess the Name of Christ openly, received the same sentence of death.

They were martyred at Beauvais, France.

290 ST LUCIAN OF BEAUVAIS, MARTYR
IT is said that this Lucian preached the gospel in Gaul in the third century and came from Rome; he was possibly one of the companions of St Dionysius of Paris, or at least of St Quentin. He sealed his mission with his blood at Beauvais, under Julian, vicar or successor to the persecutor Rictiovarus in the government of Gaul, about the year 290. Maximian, called by the common people Messien, and Julian, the companions of his labours, were crowned with martyrdom at the same place a little before him. His relics, with those of his two colleagues, were discovered in the seventh century, as St Ouen informs us in his life of St Eligius. They were shown in three gilt shrines in an abbey, which bore his name, founded in the eighth century. Rabanus Maurus says that these relics were famous for miracles when he wrote, a hundred years later.

St Lucian is styled only martyr in most calendars down to the sixteenth century, and in the Roman Martyrology; but a calendar compiled in the reign of Louis the Pious calls him bishop, and he is honoured in that quality at Beauvais.

See the Acta Sanctorum for January 8, p. 640, though the two lives of this saint there printed are of little or no authority. Duchesne in his Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. iii, pp. 119 and 141—152, discusses the case of St Lucian at some length, and shows good reason for believing that the whole story is mythical. He strongly inclines to the belief that Rictiovarus never existed. See H. Moretus, Les Passions de S. Lucien et leurs dérivés céphalophoriques (1953).  

304 St. Carterius Priest martyr of Caesarea in Cappadocia.
He suffered in the persecution conducted by Emperor Diocletian.

4th v. St. Eugenian Bishop martyr of Autun; foe of Arianism.
 Augustodúni sancti Eugeniáni Mártyris.       At Autun, St. Eugenian, martyr.
France. He was a foe of Arianism, presumably a victim of this heresy in retaliation.
400? Saint Domnica came from Carthage to Constantinople By her miracles the saint moved inhabitants of the capital towards concerns about life eternal and the soul
in the time of the holy Emperor Theodosius the Great. Here she was baptized by Patriarch Nectarius and entered a women's monastery.  Through strict and prolonged ascetic effort she attained to high spiritual perfection. The saint healed the sick, demonstrated power over the natural elements, and predicted the future. By her miracles the saint moved inhabitants of the capital towards concerns about life eternal and the soul. Adorned by virtues, the saint departed this life a spotless virgin in her old age.

Theodosius Reign August 378 - 15 May 392 (emperor in the east, with Gratian and Valentinian II in the west);
15 May 392 - 17 January 395 (whole empire)
Flavius Theodosius Born  11 January 347 Cauca, modern Spain Died 17 January 395  Milan Buried  Milan Predecessor Valens (in the east); Valentinian II in the west Successor  Arcadius in the east; Honorius in the west

St. Patiens of Metz (French, bishop)
 Metis, in Gállia, sancti Patiéntis Epíscopi.       At Metz in France, St. Patiens, bishop.
491 St. Patiens Archbishop of Lyons, Gaul best known for his immense efforts at charitable work. He constantly gave aid and comfort to the poor, devoting the resources of the diocese to feed those left starving by the Gothic and Germanic invasions and to rebuilding and repairing burned and looted churches
Lugdúni, in Gállia, deposítio sancti Patiéntis Epíscopi.    At Lyons in France, the death of St. Patiens, bishop.
Little is known about his early life, but he received appointment in 450 to the see of Lyons. His period as archbishop is best known for his immense efforts at charitable work. He constantly gave aid and comfort to the poor, devoting the resources of the diocese to feed those left starving by the Gothic and Germanic invasions and to rebuilding and repairing burned and looted churches. Patiens was also a dedicated enemy of Arianism. He also ordered Constantius, a priest of the diocese, to write a life of St. Germanus of Auxerre which subsequently became immensely popular.
425 St. Atticus Bishop converted opponent of St. John Chrysostom then called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I.
Atticus was born in Sebaste. He was trained in a heretical sect but converted and was ordained in Constantinople. He and one Arsacacius aided in deposing St. John Chrysostom from the see of Constantinople at the Council of the Oak in 405. Atticus succeeded to the see of Constantinople in 406, recognized by Pope St. Innocent I. He was a tireless foe of heretics, called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I. Atticus died in Constantinople on October 10.

482 St. Severinus Monk hermit founder of monasteries along Danube comfort to refugees /victims of Attila working many miracles
 Neápoli, in Campánia, natális sancti Severíni Epíscopi, qui fuit frater beáti Victoríni Mártyris; et, post multárum virtútum perpetratiónem, plenus sanctitáte quiévit.
       At Naples in Campania, the birthday of the bishop St. Severin, brother to the blessed martyr Victorinus, who, after working many miracles, died, replenished with virtues and merits.
He labored to evangelize the region of Noricum (part of. modern Austria), establishing a number of monasteries along the Danube River near modern Vienna.
In his last years, he gave aid and comfort to the many refugees and victims of the invasion of the region by Attila and the Huns. He was known for his preaching and prophecies, Severinus died on January 5. His relics were later carried to Naples. Italy, and enshrined in the Benedictine monastery of San Severino.
St. Severinus Bishop of Naples brother of St. Vietorinus unknown. He may be the same saint as Severinus.

480 ST SEVERINUS OF NORICUM
WE know nothing of the birth or country of this saint. From the purity of his Latin he was generally supposed to be a Roman, and his care to conceal what rank he had held in the world was taken for a proof of his humility and a presumption that he was a person of birth.

   He spent the first part of his life in the deserts of the East, but left his retreat to preach the gospel in Noricum (Austria). At first he came to Astura, now Stockerau; but finding the people hardened in vice, he fore­told the punishment God had prepared for them, and repaired to Comagene (Hainburg, on the Danube). It was not long ere his prophecy was veri­fied, for Astura was laid waste, and the inhabitants destroyed by the Huns. By the fulfilment of this prophecy, and by several miracles, which he wrought, the name of the saint became famous.

Faviana, a city on the Danube, distressed by a terrible famine, implored his assistance. St Severinus preached penance among them with great fruit, and he so effectually threatened a certain rich woman who had hoarded up a great quantity of provisions, that she distributed all her stores amongst the poor. Soon after his arrival, the ice of the Danube and the Inn breaking, the country was abundantly supplied by barges up the rivers.

Another time by his prayers he chased away the swarms of locusts, which were then threatening the whole produce of the year.

He wrought many miracles, yet never healed the sore eyes of Bonosus, the dearest to him of his disciples, who spent forty years without any abatement of his religious fervour. Severinus himself never ceased to exhort all to repentance and piety; he redeemed captives, relieved the oppressed, was a father to the poor, cured the sick, mitigated or averted public calamities, and brought a blessing wherever he came. Many cities desired him for their bishop, but he withstood their importunities by urging that it was sufficient he had relinquished his dear solitude for their instruction and comfort.

He established several monasteries, of which the most considerable was one on the banks of the Danube near Vienna; but he made none of them the place of his constant abode, often shutting himself up in a hermitage where he wholly devoted himself to contemplation. He never ate till after sunset, unless on great festivals, and he always walked barefoot, even when the Danube was frozen. Kings and princes of the barbarians came to visit him, and among them Odoacer on his march for Italy. The saint’s cell was so low that Odoacer could not stand upright in it. St Severinus told him that the kingdom he was going to conquer would shortly be his, and Odoacer finding himself soon after master of the country, wrote to the saint, promising him all he was pleased to ask; but Severinus only desired of him the restoration of a certain banished man.

Having foretold his death long before it happened, he fell ill on January 5, and on the fourth day of his illness, repeating that verse of the psalmist, “Let every spirit praise the Lord”, he closed his eyes in death. This happened between 476 and 482. Some years later his disciples, driven out by the inroads of barbarians, retired with his relics into Italy, and deposited them at Luculanum, near Naples, where a monastery was built, of which Eugippius, his disciple and biographer, was soon after made abbot. In the year 910 they were translated to Naples, where they were honoured in a Benedictine abbey that bore his name.

The one supreme authority for the life of St Severinus is the biography by his disciple Eugippius, the best text of which is to be found in the edition of T. Mommsen (1898), or in that of the Vienna Corpus scriptorum ecciesiasticorum latinorum, edited by Pius Knoell (1886). See also A. Baudrillart, St Séverin (1908); and T. Sommerlad, Wirtschafts­geschichtliche Untersuchungen, part ii (1903). Sommerlad shows some reason for thinking that St Severinus belonged to a distinguished family in Africa, and that in his own country he had been consecrated bishop before he sought refuge in the East and led the life of a hermit or monk.  

5th v. St. Ergnad Irish nun who received the veil from St. Patrick. She followed the monastic tradition of performing prayer and penance in seclusion.
In some lists she is called Ercnacta. She followed the monastic tradition of performing prayer and penance in seclusion.
Papíæ sancti Máximi, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Pavia, St. Maximus, bishop and confessor.
He attended the councils of Rome convened by Pope Symmachus.

550 ST SEVERINUS, legend BISHOP OF SEPTEMPEDA
THE ancient town of Septempeda in the Marches of Ancona is now called San Severino, deriving its name from a St Severinus who is believed to have been bishop there in the middle of the sixth century. He was the brother of St Victorinus, whom Ado in his martyrology identifies with a martyr of that name. The con­fusion seems to have arisen from the fact that the relics of St Severinus of Noricum were transferred to Naples, whence Ado was led to identify him with the Italian St Severinus. The confusion is perpetuated in the present Roman Martyrology, for there is no reason to believe that Severinus of Septempeda ever had anything to do with Naples.

See the legend of SS. Severinus and Victorinus in the Acta Sanctorum, January 8; and cf. Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxvii (1908), p. 466.

7v Saint George the Chozebite example in fasting, vigil and physical efforts lived as an angel upon the earth, he died in peace.
was born on the island of Cyprus toward the end of the sixth century. After the death of his parents, he went to Palestine to worship at the holy places. Here he entered into the monastic community of Chozeba between the River Jordan and Jerusalem, and he later became head of this monastery. St George presented the monks example in fasting, vigil and physical efforts. Having lived as an angel upon the earth, he died in peace.

Theophilus, deacon, and Helladius In Libya, the holy martyrs
 In Libya sanctórum Mártyrum Theóphili Diáconi, et Helládii, qui, primo laniáti ac téstulis peracútis compúncti, demum, in ignem conjécti, ánimas Deo reddidérunt.
      In Libya, the holy martyrs Theophilus, deacon, and Helladius, who, after having their bodies lacerated and cut with sharp pieces of earthenware, were cast into the fire, and rendered their souls unto God.
 In Libya sanctórum Mártyrum Theóphili Diáconi, et Helládii, qui, primo laniáti ac téstulis peracútis compúncti, demum, in ignem conjécti, ánimas Deo reddidérunt.       In Libya, the holy martyrs Theophilus, deacon, and Helladius, who, after having their bodies lacerated and cut with sharp pieces of earthenware, were cast into the fire, and rendered their souls unto God.
673 St. Frodobert Benedictine abbot-founder monk, trained by St. Waldebert. He was a monk at Luxeuil, France. He founded MoutierlaCelle Abbey near Troyes.
686 St.  Erhard Irish Bishop missionary to Bavaria baptized St Odilia, who, though born blind, recovered her sight on receiving the sacrament.
 Ratisbónæ, in Bavária, sancti Erhárdi Epíscopi.       At Ratisbon in Bavaria, St. Erhard, bishop.
Germany. An Irishman, Erhard was auxiliary bishop of Ratisbon and possibly the abbot of Ebersheimmünster Abbey.

686 ST ERHARD, Bishop

THERE is better evidence for the existence of St Erhard, described as bishop of Ratisbon (he was, however, possibly only a chorepiscopus, a sort of bishop auxiliary), than there is for his supposed brother Albert. A strong local tradition evidenced by place names—e.g. “Erhardsbrunnen”, “Erhardicrypta”, etc.—as well as by entries in calendars and other early documents, seems to imply a considerable cultus dating back to the eighth century and possibly earlier. What purports to be his episcopal staff of black buffalo-horn is still preserved, as well as part of his skull. He may be identical with an abbot of Ebersheimmünster whose name appears in a Merovingian charter of the year 684. He is stated to have baptized St Odilia, who, though born blind, recovered her sight on receiving the sacrament. Two or three lives of him have been printcd by the Bollandists, but they are all overlaid by fabulous or legendary matter. He is in some accounts described as an Irishman, or at least of Irish descent but no great reliance can be placed upon this statement.

The most trustworthy information which is available concerning St Erhard has been collected by W. Levison in his preface to the Latin texts printed in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. vi, pp. 1—23.  

712 St. Gudula Patroness of Brussels, Belgium daughter of St. Amalberga, educated by St. Gertrude of Nivelles was known for her great charity.
also called Ergoule. The daughter of Count Witger and St. Amalberga, Gudula was educated by St. Gertrude of Nivelles. She lived at the family castle of Morzelles until Gertrude died. She then dedicated herself to God in 664. Gudula was known for her great charity.
712 ST GUDULA, VIRGIN
ST AMALBERGA, mother of this saint, was niece to Bd Pepin of Landen. Gudula was educated at Nivelles, under the care of St Gertrude, her cousin and godmother, after whose death in 664 she returned to the house of Count Witger, her father; having by vow consecrated herself to God, she led a most austere life in watching, fasting and prayer. By her profuse alms she was truly the mother of all the dis­tressed. Though her father’s castle was two miles from the church at Morzelle, she went thither early every morning, with a maid to carry a lantern before her; and the wax taper being once put out, is said to have miraculously lighted again at her prayers, whence she is usually represented in pictures with a lantern.
<>She died on January 8, perhaps in 712, and was buried at Hamme, near Brussels. In the reign of Charlemagne, her body was removed to the church of Saint-Sauveur at Morzelle, and placed behind the high altar. This emperor, out of veneration for her memory, often resorted thither to pray, and founded a nunnery, which soon after changed its name of St Saviour for that of St Goule. This house was destroyed in the irruptions of the Normans. The relics of St Gudula, by the care of Charles, Duke of Lorraine (in which Brabant was then comprised), were trans­lated to Brussels in 978, where they were first deposited in the church of St Géry, but in 1047 removed into the great collegiate church of St Michael, since called from her St Gudule’s. This saint was called colloquially Goule or Ergoule in Brabant, and Goelen in Flanders.
See her life written by Hubert of Brabant in the eleventh century, soon after this trans­lation of her relics to St Michael’s, who assures us that he took the whole relation from an ancient life of the saint, having only changed the order and style. But even if we could trust this statement, some of the miracles found in this and one or two other slightly differing accounts are very extravagant—e.g. that a pair of gloves given her by a friend, which she refused to use, remained suspended in the air for an hour or that a tall poplar-tree grew up beside her grave in a night. See for the texts the Acta Sanctorum, January 8, and cf. Des­tombes, Saints de Cambrai, vol. i, pp. 51-56. Visitors to Brussels often take the great church of Sainte-Gudule for a cathedral, but Brussels has never been an episcopal see.
719 ST PEGA, VIRGIN; Ordericus Vitalis says her relics were honoured with miracles, and kept in a church which bore her name at Rome, but this church is not now known
PEGA was sister to St Guthlac and she lived a retired life not far from her brother’s hermitage at Croyland, just across the border of what is now Northamptonshire, on the western edge of the great Peterborough Fen. The place is now called Peakirk, i.e. Pega’s church. She attended her brother’s funeral, making the journey by water down the Welland, and is reputed on that occasion to have cured a blind man from Wisbech. She is said to have then gone on pilgrimage to Rome, where she slept in the Lord about the year 719. Ordericus Vitalis says her relics 
were honoured with miracles, and kept in a church which bore her name at Rome, but this church is not now known.
The Bollandists have brought together scattered allusions from the Life of St Guthlac and elsewhere (Acta Sanctorum, January 8). See also DCB., vol. iv, pp. 280—281, and the forthcoming Life of Guthlac by Bertram Colgrave.

762 St. Garibaldus Benedictine bishop of Regensburg ordained by St. Boniface He was also a noted scholar.
Germany, ordained by St. Boniface about 740. He was also a noted scholar.

800 St. Albert Patron saint of Cashel English in Ireland and Bavaria
of Cashel, Ireland. Listed traditionally as an Englishman who labored in Ireland and then in Bavaria, Albert went to Jerusalem and died in Regensburg on his return journey.

923 St. Athelm Benedictine Archbishop of Canterbury uncle of St. Dunstan
A Benedictine, Atheim served as a monk at Glastonbury, England, becoming abbot of the famous monastery. In 909, Athelm was named the first bishop of Wells. He became the archbishop of Canterbury in 914.

St. Severin
 Apud Nóricos sancti Severíni Abbátis, qui apud eam gentem Evangélium propagávit, et Noricórum dictus est Apóstolus.  Ejus corpus ad Lucullánum prope Neápolim, in Campánia, divínitus delátum, inde póstea ad monastérium sancti Severíni translátum est.
       Among the inhabitants of Noricum (now Austria), the abbot St. Severin, who propagated the Gospel in that country, and is called its apostle.  By divine power his body was carried to Lucullano, near Naples, and thence transferred to the monastery of St. Severin.

1002 St. Wulsin Benedictine bishop monk St. Dunstan disciple abbot of Westminster,
Wulsin (d. 1002) + Benedictine bishop and monk also called Ultius and Vulsin. A disciple of St. Dunstan, he was named by the saint to serve as superior over the restored community of Westminster, England, circa 960, and eventually became abbot in 980. In 993 he was named bishop of Sherborne, although he remained abbot of Westminster.

1005 ST WULSIN, BISHOP OF SHERBORNE
IN a charter, which purports to emanate from King Ethelred in the year 998, Wulsin is described as a loyal and trusty monk whom St Dunstan “loved like a son with pure affection”. It is a little difficult to be sure of the dates, but it would seem that when Dunstan was bishop of London he obtained a grant of land from King Edgar and restored the abbey of Westminster, making Wulsin superior of the dozen monks he placed there. In 980 Wulsin was consecrated abbot, and thirteen years afterwards he was appointed to the see of Sherborne. He seems to have died on January 8, 1005. He was evidently much beloved, and is called Saint by Malmes­bury, Capgrave, Flete and others, but his name apparently is not found in the medieval English calendars.
See John Flete, History of Westminster Abbey (ed. Armitage Robinson, 1909), pp. 79—80 Stubbs, Memorials of St Dunstan, pp. 304, 406—408; Stanton, Menology, p.10.

1285 St. Thorfinn miracles reported at his tomb 50 yrs after death
In the Cistercian monastery at TerDoest, near Bruges, a Norwegian bishop named Thorfinn died . He had never attracted particular attention and was soon forgotten. But over fifty years later, in the course of some building operations, his tomb in the Church was opened and it was reported that the remains gave out a strong and pleasing spell. The Abbot made inquiries and found that one of his monks, and aged man named Walter de Muda, remembered Bishop Thorfinn staying in there monastery and the impression he had made of gentle goodness combined with strength. Father Walter had in fact, written a poem about him after his death and hung it up over his tomb. It was then found that the parchment was still there, none the worse for the passage of time. This was taken as a direction from on high that the Bishop's memory was to be perpetuated, and Father Walter was instructed to write down his recollections of him. For all that, there is little enough known about St. Thorfinn. He was a Trondhjem man and perhaps was a Canon of the Cathedral of Nidaros, since there was such a one named Thorfinn among those who witnessed the agreement of Tonsborg in 1277. This was an agreement between King Magnus VI and the Archbishop of Nidaros confirming certain privileges of the clergy, the freedom of episcopal elections and similar matters. Some years later, King Eric repudiated this agreement, and a fierce dispute between Church and state ensued. Eventually the King outlawed the Archbishop, John, and his two chief supporters, Bishop Andrew of Oslow and Bishop Thorfinn of Hamar.

Bishop Thorfinn, after many hardships, including shipwreck, made his way to the Abbey of TerDoest in Flanders, which had a number of contacts with the Norwegian Church. It is possible that he had been there before, and there is some reason to suppose he was himself a Cistercian of the Abbey of Tautra, near Nidaros.
After a visit to Rome he went to TerDoest, in bad health. Indeed, though probably still a youngish man, he saw death approaching and so made his will; he had little to leave, but what there was, he divided between his mother, his brothers and sisters, and certain monasteries, churches and charities in his dioceses. He died shortly after on January 8, 1285.

After his recall to the memory of man as mentioned in the opening paragraph of this notice, miracles were reported at his tomb and St. Thorfinn was venerated by the Cistercians and around Bruges. In our own day, his memory has been revived among the few Catholics of Norway, and his feast is observed in his episcopal city of Hamar. The tradition of Thorfinn's holiness ultimately rests on the poem of Walter de Muda, where he appeared as a kind, patient, generous man, whose mild exterior covered a firm will against whatever he esteemed to be evil and ungodly.

1285 ST THORFINN, BISHOP OF HAMAR
IN the year 1285 there died in the Cistercian monastery at Ter Doest, near Bruges, a Norwegian bishop named Thorfinn. He had never attracted particular attention and was soon forgotten. But over fifty years later, in the course of some building operations, his tomb in the church was opened and it was reported that the remains gave out a strong and pleasing smell. The abbot made enquiries and found that one of his monks, an aged man named Walter de Muda, remembered Bishop Thorfinn staying in the monastery and the impression he had made of gentle goodness combined with strength. Father Walter had in fact written a poem about him after his death and hung it up over his tomb. It was then found that the parchment was still there, none the worse for the passage of time. This was taken as a direction from on high that the bishop’s memory was to be perpetuated, and Father Walter was instructed to write down his recollections of him.

For all that, there is little enough known about St Thorfinn. He was a Trondhjem man and perhaps was a canon of the cathedral of Nidaros, since there was such a one named Thorfinn among those who witnessed the Agreement of Tönsberg in 1277. This was an agreement between King Magnus VI and the Archbishop of Nidaros confirming certain privileges of the clergy, the freedom of episcopal elections and similar matters. Some years later King Eric*{* He married Margaret, daughter of King Alexander III of Scotland. Their daughter was “The Maid of Norway”, who has a paragraph in English and Scottish history.} repudiated this agreement, and a fierce dispute between church and state ensued. Eventually the king outlawed the archbishop, John, and his two chief supporters, Bishop Andrew of Oslo and Bishop Thorfinn of Hamar.

The last-named, after many hardships, including shipwreck, made his way to the abbey of Ter Doest in Flanders, which had a number of contacts with the Norwegian church. It is possible that he had been there before, and there is some reason to suppose he was himself a Cistercian of the abbey of Tautra, near Nidaros.

After a visit to Rome he went back to Ter Doest, in bad health. Indeed, though probably still a youngish man, he saw death approaching and so made his will; he had little to leave, but what there was he divided between his mother, his brothers and sisters, and certain monasteries, churches and charities in his diocese. He died shortly after, on January 8, 1285.

After his recall to the memory of man as mentioned in the opening paragraph of this notice, miracles were reported at his tomb, and St Thorfinn was venerated by the Cistercians and around Bruges. In our own day his memory has been revived among the few Catholics of Norway, and his feast is observed in his episcopal city of Hamar. The tradition of Thorfinn’s holiness ultimately rests on the poem of Walter de Muda, wherein he appears as a kind, patient, generous man, whose mild exterior covered a firm will against whatever he esteemed to be evil and ungodly.

The text of Walter de Muda’s poem and other pieces were printed in the Acta Sanctorum, January 8. St Thorfinn is shown in his historical setting by Mrs Undset in Saga of Saints (1934). See also Dc Visch’s Bibliotheca scriptorum ordinis Cisterciensis.

St. Theophilus deacon & Helladius a layman martyrs  in Libya
Two martyrs put to death in Libya, Africa. They were killed by being thrown into a furnace. Theophilus was a deacon and Helladius was a layman.

1309 Blessed Angela of Foligno dedicated to prayer and works of charity; her Book of Visions and Instructions Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693. 
Some saints show marks of holiness very early. Not Angela! Born
1248 of a leading family in Foligno, she became immersed in the quest for wealth and social position. As a wife and mother, she continued this life of distraction.
Around the age of 40 she recognized the emptiness of her life and sought God’s help in the Sacrament of Penance. Her Franciscan confessor helped Angela to seek God’s pardon for her previous life and to dedicate herself to prayer and the works of charity.

Shortly after her conversion, her husband and children died. Selling most of her possessions, she entered the Secular Franciscan Order. She was alternately absorbed by meditating on the crucified Christ and by serving the poor of Foligno as a nurse and beggar for their needs. Other women joined her in a religious community.

At her confessor’s advice, Angela wrote her Book of Visions and Instructions. In it she recalls some of the temptations she suffered after her conversion; she also expresses her thanks to God for the Incarnation of Jesus. This book and her life earned for Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693.
Comment:  People who live in the United States today can understand Blessed Angela’s temptation to increase her sense of self-worth by accumulating money, fame or power. Striving to possess more and more, she became more and more self-centered. When she realized she was priceless because she was created and loved by God, she became very penitential and very charitable to the poor. What had seemed foolish early in her life now became very important. The path of self-emptying she followed is the path all holy men and women must follow.
Quote:  Pope John Paul II writes: “Christ the Redeemer of the World is the one who penetrated in a unique, unrepeatable way into the mystery of the human person and entered our ‘hearts.’ Rightly therefore does the Second Vatican Council teach: ‘The truth is that only in the mystery of the Incarnate Word does the mystery of the human person take on light.... Christ the New Adam, in the very revelation of the mystery of the Father and his love, fully reveals human beings to themselves and brings to light their most high calling’” (Redemptor Hominis, 8).
1456 St. Lawrence Justinian first Patriarch of Venice the death of Eminent for learning, and abundantly filled with the heavenly gifts of divine wisdom the 5th of September, on which day he ascended the pontifical throne.
 Venétiis deposítio sancti Lauréntii Justiniáni, primi Patriárchæ urbis ejúsdem et Confessóris; quem, doctrína et supérnis divínæ sapiéntiæ charismátibus copiosíssime replétum, Alexánder Octávus, Póntifex Máximus, in Sanctórum númerum rétulit.  Ipsíus autem festívitas Nonis Septémbris, quo die Cáthedram pontificálem ascéndit, potíssimum celebrátur.
      At Venice, the death of St. Lawrence Justinian, confessor, first patriarch of that city.  Eminent for learning, and abundantly filled with the heavenly gifts of divine wisdom, he was ranked among the saints by Alexander VIII.  He is again mentioned on the 5th of September, on which day he ascended the pontifical throne.

Bishop and first Patriarch of Venice, b. in 1381, and d. 8 January, 1456. He was a descendant of the Giustiniani, a Venetian patrician family which numbered several saints among its members. Lawrence's pious mother sowed the seeds of a devout religious life in the boy's youth. In 1400 when he was about nineteen years old, he entered the monastery of the Canons Regular of St. Augustine on the Island of Alga near Venice. In spite of his youth he excited admiration by his poverty, mortifications, and fervour in prayer. At that time the convent was changed into a congregation of secular canons living in community. After his ordination in 1406 Lawrence was chosen prior of the community, and shortly after that general of the congregation. He gave them their constitution, and was so zealous in spreading the same that he was looked upon as the founder. His reputation for saintliness as well as his zeal for souls attracted the notice of Eugene IV and on 12 May, 1433, he was raised to the Bishopric of Castello. The new prelate restored churches, established new parishes in Venice, aided the foundation of convents, and reformed the life of the canons. But above all he was noted for his Christian charity and his unbounded liberality. All the money he could raise he bestowed upon the poor, while he himself led a life of simplicity and poverty. He was greatly respected both in Italy and elsewhere by the dignitaries of both Church and State. He tried to foster the religious life by his sermons as well as by his writings. The Diocese of Castello belonged to the Patriarchate of Grado. On 8 October, 1451, Nicholas V united the See of Castello with the Patriarchate of Grado, and the see of the patriarch was transferred to Venice, and Lawrence was named the first Patriarch of Venice, and exercised his office till his death somewhat more than four years later. His beatification was ratified by Clement VII in 1524, and he was canonized in 1690 by Alexander VIII. Innocent XII appointed 5 September for the celebration of his feast. The saint's ascetical writings have often been published, first in Brescia in 1506, later in Paris in 1524, and in Basle in 1560, etc. We are indebted to his nephew, Bernardo Giustiniani, for his biography.

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005
 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Pope St. Clement (92-101):  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand?
 
"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints of the day
Pope St. Innocent I. St. Atticus Bishop converted opponent of St. John Chrysostom then called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I.  He was a tireless foe of heretics, called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I. Atticus died in Constantinople on October 10.

Pope Francis:
The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (Video)
He explained that it can also be found in day to day life By Staff
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"
126 ST TELESPHORUS Pope in the time of Antoninus Pius, St. Telesphorus, pope, who, after many
       sufferings for the confession of Christ, underwent a glorious martyrdom.

January 5 - OUR LADY OF ABUNDANCE OR PROSPERITY (Cursi, Italy) - (d. 1066)
Saint Edward the Confessor
Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

Clement XI {1649 1721} 1713 St. Joseph Mary Tomasi;  Cardinal confessor of Pope Clement XI {1649 1721};
He answered that the days of actual physical martyrdom are over, and that we are now in the days of hidden martyrdom, seen only by God; the lesson of it all being trust in God; Even before his death the sick were healed through touching his clothing, and when the end had come cures multiplied round his bier. Bd Joseph Tommasi was beatified in 1803.

335 St. Sylvester Pope (25 yrs) council of Arles and Nice
   274 St. Felix I Pope from 269-274 274 Pope St. Felix I, martyr, birthday commemorated on 30th of December. Pope St Siricius, 384 -399: Upon death of her second consort Fabiola submitted to the canons of the Church, presenting herself for public penance at the Lateran basilica, and was readmitted to communion with the faithful by Pope St Siricius. She now devoted her great wealth to works of charity, gave large sums to churches, and communities in Italy and the adjoining islands, and founded a hospital for the sick whom she gathered from the streets and alleys of Rome, waiting on them in person. It was a great moment in the history of our civilization, for this was the first Christian public hospital in the West of which there is record.
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints of previous days
Pope St. Zosimus
 He is mentioned in a letter of Pope St. Zosimus in 417. He shares a feast day with the biblical Trophimus.


St Innocent I and St Leo the Great.
407 St. Anysius Bishop successor of St. Ascolus in see of Salonika.  The virtues of St Anysius were highly praised both by St Innocent I and St Leo the Great.

268 St. Dionysius Pope a Greek 259-268 rebuilt the Church after the persecution conducted by  Emperor Valerian.
 Ibídem, via Appia, deposítio sancti Dionysii Papæ, qui, multis pro Ecclésia impénsis labóribus, fídei documéntis clarus effúlsit.
       Likewise at Rome, on the Appian Way, the death of Pope St. Denis, who sustained many labours for the Church, and was renowned for his doctrinal writings.


417-418 St. Zosimus Pope from Greece succeeded Pope St. Innocent I (r. 401-417) on March 18, 417.
418 ST ZOSIMUS, POPE
ST Zosimus is said by the Liber Pontificalis to have been a Greek by birth, son of the presbyter Abram, and he succeeded Pope St Innocent I.


St. Gregory the Great  (540-12 March 604)
St. Emiliana aunt of St. Gregory the Great: three aunts, sisters to his father, Gordian the regionarius, who led an ascetic religious life in their father's house. Their names were Tarsilla, who was the eldest, Emiliana and Gordiana. Tarsilla and Emiliana were more united by the fervor of their hearts and the bond of charity than by blood. They lived in their father's house on the Clivus Scauri as in a monastery and, encouraging one another to virtue by discourse and example, made great progress in spiritual life. Gordiana joined them, but she was often impatient of silence and retirement and, being called to another way of living, married her guardian. Tarsilla and Emiliana persevered in the path they had chosen, enjoying divine peace and love until they were called to receive the recompense of their fidelity.

A few days later she appeared to Emiliana, and called her to celebrate the Epiphany in heaven. Emiliana in fact, died January 5. Both are named, on the respective days of their death, in the Roman Martyrology.


Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
36 ST ANTHERUS, POPE AND MARTYR; the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies
         of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives
236 ST ANTHERUS, POPE AND MARTYR; the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proce