Mary Mother of GOD
 Monday   Saint of the Day July 04   Quarto Nonas Júlii  

Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.

There are over 10,000 named saints beati from history;
Roman Martyology, Orthodox sources, Islam, Lutheran, + many others


The Galatea Icon of the Mother of God is found in Galatea (one of the districts of Constantinople), at Perge (in a tower). In honor of the holy icon a monastery was formed, which existed until the seventeenth century. An exact copy of the icon is located in Moscow, in the Church of St Tikhon, at the Arbat Gate.

 The Galatea Icon is of the Hodigitria type.
 
Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }


July 4 – Our Lady Refuge of Sinners 
 
“I came to tell you that you are healed”
 In 1966, a sister of the Daughters of Charity, Sister Catherine, who had been seriously ill for months, was in the hospital of Naples, Italy, close to death. Everything had been tried to save her life, but in vain. On May 26, 1966, her sisters began a novena to Pope John XXIII whose cause for beatification had just opened.
On the third day of the novena, while the sisters were in the chapel, Sister Catherine, who was alone in her room, suddenly heard a man's voice calling her name. Frightened at first, she looked away.
But soon she perceived a beautiful face by her bed, and a soft voice that spoke to her:
"Sister Catherine, you have petitioned me and so have your sisters. That is why I came to tell you that you are healed. Ring the bell and your sisters will see that you have completely recovered. You do not even have a fever anymore."
The sister rang and her companions came running. They saw that her temperature was below 37°C. Sister Catherine told them about the vision of Pope John she had had, adding that before he left he advised her to recite the Rosary every day.
 
Notre Dame des Temps Nouveaux, September 1967
Story told by Brother Albert Pfleger
In Fioretti de la Vierge Marie, Ephèse Diffusion

 
Independence Day
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850
 516 BC Haggai Aggaeus (Aggeus ), Prophet The tenth of the Minor Prophets, Haggai belongs to the period after the exile. The purpose of his divine message was to forward rebuilding the Temple of Jerusalem (Benedictines) (RM)
St. Ananias Martyrdom of; bishop for the city of Damascus; baptized the apostle Paul {Coptic}
180 St. Namphanion Called “the Archmartyr” by African Christian historians.

310 St. Theodore of Cyrene Bishop of Cyrene, Libya, martyr; A scribe who was especially noted for his skill in copying manuscripts. arrested during persecutions under Emperor Diocletian and ordered to deliver up his copies of the Scriptures.

544 St. Laurianus Martyred archbishop of Seville, Spain Hungarian, ordained in Milan, Italy.
725 St. Bertha Benedictine widow abbess entered convent she founded at Blangy, in Artois, France.
895 St. Aurelian Benedictine archbishop; a monk in Benedictine monastery at Ainoy, in France.
959 St. Odo the Good Canterbury Archbishop promoting revival of monasticism in England; miracles
973 St. Ulric of Augsburg  canonization by Pope John XV 993 is first recorded canonization by a Pope;
1336 St. Elizabeth of Portugal exercises of piety, including daily Mass, also through her exercise of charity she was able to befriend and help pilgrims, strangers, the sick, the poor—in a word, all those whose need came to her notice
1427-1430 Saint Andrew Rublev, Russia's greatest iconographer monastic tonsure; taught iconography by Theophanes the Greek and monk Daniel, In 1408 St Andrew painted his most famous icon: the Holy Trinity (actually, the Hospitality of Abraham).
1594 BB. JOHN CORNELIUS AND HIS COMPANIONS, THE DORCHESTER MARTYRS

1900 Bl. Anthony Fantosat Martyr of China, a victim of the Boxer Rebellion. The vicar apostolic
1918 Saint Nicholas, the last Russian Tsar, born 1868. a child, religious, guileless and free from malice.

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Mary at Lesotho (II) July 4 - Our Lady Refuge of Sinners
While the catechist was preparing things for the baptism, the father asked the patient some questions to which she answered without hesitation. The missionary was very surprised to learn that she had spent some time with the children of the Christian village who had shared what they knew about God. Without delaying any further, the priest gave her the sacrament.
When he spoke these words, "Mary, I baptize you" radiant joy lit up her face and new force of life flowed through her.
The priest took advantage of this betterment to ask her why she wanted to be baptized. She replied, "I had a dream: I saw a beautiful white lady wearing a belt the color of the sky. She smiled at me and kissed me lovingly. I wanted to get closer to her, but she said, 'Not now, but ask to be baptized by a Catholic priest and then I will come and get you.'" The priest was very much moved and he gave her a Miraculous Medal. "This is the lady! This is the one I saw!" said the dying girl. She kissed the medal with love, then, exhausted, she fell asleep. The priest blessed her and went back on his way. He wasn't far when the witches called to him, crying: "She has passed away."
Testimony of a missionary of Lesotho Published in the magazine "Our Lady of New Time" #6 1982
Told in the Marian Collection 1986 by Brother Albert Pfleger, Marist

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

The Holy Father also chooses an apostolic intention In July he will pray "that, aware of their own missionary duty, all Christians may actively help all those engaged in the evangelization of peoples."
July 4 - Our Lady Refuge of Sinners                      You Can Be Certain Bertram!
A Cistercian Chronicle reports that in the 12th century, Blessed Bertram, an Italian monk, from the Cerredo Abbey in Lombardy, “was charmed by an angel” with whom He entered “a temple where he found the Blessed Virgin Mary, surrounded by the patriarchs, the apostles and the other troops of the celestial fatherland”.
The Mother of God said to him: “You can be certain Bertram that I was glorified in body and soul and raised from among the dead”.
According to Menology the Cistercian, July 4, quoted by Dom Domenica Nogues, Mariology of Saint Bernard, Paris-Turned, Casterman, 1935, 97, No 1.P.S.
 516 BC Haggai Aggaeus (Aggeus ), Prophet The tenth of the Minor Prophets, Haggai belongs to the period after the exile. The purpose of his divine message was to forward rebuilding the Temple of Jerusalem (Benedictines) (RM)
       
St. Ananias Martyrdom of; bishop for the city of Damascus; baptized the apostle Paul {Coptic}
       
St. Thomas of Shentalet Martyrdom of Michael angel of God appeared to this Saint when he was 21 {Coptic}
        Saint Theodotus suffered martyrdom during the reign of Trajan because he refused to sacrifice to idols.
 180 St. Namphanion Called “the Archmartyr” by African Christian historians. He was an African martyr of Carthaginian heritage, put to death in Numidia with Several companions.

        St. Jucundian Martyr of Africa, thrown into the sea 
  310 St. Theodore of Cyrene Bishop of Cyrene, Libya, martyr; A scribe who was especially noted for his skill in copying manuscripts. Theodore was arrested during the persecutions of the Church under Emperor Diocletian  and ordered to deliver up his copies of the Scriptures. When he refused, he was martyred;  Also put to death were the women Cyprilla, Lucia and Aroa, and all who had accepted holy Baptism from the holy bishop.
6th v. Saint Martha St John the Forerunner was for her a protector, frequently appearing to her in visions; charitable towards the poor, fed and clothed them, visited convalescents and attended the sick, buried the dead, and for those preparing to receive holy Baptism she made baptismal garments with her own hands
  544 St. Laurianus Martyred archbishop of Seville, Spain. He was Hungarian, and was ordained in Milan, Italy. The site of his martyrdom is reportedly Bourges, France.
712-26 Saint Andrew, Archbishop of Crete; monastic tonsure at monastery of St Sava the Sanctified; led a strict chaste life; meek and abstinent, such that all were amazed at his virtue and reasoning of mind

  725 St. Bertha Benedictine widow and abbess  entered the convent she had founded at Blangy, in Artois, France. Two  daughters joined her in the religious life. Bertha served as abbess for a time and also lived as a recluse.
895 St. Aurelian Benedictine archbishop; a monk in Benedictine monastery at Ainoy, in France. Aurelian was then appointed archbishop of Lyon.
959 St. Odo the Good Archbishop of Canterbury  promoting the revival of monasticism in England. Known as “the Good” because of his famed holiness, he was also credited with miracles; a demonstration of the Real Presence against some doubting clergy;  God bore witness to his sanctity by miracles during his life and after his death.
973 St. Ulric of Augsburg His canonization by Pope John XV in 993 is the first recorded canonization by a Pope;  Miracles were recorded at his tomb.
1091 BD WILLIAM OF HIRSCHAU, ABBOT concern for spiritual and material well-being of serfs both of the monastery and neighbouring manors; and by aggregating its servants to the monastic community he had a significant part in the development of the institution of fratres conversi (lay-brothers).
1174 Holy Prince Andrew Bogoliubsky (1110-1174), grandson of Vladimir Monomakh, son of Yurii Dolgoruky and a Polovetsian princess (in holy Baptism Maria)
1336 St. Elizabeth of Portugal exercises of piety, including daily Mass, also through her exercise of charity she was able to befriend and help pilgrims, strangers, the sick, the poor—in a word, all those whose need came to her notice
1387 St. Peter of Luxembourg well known for his austerity and holiness
1427-1430 Saint Andrew Rublev, Russia's greatest iconographer received monastic tonsure; was taught iconography by Theophanes the Greek and the monk Daniel, St Andrew's friend and fellow-ascetic
In 1408 St Andrew painted his most famous icon:
the Holy Trinity (actually, the Hospitality of Abraham).
1507 Uncovering of the Relics of Saint Euthymius the Wonderworker of Suzdal, who died on April 1, 1405
1594 Bld's. John Carey Martyr of England, an Irish layman; put to death with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Cornelius, and Patrick Salmon at Dorchester in Oxfordshire. He was servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave. They were beatified in 1929.
1594 BB. JOHN CORNELIUS AND HIS COMPANIONS, THE DORCHESTER MARTYRS
1594 Bl. Patrick Salmon Martyr of England charged with sheltering a priest
1597 Bl. William Andleby Martyr of England studied at St. Johns College, Cambridge, and was converted to Catholicism on the way to fight the Spanish. He went to Douai, France, ordained in 1577. Returning home, he worked inYorkshire and Lincolnshire for two decades.
1597 Bl. Thomas Warcop English martyr. A gentleman in Yorkshire, England, who sheltered Blessed William Andleby. He was arrested and condemned for giving this aid and hanged at York with three companions on July 4.
1597 St. Henry Abbot, Blessed Martyr of England. A native of Howden, England, a convert to the Church duly arrested and hanged at York. Pope Pius XI beatified  him 1929.
1900 Bl. Anthony Fantosat Martyr of China, a victim of the Boxer Rebellion. The vicar apostolic for southern Hunan, in China, he was martyred at Hangchow on July 7.
1918 Saint Nicholas, the last Russian Tsar, was born in 1868. As a child, very religious, guileless and free from malice.

Sírmii sanctórum Mártyrum Innocéntii et Sebástiæ, cum áliis trigínta.
    At Sirmium, Saints Innocent and Sebastia, with thirty other martyrs.
Turónis, in Gállia, Translátio sancti Martíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris; et Dedicátio Basílicæ suæ hoc ipso die, quo étiam is ante áliquot annos in Epíscopum fúerat ordinátus.
At Tours in France, the translation of St. Martin, bishop and confessor, and the dedication of his basilica, consecrated on the same day that he had been raised to the episcopate some years previously.
Mary the Mother of God


The great psalm of the Passion, Psalm 21, whose first verse "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord; and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28
516 BC Haggai Aggaeus (Aggeus ), Prophet The tenth of the Minor Prophets, Haggai belongs to the period after the exile. The purpose of his divine message was to forward the rebuilding of the Temple of Jerusalem (Benedictines) (RM)
Sanctórum Osée et Aggǽi Prophetárum.
    The holy prophets Osee and Aggaeus.

Haggai
The last, the post-exilic, period of prophecy opens with Haggai. The change is striking. Before the Exile the watchword of the prophets was Punishment. During Exile it became Consolation. Now it is Restoration. Haggai appears  at a critical moment in the development of Judaism; the birth of the new Palestinian community. His short exhortations are precisely dated, August and September of 520. The first Jews to return from Babylonia to rebuild the  Temple were quickly discouraged. The prophets Haggai and Zechariah stirred  them to new efforts and urged Zerubbabel the governor and the High Priest  Joshua to resume work on the Temple; this was done in September, 520,  1:15; cf. En 5:1.
    The four brief discourses composing this book are entirely concerned with this. Since the Temple is still in ruins Yahweh has destroyed the harvests; its  rebuilding will usher in an age of prosperity. However unimposing, this new Temple will dim the glory of the old; and power is promised to Zerubbabel, the chosen of God. This Temple, therefore, and this descendant of David  become the focus of a messianic hope that will be more clearly expressed in  Zechariah.


The name Haggai means "festival, feast, festive." Some suggest it may be a shortened form of Haggiah which means "festival of Jehovah." This has led many to conjecture that he may have been born on one of the major festival or feast days of the Jews (Passover, for example). Although he is referred to as a "prophet" (Haggai 1:1; Ezra 5:1; 6:14), little else is known of this man. His father's name is never mentioned. It is assumed that he was born in Babylon during the time of the captivity. It is very likely Haggai returned to Jerusalem with the first group of 50,000 persons led by Zerubbabel in 536 BC. It is also possible he did some writing of psalms during this time. The Septuagint (the Greek version of the OT, which was made around 250 BC) credits him as being the author/co-author of several psalms (Psalms 138, 146-149).
"In the Midrash and Talmud, legend makes Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi to be the founders of the 'Great Synagogue' (Aboth R. Nathan 1; Baba Bathra 15a), a body that is alleged to have played a great role in post-exilic times in preserving Scripture and handing on the traditional precepts and lore. It is further believed by the rabbis that after these three prophets died the Holy Spirit departed from Israel" (Jack P. Lewis)."It is legitimate to suppose that Haggai was still a child when he returned to Judea with his parents in 536 BC" (Zondervan's Pictorial Encyclopedia). Haggai was a contemporary of Zechariah and also of Confucius (557-479 BC). Haggai was the first prophet in Jerusalem after the return from Babylonian captivity. The prophecy of Haggai is second only to that of Obadiah in brevity among OT books.

Martyrdom of St. Ananias bishop for the city of Damascus baptize the apostle Paul
On this day, St. Ananias, the apostle, departed. The apostles ordained this saint bishop for the city of Damascus. He preached therein with the life-giving gospel, as he preached also in the city of Beth-Gabriel and converted many of its people to the faith, and baptized them and their children.
St. Ananias was the one to baptize the apostle Paul when the Lord sent him to him. When he baptized St. Paul, something like scales fell from his eyes, and he received his sight at once. God wrought many great miracles by his hands; and many of the Jews and Gentiles believed through his preaching. Afterwards, Lucianus the governor seized St. Ananias, and tortured him with sever tortures, such as burning his sides with fiery torches. Finally, Lucianus took him outside the city, and commanded him stoned until St. Ananias delivered up his pure soul in the hand of the Lord.  May his prayers be with us. Amen.

St. Thomas of Shentalet Martyrdom of. Michael, the angel of the Lord, appeared to this Saint when he was 21
St. Thomas of Shentalet (1) (Sandalat) was martyred On this day also. Michael, the angel of the Lord, appeared to this Saint when he was twenty-one years old, while he was sleeping in the field tending the pigs. The angel Michael commanded him to go and confess the Lord Christ. St. Thomas went to Alexandria and confessed his faith before the governor who tortured him with different kinds of tortures. There were with him under the torture St. Babnuda, of the city of El-Bandara, and Anba Shenousy(2), from the city of Balkim, and they encouraged each other to endure. After many tortures, the governor sent St. Thomas to Arianus, the governor of Ansena, where he was beheaded and received the crown of martyrdom. There were seven hundred men and nine women martyred during his days. May their prayers be with us and Glory be to God forever. Amen.
(1) District of El-Santa, El-Gharbiah governorate.
(2) The name (Moses) mentioned in a manuscript in Shebeen El-Koum.

 St. Jucundian Martyr of Africa, thrown into the sea
In Africa natális sancti Jucundiáni Mártyris, pro Christo in mare demérsi.
    In Africa, the birthday of St. Jucundian, a martyr who was drowned in the sea for Christ.
Saint Theodotus suffered martyrdom during the reign of Trajan because he refused to sacrifice to idols.
180 St. Namphanion Called “the Archmartyr” by African Christian historians. He was an African martyr of Carthaginian heritage, put to death in Numidia with Several companions.
Madáuri, in Africa, sancti Namphaniónis Mártyris et Sociórum, quos ille roborávit ad pugnam, et ad corónam provéxit.
    At Madaurus in Africa, the martyr Namphanion and his companions, whom he strengthened for the combat and led to the crown of martyrdom.
310 St. Theodore of Cyrene Bishop of Cyrene, Libya, martyr; A scribe who was especially noted for his skill in copying manuscripts. Theodore was arrested during the persecutions of the Church under Emperor Diocletian and ordered to deliver up his copies of the Scriptures. When he refused, he was martyred; Also put to death were the women Cyprilla, Lucia and Aroa, and all who had accepted holy Baptism from the holy bishop.
Cyréne, in Líbya, sancti Theodóri Epíscopi, qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, sub Digniáno Prǽside, plumbátis cæsus et lingua abscíssus est; atque in pace tandem Conféssor occúbuit.
    At Cyrene in Libya, the holy bishop Theodore.  In the persecution of Diocletian, under the governor Dignian, he was scourged with leaded whips and had his tongue cut out.  Finally, however, he died a confessor.
The Hieromartyr Theodore, Bishop of Cyrene, lived during the reign of the emperor Diocletian (284-305). Skilled at writing, and having attained great skill in calligraphy, he transcribed many books for the churches. His son Leo denounced him to the district governor, Dignianus, saying that his father possessed Christian books and was turning people away from idol worship, and bringing them instead to faith in Christ the Savior. St Theodore was brought to trial. Many Christians followed after him, including the women Cyprilla, Lucia and Aroa. The holy bishop was ordered to surrender his books and renounce Christ, but he refused this demand. They beat him with rods, but St Theodore was not intimidated. With a fiery zeal for the truth he destroyed the pagan sacrificial offerings. They tortured him for a long while, cut out his tongue, and then threw him in prison where he died. Also put to death were the women Cyprilla, Lucia and Aroa, and all who had accepted holy Baptism from the holy bishop.

6th v. Saint Martha St John the Forerunner, who was for her a protector, frequently appearing to her in visions. St Martha was charitable towards the poor, she fed and clothed them, she visited the convalescent and she attended to the sick, she buried the dead, and for those preparing to receive holy Baptism she made the baptismal garments with her own hands
Mother of Saint Simeon of Wonderful Mountain (May 24) a native of Antioch
From her early years she yearned for monasticism, but her parents persuaded her to marry. Her husband, John, soon died, and righteous Martha with all her strength devoted herself to the raising of her son. She was an example of high Christian temperament for her son. She often visited the temple of God, she attended church services attentively and with piety, and frequently received the Holy Mysteries of Christ.

St Martha rose up to pray each night, and her prayers were offered with heartfelt warmth and tears. She particularly venerated St John the Forerunner, who was for her a protector, frequently appearing to her in visions. St Martha was charitable towards the poor, she fed and clothed them, she visited the convalescent and she attended to the sick, she buried the dead, and for those preparing to receive holy Baptism she made the baptismal garments with her own hands.
St Martha was reserved, and no one heard from her a frivolous, false or vain word, no one saw her angry, nor fighting with anyone nor bitter. She was a model of chaste and pious life and by her example she guided many on the pathway to salvation. When her son, St Simeon, had become a renowned ascetic, she urged him not to exalt himself for his own efforts, but to thank God for everything.
The time of her death was revealed to St Martha. She beheld angels with candles saying that they would come for her in another year's time. The saint was also granted visions of Paradise, and the All-Pure Virgin Herself showed to her the heavenly habitations prepared for the righteous.
St Martha's death was peaceful, and her body was buried on Wonderful Mountain, at the place of the ascetic deeds of her son, St Simeon the Stylite
.
544 St. Laurianus Martyred archbishop of Seville, Spain. He was Hungarian, and was ordained in Milan, Italy. The site of his martyrdom is reportedly Bourges, France.
In território Bituricénsi sancti Lauriáni, Epíscopi Hispalénsis et Mártyris, cujus caput Híspalim, in Hispánia, delátum est.
    In the diocese of Bourges, St. Laurian, bishop of Seville and martyr, whose head was taken to Seville in Spain.
712 726 Saint Andrew, Archbishop of Crete; monastic tonsure at monastery of St Sava the Sanctified;.led a strict chaste life;,meek and abstinent, such that all were amazed at his virtue and reasoning of mind
Born in the city of Damascus into a pious Christian family. Up until seven years of age the boy was mute and did not talk. However, after communing the Holy Mysteries of Christ he found the gift of speech and began to speak. And from that time the lad began earnestly to study Holy Scripture and the discipline of theology.
At fourteen years of age he went off to Jerusalem and there he accepted monastic tonsure at the monastery of St Sava the Sanctified. St Andrew led a strict and chaste life, he was meek and abstinent, such that all were amazed at his virtue and reasoning of mind. As a man of talent and known for his virtuous life, over the passage of time he came to be numbered among the Jerusalem clergy and was appointed a secretary for the Patriarchate -- a writing clerk. In the year 680 the locum tenens of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, Theodore, included archdeacon Andrew among the representatives of the Holy City sent to the Sixth Ecumenical Council, and here the saint contended against heretical teachings, relying upon his profound knowledge of Orthodox doctrine. Shortly after the Council he was summoned back to Constantinople from Jerusalem and he was appointed archdeacon at the church of Hagia Sophia, the Wisdom of God. During the reign of the emperor Justinian II (685-695) St Andrew was ordained bishop of the city of Gortineia on the island of Crete. In his new position he shone forth as a true luminary of the Church, a great hierarch -- a theologian, teacher and hymnographer.
St Andrew wrote many liturgical hymns. He was the originator of a new liturgical form -- the canon. Of the canons composed by him the best known is the Great Penitential Canon, including within its 9 odes the 250 troparia recited during the Great Lent. In the First Week of Lent at the service of Compline it is read in portions (thus called "methymony" [trans. note: from the useage in the service of Compline of the "God is with us", in Slavonic the "S'nami Bog", or in Greek "Meth' Humon ho Theos", from which derives "methymony"], and again on Thursday of the Fifth Week at the All-night Vigil during Matins.
St Andrew of Crete gained renown with his many praises of the All-Pure Virgin Mary. To him are likewise ascribed: the Canon for the feast of the Nativity of Christ, three odes for the Compline of Palm Sunday and also in the first four days of Holy Passion Week, as well as verses for the feast of the Meeting of the Lord, and many another church-song. His hynographic tradition was continued by the churchly great melodists of following ages: Saints John of Damascus, Cosma of Maium, Joseph the Melodist, Theophan the Written-upon. There have also been preserved edifying Sermons of St Andrew for certain of the Church feasts.
Church historians are not of the same opinion as to the date of death of the saint. One suggests the year 712, while others -- the year 726. He died on the island of Mytilene, while returning to Crete from Constantinople, where he had been on churchly business. His relics were transferred to Constantinople.
In the year 1350 the pious Russian pilgrim Stephen Novgorodets saw the relics at the Constantinople monastery named for St Andrew of Crete.
Andreas von Kreta Orthodoxe Kirche: 4. Juli
Die orthodoxe Kirche nennt zwei Heilige dieses Namens, den Erzbischof Andreas von Kreta und den Märtyrer Andreas von Kreta. Erzbischof Andreas von Kreta (auch Andreas von Jerusalem gennant) wurde 660 in Damaskus in einer frommen christlichen Familie geboren. Mit 14 Jahren ging er nach Jerusalem und wurde Mönch im Mar Sabas Kloster. Wegen seiner Gelehrsamkeit wurden ihm bald Aufgaben im Patriarchat von Jerusalem übertragen. 685 sandte ihn Patriarch Theodor von Jerusalem nach Konstantinopel um ein oekumenisches Konzil anzustoßen. Andreas blieb dann zunächst in Konstantinopel und wurde Erzdiakon an der Hagia Sophia.
Das Konzil wurde 691 von Kaiser Justinian II. (685-695) einberufen und Andreas wurde nach dem Konzil oder nach anderen Quellen um 700 zum Erzbischof von Gortyna in Kreta ernannt. Er wirkte bis zu seinem Tode als Bischof. Er starb auf dem Rückweg von Konstantinopel auf der Insel Mytilene. Als Todesjahr werden 712 und 726 angegeben.
Andreas schrieb viele liturgische Gesänge. Er war auch der Erfinder einer neuen liturgischen Form, des Kanons. Sein großer Bußkanon, der 250 Troparien umfaßt, wird auch heute in der Fastenzeit in der griechisch-orthodoxen Kirche gebetet. Auch zahlreiche andere liturgische Stücke, die weiterhin im Gebrauch sind, wurden von ihm verfaßt oder werden ihm zugeschrieben.
ST ANDREW OF CRETE, ARCHBISHOP OF GORTYNA (A.D. 740?)
This Andrew was born at Damascus about the middle of the seventh century. In contrast with the ready tongue of his later years, he is said to have been quite dumb until he received holy communion when he was seven years old. At the age of fifteen he went to Jerusalem (after which city he is sometimes named) and became a monk of St Sabas and of the Holy Sepulchre, where he received the orders of lector and subdeacon. He in 685 was sent to Constantinople by Theodore, Patriarch of Jerusalem, to reiterate the adhesion of his church to the sixth oecumenical council, which had recently condemned the monothelite heresy. Andrew remained in the city and was ordained a deacon of the Great Church, and put in charge of an orphanage and of a hospice for old men. His character and all-round abilities caused him soon to be advanced to the bishopric of Gortyna, the metropolitan see of Crete. Here he became himself involved in the final recrudescence of Monothelism in 711, when Philippicus Bardanes seized the imperial throne, burned the acts of the sixth ecumenical council, restored the names of those it had anathematized to the diptychs in the liturgy, and summoned a synod to approve his actions. Andrew was present at this synod in 712, but came to his senses in the following year and doubtless associated himself with the long letter of apology and explanation (pleading force majeure) which his patriarch sent to Pope Constantine, when the orthodox Anastasius II had driven out Bardanes.
For the rest of his life St Andrew distinguished himself as a preacher and hymnographer. More than twenty of his discourses are extant, which have been edited and published; but it is as a writer of hymns that he has left a permanent mark on the Byzantine liturgy. He is said to have introduced that form of hymnody called a kanon; certain it is that he wrote a large number of these and associated compositions, some of which are still sung. Unfortunately the kanon is a form that lends itself to empty verbosity; St Andrew himself wrote one of 250 strophes, sung in Lent, "with much hard work and weariness of the lungs", wrote Combefis. St Andrew's homilies are of importance in the history of the development of Mariology. This saint must not be confused with another Andrew of Crete, "the Calybite" (October 17).
The panegyric of Nicetas Quaestor (BHG., 16) tells us something of the life of St Andrew, and cf, S. Vailhe in Echos d'Orient, vol. v (1902), pp. 378-387. Upon Andrew as homilist and hymn-writer see Bardenhewer, Patrology (Eng. trans.), p. 567; DTC., vol. i, cc. 1183-1184; DAC., vol. i, cc. 2034-2041; Nilles, Kalendarium manuale, vol. ii, pp. 147-156; and  M. Neale, Hymns of the Eastern Church. For a very free rendering of one of St Andrew's hymns, see no. 91 in Hymns Ancient and Modern .
725 St. Bertha Benedictine widow and abbess entered the convent she had founded at Blangy, in Artois, France. Two of her daughters joined her in the religious life. Bertha served as the abbess for a time and also lived as a recluse.
ST BERTHA, WIDOW (c. A.D. 725)
THIS Bertha at twenty years of age married a nobleman by whom she had five daughters. After her husband's death, she retired to the nunnery which she had built at Blangy in Artois, with her two elder daughters, Gertrude and Deotila. After establishing regular observance in her community, she left Deotila abbess in her stead, and shut herself in a cell, to be employed only in prayer.
No confidence can, however, be put in the historical accuracy of these particulars, for which the evidence is very late and unreliable. Another story, of her pursuit by a certain Roger who wished to marry her by force, is equally worthless.
The so-called life is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii; see also Van der Essen, Étude critique, pp. 420--421.
Married to a nobleman at twenty, Bertha bore five daughters.When her husband died, she entered the convent she had founded at Blangy, in Artois, France. Two of her daughters joined her in the religious life. Bertha served as the abbess for a time and also lived as a recluse.
Bertha at twenty years of age married a nobleman by whom she had five daughters. After her husband's death, she retired to the nunnery which she had built at Blangy in Artois, with her two elder daughters, Gertrude and Deotila. After establishing regular observance in her community,  she left Deotila abbess in her stead, and shut herself in a cell, to be employed only in prayer
.
895 St. Aurelian Benedictine archbishop; a monk in the Benedictine monastery at Ainoy, in France. Aurelian was then appointed archbishop of Lyon.
959 St. Odo the Good Archbishop of Canterbury; promoting the revival of monasticism in England. Known as “the Good” because of his famed holiness, he was also credited with miracles;  a demonstration of the Real Presence against some doubting clergy;  God bore witness to his sanctity by miracles during his life and after his death. .
Also known as Odo of Canterbury. Born to Danish parents in East Anglia, he joined a Benedictine monastery at Fleury-sur-Loire and then was appointed bishop of Ramsbury, in Wessex. In 937, Odo was present at the Battle of Brunabur where King Athelstan of Wessex defeated a force of Scots, Danes, and Northumbrians. In 942, Odo became archbishop of Canterbury, wielding both secular and spiritual authority with fairness and deep concern for the welfare of the people. He assisted in the formulation of the legislation of Kings Edmund and Edgar the Peaceful, created as a separate diocese the region of East Anglia, and gave his blessings to the monastic reforms of St. Dunstan at Glastonbury, thereby promoting the revival of monasticism in England. Known as “the Good” because of his famed holiness, he was also credited with miracles.
ODO was born in East Anglia of Danish parents. While bishop of Ramsbury he was present at the great battle of Brunanburh, when King Athelstan defeated the Danes, Northumbrians and Scots, and shortly afterwards was translated to the see of Canterbury. As archbishop he was very active in both civil and ecclesiastical affairs; he made his native East Anglia into a separate diocese, and encouraged the monastic reforms of St Dunstan at Glastonbury. Odo himself had received the religious habit at Fleury-sur-Loire.
He was popularly known as "Odo the Good", and several miracles are recorded of him, one of which, at Canterbury, was a demonstration of the Real Presence against some doubting clergy. He died in 959, having lived in the reigns of six kings, and his name appears in several ancient calendars of the church of Canterbury.
The most reliable information about St Odo comes from the life of his nephew, St Oswald of York, by a contemporary monk of Ramsey; it is printed in Historians of the Church of York, vol. i, in the Rolls Series. A life of Odo himself by Eadmer (Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii) is valuable, but much later in date. See also DNB., vol. xli. Odo's prefatory epistle to Frithegod's metrical Life of St Wilfrid is a curiosity of Anglo-Saxon learning; cf, Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lxx (1952), p. 400 .
973 St. Ulric of Augsburg His canonization by Pope John XV in 993 is the first recorded canonization by a Pope;  Miracles were recorded at his tomb.
Augústæ, in Rhǽtia, sancti Uldaríci Epíscopi, miræ abstinéntiæ, largitátis et vigilántiæ virtúte, ac miraculórum dono illústris.
    At Augsburg in Germany, St. Uldaric, a bishop illustrious for extraordinary abstinence, liberality, vigilance, and the gift of miracles.
Ulric was born 890 at Augsburg, Germany. He was educated at St. Gall Abbey in Switzerland and by his uncle, St. Adalbeo, bishop of Augsburg. Ulric succeeded to the See as bishop in 923, and when Augsburg was plundered and ravaged by the Magyars, he led its inhabitants in the task of rebuilding the city and its cathedral. In his old age, he retired to St. Gall, named his nephew as his successor, and was accused of nepotism for his action.
Ulrich von Augsburg Orthodoxe, Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 4. Juli
Ulrich. Sohn des allemannischen Grafen Hupald, wurde um 890 in Augsburg geboren. Er soll körperlich schwach gewesen sein. Er sollte jedenfalls Geistlicher werden und wurde deshalb Schüler im Kloster St. Gallen, dann Kämmerer unter seinem Onkel, Bischof Adalbero. Als Adalbero 909 starb, lehnte Ulrich die ihm angetragene Bischofswürde ab. 923 wurde er von Heinrich I. zum Bischof von Augsburg ernannt.
Die Ungarnkriege hatten das Land verwüstet, Ulrich trieb den Wiederaufbau voran und ließ Augsburg mit einer starken Mauer befestigen. Luidolf, Sohn Otto des Großen, wollte Ulrich gewaltsam auf seine Seite ziehen. Ulrich widerstand und setzte sich für eine Versöhnung zwischen Vater und Sohn ein, die er schließlich auch erreichen konnte.
955 griffen die Ungarn erneut die Stadt Augsburg an. Ulrich leitete den Widerstand, der aufrechterhalten werden konnte, bis Otto mit dem Reichsheer erschien und auf dem Lechfeld die Ungarn vernichtend schlagen konnte. Ulrich starb 973. Er wurde auf seinen Wunsch in der Afrakirche bestattet. 993 wurde Ulrich in der ersten förmlichen Kanonisation der katholischen Kirche heilig gesprochen.
ST ULRIC was born at Augsburg in 890, and was educated in the abbey of St Gall. St Wiborada, a recluse who lived near that monastery, is said to have foretold that he would one day be a bishop, and would meet with severe trials, though the young man was so delicate that others who knew him judged he could never live long. Regularity and temperance preserved a life and strengthened a constitution which the excessive tenderness of parents and care of physicians would probably have worn out: a thing which Cardinal Lugo shows by several instances to have often happened in austere religious orders. When he had made progress in his studies his father removed him to Augsburg, where he placed him under the care of his uncle St Adalbero, bishop of that city; and in due course Ulric himself was raised to the see.
The Magyars had lately pillaged the country, murdered his old friend Wiborada, plundered Augsburg, and burnt the cathedral. The new bishop, not to lose time, built for the present a small church, in which he assembled the people, who in their distress stood in extreme need of instruction, comfort, and relief, all which they found abundantly in Ulric, who devoted himself, so far as his other obligations would allow, entirely to his spiritual functions. He rose every morning at three o'clock to assist at Matins and Lauds, and only left the church after noon; then he went to the hospital, where he comforted the sick and every day washed the feet of twelve poor people, giving to each of them liberal alms. The rest of the day he employed in instructing, preaching, visiting and discharging all the duties of a vigilant pastor. He made every year the visit of his whole diocese.
During his last years the saint earnestly desired to resign his bishopric and retire to the monastery of St Gall, and with this object appointed his nephew Adalbero in his place; this was judged to be an uncanonical act, for which he had to answer before a synod at Ingelheim. In his last illness Ulric caused himself to be laid on ashes strewed on the floor in the form of a cross, and thus he died amidst the prayers of his clergy on July 4, 973. Miracles were recorded at his tomb, and he was canonized by Pope John XV in 993, the first solemn canonization by a pope of which there is record.
Abundant materials are available for the life of St Ulric. The most important is the biography by the provost Gerhard, a contemporary, printed in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii, and in MGH., Scriptores, vol. iv. There is also a life by Berno, abbot of Reichenau (in Migne, PL., cxlii, 1183-1204), as well as other early sources. St Ulric seems to have left no writings; a letter against clerical celibacy attributed to him is admittedly a forgery belonging to the period of the Libelli de Lite (see The Month, March, 1908, pp. 311-313) : this letter was exploited by the Reformers. A German translation of it was printed and circulated in 1521, and an English version appeared in London about 1550. There are several modern lives in German, e.g, those of Ramer, Stutzle, and U. Schmid (1904), and a full lind able article in the Kirchenlexikon, vol. xii .
BD WILLIAM OF HIRSCHAU, ABBOT (A.D. 1091) concern for the spiritual and material well-being of the serfs both of the monastery and of neighbouring manors; and by aggregating its servants to the monastic community he had a significant part in the development of the institution of fratres conversi (lay-brothers).
   IN the year 1065 Bd Frederick, a monk of Einsiedeln, was sent with twelve companions to re-people the abbey of Hirschau in Wiirtemberg, which for sixty years had been in the hands of the counts of Calw and was falling into decay. Pope St Leo IX, who belonged to the family of Calw, had ordered Count Adalbert to restore the abbey to the Benedictines, which he did very slowly and with a bad grace, and obtained such an influence over part of the new community that after four years they deposed Frederick. In his place was elected William, a monk of the abbey of St Emmeram at Ratisbon, who protested against the deposition of Bd Frederick and refused to regard himself as other than his vicar until after his death.
     After dealing with Count Adalbert, Abbot William turned his attention to the reform of his monks and the building up of a stable and observant community. Bernard, abbot of Saint Victor at Marseilles who had been sent into Germany as papal legate, advised him to adopt the usages and observance of Cluny, which William accordingly did. His own personal reputation attracted numbers of suitable subjects and he was able to re-establish the school for which Hirschau had formerly been famous; and, knowing that idleness is a chief enemy of monks and that good books cannot be too often multiplied, he staffed a large scriptorium. He himself drew up the " Constitutions of Hirschau ", which for long remained the norm of observance in that monastery and in many others, and set an example of such careful observance of them that he completely reformed his own community and attracted so many aspirants that other monasteries had to be founded for them.

One of the outstanding characteristics of William's life and one by no means shared by all the great abbots of the middle ages, was his concern for the spiritual and material well-being of the serfs both of the monastery and of neighbouring manors; and by aggregating its servants to the monastic community he had a significant part in the development of the institution of fratres conversi (lay-brothers). Bd William strongly appreciated the value of learning, and had seen how often bad morals go with lack of instruction and of intelligence; hence on the one hand his interest in the schooling of the common people and on the other his urgency for a learned episcopate: when asked to recommend men suitable for a bishopric he always, other things being equal, named a scholar. His own accomplishments, after that science of the saints, knowledge of God and holy living, in which he excelled, were of a variousness more common in his time than in ours: astronomy, music, mathematics, poetry; he invented an ingenious clock, revised and rewrote several of the office hymns, and among other works wrote a treatise De musica et tonis. But his great public work was the establishment of his "school the Lord's service", whose charter he wrote down in the constitutions which continued to be in force at Hirschau until the beginning of the fifteenth century.
There is a biography by a contemporary, said to be Haymo, Prior of Hirschau. As printed in the Acta Sanctorum (July, vol. ii) it seems to be overlaid with legendary matter. The more historical portions have been re-edited in MGH., Seriptores, vol. xii. See also B. Albers in Festschrift zum Jubiläum des deutschen Campo Santo, pp. 115-129, and the articles in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. xv, p. 629, and vol. vii, p. 363. There are modern lives by Kerker (1863) and Helmsdorfer (1874) and a valuable study of Bd William's musical theories by Hans Muller (1883).
1174 Holy Prince Andrew Bogoliubsky (1110-1174), grandson of Vladimir Monomakh, son of Yurii Dolgoruky and a Polovetsian princess (in holy Baptism Maria)
While still in his youth he was called "Bogoliubsky" ("God-loving") for his profound attention to prayer, his diligence for church services and "his adoption of secret prayers to God." From his grandfather, Vladimir Monomakh, the grandson inherited great spiritual concentration, love for the Word of God and the habit of turning to the Scripture in all the circumstances of life.
A brave warrior [Andrew means "brave"], a participant in his military father's many campaigns, more than once he came close to death in battle. But each time Divine Providence invisibly saved the princely man of prayer. Thus for example, on February 8, 1150, in a battle near Lutsk, St Andrew was saved from the spear of an enemy German by a prayer to the Great Martyr Theodore Stratelates, whose memory was celebrated that day.
The chronicles also stress St Andrew's peace-making activity, a rare trait among the princes and military commanders of those harsh times. The combination of military valor with love for peace and mercy, of great humility with indomitable zeal for the Church were present in Prince Andrew in the highest degree. A responsible master of the land, and a constant coworker in the city construction and church building activity of Yurii Dolgoruky, he built with his father: Moscow (1147), Iuriev-Polsk (1152), Dmitrov (1154), and he also adorned the cities of Rostov, Suzdal', and Vladimir with churches. In 1162 St Andrew could say with satisfaction, "I have built up white Rus with cities and settlements, and have rendered it with much populace."
When Yurii Dolgoruky became Great Prince of Kiev in 1154, he gave his son Vyshgorod near Kiev as his appanage (land given by kings and princes to their younger children for their support), but God willed otherwise. One night in the summer of 1155, the wonderworking Icon of the Mother of God in the Vyshgorod church was removed. This icon was painted by the holy Evangelist Luke, and in some period before this had been transferred here from Constantinople. Later, it was called the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God. On this night with the icon in hand, holy Prince Andrew left Vyshgorod going northwards to the Suzdal territory, secretly and without the blessing of his father, mindful only of the will of God.
The miracle of this holy icon, which occured on the way from Vyshgorod to Vladimir, was recorded by a clergyman of Prince Andrew, "the priest Mikula" [Nicholas], in his "Reports of the Miracles of the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God."
Ten versts before reaching Vladimir, the horse bearing the icon suddenly stopped. During the night the Mother of God appeared to St Andrew with a scroll in her hand and commanded, "I do not want you to take my icon to Rostov, but rather leave it in Vladimir. Build a stone church here in the name of My Nativity." In memory of this miraculous event, St Andrew commissioned an iconographer to paint an icon of the Mother of God the way that the All-Pure Virgin had appeared to him. He established Feast of this icon as June 18. The icon, named the Bogoliubsk, was afterwards glorified by numerous miracles.
Upon the place decreed by the Queen of Heaven, Prince Andrew built (in 1159) the church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos. He also remained in the city of Bogoliubov, which became his constant dwelling and the place of his martyric end.
When his father Yurii Dolgoruky died (+ May 15, 1157), St Andrew did not take up his father's throne at Kiev, but rather remained prince at Vladimir. During the years 1158-1160 was built the Dormition cathedral at Vladimir, and in it was placed the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God. In the year 1164 the Golden Gates were set in place, over which was the church of the Placing of the Robe of the Mother of God, and also the church of the Savior at the princely court.
Thirty churches were built by Prince Andrew during the years of his rule. The finest of them is the Dormition cathedral. The richness and splendor of the church helped to spread Orthodoxy among the surrounding peoples and foreign merchants. St Andrew had directed that all travellers, whether Latins or pagans, were to be led into the churches he built and to have "true Christianity" pointed out to them. The chronicler writes: "Both Bulgars, and Jews, and every sort of common person, beholding the glory of God and churchly adornment, came to be baptized."
The conquest of the great Volga journey-way became for St Andrew a fundamental task of his civil service to Russia. The Volga Bulgars from the time of the campaigns of Svyatoslav (+ 972) presented a serious danger to the Russian state. St Andrew continued with the initiatives of Svyatoslav.
A shattering blow was struck against the enemy in 1164, when Russian forces burned and destroyed several Bulgar fortresses. St Andrew took with him on this campaign the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God and a two-sided icon, on one side was depicted the Icon of the Savior "Not-Made-by-Hands," and the "Veneration of the Cross" on the opposite side. [At the present time both icons are in the Tretyakov State Gallery.]
A great miracle from the holy icons occurred for the Russian army on the day of the decisive victory over the Bulgars, August 1, 1164. After the destruction of the Bulgar army, the princes (Andrew, his brother Yaroslav, his son Izyaslav and others) returned towards the infantry standing by the princely standards with the Vladimir Icon, and they made a prostration before the Icon, "bestowing on it praise and song." And then all beheld the blinding rays of light, issuing from the face of the Mother of God and the Savior Not-Made-by-Hands.
Remaining a faithful son of the Orthodox Church in all things, vigilant in belief and canons, St Andrew turned to the Patriarch of Constantinople with a filial request to establish a separate metropolitan for northeastern Rus. And with the prince's letter of accord there journeyed to Byzantium the candidate chosen by the prince, Archimandrite Theodore of Suzdal. Patriarch Luke Chrysoverges, however, only agreed to consecrate Theodore as Bishop of Vladimir, but not as Metropolitan. Yet at the same time, wanting to uphold the position of Prince Andrew as the most powerful among the rulers of the Russian Land, the Patriarch honored Bishop Theodore with the right to wear the white klobuk [monastic head covering], which in ancient Rus was a distinctive sign of church autonomy. Such recognition (the white klobuk) was also granted to the Archbishop of Novgorod. Evidently, since the Russian chronicles speak of Bishop Theodore with the title of "White Klobuk", much later historians sometimes call him "the bishop of an autonomous diocese."
In the year 1167 St Rostislav died at Kiev. He was the twin brother of Andrew, and had been able to carry out compromise during the complicated political and churchly life of the time. But after this, there was dispatched from Constantinople a new metropolitan, Constantine II. The new metropolitan demanded that Bishop Theodore come before him to be confirmed in his position. St Andrew again went to Constantinople for the affirmation of the autonomous status of the Vladimir diocese and again he requested a separate metropolitanate. The letter of reply from Patriarch Luke Chrysoverges has been preserved. It contains a categorical refusal for establishing a new metropolitan, a demand to accept the expelled bishop Leo, and to submit to the Metropolitan of Kiev.
In fulfilling this churchly obedience, St Andrew urged Bishop Theodore to journey in repentance to Kiev for the restoration of canonical relations with the Metropolitan. The repentance of Bishop Theodore was not accepted. Without investigation by a council, and in accord with the Byzantine morals of the time, Metropolitan Constantine condemned him to a terrible execution. St Theodore's tongue was cut out, they cut off his right hand, and then they gouged out his eyes. After this he was drowned by servants of the Metropolitan (by other accounts, he died in prison).
Not only the churchly, but also the political affairs of Southern Rus demanded the decisive response of the Great Prince of Vladimir. On 8 March 8, 1169 an army of allied princes with Andrew's son Mstislav at the head conquered Kiev. The city was devastated and burned, and the Polovetsians participating in the campaign did not spare even the churchly treasures. The Russian chronicles viewed this event as something that was deserved: "These misfortunes were for their sins (the Kievans), especially for the outrage perpetuated by the Metropolitan." In the same year (1169) the prince moved an army against unruly Novgorod, but they were repulsed by a miracle of the Novgorod Icon of the Mother of God of the Sign (November 27), which had been carried along the city walls by holy Archbishop John (September 7). But when the understandable wrath of the Great Prince gave way to mercy, and in peace he summoned the Novgorod people to him, the blessing of God returned to him. Novgorod accepted the prince appointed by St Andrew.
In such a manner, towards the end of 1170, St Andrew Bogoliubsky was able to attain the unity of the Russian Land under his rule.
In the winter of 1172 he sent a large army under the command of his son Mstislav against the Volga Bulgars. The Russian forces gained the victory, but their joy was overshadowed by the death of the valiant Mstislav (March 28, 1172).
On the night of June 30, 1174 holy Prince Andrew Bogoliubsky accepted a martyr's death at the hands of traitors in his own household. The Tver Chronicle relates that St Andrew was murdered at the instigation of his second wife (a Volga Bulgar), who participated in the conspiracy. At the head of the conspiracy stood her brothers, the Kuchkovichi: "and they commited murder in the night, as did Judas against the Lord." A throng of assassins, twenty men, burst in upon the court, they killed the few guards and stormed into the bedchamber of the unarmed prince. The sword of St Boris, which hung constantly over his bed, had been treacherously removed that night by the steward Anbal. The prince succeeded in pushing the first of his assailants down on the floor. The conspirators then mistakenly ran him through with their swords. Soon they realised their mistake, "and then they perceived the prince, and he fought much with them, for he was strong, and they did thrust with swords and sabres, and gave him copious wounds." The forehead of the holy prince was struck on the side with a spear, while all the remaining blows from the cowardly assassins were dealt from behind. When the prince finally fell, they abruptly rushed out of the bedchamber, taking along their murdered accomplice.
The saint was still alive, however. With his final strength he lowered himself along the palace stairway, hoping to alert a guard. Instead, his groans were heard by the assassins and they turned back. The prince was able to hide himself in a niche below the stairway and so they passed by him. The conspirators rushed to the bedchamber but did not find the prince there. "Disaster stands before us, since the prince is alive," the assassins cried out in terror. But all around it was quiet, and no one came to the aid of the suffering prince. Then the evil-doers again regained their boldness, they lit candles and followed the bloody trail to seek out their victim. Prayer was on the lips of St Andrew when the assassins again surrounded him.
The Russian Church remembers and venerates its martyrs and makers. A special place belongs to St Andrew Bogoliubsky. Having taken in his hands the wonderworking icon of the Vladimir Mother of God, the holy prince, as it were, blessed the major events of Russian history with it. In 1395 was the year of the transfer of the Vladimir Icon to Moscow and the deliverance of the capital from the invasion of Tamerlane (August 26); the year 1480 marks the salvation of Rus from the invasion of Khan Akhmat and the ultimate collapse of the Mongol Horde (June 23); in the year 1521 Moscow was saved from the invasion of the Crimean Khan Makhmet-Girei (May 21). Through the prayers of St Andrew, his fondest dreams for the Russian Church came true. In the year 1300 Metropolitan Maximus transferred the metropolitan See of All-Russia from Kiev to Vladimir, making the Dormition cathedral the foremost cathedral of the Russian Church There rest the relics of St Andrew, and the Vladimir wonderworking Icon is its chief holy object.
Later on, when the center of the Russian Church was moved to Moscow, selections of the metropolitans and patriarchs of the Russian Church were made before the Vladimir Icon. In the year 1448, a Council of Russian bishops raised up the first metropolitan of the autocephalous Russian Church, St Jonah. On November 5, 1917, in front of it was made the selection of His Holiness Patriarch St Tikhon, the first such election after the restoration of the patriarchate in the Russian Church. And in 1971, on the Feast of the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God, the enthronment of His Holiness Patriarch Pimen took place.
The liturgical activity of St Andrew was multi-faceted and fruitful. In 1162 the Lord granted the holy prince a great solace: in Rostov there was discovered the relics of Rostov saints -- the holy hierarchs Isaiah and Leontius. The glorification of these Rostov saints throughout all the Church took place somewhat later, but St Andrew initiated their national veneration. In 1164 the military forces of St Andrew crushed their long-time enemy, the Volga Bulgars. The victories of the Orthodox nation were marked by a blossoming of liturgical creativity within the Russian Church.
In this same year of 1164, at the initiative of St Andrew, the Church established the Feast of the All-Merciful Savior and the Most Holy Theotokos on August 1 (venerated by the Russian people as "Savior of the First Honey"), in memory of the Baptism of Rus by holy Equal of the Apostles Vladimir and in memory of the victory over the Bulgars in 1164. The Feast of the Protection of the Mother of God on October 1 embodied in liturgical forms the faith of the holy prince and all the Orthodox nation in the acceptance by the Mother of God of Holy Rus beneath Her omophorion. The Protection of the Theotokos became one of the most beloved of Russian Church Feasts. The Protection is a Russian national holiday, unknown to the Latin West. It is a liturgical continuation and creative development of theological ideas inherent to the Feast of the Placing of the Robe of the Mother of God on July 2.
The first church consecrated to the new Feast was the Protection church at Nerla (1165), a remarkable monument of Russian Church architecture, built by the master artisans of St Andrew at the head-waters of the River Nerla, so that the prince could always see it from a window of his Bogoliubov garret.
St Andrew took an active part in the literary work of the Vladimir church writers. He participated in the compiling of the Service of the Protection (the most ancient copy is in the manuscript of a fourteenth century Psalter), and also a preface about the establishment of the Feast of the Protection in the Great Reading Meneion for October, as well as a "Discourse on the Protection." He wrote an "Account of the Victory over the Bulgars and the Establishing of the Feast of the Savior in the Year 1164," which in several of the old manuscripts is called, "Discourse concerning the Mercy of God by Great Prince Andrew Bogoliubsky." The fate of Bogoliubsky is also noted in the Vladimir Chronicle entry for the year 1177, completed after the death of the prince by his confessor, the priest Mikula, who inserted his special "Account of the Murder of St Andrew." To St Andrew's time belongs also the final editing of the "Account of Boris and Gleb," inserted into the "Dormition Sbornik" ("Compendium" or "Book of Collected Services" of these Rostov saints). The prince particularly venerated St Boris, and his chief household treasure was a cap belonging to St Boris. St Boris's sword always hung over his bed. Another memorial of St Andrew's prayerful inspiration is "A Prayer," included in the chronicle under the year 1096 after the "Instructions of Vladimir Monomakh."
1336 St. Elizabeth of Portugal exercises of piety, including daily Mass, but also through her exercise of charity, by which she was able to befriend and help pilgrims, strangers, the sick, the poor—in a word, all those whose need came to her notice
Stremótii, in Lusitánia, natális sanctæ Elísabeth Víduæ, Lusitanórum Regínæ, quam, virtútibus et miráculis claram, Urbánus Octávus, Póntifex Máximus, in Sanctórum númerum rétulit.  Ejus tamen celébritas octávo Idus mensis hujus recólitur, ex dispositióne Innocéntii Papæ Duodécimi.
    At Estremos in Portugal, the birthday of St. Elizabeth the Widow, queen of Portugal, whom Pope Urban VIII, mindful of her virtues and miracles, placed among the number of the saints.  Pope Innocent XII ordered her feast to be kept on the 8th of July.
Sanctæ Elísabeth Víduæ, Lusitanórum Regínæ, quæ ad regnum cæléste quarto Nonas hujus mensis transívit.
    St. Elisabeth, widow, queen of Portugal, whose birthday is observed on the 4th of July.
ST ELIZABETH OF PORTUGAL, WIDOW (A.D. 1336
THIS Elizabeth was daughter of Peter III, King of Aragon. She was born in 1271, and received at the font the name of Elizabeth, from her great-aunt, St Elizabeth of Hungary, but she is known in her own country by the Spanish form of that name; Isabella. Her birth was an omen of that title of "the Peacemaker" which she was to earn in after-life, for by it was established a good understanding between her grandfather James, who was then on the throne, and her father, whose quarrelling had divided the whole kingdom. The young princess was of a sweet disposition, and from her early years had relish for anything that was conducive to devotion and goodness. She desired to emulate every virtue which she saw practised by others, for she had been already taught that mortification of the will is to be joined with prayer to obtain the grace which restrains our tendency to sin. This is often insufficiently considered by those parents who excite the wilfulness and self-indulgence of their children by teaching them a love of worthless things and giving in to every whim and want. Certainly, fasting is not good for them; but submission of the will, obedience, and consideration for others are never more indispensable than at this time; nor is any abstinence more fruitful than that by which children are taught not to drink or eat between meals, to bear little denials without impatience, and never to make a fuss about things. The victory of Elizabeth over herself was owing to this early training.
At twelve years of age she was married to Denis, King of Portugal. That prince admired her birth, beauty, riches and personality more than her virtue; yet he allowed her an entire liberty in her devotion, and esteemed her piety without feeling called on to imitate it. Elizabeth therefore planned for herself a regular distribution of her time, which she never interrupted unless extraordinary occasions of duty or charity obliged her. She rose early every morning, and recited Matins, Lauds and Prime before Mass; in the afternoon she had other regular devotions after Vespers. Certain hours were allotted to her domestic affairs, public business, or what she owed to others. She was abstemious in her food, modest in her dress, humble and affable in conversation, and wholly bent upon the service of God. Frequent attempts were made to induce her to modify her life, but without success. Charity to the poor was a distinguishing part of her character. She gave orders to have pilgrims and poor strangers provided with lodging and necessaries, and made it her business to seek out and relieve persons who were reduced to necessity. She provided marriage dowries for girls, and founded in different parts of the kingdom charitable establishments, particularly a hospital at Coimbra, a house for penitent women at Torres Novas, and a refuge for foundlings. Nor with it all did Elizabeth neglect any of her immediate duties, especially those of respect, love and obedience to her husband, whose neglect and infidelity she bore with much patience.
For Denis, though a good ruler, was a bad subject: just, brave, generous and compassionate in public life, devoted to his realm, but in his private relations selfish and sinful. The queen used all her endeavours to reclaim him, grieving deeply for the offence to God and the scandal given to the people; she never ceased to pray for his conversion. She strove to gain him by courtesy and constant sweetness, and cheerfully cherished his natural children and took care of their education.
St Elizabeth had two children, Alfonso, who afterwards succeeded his father, and a daughter, Constance. This son when he grew up showed a very rebellious spirit, partly due to the favour in which his father held his illegitimate sons. Twice he rose in arms and twice his mother brought about a reconciliation, riding out between the opposing forces. But evil tongues suggested to the king that she secretly favoured her son and for a time she was banished from the court. Her love for concord and qualities as a peacemaker were indeed very notable; she stopped or averted war between Ferdinand IV of Castile, and his cousin, and between that prince and her own brother, James II of Aragon.
Her husband Denis became seriously ill in 1324, and Elizabeth gave all her attention to him, scarcely ever leaving his room unless to go to the church. During his long and tedious illness the king gave marks of sincere sorrow for the disorders of his life, and he died at Santarem on January 6, 1325. After his burial the queen made a pilgrimage to Compostela, after which she wished to retire to a convent of Poor Clares which she had founded at Coimbra. However, she was dissuaded, and instead she was professed in the third order of St Francis, and lived in a house which she built near to her convent, leading a life of great simplicity.
The cause of peace that had been so dear to her all her life was the occasion of Elizabeth's death, which came about on July 4, 1336 at Estremoz, whither she had gone on an errand of reconciliation in spite of her age and the great heat. She was buried in the church of her monastery of Poor Clares at Coimbra, and honoured by miracles; and eventually in 1626 her cultus was crowned by canonization.
The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii, have printed a life of the queen which seems to be of almost contemporary date, and a good deal of information may also be found in the chronicles of the period. See also P; de Moucheron, Ste Elisabeth d'Aragon (1896); and a short sketch by Fr V. McNabb (1937). The story (told by Butler in company with many others) of the innocent page saved miraculously from death in a lime-kiln is a mere fiction which can be traced back to the folk-lore of ancient India. See Cosquin in the Revue des Questions historiques, vol. lxxiii (1903), pp, 3-12, with vol. lxxiv, pp, 207-217; and Formichi in Archivio delle tradizioni popolari, vol. xxii (1903), pp. 9-30. It is only in 1562 that we find it christianized and told in connection with St Elizabeth.

Elizabeth is usually depicted in royal garb with a dove or an olive branch. At her birth in 1271, her father, Pedro III, future king of Aragon, was reconciled with his father, James, the reigning monarch. This proved to be a portent of things to come. Under the healthful influences surrounding her early years, she quickly learned self-discipline and acquired a taste for spirituality. Thus fortunately prepared, she was able to meet the challenge when, at the age of 12, she was given in marriage to Denis, king of Portugal. She was able to establish for herself a pattern of life conducive to growth in God’s love, not merely through her exercises of piety, including daily Mass, but also through her exercise of charity, by which she was able to befriend and help pilgrims, strangers, the sick, the poor—in a word, all those whose need came to her notice. At the same time she remained devoted to her husband, whose infidelity to her was a scandal to the kingdom.
He too was the object of many of her peace endeavors. She long sought peace for him with God, and was finally rewarded when he gave up his life of sin. She repeatedly sought and effected peace between the king and their rebellious son, Alfonso, who thought that he was passed over to favor the king’s illegitimate children. She acted as peacemaker in the struggle between Ferdinand, king of Aragon, and his cousin James, who claimed the crown. And finally from Coimbra, where she had retired as a Franciscan tertiary to the monastery of the Poor Clares after the death of her husband, she set out and was able to bring about a lasting peace between her son Alfonso, now king of Portugal, and his son-in-law, the king of Castile.
Third Order of St. Francis
Elizabeth was a Spanish princess who was given in marriage to King Denis of Portugal at the age of twelve. She was very beautiful and very lovable. She was also very devout, and went to Mass every day. Elizabeth was a holy wife, but although her husband was fond of her at first, he soon began to cause her great suffering. Though a good ruler, he did not imitate his wife's love of prayer and other virtues. In fact, his sins of impurity gave great scandle to the people.
Later, to make matters worse, the King believed a lie told about Elizabeth and one of her pages by another page, who was jealous of his companion. In great anger the King ordered the one he believed guilty, to be sent to a lime-burner. The lime-burner was commanded to throw into his furnace the first page who came. The good page set out obediently, not knowing death was waiting for him. On his way he stopped for Mass, since he had the habit of going daily. The first Mass had begun, so he stayed for a second one. In the meantime, the King sent the wicked page to the lime-burner to find out if the other had been killed. And so it was this page who was thrown into the furnace! When the King learned what had happened, he realized that God had saved the good page, punished the liar, and proven Queen Elizabeth to be innocent.
This amazing event helped greatly to make the King live better. He apologized to his wife in front of everyone and began to have a great respect for her. In his last sickness, she never left his side, except for Mass, until he died a holy death. St. Elizabeth lived for eleven more years, doing even greater charity and penance. She was a wonderful model of kindness toward the poor and a successful peacemaker between members of her own family and between nations.
Because St. Elizabeth was faithful to daily Mass, she found strength to carry her many great crosses. And because her page was faithful to daily Mass, he escaped death. We should try our best to make it a habit to go to Mass daily.
Comment:  The work of promoting peace is anything but a calm and quiet endeavor. It takes a clear mind, a steady spirit and a brave soul to intervene between people whose emotions are so aroused that they are ready to destroy one another. This is all the more true of a woman in the early 14th century. But Elizabeth had a deep and sincere love and sympathy for humankind, almost a total lack of concern for herself and an abiding confidence in God. These were the tools of her success.

 July 4, 2010 St. Elizabeth of Portugal (1271-1336)
Elizabeth is usually depicted in royal garb with a dove or an olive branch. At her birth in 1271, her father, Pedro III, future king of Aragon, was reconciled with his father, James, the reigning monarch. This proved to be a portent of things to come. Under the healthful influences surrounding her early years, she quickly learned self-discipline and acquired a taste for spirituality. Thus fortunately prepared, she was able to meet the challenge when, at the age of 12, she was given in marriage to Denis, king of Portugal. She was able to establish for herself a pattern of life conducive to growth in God’s love, not merely through her exercises of piety, including daily Mass, but also through her exercise of charity, by which she was able to befriend and help pilgrims, strangers, the sick, the poor—in a word, all those whose need came to her notice. At the same time she remained devoted to her husband, whose infidelity to her was a scandal to the kingdom.

He too was the object of many of her peace endeavors. She long sought peace for him with God, and was finally rewarded when he gave up his life of sin. She repeatedly sought and effected peace between the king and their rebellious son, Alfonso, who thought that he was passed over to favor the king’s illegitimate children. She acted as peacemaker in the struggle between Ferdinand, king of Aragon, and his cousin James, who claimed the crown. And finally from Coimbra, where she had retired as a Franciscan tertiary to the monastery of the Poor Clares after the death of her husband, she set out and was able to bring about a lasting peace between her son Alfonso, now king of Portugal, and his son-in-law, the king of Castile.

Comment:  The work of promoting peace is anything but a calm and quiet endeavor. It takes a clear mind, a steady spirit and a brave soul to intervene between people whose emotions are so aroused that they are ready to destroy one another. This is all the more true of a woman in the early 14th century. But Elizabeth had a deep and sincere love and sympathy for humankind, almost a total lack of concern for herself and an abiding confidence in God. These were the tools of her success.
Elisabeth von Portugal Katholische Kirche: 4. Juli
Elisabeth, Tochter des Königs Pedro von Aragon, wurde um 1270 geboren. In der Taufe erhielt sie nach ihrer Großtante den Namen Elisabeth. Sie wird auch Isabella von Aragon genannt. 1282 heiratete sie König Dionysius von Portugal. Ihr Sohn Alfons lag laufend mit seinem Vater und anderen Königen im Streit und Elisabeth konnte mehrmals erfolgreich vermitteln. Bei ihrer letzten Mission starb sie am 4.7.1336 in Estremoz. Elisabeth unterstütze zahlreiche kirchloche Einrichtungen. Nach dem Tod ihres Mannes 1325 zog sie sich in ein von ihr errichtetes Kloster zurück und wurde später Franziskaner-Tertiarin. Elisabeth ist Patronin von Portugal, Coimbra, Estremoz und Saragossa.
1387 St. Peter of Luxembourg well known for his austerity and holiness
Cardinal and bishop. Peter was born 1369, son of Guy of Luxembourg, count of Ligny, in Lorraine, but was orphaned at the age of four. Taken to Paris, he became a canon at Notre Dame, Chartres, and Cambrai and was appointed archdeacon of Dreux. For a time he was held by the English as a hostage at Calais for his brother, and then, in 1384, he was named bishop of Metz at the age of fourteen. Two years later, he became a cardinal by decree of the antipope Clement VII. Owing to the political strife which attended the schism, Peter needed armed troops to take possession of his see against the followers of Pope Urban VI. Despite the reforms he introduced to the diocese, he was driven from Metz and joined Clement at Avignon. He died at the age of eighteen at the Carthusian monastery at Villeneuve, France. Peter was well known for his austerity and holiness.
1427-1430 Saint Andrew Rublev, Russia's greatest iconographer received monastic tonsure; was taught iconography by Theophanes the Greek and the monk Daniel, St Andrew's friend and fellow-ascetic.
Born near Moscow sometime between 1360 and 1370. While still very young, he went to the Holy Trinity Monastery, and was profoundly impressed by St Sergius of Radonezh (September 25).
After the death of St Sergius in 1392, St Nikon (November 17) succeeded him as igumen. St Andrew became a novice in the monastery under St Nikon. Sometime before 1405 he moved to the Spaso -Andronikov Monastery founded by St Andronicus (June 13), with the blessing of St Nikon.  There St Andrew received monastic tonsure and was taught iconography by Theophanes the Greek and the monk Daniel, St Andrew's friend and fellow-ascetic.
St Andrew is first mentioned in the Chronicles in 1405, when he, Theophanes, and Prochorus painted the cathedral of the Annunciation.
His next important project, which he undertook with the monk Daniel, was to paint the frescoes in the Dormition Cathedral in Vladimir in 1408.
St Nikon of Radonezh asked St Andrew and Daniel to paint the new church in the reconstructed monastery of the Holy Trinity, which had been destroyed by the Tatars in 1408.
At this time St Andrew painted his most famous icon: the Holy Trinity (actually, the Hospitality of Abraham).
St Andrew fell asleep in the Lord between 1427-1430, and was buried in the Andronikov Monastery. He was over seventy years old at the time of his death. The monk Daniel, who died before St Andrew, appeared to his friend and urged him to join him in eternal blessedness

1507 Uncovering of the Relics of Saint Euthymius the Wonderworker of Suzdal, who died on April 1, 1405
Occurred in the year 1507 during the construction of a new stone church when the monastery was headed by the igumen Cyril (later Bishop of Rostov). The incorrupt relics were the source of numerous miracles, and they were placed in the Transfiguration cathedral of the monastery. In 1511 after its restorations, the church (a rare memorial of fourteenth century architecture) was consecrated in the name of St Euthymius.
1594 Bl. John Carey Martyr of England, an Irish layman. He was the servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave and was put to death with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Cornelius, and Patrick Salmon at Dorchester in Oxfordshire. They were beatified in 1929.
 1594 Bl. John Cornelius Martyred Jesuit of England. He was of Irish descent and was bom in Bodmin. Educated at Oxford, he went to Reims and then Rome where he was ordained in 1583. John went to England the next year, where he used the alias Mohun, and where he became a Jesuit. He was discovered at Lady Arundel’s Castle in Dorset. In 1594 , after working for ten years in Lanherne, he was executed at Dorchester, Oxfordshire, with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Carey, and Patrick Salmon. They were beatified in 1929.

 1594 Bl. Thomas Bosgrave English martyr. The nephew of Sir J. Arundel, Thomas was arrested by English authorities at Arundel's Chidicock Castle in Dorset. He was hanged at Dorchester with Blessed John Cornelius and two of his servants. He was beatified.
1594 Bl. Patrick Salmon Martyr of England charged with sheltering a priest
He was a servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave and was martyred with him at Dorchester, England. They were 
1594 BB. JOHN CORNELIUS AND HIS COMPANIONS, THE DORCHESTER MARTYRS
ON July 4, 1594 was hanged, drawn and quartered at Dorchester in Dorset Bd JOHN CORNELIUS (alias Mohun), priest, and with him were simply hanged BB. THOMAS BOSGRAVE, JOHN CAREY and PATRICK SALMON, laymen. Mr Cornelius was born of Irish parents at Bodmin in 1557 and was sent to Oxford by Sir John Arundell of Lanherne: but not liking the " new learning" of that university he went overseas to the English College at Rheirns and afterwards to Rome, where he was ordained. He worked on the English mission from Lanherne for nearly ten years, and both then and during his earlier days abroad he was known as a man of unusual zeal and recollection.
On April 25, 1594, he was arrested at Chideock Castle, the seat of Lady Arundell, by the sheriff of Dorset. While he was being hurried away, bareheaded and unprepared, Mr Thomas Bosgrave, a gentleman of Cornwall, nephew of Sir John Arundell, offered him his hat, saying, " The honour lowe to your function may not suffer me to see you go bare-headed". This innocent act of kindness and respect was sufficient to implicate him, and he also was arrested. At the same time were carried off two of the castle serving-men, John Carey and Patrick Salmon, both Dubliners. Cornelius was taken to London and examined before the Privy Council, which ordered him to be racked that he might betray the names of those who had harboured or assisted him; but he remained mute, and was returned to Dorchester for trial. On July 2 he was found guilty of high treason, in that he was a priest who had come into the realm and remained there, and the other three for felony in aiding and abetting him. After sentence had been pronounced they were offered a reprieve if they would apostatize.
Two days later they were executed. The laymen, each of whom made a final profession of faith, suffered first; Bd John Cornelius kissed the feet of his companions, but was not allowed to speak to the people; he was, however, able to declare that he had been admitted into the Society of Jesus and would have gone to Flanders for his novitiate but for his arrest.
There also suffered at Dorchester Bd HUGH GREEN, a secular priest who on August 19, 1642, was hanged, drawn and quartered with peculiarly revolting circumstances, for his priesthood. The feast of the Dorchester martyrs is kept in the diocese of Plymouth.
See MMP., pp. 198-202. But fuller details concerning these martyrs may be found in an article contributed by Fr Leo Hicks to Studies, December, 1929, pp. 537--555; and cf, A. L. Rowse, Tudor Cornwall (1941), pp. 358, 363-367.
1597 Bl. William Andleby Martyr of England studied at St. Johns College, Cambridge, and was converted to Catholicism on the way to fight the Spanish. He went to Douai, France, and was ordained in 1577. Returning home, he worked inYorkshire and Lincolnshire for two decades.
Born at Eton, near Beverley, England, he studied at St. Johns College, Cambridge, and was converted to Catholicism on the way to fight the Spanish. He went to Douai, France, and was ordained in 1577. Returning home, he worked inYorkshire and Lincolnshire for two decades. Arrested and condemned, he was executed at York with Thomas Warcop and two companions. He was beatified in 1929.
BB. WILLIAM ANDLEBY AND HIS COMPANIONS, MARTYRS
ON July 4, 1597, there suffered at York Bd WILLIAM ANDLEBY, a secular priest, and BB. HENRY ABBOT, THOMAS WARCOP and EDWARD FULTHROP, laymen. Mr Andleby (or Anlaby) was born at Etton, near Beverley, and brought up a Protestant, being educated at St John's College, Cambridge. When some twenty-five years old, while on his way to join the Dutch in their wars with the Spaniards, he visited Douay and had an interview with Dr Allen. Within twenty-four hours the prayers and discourses of the rector of the seminary had such an effect on the young man, who hitherto had been strongly averse from the Church and even from religion at all in his behaviour, that he not only made his submission but remained in Douay and was in due course ordained in 1577·
He worked on the mission in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire for twenty years, and was concerned with the Yen. Thomas Atkinson in ministering under conditions of the greatest difficulty and danger to the Catholic prisoners in Hull Castle. He was at last arrested and condemned to be hanged, drawn and quartered for being a priest. The same death was inflicted on Edward Fulthrop, a Yorkshire gentleman, for having been reconciled to the Church, and Thomas Warcop was hanged for sheltering Mr Andleby. Henry Abbot, of Holden in the East Riding, was hanged, drawn and quartered for persuading another to join the Catholic Church. Into this he had been tricked by a Protestant minister who, being imprisoned in York Castle for some offence or other, had pretended that he wished to abjure his heresy to ingratiate himself with some recusant fellow prisoners. These at his release referred him to Mr Abbot as a likely person to know of a priest who would reconcile him. At the minister's request, therefore, Abbot tried to find one at a certain house, and, though he did not succeed, this was sufficient to ensure his death and that of the recusants in the jail (the Yen. George Errington, William Knight and William Gibson) when the treacherous minister had commended himself to his superiors by informing on those whom he had deceived. 
See Challoner, Memoirs of Missionary Priests, pp. 231-232.
1597 Bl. Thomas Warcop English martyr. A gentleman in Yorkshire, England, who sheltered Blessed William Andleby. He was arrested and condemned for giving this aid and hanged atYork with three companions on July 4.

1597 St. Henry Abbot, Blessed Martyr of England. A native of Howden, England, Henry became a convert to the Church and was duly arrested and hanged at York. Pope Pius XI beatified him 1929.
1900 Bl. Anthony Fantosat Martyr of China, a victim of the Boxer Rebellion. The vicar apostolic for southern Hunan, in China, he was martyred at Hangchow on July 7.
1918 Saint Nicholas, the last Russian Tsar, was born in 1868. As a child, he was very religious, guileless and free from malice.
Nicholas II was crowned as Tsar in 1894, following the death of his father Tsar Alexander. He began his reign with lofty hopes for peace, urging other nations to reduce the size of their armies, and to seek the peaceful settlement of international disputes. The Peace Conference at the Hague in 1899 laid the groundwork for the League of Nations and the United Nations.
He married Princess Alice of Hesse, who converted to Orthodoxy and took the name Alexandra. Their children were Olga (1895), Tatiana (1897), Maria (1899), Anastasia (1901), and Alexis (1904).
The glorification of St Seraphim of Sarov took place on July 19, 1903, and Tsar Nicholas attended the ceremonies at Sarov with his family. At that time he was given a letter written by St Seraphim more than seventy years before, which seemed to disturb him.  Although the Sovereign never revealed the letter's contents, it is believed that it was a prophecy of the bloodshed that would engulf Russia in less than fifteen years.
St Nicholas was executed by the Soviets at Ekaterinburg on July 4, 1918 along with his family and servants. The prisoners were awakened late at night and ordered to get dressed for travel. They went down to the cellar of the home in which they were being held, waiting for the word to leave. The Tsar sat on a chair in the middle of the room holding his son Alexis in his lap, while his wife and daughters stood around them.
The executioners entered the room and read out the order for their execution. Sts Nicholas and Alexandra died under the hail of bullets, but the children did not die right away. They were stabbed and clubbed with the butts of rifles. Their bodies were taken to an abandoned mine, cut into pieces, then piled in front of the mine. Sulphur and gasoline were poured on the bloody mound and set on fire. When the fire went out two days later, whatever remained of the bodies was thrown into the mine and grenades were tossed into it. Then the ground was plowed so that no trace of the disposal of the bodies remained.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  July 2016
Universal:  
Indigenous Peoples; That indigenous peoples, whose identity
and very existence are threatened, will be shown due respect.
”.
Evangelization:  Latin America and the Caribbean; That the Church in Latin America and the Caribbean,
by means of her mission to the continent, may announce the Gospel with renewed vigor and enthusiasm. 

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

        
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die
 so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads,
 'The Gospel of Life'


"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel


Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
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 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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