Mary Mother of GOD
 Thursday  Saint of the Day July 06 Prídie Nonas Júlii  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.
St. Maria Goretti, Virgin, Martyr (Optional Memorial)

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.


"And one cried to another, and said, 'Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord of hosts: the whole earth is full of His glory" Isaias>
 
CAUSES OF SAINTS

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Octava sanctórum Apostolórum Petri et Pauli.
The Octave of the holy apostles Peter and Paul.

Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China { article here }

"The Rosary and the sign (of the cross) are the only weapons you will have"
 
In Akita, Japan, five nuns from a secular institute had a chapel with the Real Presence. Near the tabernacle was a replica statue of the Virgin who appeared in Amsterdam, known as the "Lady of All Nations."

On Thursday evening of July 5, 1956, Sister Agnes Sasagawa Azuma started praying. Suddenly she felt a cross-shaped wound in the palm of her left hand. The sensation of a deep puncture kept her awake in pain all night.

At three in the morning, she heard a voice (her guardian angel): "Don’t just pray for your own sins, but pray in reparation for those of all mankind. Today’s world hurts the Most Sacred Heart of Our Lord by its ingratitude. Mary's wounds are much deeper than yours. Let’s go together to the chapel."

... In the chapel, Agnes saw on the hands of the Virgin wounds very similar to hers. On Saturday, October 13, 1973, she received a new message: "Fire will fall from heaven and consume a large part of humanity... The Rosary and the sign (of the cross) are the only weapons you will have that the Son left."
Bishop Shojiro Ito, the local Bishop, officially declared the authenticity of the facts on April 22, 1984.

 

It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel
St. Maria Goretti, Virgin, Martyr (Optional Memorial)
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
 Monday  Saint of the Day July 06 Prídie Nonas Júlii  

THE PRECIOUS BLOOD OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST  

 701 BC Jesaja ist neben Jeremia, Ezechiel und anderen einer der großen Schriftpropheten des Tanach, der Hebräischen Bibel. Er wirkte im damaligen Südreich Juda zwischen 740 und 701 v. Chr. in der Zeit der Bedrohung durch die antike Großmacht Assyrien.
  90 St Romulus, Bishop Of Fiesole, Martyr a Roman convert of St Peter

   303 St Dominica, Virgin And Martyr
 429 St Sisoes After death of St Antony, St Sisoes was one of the most shining lights of the Egyptian deserts; Egyptian by birth; quit the world in his youth he retired to the desert of Skete.

 518 St. Monenna Irish abbess also called Darerca resided at Sliabh Cuillin Ireland noted for  austerities
 575 St. Goar Priest of Aquitaine, France, honored by Charlemagne. A parish priest,

 699 St Sexburga, Abbess Of Ely, Widow daughter of Anna, King of the East Angles; sister of SS. Etheldreda, Ethelburga and Withburga, and half-sister of St Sethrida
1070 St  Godeleva, Martyr The scene of the murder of Godeleva soon had a reputation for miracles
1433 Johannes Hus Evangelische Kirche: 6. Juli 1990 bedauerte Papst Johannes Paul II. den grausamen Tod von Johannes Hus.
1535 Thomas More mit Kardinal John Fisher
1794 Blessed Mary Rose entered Benedictine convent of Caderousse in 1762 French Revolution martyr,
1902 St. Maria Goretti Devotion grew, miracles, and in less than half a century she was canonized


July 6 – Lacrymations and messages of Our Lady to Sister Agnes Sasagawa Katsuko,
approved by Bishop Ito in 1984 (Akita, Japan) 
 You who wish to belong without reserve to the Lord, to become the spouse worthy of the Spouse
 In August 1973, Sister Agnes, in Akita, Japan, started her day with a time of prayer longer than usual. In her own words, ‘I had barely begun, when all of a sudden I heard coming from the statue of Mary, for the second time, a voice of indescribable beauty’:
“My daughter, my novice, do you love the Lord? If you love the Lord, listen to what I have to say to you. It is very important… I have intervened so many times to appease the wrath of the Father. I have prevented the coming of calamities by offering Him the sufferings of the Son on the Cross, His Precious Blood, and beloved souls who console Him and form a cohort of victim souls.
Prayer, penance, and courageous sacrifices can soften the Father's anger.”
After a silence: “Is what you think in your heart true? (…) My novice, you who wish to belong without reserve to the Lord, to become the spouse worthy of the Spouse, make your vows knowing that you must be fastened to the Cross with three nails.
These three nails are poverty, chastity, and obedience.
Of the three, obedience is the foundation. In total abandon, let yourself be led by your superior.
He will know how to understand you and to direct you.”
 
Words spoken by Our Lady in Akita
The apparitions of Akita (Japan) have been approved by the local bishop.
www.catolico.org


July 6 - Sr Agnes Sasagawa at Akita: Crying Statue and Messages (Japan)
At Akita, the Virgin Cries Over the Sins of the World
On July 6, 1973, Sr Agnes Sasagawa receiving messages from Heaven at Akita, Japan.
These messages asked her to make reparation for the sins of mankind.
"Do not fear. Pray with fervor not only because of your sins, but in reparation for those of all men.
The world today deeply wounds the most Sacred Heart of Our Lord  by its ingratitude and injuries.
The wounds of Mary are much deeper and more sorrowful than yours." -
"Pray very much for the Pope, the bishops, and priests." -
"Many men in this world afflict the Lord. I desire souls to console Him, to soften the anger of the Heavenly Father.
I seek, with my Son, souls who will make reparation, by their suffering and their poverty, for sinners and ingrates."
"As I told you, if men do not repent & better themselves, the Father will inflict a terrible punishment on all humanity."
Two years later on January 4, 1975, the statue began to weep. It wept 101 times until September 15, 1981.
Scientific examination proved the liquid to be human tears.
In 1984, Bishop Ito declared that the events of Akita were of supernatural origin and worthy of belief.

Ah! What years and centuries of torment to punish us! ...
How dearly we shall pay for all those faults that we look upon as nothing at all, like those little lies that we tell to amuse ourselves, those little scandals, the despising of the graces which God gives us at every moment, those little murmurings in the difficulties that He sends us!
No, my dear brethren, we would never have the courage to commit the least sin if we could understand how much it outrages God and how greatly it deserves to be rigorously punished, even in this world. God is just, my dear brethren, in all that He does.
When He recompenses us for the smallest good action, He does so over and above all that we could desire. A good thought, a good desire, that is to say, the desire to do some good work even when we are not able to do it, He never leaves without a reward.
But also, when it is a matter of punishing us, it is done with rigor, and though we should have only a light fault, we shall be sent into Purgatory. -- St. John Vianney

 
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

 701 BC Jesaja ist neben Jeremia, Ezechiel und anderen einer der großen Schriftpropheten des Tanach, der Hebräischen Bibel. Er wirkte im damaligen Südreich Juda zwischen 740 und 701 v. Chr. in der Zeit der Bedrohung durch die antike Großmacht Assyrien.
  90 St Romulus, Bishop Of Fiesole, Martyr a Roman convert of St Peter
 268-270 The Holy Martyrs Marinus, Martha, Audifax, Habakkuk, Cyrenus, Valentinus the Presbyter, Asterius, and many others with them at Rome.
 283-284 The Holy Martyrs Isaurius the Deacon, Innocent, Felix, Hermias, Basil, Peregrinus were Athenians, suffering for Christ in the Macedonian city of Apollonia & two city officials, Rufus and Ruphinus
 288 St. Tranquillinus Roman martyr. He is affiliated with the legends surrounding St. Sebastian
 300 Holy Martyrs Lucy (Lucia) the Virgin, Rexius, Antoninus, Lucian, Isidore, Dion, Diodorus, Cutonius, Arnosus, Capicus and Satyrus: twenty-four martyrs suffered with Sts Lucy and Rexius
  Martyrdom of the Seven Ascetic Saints in Tounar Mount. {Coptic}
  Martyrdom of Sts. Abba Hour and his Mother Theodora.   {Coptic}
   303 St Dominica, Virgin And Martyr
 429 St Sisoes After death of St Antony, St Sisoes was one of the most shining lights of the Egyptian deserts; Egyptian by birth; quit the world in his youth he retired to the desert of Skete.
 518 St. Monenna Irish abbess also called Darerca. She resided at Sliabh Cuillin in Ireland noted for her austerities
 575 St. Goar Priest of Aquitaine, France, honored by Charlemagne. A parish priest, Goar became a hermit at Oberwesel, Germany, on the Rhine River. 575 St Goar was born in Aquitaine and for years worked as a parish priest in his own country
St. Noyala Virgin martyr. A much revered martyr in Brittany said to have crossed to Brittany on the leaf of a tree, accompanied by her nurse
 699 St Sexburga, Abbess Of Ely, Widow daughter of Anna, King of the East Angles; sister of SS. Etheldreda, Ethelburga and Withburga, and half-sister of St Sethrida
St. Rixius Varus

       St. Merryn hermitess on the island of Andresey in the Trent River in England
1070 St  Godeleva, Martyr The scene of the murder of Godeleva soon had a reputation for miracles
1433 Johannes Hus Evangelische Kirche: 6. Juli 1990 bedauerte Papst Johannes Paul II. den grausamen Tod von Johannes Hus.
1535 Thomas More mit Kardinal John Fisher
1585 Bl. Thomas Alfield English martyr native of Gloucester educated at Eton and Cambridge; raised as an Anglican convert left England to study for the priesthood at Douai and Reims, France, ordination in 1581
1599-1624 Virgin Juliana, Princess of Olshansk Uncovering of the Relics of; Many miracles have been worked by St Juliana, and she helps those who venerate her holy relics with piety and faith
1794 Blessed Mary Rose entered Benedictine convent of Caderousse in 1762 French Revolution martyr, OSB M (AC)
1902 St. Maria Goretti Devotion to the young martyr grew, miracles, and in less than half a century she was canonized

July 6 - Tears and Messages to Sister Agnes Sasagawa (Akita, Japan, recognized by Bishop Shojiro Ito in 1984)
Fight Against Death With a Hail Mary (I)
   In the year 1958, we lived in a poor working suburb. Life was miserable for everyone and the second halves of the month were especially hard. On the evening of July 12th sadness came into my own home. I had put my two little girls to bed: Jeannine, 28 months, was already asleep, but Suzy, 17 months, in spite of the late hour, had not yet fallen to sleep. She was agitated… and suddenly the drama happened. My little girl went into convulsions. Her tiny body became stiff and unrecognizable. She no longer looked like a human being. What was I to do?…
   I called the doctor, who saw at once the gravity of the case and spent the entire night with us, trying to use, without success, all the resources of medical science. I thought of asking the Blessed Virgin for help, but I did not dare. I had been such a blasphemer! In fact, I belonged to a sect that prohibited us to honor Mary, forbid us to make the sign of the cross and to enter a Catholic church. However, I had spent a year as a girl in a parochial school where I had learned some elements of religion. But, I was so little enlightened; I still wondered where the truth was.
   I addressed God, “My God, You made the earth and the sky; I only know only one prayer for the dying. It is “Hail Mary”.
Am I wrong to ask the One that Catholics call the Virgin for help? Have mercy on us Lord! …”
Adapted from The Call of the Painful and Immaculate Heart, #60, from the Marian Collection #11, 1979
The great psalm of the Passion, Psalm 21, whose first verse
"My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" (Psalm 21:28)
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision:  "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
Mary the Mother of God

Isaiah_Michelangelo
701 BC Jesaja ist neben Jeremia, Ezechiel und anderen einer der großen Schriftpropheten des Tanach, der Hebräischen Bibel. Er wirkte im damaligen Südreich Juda zwischen 740 und 701 v. Chr. in der Zeit der Bedrohung durch die antike Großmacht Assyrien.
Hierosólymis sancti Isaiæ Prophétæ, qui, sub Manásse Rege, in duas sectus partes occúbuit, sepultúsque est sub quercu Rogel, juxta tránsitum aquárum.
    In Jerusalem, the holy prophet Isaias.  During the reign of King Manasses he was put to death by being sawn in two and was buried beneath the oak of Rogel, near a running stream.
        





         Isaiah
The prophet Isaiah was born in about 765 B.C. In the year of King Uzziah’s death, 740, he received his prophetic vocation while in the Temple of Jerusalem:   his mission was to proclaim the fall of Israel and of Judah, the punishment  of the nation’s infidelity, 6:1-13. His earliest pronouncements, ch. 1-5, for the  most part belong to the following years until the beginning of the reign of Ahaz in 736. Rezin, king of Damascus, and Pekah, king of Israel, tried to  persuade the young king of Judah to form an alliance against Tiglath-pileser III, king of Assyria. Ahaz refused and, when war was declared, appealed to Assyria.
         Isaiah tried in vain to discourage a policy so based on human expediency;  as  the pledge of God’s intentions he foretold the mysterious birth of Immanuel  and made the first of his messianic prophecies. Most of the oracles contained  in ch. 6-12 (the ‘Book of Immanuel’), belong to this period. The appeal of Ahaz to Tiglath-pileser put Judah under Assyrian protection and hastened the fall of the Northern Kingdom, part of the territory of which was annexed by Assyria  in 734; by 721 Samaria itself had fallen.


 In Judah, Hezekiah who succeeded  Ahaz (716) was a devout man, bent on reform. There was a resumption, however,  of political intrigue, this time for Egyptian support against Assyria. Isaiah,  true to his principles, pleaded for trust in God, not in a military alliance. In this period  just before and after the fall of Samaria, Isaiah delivered most of the  oracles of ch. 28-32, and also the oracles against the nations 14:24-23:18.
         Hezekiah allowed himself to be drawn into an anti-Assyrian revolt and Sennacherib, in 701, devastated Palestine. The king of Judah resolved to defend   Jerusalem; Isaiah supported his decision, assuring him of God’s help, and the  capital, in fact, was saved. The details are recorded in ch. 36-39, parallel to  2 K 18-20, and bring the first part of the book to a close. We know nothing  of Isaiah’s career after 700. According to Jewish tradition he was martyred  under Manasseh.
         The prominent part played by Isaiah in his country’s affairs made him a  national figure, but he was also a poet of genius. Brilliance of style and freshness of imagery make his work pre-eminent in the literature of the Bible; he wrote  a concise, majestic and harmonious prose unsurpassed by any of the biblical  writers who were to follow him. But his greatness lies above all in the religious  order. The vision in the Temple at the time of his vocation, a revelation of the  transcendence of God and the unworthiness of man, left a lasting mark on the  prophet. His monotheism has a note of exultation in it but also of awe; God is the Holy, the Strong, the Mighty On; the King. Man is a creature deified by  sin for which God demands reparation.  For God insists on justice between men and sincerity in divine worship. God looks for faithfulness and Isaiah is the prophet of faith; in times of crisis all he prescribes is trust in God and in no one else; by this alone will salvation be won. He knows clearly how hard  the test will be, but his hope is that a ‘remnant’ will be spared, with the Messiah  for its king. Isaiah is the greatest of the messianic prophets. The Messiah he  foretells is a descendant of David who will establish peace and justice on earth  and propagate the knowledge of God, 2:1-5; 7:10-17; 9:1-6; 11:1-9; 28:16-17.
     A religious genius of this quality inevitably made an impression on his period and secured a following. The prose passages in the third person which conclude the first part of the book, ch. 36-39, are the work of Isaiah’s disciples.   From time to time the prophet’s spiritual descendants made further additions
to his own work and in particular they inserted the oracles against Babylon,  ch. 13-14, the apocalypse of ch. 24-27, and the poems of ch. 33-35.
    The second part of the book, ch. 40-55, is of a very different kind, and modern criticism does not admit it to be the work of the 8th century prophet. The Biblical Commission, on 28th June 1908, warned Catholic exegetes against this  view, opposed as it is to ancient traditional opinion and setting bounds, it  might seem, to the free range of prophetic inspiration. The Commission asserted that the arguments so far adduced were not strong enough to dismiss the Isaian authorship of these chapters. It was a cautionary measure, not forbidding further inquiry. Subsequent investigations have now added weight to the earlier arguments, and a growing number of Catholic interpreters now hold that these chapters are a later addition; not merely because the name of Isaiah is never mentioned but because the historical setting itself is about two centuries after his time: Jerusalem has fallen, the nation is in exile in Babylonia, Cyrus the liberator is already on the horizon.
The oracles in the first part of the book were for the most part threatening, and alluded constantly to events under Ahaz and Hezekiah; the oracles of the second part are consoling and remote from this historical context. The style is still very fine, but is different, more rhetorical, diffuse, repetitive. The thought has also developed, and is more theologically expressed. Monotheism is not merely affirmed, but expounded; the impotence of the false gods is used as an argument for their insignificance. Emphasis is laid on the fathomless wisdom and providence of God. For the first time religious universalism receives clear expression.
    Almighty God could, of course, have conveyed the prophet into the distant future, severing him from his own time, transforming his imagery and cast of thought. This would mean, however, a duplication of the author’s personality and a disregard for his contemporaries—to whom, after all, he was sent—for which the Bible provides no parallel. It is therefore highly probable that ch. 40-55 are the work of an unnamed writer at the end of the exilic period, a disciple of Isaiah and like him a prophet of the first order. The collection is introduced, ch. 40, by a prefatory poem which epitomises this prophet’s mission: 'Be comforted, be comforted, my people’, cf. Si 48:24. The book is known as ‘the Book of the Consolation of Israel’.
     Embedded in this book are four lyrical passages, the 'Songs of the Servant of Yahweh’, 42:1-7; 49:1-9; 50:4-9; 52:13-53:12. They depict a perfect disciple of Yahweh; he proclaims the true faith and suffers to atone for the sins of his people, but God exalts him in the end. In all of this, the Christian tradition sees a foreshadowing of the true Servant of God, of the life and redeeming death of Jesus.
           The last section of the book, ch. 56-66, is composite. Ch. 57 may be pre-exilic but ch. 56, 58, 66 read as if the exiles were home again. Ch. 63-65 are markedly apocalyptic in tone. The ideas and style of ch. 60-62 bring them very close to ch. 40-55, and the whole third section reads very much like a sequel of the second, confirming traditional matter and composed by disciples of the prophet-comforter of the exilic period. This is the final production of the Isaian school extending the ministry of the great prophet of the 8th century. 
      

Orthodoxe Kirche: 09. Mai Katholische Kirche: 06. Juli
Jesaja wurde wohl um 739 in das Prophetenamt berufen. Aus seinen Worten läßt sich entnehmen, daß er der gebildeten Oberschicht Jerusalems entstammte, verheiratet war (auch seine Frau war wohl Prophetin) und mehrere Kinder hatte. Seine Aufzeichnungen wurden von Schülern kommentiert und erweitert. So besteht das Buch Jesaja aus mehreren Teilen, die in einem langen Zeitraum entstanden sind. Von dem Buch Jesaja liegt aber auch die älteste erhaltene Handschrift vor, die in Qumran gefunden wurde und auf das 2. Jahrhundert vor Christus datiert werden kann.
Nach orthodoxer Tradition wurde Jesaja unter König Manasse hingerichtet. Sein Leichnam wurde nahe dem Teich Siloah begraben. Von hier gelangten die Reliquien unter Kaiser Theodosius in die Laurentiuskirche in Blacherna (Konstantinopel). Der Kopf Jesajas wird heute im Chilandarionkloster auf dem Athos bewahrt.
Jesaja ist neben Jeremia, Ezechiel und anderen einer der großen Schriftpropheten des Tanach, der Hebräischen Bibel. Er wirkte im damaligen Südreich Juda zwischen 740 und 701 v. Chr. in der Zeit der Bedrohung durch die antike Großmacht Assyrien.
Er verkündete Juda, Israel und Assur Gottes Gericht, aber auch eine endzeitliche Wende zu universalem Frieden, Gerechtigkeit und Heil. Als erster Prophet Israels verhieß er den Israeliten einen zukünftigen Messias als gerechten Richter und Retter der Armen (vgl. Jesaja-Apokalypse).
Das gleichnamige biblische Buch wurde im Mittelalter in 66 Kapitel unterteilt. Davon weist historisch-kritische Bibelforschung die ersten 39 Kapitel dem Propheten Jesaja zu, Kapitel 40 bis 55 führt sie auf einen spätexilischen Propheten zurück, den sie Deuterojesaja nennt, die restlichen Kapitel auf den nachexilischen Tritojesaja.

Isaias (Isaiah), Prophet (RM) Died c. 681 BC. Isaiah is the great poet and believer of the Old Testament, and one of the four major prophets of the Old Testament. He lived at a time when the people of Israel had settled in Canaan; David and Solomon had formed the Hebrew religion, the temple had been built and Josiah had just ended a long and useful reign.
In 740 BC, the year of Josiah's death, Isaiah had a vision of the Lord sitting on a throne surrounded by seraphim. Each had six wings: "And one cried to another, and said, 'Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord of hosts: the whole earth is full of His glory"--words which today form part of the Mass. The God of Isaiah was a God of Holiness, and the beginnings of his vocation were marked by majesty, piety, and grandeur.
Tradition tells us that Isaiah was sawn in two by order of King Manassas of Judah, and buried under an oak tree. His tomb was still venerated in the 5th century AD (Benedictines).
St. Noyala Virgin martyr. A much revered martyr in Brittany said to have crossed to Brittany on the leaf of a tree, accompanied by her nurse.
She was originally from Britain and was beheaded at Beignan, Brittany Noyala walked from the site of her martyrdom to Pontivy, holding her head in her hands.One rather striking instance of miraculous crossing is that of St Noyala, who is said to have crossed to Brittany on the leaf of a tree, accompanied by her nurse.
A chapel at Pontivy is dedicated to her, and was remarkable in the eighteenth century for several interesting paintings on a gold ground depicting this legend
.
90 St Romulus, Bishop Of Fiesole, Martyr a Roman convert of St Peter
Fæsulis, in Túscia, sancti Romuli, Epíscopi et Mártyris, qui fuit beáti Petri Apóstoli discípulus.  Hic, ab eódem Apóstolo missus ad prædicándum Evangélium, in multis Itáliæ locis Christum annuntiávit; ac tandem, Fæsulas regréssus, ibi, sub Domitiáno Príncipe, martyrio coronátus est cum áliis Sóciis.
    At Fiesole in Tuscany, St. Romulus, bishop and martyr, disciple of the blessed apostle Peter, who commissioned him to preach the Gospel.  After announcing Christ in many parts of Italy, he returned to Fiesole, and was crowned with martyrdom along with other Christians in the reign of Domitian.
Acording to a late tradition, the apostle and first bishop of Fiesole was Romulus, a Roman convert of St Peter, who was martyred under Domitian. Nothing is known of him historically, and his name was added to the Roman Martyrology only in the sixteenth century.

St Romulus is the hero of a rather tiresome romance, of uncertain provenance, but seemingly a work of fiction of not earlier than the eleventh century. In this we are told that a certain citizen of Rome had a daughter named Lucerna who gave her affections and herself to one of her father's slaves, Cyrus. By him a son was born to her, whom she abandoned in a wood, where the baby was adopted and suckled by a wolf. The unnatural sight, was seen by some verderers of the Emperor Nero, who reported it to him and were ordered to capture the child. For three days the hunt pursued the couple without catching them, whereupon the emperor consulted St Peter. Peter provided himself and some fellow Christians with fishing nets and went into the wood, where they were confronted by the child and his foster-mother. Peter adjured the boy, " If you are born of a wolf, go hence; but if of a human woman, come to me". The quarry did not stir, the Christians shot their nets, and the two were caught and safely shut up. To eat they gave them a sheep, which the wolf straightway killed and both fed on its raw flesh. Thereupon St Peter ordered the wolf to be liberated and driven off, and the child was baptized; at the suggestion of Peter's companion Justin it was, with a nice appropriateness, given the name of Romulus. He was civilized and educated first by a noble Roman lady and then by the same justin, and at eight years of age this prodigy was preaching, exorcizing and working miracles. Romulus was later consecrated bishop, he evangelized at Fiesole, Sutri, Nepi, Florence, Pistoia, etc., and after sundry adventures and doing of marvels he was ordered to be put to death by the governor Repertian. On the way to execution Romulus begged a drink of water from a girl at a wayside spring; she, for fear of the soldiers, refused, and the martyr rebuked her and ordained that for the future the spring should still run fresh water for Christians, but to every heathen man drinking of it should be turned to blood. With St Romulus were executed Carissimus, Dulcissimus and Crescentius.
It is a curious fact that despite the wild extravagance of the above legend, there is evidence of the historical existence and early cultus of a St Romulus at Fiesole. The story has been critically studied by A. Cocchi, San Romolo, vescovo di Fiesole; Storia e Leggende (1905). The one element of historical interest is a fragmentary epitaph said to be of the end of the fourth century. But cf. M. C. Cipolla in Rivista storico-critica delle scienze teologiche, vol. i, pp. 422-428
90 St. Romulus and Companions
A group of martyrs put to death by Emperor Domitian. According to tradition, Romulus was named by St. Peter to be bishop of the community of Christians at Fiesole, Italy. He was the subject of many legends during the Middle Ages.
Romulus of Fiesole BM and Companions (RM). According to tradition, Romulus was a Roman converted by Saint Peter who became the first bishop of Fiesole, Italy, and suffered martyrdom there with Carissimus, Dulcissimus, and Crescentius during the reign of Emperor Domitian.
A worthless 11th-century fiction has him the illegitimate son of Lucerna and her father's slave Cyrus. Romulus was abandoned, suckled by a wolf, and captured by Saint Peter when Emperor Nero was unable to do so. Romulus later performed all kinds of extravagant miracles after being instructed by Peter's companion Justin. After evangelizing much of central Italy, Romulus was put to death by the governor, Repertian (Benedictines, Delaney).
In art, Saint Romulus is portrayed as a bishop with an arrow broken above his breast.
He may also be shown at their martyrdom or enthroned among four martyrs (Roeder).
268-270 The Holy Martyrs Marinus, Martha, Audifax, Habakkuk, Cyrenus, Valentinus the Presbyter, Asterius, and many others with them at Rome.
During the reign of the emperor Claudius II (268-270), St Marinus together with his wife Martha and their sons Audifax and Habakkuk journeyed from Persia to Rome, to pray at the graves of the holy Apostles Peter and Paul. During this time fierce persecutions and executions befell the Roman Church. St Marinus and his wife and sons helped Christians locked up in the prisons, and also to request the bodies of executed martyrs. At one of these jails they met a prisoner named Cyrenus and they helped him, since he had endured many torments for faith in Christ.

The persecution spread, and even more Christians were arrested. During this time 260 Christians, among whom was the tribune Vlastus, had been sent under the court sentence to dig ground along the Salerian Way, and were executed by archers. When they learned about this vicious murder, Marinus, his family, and the presbyter John went by night and took the bodies of the martyrs to be buried in the catacombs. They returned later to the prison where St Cyrenus was incarcerated, but did not find him. He had been executed the day before and his body was thrown into the Tiber River. Doing their holy duty, Sts Marinus and Martha and their sons took the body of the holy martyr from the river and committed it to the earth.
The holy workers were among Christians, who continued secretly to perform the divine services under the leadership of the holy Bishop Callistus, and hid them from their pursuers.

In consummation of their great charitable deeds the holy family was deemed worthy to glorify the Lord by martyrdom. The pagans beheaded the courageous confessor Valentinus the Presbyter, and the imperial gardener Asterius who had been converted by him, and the holy ascetics from Persia were arrested and given over to torture. By order of the emperor, Sts Marinus, Audifax and Habakkuk were beheaded in the year 269, and St Martha was drowned in a river.
The relics of the holy saints are in Rome at the Church of St John the Hut-Dweller, a
nd the relics of St Valentinus are in the Church of the holy Martyr Paraskeva.
283-284 The Holy Martyrs Isaurius the Deacon, Innocent, Felix, Hermias, Basil, Peregrinus were Athenians, suffering for Christ in the Macedonian city of Apollonia & two city officials, Rufus and Ruphinus
under the emperor Numerian (283-284). Beheaded with them for believing in Christ were two city officials, Rufus and Ruphinus.

288 St. Tranquillinus Roman martyr. He is affiliated with the legends surrounding St. Sebastian.
Romæ natális sancti Tranquillíni Mártyris, patris sanctórum Marci et Marcelliáni, qui, ad prædicatiónem sancti Sebastiáni Mártyris convérsus ad Christum, a beáto Polycárpo Presbytero baptizátus est, et a sancto Cajo Papa Présbyter ordinátus.  Ipse, die Octavárum Apostolórum, cum ad confessiónem beáti Pauli oráret, ibídem, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, a Pagánis tentus est, et, ab eis lapidátus, martyrium consummávit.
    At Rome, the birthday of St. Tranquillinus, martyr, father of Saints Mark and Marcellianus, who had been converted to Christ by the preaching of the martyr St. Sebastian.  Baptized by the blessed priest Polycarp, he was ordained priest by Pope St. Caius.  As he prayed at the tomb of blessed Paul on the octave of the apostles, he was arrested and stoned to death by the pagans, and thus completed his martyrdom.
Tranquillinus of Rome M (RM). The Roman Saint Tranquillinus is connected with the legend of Saint Sebastian (Benedictines).

300 Holy Martyrs Lucy (Lucia) the Virgin, Rexius, Antoninus, Lucian, Isidore, Dion, Diodorus, Cutonius, Arnosus, Capicus and Satyrus: twenty-four martyrs suffered with Sts Lucy and Rexius
Eódem die sanctæ Lúciæ Mártyris, quæ, natióne Campána, a Ríxio Varo Vicário tenta et ácriter cruciáta, eúndem convértit ad Christum; quibus adjúncti sunt Antonínus, Severínus, Diodórus, Dion, et álii decem et septem, qui in passióne collégæ et in coróna fuére consórtes.
    The same day, St. Lucia, martyr, a native of Campania.  Being arrested and severely tortured by the lieutenant-governor Rictiovarus, she converted him to Christ.  To them were added Antoninus, Severinus, Diodorus, Dion, and seventeen others who shared their sufferings and their crowns.
    St Lucy, a native of the Italian district of Campania, from the time of her youth dedicated herself to God and lived in an austere and chaste manner. While still quite young, she was taken captive and carried off into a foreign land by Rexius, who had the title of Vicarius (a substitute for a dead or absent provincial governor). Rexius at first tried to compel St Lucy to sacrifice to idols but, she remained firm in her faith and was ready to accept torture for the sake of Christ. Rexius was inspired with profound respect for her and even permitted her and her servants the use of a separate house, where they lived in solitude, spending their time in unceasing prayer. Whenever he left to go on military campaigns, Rexius reverently asked for St Lucy's prayers, and he returned victorious.
    After 20 years St Lucy, having learned that the emperor Diocletian had begun a persecution against Christians, entreated Rexius to send her back to Italy. She wanted to glorify the Lord together with her fellow countrymen. Rexius, under the influence of St Lucy, had already accepted Christianity by this time, and even longed for martyrdom. Leaving behind his retinue and family, he went to Rome with St Lucy. The Roman prefect Aelius sentenced them to be beheaded with a sword. After them the holy martyrs Antoninus, Lucian, Isidore, Dion, Diodorus, Cutonis, Arnosus, Capicus and Satyrus were also beheaded. In all, twenty-four martyrs suffered with Sts Lucy and Rexius.
This St Lucy should not be confused with the Virgin Martyr Lucy of Syracuse (December 13).
Martyrdom of the Seven Ascetic Saints in Tounar Mount.
On this day, the seven ascetic saints in Tounar Mount (Tona), were martyred. These were:
Basadi, Cotolus, Ardama, Moses, Esey, Parkalas (Mikalas), and a monk called Cotolus.
   The angel of the Lord had appeared to Sts. Basadi and Cotolus and commanded them to confess the name of the Lord Christ. They rose up straightway to go to the governor. They met the five saints embarking a ship going to the governor to also confess the Lord Christ. They all agreed together on receiving the crown of martyrdom. They went to the governor and confessed the Lord Christ. He tortured them excessively, then hung stones from their necks, and shut them up in prison. The Lord appeared to them, comforted, strengthened, and promised them the kingdom.
   The governor then sent them to Alexandria, where they were tortured severely. He threw them into cauldrons full of sulphur and pitch, and lighted a great fire under them, then he took them out and threw them away.
   The Lord sent His angel who healed them. They came back to the governor and confessed the Lord Christ before him. One hundred thirty persons witnessed that. They confessed the Lord Christ, were martyred, and they received the crown of martyrdom. The Governor intensified the torture on the seven saints, and finally cut off their heads with the sword, and they received the crown of martyrdom.  May their intercession be with us. Amen
.
Martyrdom of Sts. Abba Hour and his Mother Theodora.
On this day also, Sts. Abba Hour and his mother Theodora, were martyred. Abba Hour was a soldier in the army of Antioch. He came to Alexandria, and confessed the Lord Christ before its governor. He commanded that Abba Hour's hands be cut off, that he be tied to the tail of an ox and dragged through the city. Then he was thrown into a pit filled with snakes which did not harm him. During all that torture, he cried out to the Lord Christ, who healed and strengthened him. His mother came to see him and she rejoiced in his strife.
They told the governor about her, and he had her brought to him. He asked her to sacrifice to the idols but when she refused he became enraged at her, and frightened her but she was not afraid of his raging. He commanded to put red-hot iron rods in her sides. When they did so she rejoiced and sang hymns to venerate the Lord for He made her worthy to suffer for His Holy Name. Later on she delivered up her soul and received the crown of martyrdom.
As for St. Abba Hour (Hor), they placed him in a cauldron of boiling oil and tar, and he praised God until he delivered up his soul and received the crown of martyrdom. His brother Abba Bishai (Pishai) was martyred on the 1st day of Nasi (Intercalary days).  May their prayers be with us and Glory be to God forever. Amen
.
303 St Dominica, Virgin And Martyr
In Campánia sanctæ Domínicæ, Vírginis et Mártyris, quæ, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, cum fregísset idóla, hinc ad béstias damnáta, sed ab illis nil læsa, demum, cápite obtruncáta, migrávit ad Dóminum.  Ipsíus vero corpus Tropéæ, in Calábria, summa veneratióne asservátur.
    In Campania, St. Dominica, virgin and martyr, in the time of Emperor Diocletian.  For having destroyed idols, she was condemned to the beasts, but being left uninjured by them, she was beheaded and departed for heaven.  Her body is kept with great veneration at Tropea in Calabria. 
This is the best known of several saints of the name, but her existence, so far as the Western legend is concerned, is more than doubtful. Baronius inserted her name in the Roman Martyrology with this notice: "In Campania, of the holy Dominica, virgin and martyr, who was a breaker of idols under the Emperor Diocletian and was therefore condemned to the beasts; but being not at all hurt by them she was at last beheaded and passed to the Lord. Her body is preserved with great honour at Tropea in Calabria." The lessons of her office tell us further that she was born in the Campagna, suffered on the banks of the Euphrates, and that her body was carried by angels to Tropea. But in that city it is said that she was born, lived and died there-whereas actually she seems to have been unheard of there before the sixteenth century. It is possible that she must be identified with St Cyriaca (Kvp'aK7} = Dominica), a virgin martyr whom the Byzantines venerate on July 7; her acts are worthless, but they state that she suffered by beheading at Nicomedia in Bithynia. What started her cultus at Tropea, or whether there is a confusion of two Dominicas, is not known.
See the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii. What little can be said in defence of the legend will be found in a booklet of Mgr Taccone-Gallucci, Memoria storica di Santa Domenico (1893).
300 St. Dominica Martyr in Campania, Italy, during the reign of co-Emperor Diocletian . She is venerated in the East as having been martyred in Nicomedia. After wild beasts refused to harm her, she was beheaded .
429 St Sisoes After death of St Antony, St Sisoes was one of the most shining lights of the Egyptian deserts; Egyptian by birth; quit the world in his youth he retired to the desert of Skete.
After the death of St Antony, St Sisoes was one of the most shining lights of the Egyptian deserts. He was an Egyptian by birth, and having quitted the world inhis youth he retired to the desert of Skete. The desire of finding a more unfrequented retreat induced him to cross the Nile and hide himself in the mountain where St Antony died. The memory of that great man's virtues wonderfully supported his fervour and encouraged him to persevere. He imagined he saw him and heard the instructions he was wont to deliver to his disciples. He strained every nerve to imitate his most heroic exercises: the austerity of his penance, the rigour of his silence, the ardour of his prayer, so that the reputation of Sisoes spread among the neighbouring solitaries, and some came a great distance to be guided in the ways of perfection, and he was forced to submit his love of silence and retreat to the greater duty of charity.

Saint Sisoes, Schemamonk of the Kiev Caves (XIII), is commemorated in the general service of the Monastic Fathers of Kiev Caves whose relics rest in the Far Caves. He is mentioned together with St Gregory the Faster: "Sisoes the wondrous and Gregory, a name courageous, having by fasting both restrained their passions, humble the fierce lust of our flesh: for unto you is given the grace to help us in our passions" (5th Ode of the Canon).

His zeal against vice was without bitterness; and when his disciples fell into faults he did not affect astonishment or the language of reproach, but helped them to rise again with patience and tenderness. Sisoes in all his advice and instruction held out humility constantly as a most necessary virtue. A recluse saying to him one day, " Father, I always place myself in the presence of God ", he replied. "It would be much better for you to put yourself below every creature, in order to be securely humble." Thus, while he never lost sight of the divine presence, it was ever accompanied with the consciousness of his own worthlessness. To another who complained that he had not yet arrived at the perfection of St Antony, he said, " Ah! if I had but one only of that man's feelings, I should be one flame of divine ?love". On a visit of three solitaries wanting instruction, one of them said, " Father, what shall I do to avoid hell-fire?" Sisoes made no reply. " How shall I ", asked another, "escape the gnashing of teeth and the worm that dieth not? " " What will become of me ? " asked the third, " for every time I think of outer darkness I am ready to die with fear." Then the saint answered: "I confess that these are subjects which I never think about, and as I know that God is merciful, I trust He will have compassion on me. You are happy", he added, " and I envy your virtue. You speak of the torments of Hell, and your fears must be strong guards against sin. It is I should exclaim, What shall become of me? for I am so insensible as never even to reflect on the place of torment. This perhaps is the reason I am guilty of so much sin." He said another time: "I am now thirty years praying daily that my Lord Jesus may preserve me from saying an idle word, and yet I am always relapsing."

Being at length worn out with sickness and old age, Sisoes yielded to his disciple Abraham's advice, and went to reside a while at Clysma, a town near the Red Sea. Here he received a visit from Ammon, abbot of Raithu, who, seeing him miserable at being absent from his retreat, tried to comfort him by pointing out that his present state of health wanted the remedies which could not be had in the desert. "What do you say?" replied the saint. "Was not the ease of mind I enjoyed there everything for my comfort?" and he was not at ease till he returned to his retreat.

The solitaries assisting at his death-bed heard him cry out, "Behold! Abbot Antony, the choir of prophets, and the angels are come to take my soul!" At the same time his countenance shone, and being some time interiorly recollected with God, he cried out anew, "Behold! our Lord comes for me!" And so he died, about the year 429, after a retreat of at least sixty-two years in St Antony's Mount. His feast is observed in the Byzantine calendar.

This saint must not be confused with another SISOES, surnamed the Theban, who lived in the same age at Calamon, in the territory of Arsinoe. It is related of him that a certain recluse, having received some offence, went to tell him that he must be avenged. The holy old man recommended him to leave his revenge to God, to pardon his brother, and forget the injury. But seeing that his advice had no weight, "At least", said he, "let us both join in speaking to God". Then, standing up, he prayed thus aloud: "0 Lord, we no longer want your care of our interests or your protection, since this monk maintains that we can and ought to be our own avengers."
What we know of St Sisoes comes to us mainly through the Apophthegmata Patrum, a collection of utterances of the fathers of the desert, to which of late years much attention has been devoted. See particularly W. Bousset, Apophthegmata; Studien zur Geschichte des ältesten Mônchtums (1923), with the review of this in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xlii (1924), pp. 430-435; Wilmart in Revue Bénédictine, vol. xxxiv (1922), pp. 185-198. The Greek text is in Migne, PG., vol. lxv, cc. 71-440. The Latin, differently arranged, is in Migne, PL., vol. lxxiii, cc. 855-1022 .

Saint Sisoes the Great a solitary monk, pursuing asceticism in the Egyptian desert in a cave sanctified by the prayerful labors of his predecessor, St Anthony the Great (January 17).
For his sixty years of labor in the desert, St Sisoes attained to sublime spiritual purity and he was granted the gift of wonderworking, so that by his prayers he once restored a dead child back to life.
Extremely strict with himself, Abba Sisoes was very merciful and compassionate to others, and he received everyone with love. To those who visited him, the saint first of all always taught humility. When one of the monks asked how he might attain to a constant remembrance of God, St Sisoes remarked, "That is no great thing, my son, but it is a great thing to regard yourself as inferior to everyone else. This leads to the acquisition of humility." Asked by the monks whether one year is sufficient for repentance if a brother sins, Abba Sisoes said, "I trust in the mercy of God that if such a man repents with all his heart, then God will accept his repentance in three days."
When St Sisoes lay upon his deathbed, the disciples surrounding the Elder saw that his face shone like the sun.

They asked the dying man what he saw. Abba Sisoes replied that he saw St Anthony, the prophets, and the apostles. His face increased in brightness, and he spoke with someone. The monks asked, "With whom are you speaking, Father?" He said that angels had come for his soul, and he was entreating them to give him a little more time for repentance. The monks said, "You have no need for repentance, Father" St Sisoes said with great humility, "I do not think that I have even begun to repent."
After these words the face of the holy abba shone so brightly that the brethren were not able to look upon him. St Sisoes told them that he saw the Lord Himself.
Then there was a flash like lightning, and a fragrant odor, and Abba Sisoes departed to the Heavenly Kingdom.
518 St. Monennaa Irish abbess also called Darerca. resided at Sliabh Cuillin in Ireland noted for her austerities.
ST MODWENNA, VIRGIN  (SEVENTH CENTURY?)

THE St Modwenna, or Monenna, formerly venerated at Burton-on-Trent and elsewhere, may have lived in the middle of the seventh century and been a recluse on an islet called Andresey in the Trent.
       But not only are other and conflicting things alleged of her, but her legend has been conflated with that of the Irish St Darerca, or Moninne, said to have been the first abbess of Killeavy, near Newry, and to have died in 517; and she has perhaps been confused with others as well. Capgrave and others speak of St Modwenna as having charge of St Edith of Polesworth, which were it true would throw no useful light on either saint.
       The most valuable information we possess about St Moninne seems to be the entry in the Félire of Oengus:  "Moninne of the mountain of Cuilenn was a fair pillar; she gained a triumph, a hostage of purity, a kinswoman of great Mary ", with the gloss.

It would seem hopeless to unravel the tangle.  Baring-Gould and Fisher (LBS., vol. iii, pp. 490-497, and cf. i, pp. 286-287) only seem to make confusion worse confounded.  Two Latin lives are printed in the Acta Sanctorun, under July 6-the one is anonymous, from the Codex Salmanticensis, the other attributed to Conchubranus. The latter has been again edited by M. Esposito in the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, vol. xxxviii (1910), pp. 202-251.  There is a later vita in manuscript by Geoffrey of Burton. For those who can read Anglo-Norman texts "le romanz de la vie seinte Modwenne noneyne", ed. A. T. Baker and A. Bell (St Modwenna; 1947), will be of interest.  See also KSS., pp. 404-407; and for Moninne, J. Ryan, Irish Monasticism (1931), p. 136 .
St. Modwenna The St. Modwenna, or Monenna, formally venerated at Burton-on-Trent and elsewhere, may have lived in the middle of the seventh century and been a recluse on an islet called Andresey in the Trent. But not only are other and conflicting things alleged of her, but her legend has been confused with that of the Irish saint Darerca, or Moninne, said to have been the first abbess of Killeavy, near Nerwy and to have died in 517; and she has perhaps been confused with others as well. Capgrave and others speak of St. Modwenna as having charge of St. Edith of Polesworth, which were it true would throw no useful light on either saint. The most valuable information we possess about St. Moninne seems to be the entry in the Felire of Oengus: "Moninne of the mountain of Cuilenn was a fair pillar; she gained a triumph, a hostage of purity, a kinswoman of great Mary", with the gloss.
St. Merryn hermitess on the island of Andresey in the Trent River in England
Modwenna is believed to have been a hermitess on the island of Andresey in the Trent River in England and also known as Monenna. The facts of her life are hopelessly confused with those of other saints, among them, the Irish Darerea (also known as Moninna and is said to be the first Abbess of Killeavy, who died about 517), Modwenna (St. Hilda's successor as Abbess of Whitby, who died about 695), and Modwenna (Abbess of Polesworth, Warwickshire, who died about 900). The name is also spelled Moninne and Merryn
.
575 St. Goar Priest of Aquitaine, France, honored by Charlemagne. A parish priest, Goar became a hermit at Oberwesel, Germany, on the Rhine River.
In pago Trevirénsi sancti Góaris, Presbyteri et Confessóris.    In the vicinity of Treves, St. Goar, priest and confessor.
The local bishop, Rusticus of Trier, accused him falsely of sorcery, but Goar was cleared of the charge by King Sigebert I of Austrasia in Metz. Rusticus was deposed because of this attack and because he lived luxuriously. Goar was offered Rusticus’ see but returned to his hermitage. Emperor Charlemagne later erected a church over St. Goar’s former hermitage.

He heard the call of solitude and eventually settled down on the banks of the Rhine near the small town of Oberwesel. Here he lived for years in quietness till it happened to him as it has happened to so many other solitaries-he was" discovered" and people came to consult him. The peasants of the neighbourhood were particularly fond of him: they listened to his preaching, wondered at his way of life, marvelled at his holiness and patience, and then went away and attributed all sorts of miracles to him. Probably no notice would have been taken had he not been a priest, but some busybody reported his irregular ministry to the bishop of Trier, and evil-disposed persons added the information that the holy hermit was a humbug, who over-ate himself, got drunk, and deceived the people. The bishop, Rusticus, thereupon sent for Gear, who obediently came and was accused not only of hypocrisy but of sorcery and other crimes. How he cleared himself is not known: according to the legend God Himself interfered and caused a three-day-old child not only to vindicate the hermit but also to convict the bishop of most irregular living. There was at once an outcry, and Sigebert I, King of Austrasia, hearing what had happened, sent for St Goar to come to him at Metz. The hermit's modesty and innocence greatly impressed the king, and having deposed the unworthy Rusticus, he wished to put him in his place. But the idea of being a bishop so upset Goar that he was taken ill; he asked for time to think it over, and went back to his cell, where death overtook him before the king succeeded in getting his acceptance. His home became a place of pilgrimage, and is now marked by a small town which bears his name and has a church dedicated in his honour.
The curious legend of St Goar, in the form in which we have it, is probably older than 768, but it cannot be regarded as a historical document. There can have been no Rusticus, bishop of Trier, in the time of Childebert and Sigebert I. The primitive text, in very barbarous Latin, has been critically edited by B. Krusch in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. iv, pp. 402-423; a more readable recension is in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii, See also J. Depoin, La legende de S. Goar in the Revue des Etudes historiques, vol. lxxv (1909), pp. 369-385 .
699 St Sexburga, Abbess Of Ely, Widow daughter of Anna, King of the East Angles; sister of SS. Etheldreda, Ethelburga and Withburga, and half-sister of St Sethrida
She was given in marriage to Erconbert, King of Kent, a prince of excellent dispositions which she contributed for twenty-four years to improve by her counsels and example. Her virtue commanded the reverence, and her humility and devotion raised the admiration, of her subjects; and her goodness and charity gained her the love of all. She became the mother of two princes and of two saints, Ercongota and Ermenilda. Because she had a longing to consecrate herself wholly to God in religious retirement, and that others might attend divine service without impediment, she began in her husband's lifetime to found a monastery at Minster in the isle of Sheppey, which she finished after his death in 664. Here she assembled seventy-four nuns, and herself joined them. After some years she appointed her daughter Ermenilda to rule the house, and, being desirous to live in greater obscurity and to be more at liberty to employ all her thoughts on Heaven, she left Kent and went to the abbey of Ely, where she was chosen to succeed her sister St Etheldreda in the government of that house. Sixteen years after she caused the body of that saint to be taken up, when it was found incorrupt, and was enshrined in a white marble coffin found at Cambridge. Sexburga herself passed to bliss in a good old age, on July 6, at the end of the seventh century. Her monastery of Minsterin-Sheppey was destroyed by the Danes, but rebuilt in 1130, and consecrated in honour of our Lady and St Sexburga, continuing to be occupied by Benedictine nuns until the dissolution.   She was also honoured in Sweden.
See Bede's Ecclesiastical History, bk iii, cap. 8 and iv, 19.  A Latin life of Sexburga described by Hardy, Catalogue of British History (vol. i, pp. 361-362), seems to be of no historical value apart from its quotation from Bede.  There is some mention of Sexburga in certain Anglo-Saxon fragments printed by Cockayne in vol. iii of his Leechdoms.  See also the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii, and Stanton's Menology, p. 313.
1070 St  Godeleva, Martyr The scene of the murder of Godeleva soon had a reputation for miracles
According to the narrative written by a contemporary priest, Drogo, the story of Godeleva is an example of that wanton persecution and cruelty shown towards an innocent victim which is as shocking to reasonable, not to say Christian, human beings as it is unexplainable; no adequate motive is given or even suggested for the behaviour of the offender at first, though afterwards his desire to get rid of his wife is clear enough.
Godeleva was born at Londefort-lez-Boulogne about 1049, of noble parentage. She grew up beautiful both in person and character, and was particularly beloved by the poor, to whose welfare she constantly devoted herself. At age eighteen she married a Flemish lord, Bertulf of Ghistelles, who conducted his bride home, where she was received with insults by his mother; apparently she had had other plans for her son, and was furious that he had disregarded them in favour of this girl from the Boulonnais.
Bertulf, the days of the wedding festivities yet unfinished, deserted Godeleva, leaving her in charge of his mother, who was not content with petty persecutions, but treated her who should have been mistress of the house with fanatic brutality. She at length contrived to escape and returned to her parents, who took the case to the count of Flanders and the bishop of Tournai. It was ruled that Bertulf should receive back his wite, and henceforward treat her properly, which he promised to do.
   But once she was back at Ghistelles, Bertulf was first indifferent and then again openly violent to her, and to get rid of her he resolved on more direct action. First of all he shammed penitence and a desire for reconciliation, with the object both of averting suspicion from himself and to enable him the more easily to entrap the girl.   Then at the appointed time Godeleva was induced by a trick to go out of the castle by a back-door at night; she was seized by two of Bertulf's servants and smothered by having her head held down in a pond, with a thong drawn tight round her neck.   When she was dead, the ruffians replaced her body in bed, meaning it to be supposed she had died a natural death.  It was obvious that she had not, but Bertulf had absented himself in Bruges at the time of the crime and Godeleva's parents were unable to bring it home to him. He at once married again, but his wickedness haunted him, and he ended his days in a monastery at Bergues- St-Winoc.
   The scene of the murder of Godeleva soon had a reputation for miracles, and the sudden recovery of sight by Bertulf's blind daughter by his second wife was attributed to her intercession.   In 1084 her body was dug up and enshrined in the church, which is still a place of pilgrimage, the people drinking the water of her well and appropriately invoking her intercession against sore throats.
    It is difficult to see why (except in popular estimation) Godeleva is venerated as a martyr: she did not endure death for any article of the faith or for the preservation of any Christian virtue or for any other act of virtue relating to God-unless indeed her supernatural patience finally provoked her husband to his wicked violence.
The Bollandists in the Acts Sanctorum (July, vol. ii) have treated St Godeleva at great length, printing not only the life by Drogo, but also another, more diffuse, narrative of her history. A copy of the formal verification of the saint's relics made when they were elevated in 1084, shortly after her death, has been preserved, and its authenticity has been established by the tattered fragments of a later deed which recites it.  This was found when the shrine was examined in 1907.  See the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xliv (1926), pp. 102-137, for an earlier text of the Drogo vita, ed. by Father Coens, and vol. lxii (1944), pp. 292-295; and also the charming little book of M. English, Les quatre couronnes de Ste Godelieve de Gistel (1953) .
1433 Johannes Hus Evangelische Kirche: 6. Juli 1990 bedauerte Papst Johannes Paul II. den grausamen Tod von Johannes Hus.
Hus wurde um 1370 in Tschechien geboren. Er war ein Anhänger Wyclifs und predigte unerschrocken das Evangelium. Er fand breite Unterstützung in der Bevölkerung und bei König Wenzel. Dadurch verbanden sich das Streben nach einer Reform der Kirche mit dem starken tschechischen Nationalbewußtsein. Als der Papst durch einen großen Ablaß Geld für einen Kriegszug des Vatikans einholen wollte, erhob Hus seine Stimme gegen den Ablaß. In seiner Schrift 'De ecclesia' kündigte er der Kirche den Gehorsam. Der Papst verhängte den Bann über ihn, aber er fand weiter breite Unterstützung in der Bevölkerung und übte deshalb sein Amt an der Bethlehemskirche in Prag auch nach der Verhängung des Bannes aus. Erst als der Bann über die ganze Stadt ausgesprochen wurde, verließ Hus Prag und zog sich nach Südböhmen zurück. Hier übersetzte er die Bibel in die Volkssprache. Seine Anhänger feierten indessen das Abendmahl in beiderlei Gestalt. Der deutsche König Siegmund, designierter Erbe Böhmens, wollte die Parteien versöhnen. Er drang deshalb in Hus, zum Konstanzer Konzil zu reisen und sicherte ihm sicheres Geleit zu. Hus wurde dort sofort verhaftet. Als Siegmund seine Freilassung forderte, drohten die Konzilsteilnehmer mit der Abreise. Der König gab nach, um das Konzil zu retten. Hus weigerte sich zu widerrufen und wurde daraufhin am 6.7.1415 verbrannt. 1420 begannen die Anhänger von Hus die Hussitenkriege. 1433 konnten sie auf dem Konzil von Basel einen Teilerfolg erringen: ihnen wurde die Komminikation in beiderlei Gestalt zugestanden. Nach dem Beginn der Reformation wechselten einige Hussiten zu den Lutheranern, andere bildeten die Böhmische Brüderkirche, die später in der Herrnhuter Gemeine aufging. 1990 bedauerte Papst Johannes Paul II. den grausamen Tod von Johannes Hus
.
1535 Thomas More mit Kardinal John Fisher
Londíni, in Anglia, sancti Thomæ More, regni Cancellárii, qui, pro fide cathólica ac beáti Petri primátu, jubénte Henríco Octávo Rege, decollátus est.
    At London in England, on Tower Hill, St. Thomas More, chancellor of the entire realm, who was beheaded by order of King Henry VIII for the defence of the Catholic faith and the primacy of blessed Peter.
Katholische Kirche: 22. Juni Anglikanische Kirche: 6. Juli
Thomas More (oder latinisiert Morus) wurde am 7.2.1478 in London geboren. Er studierte in Oxford zunächst Geisteswissenschaften, dann Rechtswisenschaften. Er wurde ein angesehner Jurist und bekannter Humanist. Er war verheiratet und lebte mit seiner Ehefrau und vier Kindern in Chelsea. 1504 wurde er in das Parlameent gewählt. Nachdm er sich wegen seines Freimuts das Mißfallen des Königs Heinrich VII. zugezogen hatte, zog er sich aus dem öffentlichen Leben zurück. Est nach dem Tod des Königs nahm er wieder öffentliche Äter wahr. Heinrich VIII. adelte ihn 1514 und ernannte ihn 1529 zum Lordkanzler. Nachdem More den König nicht von seinen kirchenfeindlichen Tendenzen abbringen konnte, legte er 1532 sein Amt nieder und zog sich zurück. Der König und Anna Boleyn versuchten seitdem, ihn zu beseitigen. Als More sich 1534 weigerte, den Suprematseid zu leisten, wurde er verhaftet und in einem Schauprozess wegen Hochverrats zum Tode verurteilt. More wurde am 6.7.1535 enthauptet. Die römisch-katholische Kirche begeht sein Gedächtnis gemeinsam mit Kardinal John Fisher am 22. Juni
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1585 Bl. Thomas Alfield English martyr native of Gloucester educated at Eton and Cambridge; raised as an Anglican converted to Catholicism and left England to study for the priesthood at Douai and Reims, France, receiving ordination in 1581
Returning to England, he was soon arrested while handing out copies of the polemic True and Modest Defence by Dr. Allen. Condemned, he was hanged at Tybum. Thomas was beatified in 1929.
THOMAS ALFIELD (his name is variously spelt) was born in Gloucester and educated at Eton and King's College, Cambridge.
    He was brought up a Protestant, and on becoming a Catholic went to Douay in 1576 to study for the priesthood. He was  ordained at Rheims in 1581 and sent on the English mission, where he was associated with Bd Edmund Campion.  By spring of 1582 he was already in the  Tower of London, and here he endured torture without failing; later for a  short time he succumbed to temptation and outwardly conformed to the Established Church.  After his release he withdrew to Rheims, where he made amends,  and then came back to England.
In the early part of 1584 Alfield was concerned in a curious episode.
He was  employed by John Davys, the navigator who explored for the NorthWest Passage, to communicate an offer of his (Davys's) services to the court of Spain-a proposal  that may be assumed not to have been seriously meant.  Later in the year, with  the help of Thomas Webley, also of Gloucester, and a dyer by trade, Alfield was busy circulating copies of Dr Allen's True and modest Defence, written in answer to Execution of Justice, in which Burghley had sought to prove that Catholics were being proceeded against in England not for their religion but for treason. This soon landed him in the Tower again, and both he and Webley were tortured, with the object of making them disclose to whom they had distributed the book. They were both tried and condemned for this offence, and were hanged at Tyburn on July 6, 1585, after being offered their freedom if they would acknowledge the queen's ecclesiastical leadership. A reprieve had in fact been issued for Bd Thomas-it is not known why-but it arrived too late. A third man who had been corrcerned with them, one Crabbe, purchased his life by apostasy; Alfield's brother, Robert, also became a renegade.
Bd Thomas Alfield was beatified in 1929; the Venerable Thomas Webley's cause is still under consideration. See MMP., pp. 105-106; Burton and PolIen, LEM.; and Catholic Record Society's Publications, vol. v.
1599-1624 Virgin Juliana, Princess of Olshansk Uncovering of the Relics of; Many miracles have been worked by St Juliana, and she helps those who venerate her holy relics with piety and faith
St Juliana lived during the first quarter of the sixteenth century. Her father, Prince Yurii Dubrovitsky-Olshansky, was one of the benefactors of the Kiev Caves Lavra. The God-pleasing virgin died at the age of sixteen. Her body, which was buried at the Kiev Caves Lavra near the great church, was found incorrupt during the time of Archimandrite Elisha Pletenets (1599-1624).
The holy relics were in a fire at the great church in the year 1718, and were put into a reliquary and placed in the church of the Near Caves.
St Juliana appeared to Archimandrite Peter Moghila (afterwards Metropolitan of Kiev) in a dream, reproaching him for the carelessness and lack of respect shown to her relics. He ordered a new reliquary to be made, for which a suitable covering was made by pious nuns. On the reliquary was the inscription: "By the will of the Creator of heaven and earth Juliana, patroness and great intercessor to Heaven, rests here for all time. Here are the bones ... healing against all passions ... You adorn Paradise, Juliana, like a beautiful flower ..."
Many miracles have been worked by St Juliana, and she helps those who venerate her holy relics with piety and faith. She is also commemorated on October 10 with the seven saints of Volhynia
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1794 Blessed Mary Rose entered Benedictine convent of Caderousse 1762 French Revolution martyr, OSB M (AC)
Born at Sérignan (near Orange), in 1741; beatified in 1925. Baptized Susanne-Agatha de Loye, she took the name Mary Rose when she entered the Benedictine convent of Caderousse in 1762. At the outbreak of the French Revolution, she was expelled from the convent and, in May 1794, she was arrested and guillotined, the first of a band of 31 martyrs put to death at Orange (Benedictines).
Orange, 32 Blessed Martyrs of (AC) Died 1794; beatified in 1925. Thirty-two nuns were imprisoned during the French Revolution at Orange for several months before their execution by guillotine. They included one Benedictine, two Cistercians, 13 members of the Institute of Perpetual Adoration, and 16 Ursulines (Benedictines)
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1902 St. Maria Goretti Devotion to the young martyr grew, miracles were worked, and in less than half a century she was canonized
Neptúni, in Látio, sanctæ Maríæ Gorétti, piíssimæ adolescéntis, in defendénda virginitáte crudelíssime necátæ, quam Pius Papa Duodécimus sanctárum Mártyrum catálogo solémniter accénsuit.
    At Nettuno in Lazio, St. Maria Goretti, a most devout young girl, who was savagely murdered for the defence of  her virginity, and whom Pope Pius XII solemnly added to the catalogue of holy martyrs.
One of the largest crowds ever assembled for a canonization—250,000—symbolized the reaction of millions touched by the simple story of Maria Goretti.
Born in 1890, the daughter of a poor Italian tenant farmer, had no chance to go to school, never learned to read or write. When she made her First Communion not long before her death at age 12, she was one of the larger and somewhat backward members of the class.
On a hot afternoon in July, Maria was sitting at the top of the stairs of her house, mending a shirt. She was not quite 12 years old, but physically mature. A cart stopped outside, and a neighbor, Alessandro, 18 years old, ran up the stairs. He seized her and pulled her into a bedroom. She struggled and tried to call for help, gasping that she would be killed rather than submit. “No, God does not wish it. It is a sin. You would go to hell for it.” Alessandro began striking at her blindly with a long dagger.
She was taken to a hospital. Her last hours were marked by the usual simple compassion of the good—concern about where her mother would sleep, forgiveness of her murderer (she had been in fear of him, but did not say anything lest she cause trouble to his family) and her devout welcoming of Viaticum. She died about 24 hours after the attack.
Her murderer was sentenced to 30 years in prison. For a long time he was unrepentant and surly. One night he had a dream or vision of Maria, gathering flowers and offering them to him. His life changed. When he was released after 27 years, his first act was to go to beg the forgiveness of Maria’s mother.
Devotion to the young martyr grew, miracles were worked, and in less than half a century she was canonized. At her beatification in 1947, her mother (then 82), two sisters and a brother appeared with Pope Pius XII on the balcony of St. Peter’s. Three years later, at her canonization, a 66-year-old Alessandro Serenelli knelt among the quarter-million people and cried tears of joy.
Comment:  Maria may have had trouble with catechism, but she had no trouble with faith. God's will was holiness, decency, respect for one's body, absolute obedience, total trust. In a complex world, her faith was simple: It is a privilege to be loved by God, and to love him—at any cost. As the virtue of chastity dies the death of a thousand qualifications, she is a breath of sweet fresh air. Quote:  "Even if she had not been a martyr, she would still have been a saint, so holy was her everyday life" (Cardinal Salotti).
MARY GORETT! was born in 1890 at Corinaldo, a village some thirty miles from Ancona, the daughter of a farm-labourer, Luigi Goretti, and his wife Assunta Carlini. They had five other children, and in 1896 the family moved to Colle Gianturco, near Galiano, and later to Ferriere di Conca, not far from Nettuno in the Roman Campagna. Almost at once after settling down here, Luigi Goretti was stricken with malaria and died. His widow had to take up his work as best she could, but it was a hard struggle and every small coin and bit of food had to be looked at twice. Of all the children none was more cheerful and encouraging to her mother than Mary, commonly called Marietta .
On a hot afternoon in July 1902 Mary was sitting at the top of the stairs in the cottage, mending a shirt. She was not yet quite twelve years old, and it must be remembered that in Italy girls mature earlier than in more northern countries. Presently a cart stopped outside, and a neighbour, a young man of eighteen named Alexander, ran up the stairs. He beckoned Mary into an adjoining bedroom; but this sort of thing had happened before and she refused to go. Alexander seized hold of her, pulled her in, and shut the door.
Mary struggled and tried to call for help, but she was being half-strangled and could only protest hoarsely, gasping that she would be killed rather than submit. Whereupon Alexander half pulled her dress from her body and began striking at her blindly with a long dagger. She sank to the floor, crying out that she was being killed: Alexander plunged the dagger into her back, and ran away.
An ambulance fetched Mary to hospital, where it was seen at once that she could not possibly live. Her last hours were most touching-her concern for where her mother was going to sleep, her forgiveness of her murderer (and she now disclosed that she had long been going in fear of him, but did not like to say anything lest she cause trouble with his family), her childlike welcoming of the holy viaticum. Some twenty-four hours after the assault, Mary Goretti died. Her mother, the parish priest of Nettuno, a Spanish noblewoman and two nuns, had watched by her bed all night.
Alexander was sentenced to thirty years' penal servitude. For long he was surly, brutal and unrepentant. Then one night he had a dream or vision in which Mary Goretti appeared gathering flowers and offering them to him. From then on he was a changed man, and so exemplary a prisoner that at the end of 27 years he was released. His first act when free was to visit Mary's mother to beg her forgiveness.
Meanwhile the memory of his victim had become more and more revered.
The sweetness and strength of her life before her untimely end was recalled, people prayed for her intercession in Heaven, answers, even miracles, were attributed to that intercession, and in response to a widespread wish the cause of her beatification was introduced. On April 27, 1947, Mary Goretti was declared blessed by Pope Pius XII. When he afterwards appeared on the balcony of St Peter's he was accompanied by Mary's mother, Assunta Goretti, then eighty-two years old, together with two of Mary's sisters and a brother. Pilgrims came from all over Italy and the pope addressed them, presenting Bd Mary as a new St Agnes and calling down woe on the corrupters of chastity in press and theatre and cinema and fashion-studios "in our day", he said, "women have been thrown even into military service-with grave consequences."
Three years later the same pope canonized Mary Goretti, in the piazza of St Peter's,
before the biggest crowd ever assembled for a canonization. Her murderer was still alive.

A number of "popular" canonizations of early times notwithstanding, a violent and unjust death alone is not sufficient to constitute martyrdom. (The common idea that St Joan of Arc, for example, was a martyr is mistaken.) But St Mary Goretti was killed in defence of a Christian virtue, and so was every bit as much a martyr as if she had died for the Christian faith.  It was Cardinal Salotti's opinion that, "Even had she not been a martyr she would still have been a saint, so holy was her everyday life".
The case of Mary Goretti seems to be unique in hagiology, end at the time of the beatification her short and moving story was noticed in the newspaper press of the world, from the London Times downwards. Among the published accounts of her in English are those of Mother C. E. Maguire, Father J. Carr and Marie C. Buehrle. In L'art sacre, May-June 1951, p. 14, are printed some pictures illustrating the iconographical evolution of the saint. There is a good essay by Eric B. Strauss in Saints and Ourselves (1953)


Mary's Divine Motherhood
  Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR July
Lapsed Christians.
That our brothers and sisters who have strayed from the faith, through our prayer and witness to the Gospel, may rediscover the merciful closeness of the Lord and the beauty of the Christian life.

ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.
St. Maria Goretti, Virgin, Martyr (Optional Memorial)

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With