Friday   Saint of the Day July 01   Kaléndis Júlii  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum,
atque sanctárum Vírginum. RDeo grátias.

And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors,
and holy virgins. R.  Thanks be to God.

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.


Festum pretiosíssimi Sánguinis Dómini nostri Jesu Christi.
The feast of the most Precious Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Octáva Nativitátis sancti Joánnis Baptístæ.
The Octave of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist.


There are over 10,000 named saints beati from history;
Roman Martyology, Orthodox sources, Islam, Lutheran, + others





                     
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

On Mt. Hor, the death of St. Aaron   In monte Hor deposítio sancti Aaron, primi ex órdine Levítico Sacerdótis.  On Mt. Hor, the death of St. Aaron, the first priest of the Levitical order.  
Viénnæ, in Gállia, sancti Martíni Epíscopi, Apostolórum discípuli.
At Vienne in France, St. Martin, a bishop who was a disciple of the apostles.

283 Saints Cosmas and Damian The Holy Martyrs, Wonderworkers and Unmercenary Physicians led strict and chaste lives, and were granted by God the gift of healing the sick
305 Saint Julius and Anron Martyrs of Britain at Caerlon, Monmouthshire, companions. Saint Bede lists them in his martyrology
390 Saint Felix of Como First bishop of Como, Italy. He was a friend of Saint Ambrose.

466 ST SHENUTE, ABBOT EGYPT the original home of communal monastic life, and St Shenute (Shenoudi) was, after St Antony and St Pachomius, the most considerable force in its early development, as well as the only prominent original writer in Coptic.
533 Saint Theodoric (Thierry) Abbot of Mont d'Or, near Reims; educated by Saint Remigius of Reims; founded Mont d'Or; known for converting sinners; cured King Theodoric (r. 471-526) of an eye disease.
645 Saint Gall Famous Irish missionary companion of Saint Columban noted scriptural scholar helped founding Luxeuil Monastery
854 Saint Peter of Constantinople One night, while praying, the holy Evangelist John the Theologian appeared in a vision and released him from captivity; lived all his monastic life in strict fasting and constant vigil, wearing a prickly hair-shirt and going barefoot founded a church and a monastery named for St Euandrus.
1160 Saint Arnulf Archbishop of Mainz, martyred for the faith. Arnulf served the archdiocese of Mainz, Germany,from 1153.
1505 Saint Angelina daughter of Prince George Skenderbeg of Albania
1784 Bld. Junipero Serra Miguel Jose Serra Franciscan Ordained 1737 taught philosophy theology at University of Padua At 37, landed in Mexico City January 1, 1750, and spent the rest of his life working for the conversion of the peoples of the New World.

Mary, the New Eve July 01 - Our Lady of Happy Deliverance (Paris, France)
When Mary said, "Behold the handmaid of the Lord; let it be done to me according to thy word," she was found to be obedient. Eve, for her part, had proven to be disobedient: she had disobeyed while still a virgin.
Just as Eve, thus, by her disobedience, became the cause of death for herself and the entire human race; so also did Mary, betrothed to man but nevertheless a virgin, by yielding obedience,
become the cause of salvation, both to herself and the whole human race.

The reason being that what has been tied once can only be untied if one does again in reverse order the loops of the knots. Thus, the knot of Eve's disobedience was untied by Mary's obedience,
for what Eve had tied by her lack of faith the Virgin Mary untied with her great faith.

Saint Irenaeus (d. 202 )  Adversus haereses (Book III 22, 4)

July 1, 2014 1784 Bld. Junipero Serra Miguel Jose Serra Franciscan Order. Ordained in 1737 taught philosophy and theology at the University of Padua At the age of thirty-seven, he landed in Mexico City on January 1, 1750, and spent the rest of his life working for conversion of the peoples in the New World.

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Stand With Mary and With the Church under the Cross (I)  1st July - Month of the Most Precious Blood
Today I stood with you under the Cross, And felt more clearly than I ever did That you became our Mother only there. Even an earthly mother faithfully Seeks to fulfill the last will of her son. But you became the handmaid of the Lord; The life and being of the God made Man Was perfectly inscribed in your own life.
So you could take your own into your heart, And with the lifeblood of your bitter pains
You purchased life anew for every soul.

Blessed Edith Stein (Sister Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, d. 1942) Adapted from www.catholiceducation.org
Viénnæ, in Gállia, sancti Martíni Epíscopi, Apostolórum discípuli.
    At Vienne in France, St. Martin, a bishop who was a disciple of the apostles.
 160 Saint Potitus The Holy Martyr accepted holy Baptism at 13; by the power of God he worked wondrous miracles settled on Mount Garganus and lived in solitude, among the animals
283 Saints Cosmas and Damian The Holy Martyrs, Wonderworkers and Unmercenary Physicians they led strict and chaste lives, and they were granted by God the gift of healing the sick

  305 Saint Castus & Secundinus Two saints venerated in southern Italy; recorded as living in Sinussa near Caserta.

305 Saint Julius and Anron Martyrs of Britain, put to death at Caerlon, Monmouthshire, with companions. Saint Bede listed them in his martyrology
  390 Saint Felix of Como First bishop of Como, Italy. He was a friend of Saint Ambrose.
  440 Saint Domitian Founder of the monastery of Bebron, now called Saint Rambert de Joux. An orphan in Rome, he became a monk at Lerins, France.
466 ST SHENUTE, ABBOT EGYPT was the original home of communal monastic life, and St Shenute (Shenoudi) was, after St Antony and St Pachomius, the most considerable force in its early development, as well as the only prominent original writer in Coptic.
485 Saint Gall Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne, France, ordained by Saint Quinctian; his humility, charity, and zeal increased: conspicuous above all was his patience under injuries; a monk, deacon, and cantor in the court of King Thierry I before bishop of Clermont 526; uncle was Saint Gregory of Tours.
533 Saint Theodoric Abbot of Mont d'Or, near Reims, sometimes called Thierry; educated by Saint Remigius of Reims; founded Mont d'Or; known for converting sinners; cured King Theodoric (r. 471-526) of an eye disease.
  536 Saint Carilefus Abbot and friend of Saint Avitus ordained at Micy Abbey became a hermit at Maine
  581 Saint  Eparchius Abbot who lived in a walled-up residence at Angouleme, France the duke of Perigord
6th v. Saint Veep Patron saint of Saint Veep, in Cornwall, England member of the celebrated clan of Brychan
6th v. Saint Cewydd A Welsh saint of Anglesey, Wales.
6th v. Saint Servan  consecrated bishop from St Palladius; preaching among the Seots called the Apostle of West Fife
6th v.Saint Martin of Vienne Third bishop of Vienne, France. Pope Saint Alexander I sent him as apostle to this region
6th v. Simeon der Narr um Christi willen in Edessa geboren Er ist wohl der erste bekannte Narr um Christi willen
645 Saint Gall Famous Irish missionary and companion of Saint Columban a noted scriptural scholar and helped in the founding of Luxeuil Monastery
7th v. Saint Juthware Virgin and possible martyr of England, the sister of Saint Sidwell. Many legends are connected to her life, including one in which she was beheaded
854 Saint Peter of Constantinople One night, while praying, the holy Evangelist John the Theologian appeared in a vision and released him from captivity; lived all his monastic life in strict fasting and constant vigil, wearing a prickly hair-shirt and going barefoot founded a church and a monastery named for St Euandrus.
1160 Saint Arnulf Archbishop of Mainz, martyred for the faith. Arnulf served the archdiocese of Mainz, Germany,
from 1153. He was murdered there and is venerated as a martyr
1238 Saint John of Rila On October 19, the relics of were solemnly transferred to the new capital, Trnovo, and put in a church dedicated to the saint
14th v. Saint Leontius of Radauti, Moldavia; leading a holy life, he received from God the grace of working miracles; holy relics were found incorrupt, and many people received healing at his tomb
1505 Saint Angelina daughter of Prince George Skenderbeg of Albania
1523 Heinrich Voes und Jan van Esch
1616 BD THOMAS MAXFIELD, MARTYR
1784 Bld. Junipero Serra Miguel Jose Serra Franciscan Order. Ordained in 1737 taught philosophy and theology at the University of Padua At the age of thirty-seven, he landed in Mexico City on January 1, 1750, and spent the rest of his life working for the conversion of the peoples of the New World.
1809 The Monk Nicodemos of the Holy Mountain (Nikodim Svyatogorets) editing of the work of the Monk Simeon the New Theologian. The Monk Nicodemos put aside the ascetic deed of silence and again occupied himself with literary work. And from this time until his death he continued zealously to toil in this endeavour
1873 Henry, John und Henry Venn
        Martyrdom of the Great Saint Anba Moses the Black {Coptic}

Mary the Mother of God


THE PRECIOUS BLOOD OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST
THOUGH the Precious Blood of our Lord has been used as a synonym for the Redemption from the times of the Apostles, spread of a special devotion in its honour was due in the main to St Caspar del Bufalo (January 2).
But the celebration of a feast of the Precious Blood was observed in some few churches long before his time.
For example, an office “of the Blood of Christ" was conceded to the archdiocese of Valencia in Spain in 1582, and a similar office was approved for the diocese of Sarzana in Tuscany in 1747; the feast was granted to St Caspar's congregation early in the nineteenth century. Pope Pius IX extended it to the whole Western church in 1849, amid the trials of the revolution which had driven him from Rome. The feast was at first fixed for the first Sunday of July; this was altered by Pope Pius X to the first day of the month. By the Passionists and some others a second feast is kept on the Friday after Laetare Sunday. The cathedral-church of the archdiocese of Westminster is dedicated to the Most Precious Blood.

In this feast, as Dom Guéranger has pointed out, the Church rejoices in the celebration of her birthday, for the stream of blood and water which issued from the Lord's pierced side is mystically the beginning of the Church. It was a stream of new life poured out over the world. St John Chrysostom says in a homily read at Matins: "It was therefore out of the side of Christ that the Church was built, just as it was out of the side of Adam that Eve was raised up to be his bride...for even as God made the woman out of the side of the man so Christ gave to us the water and blood from His own side whence was the Church raised up." St Augustine, whose homily is read at the third nocturn, speaks to the same effect.
See F. G. Holweck, Calendarium festorum Dei et Dei Matris (1925), p. 235; Moroni, Dizionario di Erudizione, vol. lxi, pp. 40-48; Nilles, Kalendarium manuale (1896-97), vol. ii, pp. 493-495; Buchberger, Lexikon fur Theologie und Kirche, vol. ii, cc. 401-404.
In monte Hor deposítio sancti Aaron, primi ex órdine Levítico Sacerdótis.  
    On Mt. Hor, the death of St. Aaron, the first priest of the Levitical order.
 
160 Saint Potitus The Holy Martyr accepted holy Baptism at thirteen by the power of God he worked wondrous miracles settled on Mount Garganus and lived in solitude, among the animals. Catholic Church celebrates on January 13.
Suffered under the emperor Antoninus Pius (reigned 138-161). Having become familiar with the Christian teaching, the young Potitus believed in the true God and accepted holy Baptism at thirteen years of age. When he learned of this, his pagan father was extremely upset and tried, first by endearments, and then by threats to dissuade his son from his faith in Christ the Savior, but his efforts were in vain. Impressed by the boy's firmness of faith, the father also came to believe in the Son of God and became a Christian himself.

St Potitus traveled through many lands preaching about Christ, and by the power of God he worked wondrous miracles.

In the region of Epiros, lived the illustrious woman Kyriake, the wife of a senator; she was afflicted with leprosy. Hearing of St Potitus, she summoned him and asked him to heal her. The saint declared that if she believed in Christ, she would be healed. The woman accepted holy Baptism and was immediately made well. Seeing such a miracle, her husband and all their household believed in Christ and were baptized as well.
After this, the saint settled on Mount Garganus and lived in solitude, among the animals. He was found there by servants of the emperor Antoninus, whose daughter was possessed by a demon. Through the lips of the maiden, the devil said that he would come out of her only if Potitus should come. They brought the holy youth to the emperor, and through the prayers of St Potitus the demon released the girl. But instead of being grateful, the emperor treated the saint with inhuman cruelty. For his firm confession of faith in Christ the Savior, and for his refusal to offer sacrifice to the pagan gods, to whom the emperor imputed the healing of his daughter, he ordered that the saint's tongue be torn out, and that he be blinded. After lengthy torture, St Potitus was finally beheaded
.
283 Cosmas and Damian The Holy Martyrs, Wonderworkers and Unmercenary Physicians they led strict and chaste lives, and they were granted by God the gift of healing the sick
Born at Rome, brothers by birth, and physicians by profession. They suffered at Rome in the reign of the emperor Carinus (283-284). Brought up by their parents in the rules of piety, they led strict and chaste lives, and they were granted by God the gift of healing the sick. By their generosity and exceptional kindness to all, the brothers converted many to Christ. The brothers told the sick, "It is not by our own power that we treat you, but by the power of Christ, the true God. Believe in Him and be healed." Since they accepted no payment for their treatment of the infirm, the holy brothers were called "unmercenary physicians."

Their life of active service and their great spiritual influence on the people around them led many into the Church, attracting the attention of the Roman authorities. Soldiers were sent after the brothers. Hearing about this, local Christians convinced Sts Cosmas and Damian to hide for a while until they could help them escape. Unable to find the brothers, the soldiers arrested instead other Christians of the area where the saints lived. Sts Cosmas and Damian then came out of hiding and surrendered to the soldiers, asking them to release those who had been arrested because of them.

At Rome, the saints were imprisoned and put on trial. Before the Roman emperor and the judge they openly professed their faith in Christ God, Who had come into the world to save mankind and redeem the world from sin, and they resolutely refused to offer sacrifice to the pagan gods. They said, "We have done evil to no one, we are not involved with the magic or sorcery of which you accuse us. We treat the infirm by the power of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and we take no payment for rendering aid to the sick, because our Lord commanded His disciples, "Freely have you received, freely give" (Mt. 10: 8).

The emperor, however, continued with his demands. Through the prayer of the holy brothers, imbued with the power of grace, God suddenly struck Carinus blind, so that he too might experience the almighty power of the Lord, Who does not forgive blasphemy against the Holy Spirit (Mt. 12:31). The people, beholding the miracle, cried out, "Great is the Christian God! There is no other God but Him!" Many of those who believed besought the holy brothers to heal the emperor, and he himself implored the saints, promising to convert to the true God, Christ the Savior, so the saints healed him. After this, Sts Cosmas and Damian were honorably set free, and once again they set about treating the sick.

What the hatred of the pagans and the ferocity of the Roman authorities could not do, was accomplished by black envy, one of the strongest passions of sinful human nature. An older physician, an instructor, under whom the holy brothers had studied the art of medicine, became envious of their fame. Driven to madness by malice, and overcome by passionate envy, he summoned the two brothers, formerly his most beloved students, proposing that they should all go together in order to gather various medicinal herbs. Going far into the mountains, he murdered them and threw their bodies into a river.

Thus these holy brothers, the Unmercenary Physicians Cosmas and Damian, ended their earthly journey as martyrs. Although they had devoted their lives to the Christian service of their neighbors, and had escaped the Roman sword and prison, they were treacherously murdered by their teacher.  The Lord glorifies those who are pleasing to God. Now, through the prayers of the holy martyrs Cosmas and Damian, God grants healing to all who with faith have recourse to their heavenly intercession.

The Unmercenary Saints Cosmas and Damian of Rome should not be confused with the Unmercenary Saints Cosmas and Damian of Asia Minor (November 1), or the Unmercenary Saints Cosmas and Damian of Arabia (October 17) .
305 Saint Castus & Secundinus Two saints venerated in southern Italy. They were recorded as living in Sinussa near Caserta.Sinuéssæ, in Campánia, sanctórum Mártyrum Casti et Secundíni Episcopórum.
    At Sinuessa in Campánia the holy martyrs Castus and Secundinus, bishops


305  Saint Julius and Anron Martyrs of Britain, put to death at Caerlon, Monmouthshire, with companions. Saint Bede listed them in his martyrology
In Británnia sanctórum Mártyrum Júlii et Aaron, qui post sanctum Albánum, in persecutióne Diocletiáni Imperatóris, passi sunt; quo témpore ibídem quamplúrimi, divérsis cruciátibus torti et sævíssime laceráti, ad supérnæ civitátis gáudia, consummáto agóne, pervenérunt.
    In England, the holy martyrs Julius and Aaron, who suffered after St. Alban in the persecution of Diocletian.  In the same country a great number were tortured at that time in different ways and barbarously lacerated, ended their combat, and attained to the joys of the heavenly city.


390 Saint Felix of Como First bishop of Como, Italy. He was a friend of Saint Ambrose.

440 Saint Domitian Founder of the monastery of Bebron, now called Saint Rambert de Joux. An orphan in Rome, he became a monk at Lerins, France.
In território Lugdunénsi deposítio sancti Domitiáni Abbátis, qui primus illic eremitícam vitam exércuit, et, cum plúrimos ibi in Dei servítio congregásset, tandem, magnis virtútibus et gloriósis miráculis valde clarus, ad patres, in senectúte bona, colléctus est.
    In the diocese of Lyons, the death of St. Domitian, abbot, who was first to lead the life of a monk in that district.  After having called together many servants of God to that place, and having gained great renown for virtues and miracles, he was summoned to his fathers at an advanced age.

466 ST SHENUTE, ABBOT EGYPT was the original home of communal monastic life, and St Shenute (Shenoudi) was, after St Antony and St Pachomius, the most considerable force in its early development, as well as the only prominent original writer in Coptic.
He was born about the middle of the fourth century at Shenalolet and became a monk at Dair-al-Abiad, founded near Atripe in the Thebaid by his uncle, whom he succeeded as abbot in 385. The monks were numerous, chiefly recruited from rough and ignorant peasants, and the superior had to be a strict disciplinarian. It is not surprising to learn that Shenute was a martinet; and his difficulties were increased by his being naturally quick-tempered and of a rigorous, indeed, violent, disposition. His policy was to strengthen regularity, to maintain order by increasing the severity of the austere rule imposed by St Pachomius, and he instituted something in the nature of monastic vows as we now understand them. By the fact of entering on the monastic life the monk or nun took on certain obligations; Shenute legislated for these to be expressed in a formula, in which the religious covenanted to observe continence, not to steal or bear false witness or lie, and to do no secret evil, upon pain of the wrath of God and the loss of salvation. Shenute also permitted religious of proved worth, who so wished, to pass from the communal to the solitary life in the neighbourhood of the monastery. So far from discouraging aspirants, St Shenute's severity was an attraction: his successor and biographer, Besa, says that he had at one time 2200 monks and 1800 nuns. He enforced his will with great strictness, and discouraged any study among his subjects (very few of them were capable of it); he was not learned himself, but wrote many letters of direction and some powerful sermons; on the other hand he set himself against undisciplined exercises of penitence and all false mysticism, at a time and place when monastic life was prone to degenerate into competitive austerity.
It is said, though it is far from certain, that St Shenute was present at the Council of Ephesus in 431. He came to be archimandrite, a sort of abbot general, over all the monasteries that had sprung up in imitation of the one at Atripe. As all the monks of a monastery, living in their groups of huts, were subject to their abbot, so the abbots were subject to the archimandrite. The exact date of his death is unknown, but it is believed that he lived to the age of 118. In spite of numberless sackings and raidings St Shenute's monastery was still in existence a hundred years ago, and its ruins are still called Dair Anba-Shenute. In 1833 the excellent and Honourable Robert Curzon, junior, found three Coptic monks living there; but “who the great Abou Shenood had the honour to be, I could meet with no one to tell me. He was, I believe, a Mahomedan saint, and this Coptic monastery had been in some sort placed under the shadow of his protection in the hopes of saving it from the persecutions of the faithful." Mr Curzon was no more fortunate in getting ancient manuscripts (which was what he was after) than in getting information about Anba Shenute: the Mamelukes had destroyed the last of them in 1812.
Shenute's sanctity is perhaps somewhat compromised by the suspicion that in his last days he became a monophysite, and on the other hand the conspicuous part attributed to him at the Council of Ephesus is not free from difficulties. See P. Peeters in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxiv (1905), p. 146. M. Amélineau has published a French translation of the eulogistic biographies by Bêsa and others; these abound in extravagant miracles. The learned essay of J. Leipoldt published in Texte und Untersuchungen is based on a very exhaustive study of the materials, but a truer picture may be found in the book of P. Ladeuze, Etude sur le Cénobitisme pakhomien (1898), and in his article in the Revue d'histoire ecclésiastique, vol. vii (1906), pp. 76-83. Reference should also be made to the articles “Cénobitisme” and "Deir-e1-Abiad" in DAC., and to De L. O'Leary, The Saints of Egypt (1937), pp. 251-255.

485-554 Saint Gall Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne, France, ordained by Saint Quinctian; his humility, charity, and zeal increased: conspicuous above all was his patience under injuries; a monk, deacon, and cantor in the court of King Thierry I before bishop of Clermont 526; uncle was Saint Gregory of Tours.;
Arvérnis, in Gállia, sancti Galli Epíscopi.
    In Auvergne in France, St. Gall, bishop.
ST GALL, BISHOP OF CLERMONT (A.D. 551)
 THIS Gall was born about the year 486 at Clermont in Auvergne, his father being of one of the first families of that province. He took special care in the upbringing of his son, and when he arrived at a proper age, proposed to have him married to the daughter of a senator. Gall, who had resolved to consecrate himself to God, fled from his father's house to the monastery of Cournon, and asked to be admitted among the monks. The abbot refused until he should have obtained the consent of his father, which, rather surprisingly, he was able to do and so was received into the abbey. Here he attracted the notice of the bishop, Quintian, who ordained him deacon, attached him to his cathedral-church, and sent him as his representative at the royal court, where for his good singing he was made a cantor in King Theodoric's chapel. Quintian dying about 526, St Gall was appointed to succeed him. Under new responsibilities his humility, charity, and zeal increased: conspicuous above all was his patience under injuries, to which several stories bear witness. On one occasion a man hit him over the head, but the bishop showed no anger or resentment, and by his meekness disarmed the bad temper of his assailant. At another time one Evodius, who from a senator became a priest, having so far forgotten himself as to treat his bishop in the most insulting manner, Gall, without making any reply, got up quietly from his seat and went to visit the churches of the city. Evodius was so touched that he ran after him and fell on his knees in the middle of the street to ask the saint's pardon. During the last few years of his life St Gall was much concerned in the upbringing of his nephew, who became famous as St Gregory of Tours.
This St Gall is, of course, to be distinguished from the more famous St Gall, the Irishman, who has given his name to one of the Swiss cantons and who lived about a century later. The former is hardly known to us except from the account furnished in the De vitis patrum by his nephew St Gregory of Tours. All that is relevant is quoted in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. i.  
533 Saint Theodoric Abbot of Mont d'Or, near Reims, France, sometimes called Thierry; educated by Saint Remigius of Reims; founded Mont d'Or and became known for converting sinners. He also cured King Theodoric (r. 471-526) of an eye disease.
In território Rheménsi sancti Theodoríci Presbyteri, qui fuit discípulus beáti Remígii Epíscopi.
    In the diocese of Rheims, St. Theodoric, priest and disciple of the blessed Bishop Remigius.
ST THEODORIC, OR THIERRY, ABBOT (A.D. 533)
THEODORIC was born in the district of Rheims, his father being a man of evil character. He married under the compulsion of his relations, but persuaded his wife to renounce her rights; and, becoming himself a priest under St Remigius he eventually formed a religious community at "Mont d'Or" (Mons Or), near Rheims. Theodoric became famous by the many remarkable conversions he wrought through the zeal wherewith he exhorted sinners to repentance; among these was his own father, who persevered under the direction of his son and died in his monastery. He is said miraculously to have cured King Theodoric I of ophthalmia. According to the most common opinion he died on July I, 533.
Flodoard in the tenth century gives some account of Theodoric, and there are two brief Latin biographies which are printed both by Mabillon and by the Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum. These are sources in which very little confidence can be placed.  

536 Saint Carilefus Abbot and friend of Saint Avitus ordained at Micy Abbey became a hermit at Maine
He was born in Auvergne, France, and raised at Menat Monastery near Riom. Both he and Saint Avitus were ordained at Micy Abbey, and Carilefus became a hermit at Maine. He attracted so many disciples that he founded a monastery at Anisole, in Maine, and became abbot. He is venerated in Blois.
ST CARILEFUS, OR CALAIS, ABBOT (c. A.D. 540 ?)
CARILEFUS was born in Auvergne and was brought up in the monastery of Menat near Riom, where he became a friend of St Avitus. They became monks together and migrated to the abbey of Micy, near Orleans, where they were ordained to the priesthood. But Calais longed for greater solitude, so with two companions he went to Maine, where he revived the vigorous discipline of the ancient eastern hermits. But as he was constantly visited by numbers who sought to live under his direction, he at length consented to receive them; his monastery was called Anisole, from the river Anille on which it was situated. The small town which grew up around it is now known by the name of its founder, Saint-Calais, who is honoured as the pioneer of monasticism in that neighbourhood.
The oldest life of St Carilefus has been edited by B. Krusch in MGH., Scriptores merov, vol. iii. The others are of little value. See also the important article of Father Albert Poncelet on the Saints of Micy in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxiv (1905), especially p. 84. The little town of Saint-Calais in the department of Sarthe is, of course, quite distinct from Calais opposite Dover.

581 Saint  Eparchius Abbot who lived in a walled-up residence at Angouleme, France the duke of Perigord
Engolísmæ, in Gállia, sancti Epárchii Abbátis.
    At Angoulême, St. Eparchius, abbot.
Also called Cybor. He was the duke of Perigord, who was placed in a sealed cell in 542. A community built around him and he served as abbot after being ordained by a local bishop and leaving his cell.
ST EPARCHIUS, OR CYBARD (A.D. 581)
CYBARD quitted the world in spite of his parents, and retired to a monastery, perhaps at Saint-Cybard in the Dordogne. He there served God some time under Abbot Martin, and soon became known and sought after because of his virtues and miracles. In dread of the seduction of vainglory, he left his monastery to hide himself in absolute solitude near Angoulême. But his virtues were too striking for concealment, and the bishop obliged him to accept the priesthood. Moreover, although a recluse, he did not refuse to admit disciples; but he would not allow them manual labour, as he wished that they should be constantly occupied in prayer in a literal sense. When any of them complained for want of necessaries, he would remind them of St Jerome's saying that “faith never feared hunger”: and, indeed, he found abundance for himself and his disciples in the beneficence of the faithful, by whom his miracles were greatly appreciated.
That a considerable cult of this saint existed in the sixth century we know from St Gregory of Tours. Gregory calls him Eparchius, which in the popular speech became Separcus and eventually Cybard. We know little of him in reality beyond what Gregory tells us. The. Latin biography which has been printed by the Bollandists and by Bruno Krusch is pronounced by the latter editor to be a forgery of the ninth century: but cf. L. Duchesne in the Bulletin critique, 2nd series, vol. iii (1897), pp. 471-473. See also J. de la Martinière, S. Cybard (1908), who criticizes the view of H. Esmein that some of our materials date from the sixth century.  

6th v. Simeon der Narr in Edessa geboren Er ist wohl der erste bekannte Narr um Christi willen
Apud Eméssam, in Phœnícia, sancti Simeónis Confessóris, cognoménto Sali, qui stultus propter Christum factus est; sed altam ejus sapiéntiam Deus magnis miráculis declarávit.
    At Emesa, St. Simeon, surnamed Salus, confessor.  He had feigned to be an idiot for the sake of Christ, but God manifested his high wisdom by great miracles.
Orthodoxe Kirche: 21. Juli Katholische Kirche: 1. Juli
6th v. ST SIMEON SALUS
SIMEON, with his friend, a certain St John, retired to the desert near the Dead Sea, where he remained twenty-nine years in the constant practice of a most penitential life. He could never forget that we must love humiliations if we would be truly humble; that at least we should receive those which God sends us with resignation, and remember that they are less than we deserve; that it is even sometimes commendable to seek them, and that human prudence should not always be our guide in this regard. His application of these principles was such that, when he went to live at Emesa, on the Orontes in Syria, he received the nickname of Salos, which in Greek signifies "mad"; for by affecting the manners of those who want sense, he passed for a fool, and his love of humility was not without reward, for God bestowed on him extraordinary graces, and even honoured him with the gift of miracles. The year of his death is unknown, but it was some time after the earthquake of 588. Some of his eccentricities were indeed surprising; Alban Butler comments that although we are not obliged to imitate St Simeon's behaviour in all respects, and it would be rash even to attempt it without a special call, yet his example ought to make us ashamed when we consider with what an ill-will we suffer the least thing that hurts our pride. But indeed it seems likely that at times the saint's mind was unhinged.
A reasonably full account of St Simeon is furnished by the church historian Evagrius who was a contemporary, and there is also a long Greek life by Leontius, Bishop of Neapolis in Cyprus, who lived a century later. The text is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. i. There is a useful bibliography of St Simeon and "fools for Christ's sake" in general in Baudot and Chaussin, Vies des saints... t. vii (1949), pp. 18-19. 
Simeon wurde in Edessa geboren. Simeon starb im 6. Jarhhundert.  Er lebte 29 Jahre als Einsiedler-Mönch in der Wüste Palästinas. Dann ging er nach Emesa (Syrien) und lebte hier als "Narr in Christus". Als Narr hatte er die Möglichkeit, mit hochgestellten Persönlichkeiten zusammenzutreffen und ihnen das Evangelium zu verkünden. Simeon starb im 6. Jarhhundert. Er ist wohl der erste bekannte Narr um Christi willen. Diese besondere Form des Mönchtums hat sich besonders in der orthodoxen Kirche bis heute erhalten.

6th v. Saint Veep Patron saint of Saint Veep, in Cornwall, England member of the celebrated clan of Brychan
Also called Veepu and Wennapa. Veep was possibly a member of the celebrated clan of Brychan.

6th v.  Saint Cewydd A Welsh saint of Anglesey, Wales.

6th v.  Saint Servan  receiving consecration as bishop from Saint Palladius and preaching among the Scots called the Apostle of West Fife
Also known as Servanus, Serf, or Sair. According to an legend, he was from Ireland, receiving consecration as bishop from Saint Palladius and preaching among the Scots. He is honored as the patron of the Orkney Islands, although it is highly unlikely that he was ever there. He is called the Apostle of West Fife.
6th v. ST SERF, OR SERVANUS, BISHOP
THE history of this saint is a confused mass of legends, from which even the century in which he flourished cannot be clearly learned. The old Aberdeen Breviary says that he was a Scot (i.e. an Irishman), consecrated by Palladius. According to Joscelyn's Life of St Kentigern, that bishop was educated and formed by Serf in the monastery he had founded at Culross, his mother having been cast up on the shore near by. He was venerated as the patron and apostle of the Orkneys, but the evidence that he ever preached in those islands is very slight: Culross in Fifeshire and his monastery there was the centre of his activity and of his cultus in medieval Scotland. Some of the legends connected with St Serf are astonishingly wild: one says that his mother was a daughter of the king of the Picts (or of Arabia) and that his father was the king of Canaan; that he gave up his right to that throne, studied at Alexandria, was made patriarch of Jerusalem, and eventually pope-which dignity he resigned in order to preach to the Scots. A lesson in the Aberdeen Breviary tells how, a poor man having killed his only pig to feed the saint and his monks, Serf restored flesh and life to its bones to recompense him for his hospitality; other tales of his wonders are simply absurd and are apparently adaptations of local folk-tales. St Serf apparently died and was buried at Culross; a former pilgrimage has preserved at Dysart knowledge of the cave wherein he worsted the Devil.
Besides the lessons of the Aberdeen Breviary, a medieval fiction which purports to be a biography of the saint has been printed in Skene's Chronicles of the Picts, pp. 412-420, and elsewhere. See also KSS., pp. 445-447. 

7th v. Saint Juthware Virgin and possible martyr of England, the sister of Saint Sidwell. Many legends are connected to her life, including one in which she was beheaded.

645 Saint Gall Famous Irish missionary and companion of Saint Columban a noted scriptural scholar and helped in the founding of Luxeuil Monastery
Born in Ireland, he was trained by Sts. Columban and Comgall, and he was one of the twelve companions who accompanied Columban to France. He was a noted scriptural scholar and helped in the founding of Luxeuil Monastery. When Saint Columban was exiled in 610, Gall followed him to Switzerland and then to Italy. Gall remained in Switzerland and became a hermit on the Steinach River. The monastery of Saint Gall was erected on this site. Gall refused two bishoprics and abbacy of Luxeuil. He is venerated as an apostle to the land. He died in Arbon.
Abbey of Saint Gall
In Switzerland, Canton Saint Gall, 30 miles southeast of Constance; for many centuries one of the chief Benedictine abbeys in Europe; founded about 613, and named after Gallus, an Irishman, the disciple and companion of Saint Columbanus in his exile from Luxeuil. When his master went on to Italy, Gallus remained in Switzerland, where he died about 646. A chapel was erected on the spot occupied by his cell, and a priest named Othmar was placed there by Charles Martel as custodian of the saint's relics. Under his direction a monastery was built, many privileges and benefactions being upon it by Charles Martel and his son Pepin, who with Othmar as first abbot, are reckoned its principal founders. By Pepin's persuasion Othmar substituted the Benedictine rule for that of Saint Columbanus. He also founded the famous schools of Saint Gall, and under him and his successors the arts, letters, and sciences were assiduously cultivated. The work of copying manuscripts was undertaken at a very early date, and the nucleus of the famous library gathered together. The abbey gave hospitality to numerous Anglo-Saxon and Irish monks who came to copy manuscripts for their own monasteries. Two distinguished guests of the abbey were Peter and Romanus, chanters from Rome, sent by Pope Adrian I at Charlemagne's request to propagate the use of the Gregorian chant. Peter went on to Metz, where he established an important chant-school, but Romanus, having fallen sick at Saint Gall, stayed there with Charlemagne's consent. To the copies of the Roman chant that he brought with him, he added the "Romanian signs", the interpretation of which has since become a matter of controversy, and the school he started at Saint Gall, rivalling that of Metz, became one of the most frequented in Europe.

The chief manuscripts produced by it, still extant, are the "Antiphonale Missarum" (no. 339), the "Antiphonarium Sti. Gregorii" (no. 359), and Hartker's "Antiphonarium" (nos. 390-391), the first and third of which have been reproduced in facsimile by the Solesmes fathers in their "Paléographie Musicale". The other schools of the abbey — for the younger monks and for lay scholars attracted thither by the fame of the monastic professors — were founded as early as the ninth century, for the well-known, but unrealized plan of 820 provides separate accommodation for both schools. The domestic history of the community during these centuries of consolidation was not altogether free from troubles. Even during the lifetime of Othmar, the monks had to defend themselves against the bishops of Constance, who, having already secured jurisdiction over the neighbouring Abbey of Reichenau, refused to recognise the exemption and other privileges of Saint Gall. For many years the monks had to fight for their independence, but it was not until the time of Louis the Pious that their efforts were crowned with success and their rights confirmed. From that time up to the end of the tenth century was the golden age of the abbey, during which flourished many celebrated scholars — the three Notkers, Eckhard, Hartker and others. The decrees of the Council of Aachen (817) for the furtherance of discipline and the religious spirit were loyally carried into effect by Abbot Gotzbert (815-837), under whom the monks built a new and magnificent church and by whom also the library was greatly enlarged. He purchased many fresh manuscripts and set his monks to multiply copies of them. His successor Grimald (841-872) carried on the work, and a catalogue drawn up in his time, still extant, shows the wide range of subjects represented. Over four hundred of the manuscripts mentioned in that catalogue are still at Saint Gall.

During the abbacy of Engelbert II (924-933) an incursion of the Huns threatened the abbey, and most of the valuable books and manuscripts were removed to Reichenau for safety, some never being returned. In 937 a disastrous fire almost entirely destroyed the monastery, but the library fortunately escaped. The abbey and town were rebuilt and fortified, and throughout the eleventh and twelfth centuries Saint Gall maintained its place in the front rank of monastic establishments. With the thirteenth century, however, came a period of decline. Various causes contributed to this, one of them being the fact that the neighbouring feudal lords took to quartering themselves and their retinues upon the abbey more often than was good for monastic discipline. The abbots also were frequently called upon to settle their quarrels, and a spirit of worldliness thus crept into the cloister. About the same time the abbey and town became an independent principality, over which the abbots ruled as territorial sovereigns, taking rank as Princes of the Empire. Ulrich VI (1204-1220) was the first to hold that dignity. Records as to the library during this period are scanty. In the fourteenth century Humanists were allowed to take away some of the rarest of the classical manuscripts and in the sixteenth the abbey was raided by the Calvinists, who scattered many of the most valuable books. In 1530 Abbot Diethelm inaugurated a restoration with such success that he has been called the third founder of Saint Gall. The library was one of his chief cares and his successors zealously followed his good example. Through their efforts the monastic spirit, the schools and the studies all revived and attained to something of their former greatness. In 1602, when the Swiss congregation of the Order of Saint Benedict was formed, the Abbey of Saint Gall took precedence as the first house of the congregation, and many of its abbots subsequently held the office of president.

A printing-press was started under Pius (1630-1674), which soon became one of the most important in Switzerland. In 1712 a great change came over the fortunes of the monastery. It was pillaged by the Swiss, who spared nothing. Most of the books and manuscripts were carried off to Zurich, Berne and other places, and only a portion of them were afterwards restored to Saint Gall. The abbot of the time, Leodegar by name, was obliged for security to place his monastery under the protection of the townspeople whose ancestors had been serfs of the abbey, but who had, since the Reformation, thrown off the yoke of subjection. When these disturbances were over, a final attempt was made to revive the glories of the abbey. The monastery was rebuilt for the last time under Abbots Celestine II and Bede, but the resuscitation was short-lived. In 1798 the Swiss directory suppressed the ecclesiastical principality and secularized the abbey, and in 1805 its revenues were sequestrated. The monks took refuge in other houses of the congregation, the last abbot, Pancras Forster, dying in 1829 at Muri. When the Diocese of Constance was suppressed in 1821, that portion of it in which Saint Gall was situated was united to the Diocese of Coire, but in 1846 a rearrangement made Saint Gall a separate see, with the abbey church as its cathedral and a portion of the monastic buildings being resigned for the bishop's residence. The church, rebuilt 1755-65 in the rococo style, contains some finely-carved choir stalls and a beautiful wrought iron screen. The conventual buildings, besides the bishop's palace, now accommodate also the cantonal offices and what remains of the library — about thirty thousand volumes and manuscripts. The town of Saint Gall has a population of over 30,000 and is one of the principal manufacturing centres in Switzerland, muslin and cotton being its chief industries

854 Saint Peter One night, while praying, the holy Evangelist John the Theologian appeared to him in a vision and released him from captivity lived all his monastic life in strict fasting and constant vigil, wearing a prickly hair-shirt and going barefoot founded a church and a monastery named for St Euandrus.
Born into a patrician family at Constantinople at the end of the eighth century. During the reign of the Byzantine emperor Nicephorus (802-811) Peter was commissioned as an officer and participated in the campaigns of the Greek army against Bulgaria. In one particular battle the emperor was mortally wounded, and Peter was one of many soldiers taken captive.

One night, while he was praying, the holy Evangelist John the Theologian appeared to him in a vision and released him from captivity. Having returned to Constantinople, St Peter left the world and withdrew into a monastery on Mount Olympos (in Asia Minor) and became a monk. There he passed his time in constant ascetic efforts for 34 years under the guidance of St Joannicius the Great (November 4). St Peter lived all his monastic life in strict fasting and constant vigil, wearing a prickly hair-shirt and going barefoot. He lived the final eight years of his life at Constantinople, where he founded a church and a monastery named for St Euandrus.
St Peter died in 854 in the seventieth year of his life, and was buried in his monastery.
1160 Saint Arnulf Archbishop of Mainz, martyred for the faith. Arnulf served the archdiocese of Mainz, Germany, from 1153. He was murdered there and is venerated as a martyr.
1238 St John of Rila On October 19, the relics of were solemnly transferred to the new capital, Trnovo, and put in a church dedicated to the saint.
Then on July 1, 1469 the holy relics of St John were returned to the Rila monastery, where they rest to the present day, granting grace-filled help to all the believers.
See his Life on August 18.


1505 Saint Angelina daughter of Prince George Skenderbeg of Albania
Her mother's name is not known, but she raised her daughter in Christian piety and taught her to love God.  St Stephen Brancovich (October 9 and December 10), the ruler of Serbia, had come to Albania to escape those who wished to kill him. Some time before he arrived in Albania, St Stephen was unjustly blinded by the Turkish Sultan for some perceived offense. Since he was innocent, he bore his affliction with courage.  St Stephen was not only Prince George's guest, but he was also treated as a member of his family. Not surprisingly, Stephen and Angelina eventually fell in love. With her parents' blessing, they were married in church. After a few years, they were blessed with two sons: George and John.
When the boys were grown, St Stephen and his family were forced to flee to Italy for their safety. At that time the Turks invaded Albania and began to slaughter men, women, and even children.  St Stephen died in 1468, leaving Angelina a widow. In her distress, she turned to the ruler of Hungary for help. He gave them the town of Kupinovo in Sirmie.  St Angelina left Italy with her sons in 1486, stopping in Serbia to bury St Stephen's incorrupt body in his native land.

The children of these pious parents also became saints. George gave up his claim to the throne in favor of his brother John, then entered a monastery and received the name Maximus.  John was married, but had no sons. He died in 1503 at a young age, and many miracles took place before his holy relics.  St Angelina survived her husband and both of her sons. Mindful of her soul's salvation, she entered a women's monastery. She departed to the Lord in peace, and her body was buried in the same tomb as her sons in the monastery of Krushedol in Frushka Gora.
St Angelina is also commemorated on December 10 with her husband St Stephen and her son St John.
14th v. Saint Leontius of Radauti, Moldavia; leading a holy life, he received from God the grace of working miracles; holy relics were found incorrupt, and many people received healing at his tomb
Born in Radauti, Moldavia in the fourteenth century. He was named Laurence when he received the monastic tonsure. In time he was found worthy of ordination to the holy priesthod, and founded a monastery near Radauti, which later became known as St Laurence's Monastery. Among his many disciples was St Daniel the Hesychast (December 18).
Because of his holy life, he received from God the grace of working miracles. Many sick people were healed by his prayers, and he became a father, teacher, and protector to all.

Prince Alexander the Good recommended that he be made Bishop of Radauti. St Leontius led his flock with wisdom for many years, then retired to live alone in the wilderness. He received the Great Schema with the name of Leontius, and departed to the Lord soon afterward. His holy relics were found incorrupt, and many people received healing at his tomb.
St Leontius was glorified by the Orthodox Church of Romania in 1992.

1523 Heinrich Voes und Jan van Esch
Evangelische Kirche: 01. Juli
Im Antwerpener Michaelskloster der Augustiner verbreitete der Prior Jakobus Propst schon um 1519 reformatorisches Gedankengut aus Deutschland. 1522 begann Margaretha, Statthalterin der Niederlande, eine Inquisition, Jakobus Propst war das erste Opfer der Verfolgung. Die Mönche wählten Heinrich Zütphen zum Nachfolger. Er wurde am Michaelstag 1522 während des Gottesdienstes verhaftet und eingesperrt. Das Kloster wurde niedergerissen und die Mönche auf andere Klöster verteilt. Alle Verdächtigen wurden eingekerkert und nach längerer Haft verhört. Zwei Mönche, Hinrich Voes und Jan van Esch, beharrten darauf, daß Gottes Wort mehr gelte als Papstworte. Sie wurden daraufhin zum Tode verurteilt und 1523 verbrannt. Martin Luther dichtete ein Lied zum Tod dieser ersten Märtyrer der Reformation.

BD THOMAS MAXFIELD, MARTYR (A.D. 1616)
THOMAS MAXFIELD (or Macclesfield) was born at The Mere, Enville, in the county of Stafford, about the year 1590. His father William was a confessor of the faith, and at the time of Thomas's birth was actually under sentence of death for harbouring priests. Thomas himself was eventually ordained and sent on the mission in 1615.
Within three months he was arrested in London, and lodged in the Gatehouse at Westminster. After the usual interrogations he was left there for eight months, when, with the help of another prisoner, a Jesuit, he attempted to escape by means of a rope let down from a high window. But he landed right in the arms of a passer-by, who raised the alarm. The turnkeys seized him and “thrust him under a table, girding about his neck a massive collar of iron; to this again they fasten a ponderous chain of an hundredweight ... and in this painful posture they keep him for some hours till the morning". Then he was removed to a filthy and verminous underground dungeon, and fastened in wooden stocks, in such fashion that he could neither stand nor lie down properly; and so he was left from before daybreak on Friday until Monday night. Some of his fellow prisoners managed to get a blanket for him, and his Jesuit confessor spoke words of encouragement through a hole in the roof-and found the sufferer in very good heart.
At his trial Mr Maxfield refused to take the oath of allegiance to King James in the form it was tendered, while protesting that he was loyal to him as his true and lawful sovereign; and the next day he was condemned for his priesthood to be hanged, drawn and quartered. The Spanish ambassador, the Duke of Gondomar, made a personal intervention at court to obtain Mr Maxfield's pardon or at least a reprieve; but without avail.
Unusual crowds of people watched Bd Thomas dragged to Tyburn the next day, July I, many following him to the scaffold, including a number of Spaniards. To the great vexation of the authorities it was found that someone had decked the gibbet with garlands of flowers, and covered the ground about it with leaves and sweet-smelling herbs. Bd Thomas addressed the crowd from the cart, declaring that he had had no other object “but only to be serviceable to the souls of my dear countrymen" by preaching the faith that St Augustine had preached to their ancestors. In spite of the sheriff's peremptory order to the hangman to cut him down quickly, the bystanders insisted that he should be allowed to hang till he was dead, and so be spared the horrors of disembowelling.
Special precautions were taken to prevent any relics of Bd Thomas Maxfield being preserved. Nevertheless the Spanish ambassador was able to recover the body, part of which is still at Gondomar and the other part at Downside.
In the year of his death a life of Bd Thomas, by Dr Kellison, was published at Douay, and in the following year an eye-witness account of his execution: see Catholic Record Society publications, vol. iii. See also MMP., pp. 344-353; DNB., vol. xxxvii; and the Downside Review, vol. xxxiv.   

1784 Bl. Junipero Serra Miguel Jose Serra Franciscan Order. Ordained in 1737 taught philosophy and theology at the University of Padua At the age of thirty-seven, he landed in Mexico City on January 1, 1750, and spent the rest of his life working for the conversion of the peoples of the New World.
Born on the island of Majorca on November 24, 1713, and took the name of Junipero when in 1730, he entered the Franciscan Order. Ordained in 1737, he taught philosophy and theology at the University of Padua until 1749.
In 1768, Father Serra took over the missions of the Jesuits (who had been wrongly expelled by the government) in the Mexican province of Lower California and Upper California (modern day California). An indefatigable worker, Serra was in large part responsible for the foundation and spread of the Church on the West Coast of the United States when it was still mission territory.
He founded twenty-one missions and converted thousands of Indians. The converts were taught sound methods of agriculture, cattle raising, and arts and crafts.
Junipero was a dedicated religious and missionary. He was imbued with a penitential spirit and practiced austerity in sleep, eating, and other activities. On August 28, 1784, worn out by his apostolic labors, Father Serra was called to his eternal rest.  He was beatified by Pope John Paul II on September 25, 1988. His statue, representing the state of California, is in National Statuary Hall.

Saint Martin of Vienne Third bishop of Vienne, France. Pope Saint Alexander I sent him as an apostle to this region.

1809 The Monk Nicodemos of the Holy Mountain (Nikodim Svyatogorets) editing of the work of the Monk Simeon the New Theologian. The Monk Nicodemos put aside the ascetic deed of silence and again occupied himself with literary work. And from this time until his death he continued zealously to toil in this endeavour
In Baptism Nicholas, was born in the year 1748 on the Greek island of Naksos. At age 26 he arrived on Holy Mount Athos and there, in the Dionysiata monastery, he accepted monastic tonsure with the name Nicodemos.
The Monk Nicodemos at first bore the obedience of reader and letter-writer. Two years after his entry into the monastery on Athos, there arrived there the metropolitan of Corinth, Makarios, who entrusted to the young monk the preparation for publication of the manuscript of the "Philokalia" ("Dobrotoliubie"), found by him in 1777 at the Batopedeia monastery. Work upon this book was the beginning of many years of literary work by the Monk Nicodemos of the Holy Mountain. The young monk soon transferred to the Pantokrator skete monastery, and was under obedience to the monastic-elder Arsenios Peloponnesos, under the guidance of whom he zealously studied Holy Scripture and the works of the holy fathers. In 1783 the Monk Nicodemos became schema-monk and for six years he dwelt in complete silence. When metropolitan Makarios of Corinth again arrived on Athos, he imposed on the Monk Nicodemos a new obedience -- the editing of the work of the Monk Simeon the New Theologian. The Monk Nicodemos put aside the ascetic deed of silence and again occupied himself with literary work. And from this time until his death he continued zealously to toil in this endeavour.

Not long before his end, the Monk Nicodemos, worn down by bookwork and ascetic efforts, transferred his residence to the priestmonk iconographers Stephanos and Neophytes Skurtea ("Bobbed-Hair"). He besought them to help in the publication of his works, which his condition of infirmity was hindering him from doing. Here, at the Skurtea's, the Monk Nicodemos peacefully expired to the Lord on 1 July 1809.

According to the testimony of his contemporaries, the Monk Nicodemos was a simple man, without malice, unassuming and distinguished by his profound concentration. He possessed a remarkable mental ability: he knew the Holy Scripture by heart, remembering even the chapter, verse and page, and by memory he could even recite much from the works of the holy fathers.

The literary work of the Monk Nicodemos was varied. He wrote a preface to the "Philokalia" ("Dobrotoliubie"), and short lives of ascetics. From the ascetic guidances of the saint, particularly well known is the book, "Unseen Warfare" ("Nevidimaya bran'"), rendered into the Russian language by the great theological-ascetic Theophan Zatvornik ("the Hermit") (M(oscow), 1886, 5th ed. M(oscow), 1912). A remarkable work of the ascetic was his "Teaching about Confession" ("Uchenie ob ispovedi") (Venice, 1804, 1818), summarised by his pervasive book, "Discourse on Repentance" ("Slovom o pokayanii"). An interesting book of the monk, "The Moral Christian" ("Blagonravie khristian"), was published in Venice in 1803. A great service of the saint was rendered also in the area of publishing of Divine-service books. In 1796 he published extracts from the Athos manuscript collections 62 canons to the MostHoly Mother of God under the title, "The Crown of the Ever-Virgin" (" Venets Prisnodevi") (Venice, 1796, 1846).

The Monk Nicodemos prepared the edition of a new redaction of the "The Rudder" or "Pedalion" -- the Greek for "Nourishment Books" ("Kormchei knigi"), -- comprised of the rules of the Holy Apostles, of the holy Oecumenical and Local Councils, and of the holy fathers.

The monk devoted great attention to hagiography, which is witnessed also by his work, "A new Collection of the Lives of the Saints" (Venice 1803), and his posthumous book, "The New Synaxarion" in 3 volumes (Venice 1819). He accomplished a translation from old-Greek into the new-Greek language of the work, "Interpretations of the Epistles of the Holy Apostle Paul" by the Bulgarian archbishop Theophylakt. Saint Nicodemos himself wrote interpretations of the seven Conciliar Missives (published likewise at Venice in 1806 and 1819).

The Monk Nicodemos is known likewise as the author and interpreter of sacred song. Compiled by him (and accepted in the Russian Church): a canon in honour of the Mother of God "Quick-to-Hear" ("Skoroposlushnitsa"), and likewise "Service to the Monastic and God-Bearing Fathers, Illumined by Fasting", "The Eortodromion, or the Exposition of Sung Canons, Which are Sung on the Eve of Feasts of the Lord and the Mother of God" (Venice 1836), "The New Ladder, or Interpretation of the 75 Degrees of song of the Eight-Tones Oktoekhos" (Constantinople, 1844).

1873 Henry, John und Henry Venn
Anglikanische Kirche: 1. Juli
Henry Venn, sein Sohn John Venn und sein Enkel Henry Venn der Jüngere waren Mitglieder der evangelikalen anglikanischen bewegung "Clapham Sect" Diese Bewegung ist kelie Sekte, sondern das anglikanische Gegenstück zu der katholischen Oxford-Bewegung  Henry Venn wurde 1725 geboren. Er war Kurant in Clapham, dann Pfarrer in mehreren Gemeinden. Er starb 1797.
Sein Sohn John Venn wurde 1759 geboren. Er wuree 1792 Rektor von Clapham. Hier wirkte er bis zu seinem Tod 1813. Er war ein bedeutendes Mitglied der "Clapham Sect", die sich um sein Gemeindeglied William Wilberforce sammelte. Er war Mitbegründer der "Church Missionary Society" und arbeitete in der Bewegung gegen die Sklaverei mit.
John Venn der Jüngere wurde 1796 geboren. Er wirkte 32 Jahre als Sekretär der "Church Missionary Society" und engaierte sich ebenfalls in der Anti-Sklaven-Bewegung. John Venn starb 1873.

Martyrdom of the Great Saint Anba Moses the Black {Coptic}
On this day, St. Moses the Black, whose life story is remarkable, was martyred. This saint took the Kingdom of Heaven by force, exactly as our Lord Jesus Christ said: The Kingdom of Heaven suffers violence, and the violent take it by force. (Matthew 11:12). In his early life, St. Moses was a slave to people who worshiped the sun. He was a mighty man who loved to eat and drink excessively. He killed, robbed and committed all evil. No one could stand up before him, or challenge him. On many occasions, he lifted up his eyes to look to the sun and to talk to it saying, O Sun!! if you are God, let me know it. Then he said, And you O God whom I do not know, let me know you. One day, he heard someone saying to him, The monks of Wadi El-Natroun know the real God. Go to them and they will tell you. Instantly, he rose up, girded his sword and went to the wilderness of Shiheat. He met St. Esidorous (Isidore) the priest, who was frightened when he saw him, because of his appearance. St. Moses comforted him by saying that he came to the monks so that they might let him know the real God. St. Esidorous took him to St. Macarius the Great, who preached to him, taught him the faith and baptized him. He accepted St. Moses as a monk and taught him to live in the wilderness. St. Moses dashed in many worships, and fought a spiritual fight which was greater than that fought by many saints. However, the devil fought him intensively with his old habits of excessive eating, drinking, and fornication. He informed St. Esidorous about everything which came upon him in his fight with the Enemy. He comforted him and taught him how to overcome the snares of the devil. It was told about him, that when the elders of the Monastery slept, he used to go round to their cells and take their water pots and fill them with water which he brought from a well at a far distance from the monastery. After many years in spiritual struggle, the devil envied him, and struck him with a sore on his foot which made him sick and bed-ridden. When he knew that this was from the devil, he increased in his asceticism and worship, until his body became as a burnt wood. God looked to his patience, healed his illness, and removed all his pains. The blessing of the Lord came upon him. After a while, he became the Father and the spiritual guide of 500 brothers, who elected him to be ordained a priest. When he came before the Patriarch to be ordained, the patriarch wanted to test him by asking the elders, Who brought this black here? Cast him out. He obeyed, and left saying to himself, It is good what they have done to you, O black colored one. The Patriarch, however, called him back and ordained him a priest, and said to him, Moses, all of you now has become white.

One day, he went with some elders to St. Macarius the Great, who said to them, I see among you one to whom belong the crown of martyrdom. St. Moses answered him, Probably it is me, for it is written: 'For all they that take with the sword, shall perish with the sword.' (Matt. 26:25) After they returned to the monastery, it did not take long until the Barbarians attacked the monastery. He told the brethren, Whoever wants to escape, let him escape. They asked him, And you O father, why do you not also escape? He replied that he had waited for this day for long time. The Barbarians entered the monastery and killed him with seven other brothers. One of the brethren was hiding, and saw the angel of the Lord, with a crown in his hand standing by and waiting for him. He went out from his hiding place to the Barbarians and he was also martyred.

Beloved Ones, contemplate in the power of repentance, and what it did. It transformed an infidel slave who was a murderer, adulterer and robber into a great Father, teacher, comforter, and priest who wrote rules for the monks, and saint whose name is mentioned on the altar in our prayers.
His Body is located now in the Monastery of El-Baramouse.  May his prayers be with us, and glory be to God forever. Amen.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  July 2016
Universal:  
Indigenous Peoples; That indigenous peoples, whose identity
and very existence are threatened, will be shown due respect.
”.
Evangelization:  Latin America and the Caribbean; That the Church in Latin America and the Caribbean, by means of her mission to the continent, may announce the Gospel with renewed vigor and enthusiasm. 
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

      
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die
 so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads,
 'The Gospel of Life'


"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel


Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005
 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.