Mary Mother of GOD
 Monday  Saint of the Day July 13   Tértio Idus Júlii  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
Gabriel
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! 
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs,
 confessors, and holy virgins.

Archangel Gabriel The Synaxis of the celebrated on the day after the Annunciation, and a second time on July 13

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.


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Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary 

Never Forget to Say Your Rosary Everyday Our Lady of All Graces
In travelling the countryside or while you are crossing the street, driving your car, taking the subway, bedridden in the hospital or stuck in prison, don't forget to say your Rosary every day. Let the beads slip between your fingers; they also slip between the fingers of the Holy Father at the Vatican, those of a grandmother in Alaska, a child on a hill in Rwanda, a football player on a field in Rio, a Carthusian monk in his cell, a Carmelite in her cloister, or young evangelists on a mission ...
The Rosary is the certainly the prayer of the poor and the small, the sick and the suffering, par excellence. Yes, always and everywhere; not only in space, but also in time. The latitudes of the planet and longitudes of history crisscross.
The Hail Mary has moistened the lips of millions of all ages, races and nations.
How many children learned it as their first prayer? How many of the dying whispered it as their ultimate testament?
The Hail Mary is a synthesis of two first names: Mary and Jesus.  Father Daniel Ange

St. Silas One of Church of Jerusalem leaders; sent with Paul and Barnabas to Antioch to communicate decisions of the Council of Jerusalem to the Gentile community in Syria
Saint Julian, Bishop of Cenomanis, elevated to bishop by Apostle Peter; sent to preach Gospel in Gaul (Cenomanis-region of River Po) great wonders accompanied preaching of the saint  healing bodily infirmities-also the souls, blind, lame and To end of his days he preached about Christ completely eradicating idolatry Cenomanis land
St. Aoulimpas, the Apostle martyrdom one of the seventy apostles ministered to the disciples; carried epistles of St. Peter to the Gentiles; took Saint Peters body off the cross, shroud him, took him to the house of the believers; martyred just like Peter {Coptic}


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Our Lady of the Mystical Rose   Our Lady of the Road
Our Lady of the Road, Teach us not to rush to external roads And to sometimes wait in silence for
“The One who must come, the One who cannot not come.”

Our Lady of the Road I entrust myself to you, after having heard in silence the call of
“The One who must come, the One who cannot not come.”

Our Lady of the Road When we must make a choice, When we must journey outwards in order to fulfill our call,
Pray for us. 
Patrice Garczinski (1925-1950)

Archangel Gabriel The Synaxis of the celebrated on the day after the Annunciation, and a second time on July 13
St. Silas One of Church of Jerusalem leaders; sent with Paul and Barnabas to Antioch to communicate decisions of the Council of Jerusalem to the Gentile community in Syria
Saint Julian, Bishop of Cenomanis, elevated to bishop by Apostle Peter; sent to preach Gospel in Gaul (Cenomanis-region of River Po) great wonders accompanied preaching of the saint  healing bodily infirmities-also the souls, blind, lame and To end of his days he preached about Christ completely eradicating idolatry Cenomanis land
St. Aoulimpas, the Apostle martyrdom one of the seventy apostles ministered to the disciples; carried epistles of St. Peter to the Gentiles; took Saint Peters body off the cross, shroud him, took him to the house of the believers; martyred just like Peter {Coptic}
91 Romæ sancti Anacléti, Papæ et Mártyris, qui, post sanctum Cleméntem Ecclésiam Dei regens, eam glorióso martyrio decorávit.
195 St. Serapion Martyr. He was put to death in Macedonia presented himself before the judge completely healed by the Lord Jesus Christ
  251 St. Myrope Martyr of the island of Chios, in Greece, She recovered the body of St. Isidore after his martyrdom
  258 Marcian The Holy Martyr a native of Lyceian Iconium, while still at a youthful age converted many to Christ by his fiery preaching; gave thanks to God for his fate
St. Theodosia mother of St. Proconius Martyrdom of St. Theodosia mother of St. Proconius and her companions {Coptic}
5th v. St. Dogfan Welsh martyr, descended from chieftain Brychan of Brecknock. He was slain by pagan invaders at Dyfed, Wales. A church there honors his memory.
"It is Truly Meet" Icon of the Mother of God is in the high place of the altar of the cathedral church of the Karyes monastery on Mount Athos.
5th v. SS. MAURA AND BRIGID solitaries at Ariacum (now Sainte-Maure), and had died in the fifth century, not long after St Martin. The relics were found, the chapel built, and a cultus begun in Touraine which still exists their feast is kept at Tours on January 28.
505 ST EUGENIUS, BISHOP OF CARTHAGE
“If the good shepherd must lay down his life for his sheep, can it be excusable for me to trouble about the passing needs of my body?”
  700 St Mildred, Abbess Of Minster-In-Thanet, Virgin
  750  St. Turiaf Bishop of Dol, in Brittany, France. successor of St. Samson in that see and is also called Turiav
794  Saint Stephen Sabbaites, nephew of St John of Damascus entered St Sava Lavra at 10 spent his life there; given gifts of wonderworking and clairvoyance; healed the sick, cast out devils
Arno
von Würzburg war Bischof von 855 bis 892
1024 St. Henry son of Duke of Bavaria, and Gisella, daughter of Conrad, King of Burgundy; made numerous pious foundations, gave liberally to pious institutions and built the Cathedral of Bamberg
1033 Kunigunde Nachfolgers 1025 zog sie sich in das von ihr 1017 gestiftete Kloster Kaufungen (bei Kassel) zurück und wurde Benediktinerin

1298 BD JAMES OF VORAGINE, ARCHBISHOP OF GENOA; author of Legenda Sanctorum, now everywhere known as Legenda Aurea, "The Golden Legend"
1610 St. Francis Solano Franciscan Observance priest; survived Granada plague of 1583; in Peru refused to leave shipwrecked slaves baptized them most survived; 20 years untiring ministry among Indians and Spanish colonists; he had "gift of tongues", called "wonder-worker of the New World for miracles"; died at moment of consecration, saying with last breath, "Glory be to God"
1616 Bl. Thomas Tunstal English martyr priesthood at Douai; six years in confinement  joined Benedictines there until finally murdered
1620 Monk Antonii of Leokhovo Transfer of the Relics of . The account about the saint is located under 17 October
1920 St. Teresa de los Andes Discalced Carmelite mystic; 1st Chilean beatified or canonized; model for young people
Mary the Mother of God


Archangel Gabriel The Synaxis of the celebrated on the day after the Annunciation, and a second time on July 13
It was instituted in the ninth century, perhaps to celebrate the dedication of a church at Constantinople. Originally, the Feast was observed on October 16 (Juan Mateos, LE TYPIKON DE LA GRANDE EGLISE).  An account of the Holy Archangel Gabriel is found under March 26 and November 8.
Erzengel Gabriel Orthodoxe Kirche:  Synaxis des Erzengels Gabriel -13. Juli (und 26. März ) Synaxis aller Engel - 8. November 
Katholische, Anglikanische und Evangelische Kirche:  Erzengel Michael und alle Engel - 29. September

Michael und Gabriel Am Tage nach der Verkündigung der Geburt des Herrn an Maria gedenkt die orthodoxe Kirche des Verkünders, des Erzengels Gabriel.(hebr.: starker Gott). In der Bibel wird Gabriel außerdem als Ausleger der Gesichte Daniels genannt (Dan. 8, 16 f./9, 21). Nach orthodoxer Tradition hat Gabriel Mose bei der Abfassung des Pentateuch inspiriert; er verkündete Anna die Geburt Mariens und Zacharias die Geburt des Johannes. Auch Josef ist Gabriel zweimal erschienen (Matth. 1, 20/2, 13). Er stärkte Jesus im Garten Genezareth und überbrachte den Frauen die Botschaft von der Auferstehung. Er trägt wie Michael in der orthodoxen Kirche den Beinamen Archistrategos (Oberster Feldherr der himmlischen Heere).
Am 13.07. wird sein Tag ein zweites Mal gefeiert - dieses Datum ist wohl auf die Weihe der Kirche Gabriel Archistrategos bei Konstantinopel im 17. Jahrhundert zurückzuführen.

Bis 1969 hatte der Erzengel Gabriel auch in der katholischen Kirche seinen eigenen Festtag am 24. März, dem Tag vor Mariä Verkündigung.
Dieses Fest war erst 1921 von Papst Benedikt XV. für die katholische Kirche festgesetzt worden.
The Sobor of the ArchAngel Gabriel is celebrated on the day following after the Annunciation/Blagoveschenie, ie. 26 March. This feast is celebrated a second time 13 July. The reason for its being established probably served the dedication in the XVII Cent. of a church at Constantinople, constructed in the name of the Holy Archi-Strategos / Chief of the Heavenly Hosts.
An account of the Holy ArchAngel is located under 26 March and 8 November
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St. Silas One of the leaders of the Church of Jerusalem; sent with Paul and Barnabas to Antioch to communicate decisions of the Council of Jerusalem to the Gentile community in Syria
1st v. ST SILAS
IN the Roman Martyrology under July 13 is the entry: “In Macedonia, the death of the blessed Silas, who, being one of the first brethren and sent by the Apostles to the churches of the Gentiles with Paul and Barnabas, was full of the grace of God and readily fulfilled the office of preaching; and, glorifying Christ in His sufferings, was afterwards at rest.”
Silas is first mentioned in chapter xv of the Acts of the Apostles, when he was chosen with Judas as “chief men among the brethren” to go with Paul and Barnabas to Antioch bearing the letter from the Council of Jerusalem to the Gentile converts in Syria. Judas and Silas, “being prophets also themselves”, took part in the exhortation and confirming of the brethren, and Silas remained with Paul and Barnabas at Antioch until the disagreement arose between those two, when he was chosen by Paul to go with him in his visitation of the other churches of Syria and Cilicia, and ultimately into Macedonia. At Philippi he shared St Paul’s beating and imprisonment, and with him was miraculously delivered. He stopped behind with Timothy at Berea, but they received a message from the apostle at Athens that they should join him again, and they overtook him at Corinth. Here St Paul wrote his two letters to the Thessalonians, in each of which he refers to Silas in the full form of his name, Silvanus. Nothing more is known of him, but traditionally he lived the rest of his life in Europe and died, as the martyrology says, in Macedonia. It is possible that St Peter’s secretary, Silvanus (1 Peter v 12), is the same disciple.
We know nothing of St Silas beyond what is told us in the New Testament. See the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. iii, and cf. Vigouroux, Dictionnaire de la Bible, and Hastings, Dictionary of the Bible.
When Paul and Barnabas quarreled over Mark, Silas was chosen by Paul to accompany him on his second missionary journey to Syria, Cilicia, and Macedonia. Silas was beaten and imprisoned with Paul at Philippi, was involved with Paul in the riot of Jews at Thessalonica that drove Paul and Silas from the city to Beroea, remained at Beroea with Timothy when Paul left, but rejoined him at Corinth. The Silvanus mentioned with Timothy by Paul and who helped him preach at Corinth is believed to be the same as Silas, since Silvanus is a Greek variant of the Semitic Silas. Silvanus is also mentioned as the man through whom Peter communicated and is considered by some scholars to be the author of that epistle. Tradition says he was the first bishop of Corinth and that he died in Macedonia.
Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus und Andronikus  Orthodoxe Kirche: 30. Juli  Katholische Kirche: Crescens - 27. Juni  Katholische Kirche: Silas - 13. Juli  Andronikus siehe 17. Mai

Crescens (Kreszens), ein Schüler des Apostels Paulus (2. Tim. 4, 10) wurde von diesem demnach nach Galatien gesandt. Gemeint ist aber möglicherweise Gallien. Crescens soll nach verschiedenen Legenden Bischof von Chankedon, Vienne und Mainz gewesen sein. Er soll auch nach Wien gekommen sein, wo er Zacharias als ersten Bischof einsetzte. Er starb unter Trajan (98-117) den Märtyrertod in Gallien.
In Mainz wird auch des Bischofs Crescens von Mainz am 27.06. gedacht. Dieser Bischof starb bei einem Germaneneinfall um 406 als Märtyrer.

Silas hat Paulus lange begleitet. Er wird mehrmals in der Apostelgeschichte erwähnt 15, 22 ff/16,12 ff/18,5). nach der Legende wurde Silas von Paulus zum Bischof von Korinth geweiht. Dort starb er auch.
Silvanus inst nach heutiger katholischer Auffassung mit Silas identisch. Er wird in dn beiden Thessalonicherbriefen erwähnt und war nach 1. Petr. 5, 12 an der Abfassung des Briefes beteiligt. Nach orthodoxer Überlieferung war Silvanus Bischof von Thessaloniki, wo er den Märtyrertod starb.
Epenetus, den Paulus in Röm 16, 5 erwähnt, soll Bischof von Karthago gewesen sein.
St. Aoulimpas, the Apostle martyrdom one of the seventy apostles ministered to the disciples; carried epistles of St. Peter to the Gentiles; took his body off the cross, shroud him, took him to the house of the believers; martyred just like Peter
On this day, St. Aoulimpas, who was called Paul, one of the seventy apostles, was martyred. This Apostle ministered to the disciples and carried the epistles of St. Peter to the Gentiles. He went with him to the city of Rome, preached there, taught and converted many to the Faith.
When St. Peter was martyred, this Apostle was the one to take his body off the cross, shroud him, and take him to the house of one of the believers. Someone accused him, before the Emperor Nero, of being one of the disciples of Peter. Nero brought him and questioned him. The Saint confessed that the Lord Christ is the true God. Nero tortured him severely. Then he asked him, "How do you wish to die?" The Saint replied saying, "I only wish to die for the Name of Christ. Kill me any way you wish, and bring me speedily to my desire." Nero ordered to beat him and to crucify him, head downwards, like his teacher St. Peter. They did so and he received the crown of martyrdom.   May his prayers be with us. Amen
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Saint Julian, Bishop of Cenomanis, elevated to bishop by Apostle Peter; sent to preach Gospel in Gaul (Cenomanis-region of River Po) great wonders accompanied preaching of the saint healing bodily infirmities-also the souls, blind, lame and to the end of his days he preached about Christ completely eradicating idolatry Cenomanis land
Some believe that he is the same person as Simon the Leper (Mark 14:3), receiving the name Julian in Baptism.
The Apostle Peter sent St Julian to preach the Gospel in Gaul. He arrived in Cenomanis (the region of the River Po in the north of present day Italy) and settled into a small hut out beyond a city (probably Cremona), and he began to preach among the pagans. The idol-worshippers at first listened to him with distrust, but the preaching of the saint was accompanied by great wonders. By prayer St Julian healed many of the sick. Gradually, a great multitude of people began to flock to him, asking for help. In healing bodily infirmities, St Julian healed also the souls, enlightening those coming to him by the light of faith in Christ.
In order to quench the thirst of his numerous visitors, St Julian, having prayed to the Lord, struck his staff on the ground, and from that dry place there came forth a spring of water. This wonder converted many pagans to Christianity. One time the holy bishop wanted to see the local prince. At the gate of the prince's dwelling there sat a blind man whom St Julian pitied, and having prayed, gave him his sight. The prince came out towards the holy bishop, and having only just learned that he had worked this miracle, he fell down at the feet of the bishop, requesting Baptism. Having catechized the prince and his family, St Julian imposed on them a three-day fast, and then he baptized them.
On the example of the prince, the majority of his subjects also converted to Christ. The prince donated his own home to the bishop to build a temple in it, and he provided the Church with means. St Julian fervently concerned himself with the spiritual enlightenment of his flock, and he healed the sick as before. Deeply affected by the grief of parents, the holy bishop prayed that God would restore their dead children to life. The holy Bishop Julian remained long on his throne, teaching his flock the way to Heaven. The holy bishop died in extreme old age.
Sainted Julian, Bishop of Cenomanea, was elevated to bishop by the Apostle Peter. There exists the opinion that he -- is one and the same person with Simon the Leper (Mk. 14, 3), in Baptism receiving the name Julian.
The Apostle Peter sent Saint Julian to preach the Gospel in Gaul.
He arrived in Cenomanea (the region of the River Po in the north of present-day Italy) and settled into a small hut out beyond a city (probably Cremona), and he began to preach among the pagans. The idol-worshippers at first listened to him with distrust, but the preaching of the saint was accompanied by great wonders. By prayer Sainted Julian healed various of the sick. Gradually there began to flock to him a great multitude of people, asking for help. In healing bodily infirmities, Sainted Julian healed also the souls, enlightening those coming to him by the light of faith in Christ.
   In order to quench the thirst of his numerous visitors, Sainted Julian,having prayed to the Lord, struck his staff on the ground and from that dry place there came forth a spring of water. This wonder converted many pagans to Christianity. One time the Sainted Bishop wanted to see the local prince. At the gate of the prince's dwelling there sat a blind man whom Saint Julian took pity on, and having prayed, gave him his sight. The prince came out towards the Sainted Bishop, and having only just learned that he had worked this miracle, he fell down at the feet of the bishop, requesting Baptism. Having catechised the prince and his family, Saint Julian imposed on them a three-day fast, and then he fulfilled over them the mystery of Baptism.
   On the example of the prince, the majority of his subjects also converted to Christ. The prince donated his own home to the bishop for the constructing of a temple in it and he provided the Church with means. Saint Julian fervently concerned himself with the spiritual enlightening of his flock and as before he healed the sick. Deeply affected by the grief of parents, the sainted bishop by his own prayer entreated of God the raising up of their dead children to life. The holy Bishop Julian remained long on his throne, teaching his flock the way to Heaven. The Sainted Bishop died in extreme old age (I Cent.).
To the end of his days he preached about Christ and he completely eradicated idol-worship in the land of Cenomanea.
205 St. Serapion Martyr. He was put to death in Macedonia probably presented himself before the judge completely healed by the Lord Jesus Christ
   The Holy Martyr Serapion, suffered for Christ before the Emperor Severus (193-211). As a Christian he was brought to judgment before the governor Achilles. The holy martyr firmly proclaimed to the pagans his faith in Christ, and he was subjected to inhuman torments. Afterwards, he was thrown into prison.
    Healed by the Lord Jesus Christ, he was brought to the judgment place and he presented himself before the judge completely healthy. The enraged pagans sentenced the saint to be burned alive. In the midst of the flames, he gave up his soul to God (+ ca. 205).
251 St. Myrope Martyr of the island of Chios, in Greece, She recovered the body of St. Isidore after his martyrdom
She and a Roman soldier, Ammianus, were arrested for recovering the sainted remains. Myrope was scourged and died in prison. Ammianus was also martyred
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91 Romæ sancti Anacléti, Papæ et Mártyris, qui, post sanctum Cleméntem Ecclésiam Dei regens, eam glorióso martyrio decorávit.
    At Rome, St. Anacletus, pope and martyr, who governed the Church of God after St. Clement, and shed lustre upon it by a glorious martyrdom.
Pope St. Anacletus
The second successor of St. Peter. Whether he was the same as Cletus, who is also called Anencletus as well as Anacletus, has been the subject of endless discussion. Irenaeus, Eusebius, Augustine, Optatus, use both names indifferently as of one person. Tertullian omits him altogether. To add to the confusion, the order is different. Thus Irenaeus has Linus, Anacletus, Clement; whereas Augustine and Optatus put Clement before Anacletus. On the other hand, the "Catalogus Liberianus", the "Carmen contra Marcionem" and the "Liber Pontificalis", all most respectable for their antiquity, make Cletus and Anacletus distinct from each other; while the "Catalogus Felicianus" even sets the latter down as a Greek, the former as a Roman. Among the moderns, Hergenröther (Hist. de l'église, I 542, note) pronounces for their identity. So also the Bollandist De Smedt (Dissert. vii, 1). Döllinger (Christenth. u K., 315) declares that "they are, without doubt, the same person"and that "the 'Catalogue of Liberius' merits little confidence before 230." Duchesne, "Origines chretiennes", ranges himself on that side also but Jungmann (Dissert. Hist. Eccl., I, 123) leaves the question in doubt. The chronology is, of course, in consequence of all this, very undetermined, but Duchesne, in his "Origines", says "we are far from the day when the years, months, and days of the Pontifical Catalogue can be given with any guarantee of exactness. But is it necessary to be exact about popes of whom we know so little? We can accept the list of Irenaeus -- Linus, Anacletus, Clement, Evaristus, Alexander, Xystus, Telesphorus, Hyginus, Pius, and Anicetus. Anicetus reigned certainly in 154. That is all we can say with assurance about primitive pontifical chronology." That he ordained a certain number of priests is nearly all we have of positive record about him, but we know he died a martyr, perhaps about 91.

258 Marcian Youth; The Holy Martyr a native of Lyceian Iconium, while still at a youthful age converted many to Christ by his fiery preaching; gave thanks to God for his fate
   For his zeal the idol-worshippers subjected the saint to bodily punishment, and then sent him to Cappadocia to the governor Perennias. Now by persuasion, now by threats, he attempted to turn the youth away from the Truth, Christ.
     St Marcian fearlessly testified about the truthfulness of the Christian Faith, and he accused Perennias of worshipping inanimate idols. The enraged governor gave orders to subject the saint to severe torments, but in his sufferings the saint remained steadfast in his faithfulness to Christ. They cut off his head while he prayed, giving thanks to God for his fate (+258)
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"It is Truly Meet" Icon of the Mother of God is in the high place of the altar of the cathedral church of the Karyes monastery on Mount Athos.
One Saturday night an Elder went to Karyes for the all-night Vigil. He left, instructing his disciple to remain behind and read the service in their cell. As it grew dark, the disciple heard a knock on the door. When he opened the door, he saw an unknown monk who called himself Gabriel, and he invited him to come in. They stood before the icon of the Mother of God and read the service together with reverence and compunction.
During the Ninth Ode of the Canon, the disciple began to sing "My soul magnifies the Lord…" with the Irmos of St Cosmas the Hymnographer (October 14), "More honorable than the Cherubim..."
The stranger sang the next verse, "For He has regarded the low estate of His handmaiden..." Then he chanted something the disciple had never heard before, "It is truly meet to bless Thee, O Theotokos, ever-blessed and most pure, and the Mother of our God..." Then he continued with, "More honorable than the Cherubim..."
   While the hymn was being sung, the icon of the Theotokos shone with a heavenly light. The disciple was moved by the new version of the familiar hymn, and asked his guest to write the words down for him. When the stranger asked for paper and ink, the disciple said that they did not have any.
   The stranger took a roof tile and wrote the words of the hymn on its surface with his finger. The disciple knew then that this was no ordinary monk, but the Archangel Gabriel. The angel said, "Sing in this manner, and all the Orthodox as well." Then he disappeared, and the icon of the Mother of God continued to radiate light for some time afterward.
The Eleousa Icon of the Mother of God, before which the hymn "It Is Truly Meet" was first sung, was transferred to the katholikon at Karyes. The tile, with the hymn written on it by the Archangel Gabriel, was taken to Constantinople when St Nicholas Chrysoberges (December 16) was Patriarch.
Numerous copies of the "It Is Truly Meet" Icon are revered in Russian churches. At the Galerna Harbor of Peterburg a church with five cupolas was built in honor of the Merciful Mother of God, and into it they put a grace-bearing copy of the "It Is Truly Meet" icon sent from Athos
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Martyrdom of St. Theodosia mother of St. Proconius and her companions {Coptic}
   On this day also, St. Theodosia, mother of St. Proconius, along with two prefects and twelve other women, were martyred. When Theodosia heard that her son became Christian, and the Emperor had tortured him severely until he was close to death, she went to see him. She found them bringing him out of prison and all his wounds were healed. She and all those who were with her marvelled. They all cried saying, "We believe in the God of Proconius." The Emperor ordered their heads cut off and they received the crown of martyrdom.  May their prayers be with us, and Glory be to God forever. Amen
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5th v. St. Dogfan Welsh martyr, descended from chieftain Brychan of Brecknock. He was slain by pagan invaders at Dyfed, Wales. A church there honors his memory.
5th v. SS. MAURA AND BRIGID solitaries at Ariacum (now Sainte-Maure), and had died in the fifth century, not long after St Martin. The relics were found, the chapel built, and a cultus begun in Touraine which still exists their feast is kept at Tours on January 28.
THERE is an old cultus of these maidens in Picardy, but scholars have found it impossible to give a satisfactory account of them from the sources available. According to these legends they were British princesses from Northumbria, who made a pilgrimage to Rome; on their way home through Gaul they were set upon by heathen outlaws or Frankish raiders and put to death at Balagny-sur-Thérain. Here they were buried and there arose a cultus of them as martyrs. In the middle of the seventh century St Bathildis, the queen of King Clovis II, who came from England and (especially as she was a slave-girl) may have been a Briton, attempted to translate their relics to her monastery at Chelles; she was prevented by divine intervention, and forced to leave them at Nogent-les-Vierges (Oise), where they were solemnly enshrined in 1285. St Louis IX had a great devotion to these saints and was a benefactor of their shrine and church, to which he made pilgrimage, and a cessation of the plague at Beauvais attributed to their intercession further endeared them to the people.
St Gregory of Tours relates of his predecessor, St Euphronius, that, having heard of a mysterious light seen over a bramble-covered hill and of a vision of two maidens asking for a chapel to be built on the hill because two holy virgins were buried there, he himself visited the spot, and it was revealed to him that the maidens were called Maura and Britta; they had been solitaries at Ariacum (now Sainte-Maure), and had died in the fifth century, not long after St Martin. The relics were found, the chapel built, and a cultus begun in Touraine which still exists their feast is kept at Tours on January 28. Because of the likeness in names and era attempts have been made to show them identical with the saints of Nogent.

See the Acta Sanctorum, January, vol. ii; Stanton, Menology, pp. 659—660 Renet, S. Lucien et les autres SS. du Beauvaisis (1895), vol. iii, pp. 573—579 Mémoires de la Soc. des Antiquaires de Picardie, vol. x, pp. 117—119.
505 ST EUGENIUS, BISHOP OF CARTHAGE “If the good shepherd must lay down his life for his sheep, can it be excusable for me to trouble about the passing needs of my body?”
THE Roman provinces in Africa were for a long time one of the richest and most noble portions of the empire, but when its rulers, to preserve Italy, abandoned its extremities, Genseric, King of the Vandals, in 428, passed into this country and in a short time became master of those fertile provinces. The Vandals, who were mostly Christians but infected with the Arian heresy, laid the country waste, plundered churches and monasteries, burned alive two bishops and tortured others to extort from them the treasures of their churches, razed the public buildings at Carthage, and banished St Quodvultdeus, bishop of that city, with many others.
   But for the brief episcopate of St Deogratias, the episcopal see of Carthage had remained vacant for fifty years, when in 481 Huneric, who had succeeded Genseric, permitted the Catholics on certain conditions to choose one who should fill it. The people pitched upon Eugenius, a citizen of the place, eminent for his learning, zeal, piety and prudence; and he became so dear to his flock that every one of them would have thought it a happiness to lay down his life for him. His charities to the distressed were very great, especially considering his poverty. But he always found resources for their necessities in the hearts of his people, and he refused himself everything that he might give all to the poor. When others reminded him that he ought to reserve something for his own necessities, his answer was, “If the good shepherd must lay down his life for his sheep, can it be excusable for me to trouble about the passing needs of my body?”
The influence of St Eugenius was so strong that the king became alarmed, and he ordered the bishop not to occupy his episcopal chair or to preach in public or to allow any Vandals into his churches. Eugenius replied that the law of God commanded him not to shut the door of a church against any who wished to enter it. Huneric then posted guards at the doors of the Catholic churches, who when they saw any man or woman going in recognizable as a Vandal by his clothes and long hair, used forked sticks which, twisted into the hair and violently drawn back, tore off hair and skin together. Some thus lost their eyes, others died, and women who had been scalped in this way were led through the streets as a warning to others. A fierce persecution was thus initiated.
Bishop Eugenius was spared in the first storm, and he was soon informed by Huneric that the orthodox Catholics were to meet in a conference with the Arian bishops at Carthage. Eugenius answered that the terms were not equal, seeing their enemies’ were to be judges; and that as it was the common cause of all churches, other churches ought to be invited and consulted, “especially the Church of Rome, which is the head of all churches. I will write to my fellow bishops, who will be able with me to show you our common faith.” It is said that about this time one Felix, who had been long blind, addressed himself to St Eugenius, desiring him to pray over him that he might recover his sight, saying he had been told in a vision so to do. The bishop showed great reluctance, but at length, after blessing the font for the administration of baptism on the eve of the Epiphany, he turned and said to the blind man, “I have told you that I am a sinner, and the least of all men; but I pray God that He show you mercy according to your faith, and restore to you your sight.” Then he made the sign of the cross on his eyes, and the blind man saw. Huneric sent for Felix, and examined the circumstances of the miracle, which he found too evident to be called in question; but the Arian bishops told him that Eugenius had performed it by magic.
     The conference, when it assembled in 484 to discuss the divisions between Catholics and Arians, was a farce; and Huneric took the opportunity of so many bishops assembled in Carthage to plunder them, and then deport them to forced labour. St Eugenius, after having long encouraged others to the conflict, was himself suddenly carried into exile, without being allowed to take leave of his friends. He found means, however, to write a letter to his flock, which St Gregory of Tours has preserved. In it he says: “I with tears beg, exhort and implore you, by the dreadful day of judgement and the aweful light of the coming of Christ, that you hold fast the Catholic faith. Keep the grace of baptism and the anointing of chrism. Let no man born again of water return to the water.” This he mentions, because the Arians in Africa, like the Donatists, rebaptized those that came over to their sect. St Eugenius protests to his flock that, if they remain constant, no distance nor death could separate him from them in spirit; but that he was innocent of the blood of those that should perish, and that this his letter would be read before the tribunal of Christ at the last day for the condemnation of apostates.  “If I return to Carthage” says he, “I shall see you in this life; if not, I shall meet you in the other. Pray for us, and fast; fasting and almsdeeds have never failed to move God to mercy. Above all things, remember that we are not to fear those who can only kill the body.”
St Eugenius was carried into the desert country in the province of Tripoli and committed to the care of Antony, an Arian bishop who treated him with barbarity. At this time apostates signalized themselves above others by the cruelties which they exercised upon the orthodox. Elpidophorus, one of this number, was appointed judge at Carthage; and St Muritta, the deacon who had assisted when he was baptized in the Catholic Church, being brought before him, took with him the white garment with which ‘he had clothed the apostate coming out of the font. Holding it up before the whole assembly, he said, “This robe will accuse you when the Judge shall appear in majesty at the last day. It will bear testimony against you to your condemnation.” This Muritta, with the archdeacon St Salutaris, is mentioned together with St Eugenius in the Roman Martyrology on this day.
King Huneric died in 484, and his nephew Gontamund who succeeded him recalled St Eugenius to Carthage in 488; some years later the orthodox churches were reopened and the other clergy allowed to return. But the next king, Thrasimund, was again a persecutor. He eventually condemned Eugenius to death; but he was reprieved and, banished to Languedoc, which was then subject to Alaric, King of the Visigoths, who was also an Arian. He died in exile in 505 in a monastery near Albi.
The principal authority is Victor of Vita, Historia persecutionis Vandalicae (the best edition is that of Petschenig in the Corpus ss. eccles. Lat., vol. vii) but the more relevant matter is reprinted in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. iii, together with a few passages from Gregory of Tours, etc. See also S. Mesnage, L’Afrique chrétienne (1912) Ludwig Schmidt, Geschicte der Vandalen (1901); Hefele-Leclercq, Conciles, vol. U, pp. 930-933 and Duchesne, Histoire ancienne de l’Église, vol. iii.
700 St Mildred, Abbess of Minster-In-Thanet, Virgin

Our forefathers had an extraordinary veneration for St Mildred, though the scanty records we have of her life give no due to the reason for this popular devotion. William of Malmesbury says that her remains, which were translated (or rather carried off by stratagem) in 1033 to St Augustine’s at Canterbury, were venerated above all the relics in that holy place. Furthermore, the rock which received St Augustine’s first footprints was known until comparatively recent times, not as his, but as St Mildred’s rock. She was the second daughter of Merewald, an Anglian ruler, and of St Ermenburga or Domneva, a Kentish princess, and she had two sisters, Milburga and Mildgytha, as well as a brother, who were also reckoned as saints.
Egbert, King of Kent, had caused two nephews to be secretly murdered in the Isle of Thanet. He was filled with compunction, and sending for their sister Ermenburga from western Mercia, he paid her the wergild, the penalty for murder which the law ordained should be paid to the relatives of the victim. In satisfaction for the crime he settled land on her, upon which she founded a monastery in which prayers should be continually offered for the souls of the two princes. The monastery was called Minster, in the Isle of Thanet, and Ermenburga at first took charge of it herself. As her daughter Mildred gave evidence of a vocation for the religious life, she sent her to the convent of Chelles in France to be educated. Here she was persecuted by the unwelcome attentions of a young nobleman, who sought to induce her to marry him. She stood firm and eventually returned to England and rejoined her mother. St Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, received her into the community. Soon St Ermenburga gave over her charge to her daughter, who appears to have been the first abbess of Minster, under which title she attended a council in Kent. Her aunt Ermengytha served God in the same house with such fervour that she was ranked among the saints and her tomb became a place of pilgrimage.
Of St Mildred’s life we are told that “she fasted often and was intensely humble. She was merciful to widows and orphans, and a comforter to all the poor and afflicted, and in all respects of easy temper and tranquil” She died of a lingering and painful illness probably towards the close of the seventh century, but the date is quite uncertain. During the reign of Canute her relics were taken, more or less forcibly, to St Augustine’s abbey at Canterbury, whence some portion of them later found their way to Deventer in Holland. Thence a small relic was sent in 1882 to the Catholic church at Minster, where her feast is observed as its titular saint. In 1937 Minster Court, on the site of the successor of St Mildred’s monastery, was occupied by Benedictine nuns from the ancient St Walburga’s abbey at Eichstätt, thus reviving monastic life there after a thousand years.
It is curious that Bede seems nowhere to mention St Mildred, but lives of her were written at a much later date by Goscelin, Thorn and Capgrave. See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. iii, and especially Stanton’s Menology, pp. 332—333. St Augustine’s Abbey, Ramsgate, publishes a useful pamphlet on St Mildred and her sisters.
750  St. Turiaf Bishop of Dol, in Brittany, France. He was the successor of St. Samson in that see and is also called Turiav.
794  Saint Stephen Sabbaites, nephew of St John of Damascus entered Lavra of St Sava at 10 spent his life there; given gifts of wonderworking and clairvoyance; healed the sick, cast out devils
Born in the year 725. The ten-year-old boy entered the Lavra of St Sava and spent his whole life at this monastery, sometimes going out into the desert for solitary ascetic deeds. The venerable Stephen was given the gifts of wonderworking and clairvoyance. He healed the sick, cast out devils, and discerned the thoughts of those coming to him for counsel. He died in the year 794, foretelling in advance the day of his death. The Life of the monk was compiled by his student Leontius.

Stephanus der Sabait  Orthodoxe Kirche: 13. Juli  Katholische Kirche: 31. März
Stephanus wurde 725 geboren. Mit 10 Jahren trat er in das Sabakloster ein, das er bis zu seinem Tod 794 nicht mehr verließ. Er zog sich zeitweise in die Einöde zurück und wurde mit den Gaben der Heilung, Teufelsaustreibung und Prophetie beschenkt.
Arno war von 855 bis 892 Bischof von Würzburg
Orthodoxe und Katholische Kirche: 13. Juli

Arno (Arndt) war von 855 bis 892 Bischof von Würzburg. Fränkische Siedler rückten auf der Suche nach neuem Land in sorbische Gebiete ein und siedelten hier. Es kam zu blutigen Auseinandersetzungen, in die auch Arno mit einem Heer eingriff. Arno unterlag im Sommer 892 in einer Schlacht am Sandberg den Sorben und wurde kurz darauf am 13.7.892 in seinem Feldlager von eingedrungenen Sorben ermordet. Ob die Bluttat während der Feier der Messe geschah, ist fraglich.
1024 St. Henry son of Duke of Bavaria and Gisella, daughter of Conrad, King of Burgundy; made numerous pious foundations, gave liberally to pious institutions and built the Cathedral of Bamberg
Heinrich II. Orthodoxe, Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 13. Juli

Born in 972. He received an excellent education under the care of St. Wolfgang, Bishop of Ratisbon. In 995, St. Henry succeeded his father as Duke of Bavaria, and in 1002, upon the death of his cousin, Otho III, he was elected emperor. Firmly anchored upon the great eternal truths, which the practice of meditation kept alive in his heart, he was not elated by this dignity and sought in all things, the greater glory of God. He was most watchful over the welfare of the Church and exerted his zeal for the maintenance of ecclesiastical discipline through the instrumentality of the Bishops.
He gained several victories over his enemies, both at home and abroad, but he used these with great moderation and clemency.
In 1014, he went to Rome and received the imperial crown at the hands of Pope Benedict VIII. On that occasion he confirmed the donation, made by his predecessors to the Pope, of the sovereignty of Rome and the exarchate of Ravenna. Circumstances several times drove the holy Emperor into war, from which he always came forth victorious. He led an army to the south of Italy against the Saracens and their allies, the Greeks, and drove them from the country. The humility and spirit of justice of the Saint were equal to his zeal for religion. He cast himself at the feet of Herebert, Bishop of Cologne, and begged his pardon for having treated him with coldness, on account of a misunderstanding.
He wished to abdicate and retire into a monastery, but yielded to the advice of the Abbot of Verdun, and retained his dignity. Both he and his wife, St. Cunegundes, lived in perpetual chastity, to which they had bound themselves by vow. The Saint made numerous pious foundations, gave liberally to pious institutions and built the Cathedral of Bamberg. His holy death occurred at the castle of Grone, near Halberstad, in 1024.  He is the patron saint of the childless, of Dukes, of the handicapped and those rejected by Religious Order.

Heinrich II. Orthodoxe, Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 13. Juli
Der Sohn des bayrischen Herzogs Heinrich wurde am 6.5.973 geboren. Seit 995 war er Herzog von Bayern. Als Otto III. 1002 in Italien starb, war er der einzige erwachsene Verwandte, der als Nachfolger in Frage kam. Er zog dem Leichenzug bis an die Alpen entgegen und nahm dort die kaiserlichen Insignien von Heribert entgegen. Er führte zahlreiche Kriege und reiste in Friedenszeiten durch die deutschen Lande, um nach dem Rechten zu sehen. Heinrich sah sein Kaisertum als christliches Amt und stütze sich in der Regierung auf die Bischöfe als in Gott verbundene Gemeinschaft. Gottesdienst und kirchliche Festzeiten waren ihm wichtiger als die Alltagsgeschäfte und er spielte auch mit dem Gedanken, abzutreten und Domherr zu werden. Seine Stiftungen ermöglichten den Ausbau vieler Kirchen. Heinrich starb am 13.7.1024. In dem Dom seiner Stiftung Bamberg ist er mit seiner Ehefrau begraben. Die berühmten Figuren des Kaiserpaares wurden von Riemenschneider geschaffen .

 July 13, 2008 St. Henry (972-1024)
   As German king and Holy Roman Emperor, Henry was a practical man of affairs. He was energetic in consolidating his rule. He crushed rebellions and feuds. On all sides he had to deal with drawn-out disputes so as to protect his frontiers. This involved him in a number of battles, especially in the south in Italy; he also helped Pope Benedict VIII quell disturbances in Rome. Always his ultimate purpose was to establish a stable peace in Europe.
   According to eleventh-century custom, Henry took advantage of his position and appointed as bishops men loyal to him. In his case, however, he avoided the pitfalls of this practice and actually fostered the reform of ecclesiastical and monastic life.

Comment:  All in all, this saint was a man of his times. From our standpoint, he may have been too quick to do battle and too ready to use power to accomplish reforms. But, granted such limitations, he shows that holiness is possible in a busy secular life. It is in doing our job that we become saints.

Quote: “We deem it opportune to remind our children of their duty to take an active part in public life and to contribute toward the attainment of the common good of the entire human family as well as to that of their own political community. They should endeavor, therefore, in the light of their Christian faith and led by love, to insure that the various institutions—whether economic, social, cultural or political in purpose—should be such as not to create obstacles, but rather to facilitate or render less arduous man’s perfecting of himself in both the natural order and the supernatural.... Every believer in this world of ours must be a spark of light, a center of love, a vivifying leaven amidst his fellow men. And he will be this all the more perfectly, the more closely he lives in communion with God in the intimacy of his own soul” (Blessed Pope John XXIII, Peace on Earth, 146, 164).

1033 Kunigunde Nachfolgers. 1025 zog sie sich in das von ihr 1017 gestiftete Kloster Kaufungen (bei Kassel) zurück und wurde Benediktinerin
Orthodoxe Kirche: 3. März  Katholische Kirche: 13. Juli (auch 3. März)  Evangelische Kirche: 13. Juli
Kunigunde (aus germanisch kunni=Sippe und gund=Kampf), Tochter aus einem armen bayrischen Grafengeschlecht, wurde 978 geboren. Auch als Ehefrau Heinrichs II. führte sie ein einfaches Leben und gab großmütig an Bedürftige, an Kirchen und Hospitäler. Sie begleitete ihren Ehemann auf seinen Reisen und bei Kriegszügen. Begab sich Heinrich auf weite Reisen, führte sie auch für ihn die Regierung. 1007 gründete sie mit ihrem Mann das Bistum Bamberg und ließ den Dom erbauen. Ihre Ehe blieb kinderlos und wurde deshalb später als gewollte Josefsehe angesehen. So erzählt eine bekannte Legende, Kunigunde sei über 12 glühende Pflugscharen gegangen, um so ihre Jungfräulichkeit zu beweisen. Nach dem Tod ihres Ehemannes führte Kunigunde die Reichsgeschäfte bis zur Wahl eines Nachfolgers. 1025 zog sie sich in das von ihr 1017 gestiftete Kloster Kaufungen (bei Kassel) zurück und wurde Benediktinerin. Hier starb sie am 3.3.1033. Schon Vor 1099 entstand ihre weitgehend legendarische Biographie. Ihre Gebeine wurden am 9.9.1201 in den Bamberger Dom übertragen. Kunigunde ist Patronin der Diözese Bamberg. Hier wird ihr Fest am 3.3. begangen. Die katholische und evangelische Kirche gedenken ihrer mit ihrem Ehemann Heinrich II. am 13.7.
1298 BD JAMES OF VORAGINE, ARCHBISHOP OF GENOA; author of Legenda Sanctorum, now everywhere known as Legenda Aurea, "The Golden Legend"
THIS James took his name from the village of Viraggio, now Varazze, near Genoa, where he was born about the year 1230. He entered the Order of Preachers at the age of fourteen, and after some years of the most devoted study and spiritual exercises began to preach in the churches of Lombardy and was soon famous for his power. He taught theology and Sacred Scripture in various houses of his order, became prior at Genoa, and in 1267 was elected prior provincial of the Lombard province. To be given this office when only thirty-seven years old gave rise to some adverse comment which he silenced by the prudence and ability with which he discharged it: so much so that he held it for an unbroken period of nineteen years, and when he laid it down was appointed definitor. On the death of Charles Bernard, Archbishop of Genoa, in 1286, the chapter wished Bd James to succeed to the see, but he refused. Two years later he was entrusted by Pope Nicholas IV with the duty of raising the interdict and removing the censures imposed on the same city for having helped the revolting Sicilians against the king of Naples. In 1292 the see again became vacant, again the chapter elected Bd James, and again he refused; but this time he was obliged to withdraw his refusal and he was consecrated at Rome. His episcopate of six years was troubled by continuous hostilities between Guelfs and Ghibellines, represented respectively by the rampini and the mascarati, and the new archbishop laboured without ceasing to bring about political and social peace; in this he did not succeed, for an apparent reconciliation in 1295 proved to be only a truce, and in the following year the feud broke out as badly as ever. Bd James did not forget his religious vow of poverty, and liberally bestowed the revenues of his great see on the needy and those suffering from civil strife, in the endowment of hospitals and monasteries, and for the repair of churches; he was a model to the bishops of northern Italy, some of whom adopted his measures to maintain the discipline. of their clergy.
But it is as a writer that James of Voragine is chiefly famous. One work attributed to him, the translation of the Bible into Italian, cannot by any means be proved; if he did it, every copy has perished. It is as the author of Legenda Sanctorum, now everywhere known as Legenda Aurea, "The Golden Legend", that his name is known and venerated; it is the most famous, and for the mind of the people the most influential, collection of legends or "lives" of the saints that has ever been put together. From the point of view of history it is entirely uncritical and worthless-except as a sidelight on the unsophistication and simple mentality of the folk for whom it was written. But as a book of devotion, of edification, it is a superb work of art: the author perfectly accomplished what he set out to do, to write a book which people would read and whose message of love for God and hatred for sin they could not misunderstand; but for the Reformation, Caxton's beautiful translation might have had the same effect on English thought and writing as the Jacobean Bible and the Imitation of Christ have had, or as other versions had in other countries. It is illustrative of the narrowness of historical Humanism when contrasted with the true scientific spirit that, whereas Luis Vives, Melchior Cano and others roundly condemned the Legenda Aurea, the Bollandists have shown a nice appreciation of it.
Father Delehaye says: For a long time the Golden Legend, which is so accurately representative of the hagiographic labours of the middle ages, was treated with supreme disdain, and scholars showed no mercy towards the worthy James of Voragine. "The man who wrote the Legend", declared Luis Vives, "had a mouth of iron and a heart of lead."
It would in fact be hard to speak of it too severely if it were conceded that popular works are to be judged according to the standards of historical criticism. But people are beginning to realize that this is an injudicious method, and those who have penetrated into the spirit of the Golden Legend are very far from referring to it in scornful terms.
I confess that, when reading it, it is somewhat difficult at times to refrain from a smile. But it is a sympathetic and tolerant smile, and in no way disturbs the religious emotion excited by the picture of the virtues and heroic actions of the saints.
In this picture God's friends are represented for us as what is greatest on earth; they are human creatures lifted up above matter and above the miseries of our little world. Kings and princes honour and consult them, mingling with the people in order to kiss their relics and implore their protection. They live, even here on earth, in God's intimacy, and God bestows upon them, with His consolations, something also of His power; but they only make use of it for the good of mankind, and it is to them that men have recourse in order to be delivered from sufferings both of body and soul. The saints practice all the virtues in a superhuman degree; gentleness, mercy, the forgiveness of injuries, mortification, renunciation, and they render these virtues lovable, and they urge Christians to practise them. Their life is, in truth, the concrete realization of the spirit of the Gospel, and from the very fact that it brings home to us this sublime ideal, legend, like all poetry, can claim a higher degree of truth than history itself" (The Legends of the Saints, cap. vii, pp. 229-231).
The book was exceedingly popular and widely distributed in the middle ages, and in 1470 the first printed edition of the original Latin was published at Basle; within ten years printed versions had appeared in Low German, Italian, French and Czech. Caxton made the first edition printed in English at Westminster in 1483. No other book was reprinted more often between 1470 and 1530; by 1500 there were over seventy editions in Latin, fourteen in Low German, eight in Italian, five in French and three each in English and Czech-it was indeed the first printed best-seller. The cultus of Bd James began at once after his death in 1298 and was confirmed in 1816.
For a devotional account of the incidents of the life of Bd James, the illustrated biography by M. de Waresquiel, Le B. Jacques de Voragine (1902), may be recommended. Most other books and essays deal predominantly with the literary side of his career. Among these may be mentioned the two articles of E. C. Richardson in the Princeton Theological Review, 1903 and 1904; P. Butler, Legenda aurea, Légende dorée, Golden Legend (1899); and the article in DTC. For a fuller bibliography see Taurisano, Catalogus hagiographicus O.P. On E. C. Richardson's Materials for a Life of Jacopo da Varagine (1935), see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. liv (1936), pp. 440-442. Several modernized versions of Caxton's Golden Legend have been published in recent times, and a new translation appeared in New York (2 vols.) in 1941.
1610 St. Francis Solano Franciscan Observance priest; survived the plague of 1583 at Granada; in Peru refused to leave shipwrecked slaves baptized them and most survived; 20 years of untiring ministry among Indians and Spanish colonists;. he had the "gift of tongues", for miracles he was called "wonder-worker of the New World"; died at moment of consecration, saying with last breath, "Glory be to God"
ST FRANCIS SOLANO     (A.D. 1610)
THIS saint was born at Montilla in Andalusia in 1549, did his studies in the school of the Jesuits, and in 1569 joined the Franciscan Observants at his birthplace. He was duly professed and in 1576 ordained priest. Full of zeal and charity and an ardent desire for the salvation of souls, he divided his time between silent retirement and the ministry of preaching. His sermons, though without the ornaments of studied eloquence, had a great effect in reforming his hearers. The saint was appointed master of novices, and when his charges were at fault he gave a penance not to them but to himself, for if they transgressed, he said, the blame must be his.
Francis exercised his ministry in southern Spain for many years and heroically during the plague of 1583 at Granada, when he himself was struck down but made a quick recovery. After the epidemic was passed he asked to be sent as a missionary into Africa; this was refused, but when in 1589 King Philip II wanted more friars of the Observance in the West Indies, Francis was selected to go with Father Balthazar Navarro to Peru. The missionaries sailed to Panama, crossed the isthmus, and again took ship on the other side. But in approaching Peru they ran into a bad storm and were driven aground on a sandbank. The ship looked as if she were going to pieces, and the master ordered that she be abandoned, leaving aboard her a number of Negro slaves for whom there was no room in the single lifeboat. Francis had these men under instruction and he now refused to leave them, so he remained behind on the ship, which was breaking up. He gathered them around him, encouraged them to trust in the mercy of God and the merits of Jesus Christ, and then baptized them. This he had scarcely done when the vessel parted amidships, and some of the Negroes were drowned. The remainder were on the part of the hull that was firmly aground, and there they remained for three days, Francis keeping up their courage and rigging signals of distress. When the weather broke the ship's boat returned and took them off to join the others in a place of safety, whence they eventually were conveyed to Lima.
Now began twenty years of untiring ministry among the Indians and Spanish colonists. First of all Francis was sent to Tucuman, in the north of what is now the Argentine Republic; he set himself to learn the Indian languages and dialects, and from thence went on a missionary journey through the Chaco to Paraguay, where in after years were to be the famous “reductions" of the Society of Jesus. In these days it is difficult to realize what such a journey meant in those; this friar not only did it, but made numerous converts as well. After a time he was made custos of the houses of his order in Tucuman and Paraguay, and so was able to supervise the missions he had planted, but when his term in that office was ended he was appointed guardian of the Lima friary. Here there was plenty of work of another kind for him to do among the Peruvian Spaniards of that port, of Trujillo, and other towns. In 1604 his preaching in the public square against the corruptions of Lima and his comparison of the fate of a sinful soul to that of a doomed city had so powerful an effect on the people that their consciences caused them to fear an impending calamity like to that of Ninive, and a panic threatened. The viceroy was alarmed and consulted St Turibius, archbishop of the city, who with the Franciscan commissary general required of St Francis that he should calm the people, who had already had examples of his gift of prophecy, by declaring his true meaning, which was not to foretell a material destruction of buildings but a spiritual loss of souls.
It is said that St Francis had the gift of tongues, and for his miracles he was called the “Wonder-worker of the New World"; in his funeral sermon Father Sebastiani, S.J., said that God had chosen him to be "the hope and edification of all Peru. the example and glory of Lima, the splendour of the Seraphic order".
A habit of his, very reminiscent of his religious father and namesake, was to take a lute and sing to our Lady before her altar. He died on July 14, 1610, while his brethren were singing the conventual Mass, at the moment of consecration, saying with his last breath, "Glory be to God". His whole life, says Alvarez de Paz, was a holy uninterrupted course of zealous action, yet at the same time a continued prayer. St Francis Solano was canonized in 1726.
There is a very full account of this great missionary in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. v, which includes a reprint of the life by Tiburtio Navarro, together with a number of documents submitted in the process of beatification. A still more copious life by Fray Diego de Cordova appeared twenty years after the saint's death. There are modem biographies in most languages: a translation of the short sketch by F. Courtot was included in the Oratorian series in 1847, an English life appeared in New York in 1888, and a German one by O. Maas in 1938. Some of these, notably that of A. M. Hiral in French (1906), are devotional rather than critical. There is a sketch by J. Wilbois in the series “Profils franciscains" (1942). The saint's feast is observed on differing dates; he is named in the Roman Martyrology on the day of his death, July 14.
Born at Montilla in Andalusia in 1549, did his studies in the school of the Jesuits, and in 1569, joined the Franciscan Observance at his birth place. He was duly professed and in 1576 ordained priest. Full of zeal and charity and an ardent desire for the salvation of souls, he divided his time between silent retirement and the ministry of preaching.
   Francis exercised his ministry in southern Spain for many years and heroically during the plague of 1583 at Granada, when he himself was struck down but made a quick recovery. After the epidemic was passed, Francis was selected to go with Father Balthazar Navarro to Peru. The missionaries to Panama, crossed the Isthmus, and again took ship on the other side. But approaching Peru, they ran into a bad storm and were driven aground on a sand bank. The ship looked as if she were going to pieces, and the master ordered that she be abandoned, leaving aboard her, a number of negro slaves for whom there was no room in the single lifeboat. Francis had these men under instruction and he now refused to leave them, so he remained behind on the ship, which was breaking up. He gathered them around him, encouraged them to trust in the mercy of God and the merits of Jesus Christ, and then baptized them. This he had scarcely done when the vessel parted amidships and some of the negroes were drowned. The remainder were on the part of the hull that was firmly aground and there they remained for three days, Francis keeping up their courage and rigging signals of distress. When the weather broke, the ship's boat returned and took them off to join the others in a place of safety, where they eventually were conveyed to Lima, Peru.
   Now began twenty years of untiring ministry among the Indians and Spanish colonists. It is said that St. Francis had the "gift of tongues", and for his miracles he was called the "wonder-worker of the New World"; in his funeral sermon Father Sabastiani, S.J., said that God had chosen him to be "the hope and edification of all Peru, the example and glory of Lima, the splendor of the Seraphic order". A habit of his, very reminiscent of his religious father and namesake, was to take a lute and sing to Our Lady before her altar. He died on July 14, 1610, while his brethren was singing the conventual Mass, at the moment of consecration, saying with his last breath, "Glory be to God". His whole life, says Alvarez de Paz, was a holy uninterrupted course of zealous action, yet at the same time, a continued prayer. St. Francis Solano was canonized in 1726
.
1616 Bl. Thomas Tunstal English martyr priesthood at Douai; six years in confinement joined Benedictines there until finally murdered
BD THOMAS TUNSTAL, MARTYR (A.D. 1616)
THOMAS TUNSTAL was born at Whinfell, near Kendal. He entered the English College at Douay in 1606, was ordained priest, and sent on the mission in 1610. He was arrested almost at once and spent the rest of his life in various prisons. He contrived to escape from Wisbech Castle by sliding down a rope, and took refuge with a friend near King's Lynn; but he was immediately discovered, under the following circumstances. In sliding down the rope he had very badly skinned his hands, and for lack of attention the raw places had gone septic. His host recommended him to consult a certain kindly woman, who did many medical services for the poor, and this he did. Lady L'Estrange, for that was her name, cleaned and dressed his hands, not without some curiosity as to who the poorly dressed but well-bred stranger might be; unfortunately she did not keep her curiosity to herself but mentioned the man to her husband, Sir Hammond L'Estrange. He was a justice of the peace and knew that there was hue and cry for a priest escaped from Wisbech, and when he heard that the injured man was staying in the house of a recusant he at once ordered his arrest, in spite of the entreaties of his wife to forget what she had said.
Bd Thomas was committed to Norwich gaol, and brought up at the next assizes in that city, when he was condemned on the evidence of a single false witness, one Symons. This fellow swore that the prisoner had reconciled two Protestants and tried to do the same with himself. The alleged converts were called and deposed that they were still Protestants, but that Mr Tunstal had urged them in general terms to holiness of life. Mr Justice Altham offered the oath of supremacy, which Bd Thomas refused, asking, however, that he might have opportunity to expose his faith and reasons before a minister. The request was disregarded and sentence pronounced. At the scaffold the next morning he was met by Sir Hammond L'Estrange, whom he heartily forgave, saying, "I beseech God that my guiltless blood may not lie heavy upon you and yours". When he was asked if he were a Jesuit he replied that he was not, but a secular priest who had made a vow to join the Order of St Benedict, and he therefore asked the sheriff that his head might be set up on St Benet's gate. He answered a nagging question from a minister about whether he expected salvation from his good works, called for a glass of water, and enquired the hour; when told eleven o'clock, he said, "Then it is near dinner-time. Sweet Jesus, admit me though most unworthy to be a guest this day at thy table in Heaven." He quietly blessed the fire and the rope, and with the prayer, " Jesu, have mercy on me!” upon his lips, he was turned off; he was left to hang till he was dead and his head was displayed on St Benet's gate of Norwich as he had wished.
The account of Bd Thomas given in Challoner, MMP., is not quite satisfactory owing to some confusion into which he was betrayed by Raissius, but the difficulties have been cleared up and all the available evidence collected in the account published by Dom Bede Camm under the title of Nine Martyr Monks (1931), pp. 238-257. But there is still some uncertainty about the day of the month on which he suffered.
   Born in Whinfell, near Kendal, Westmoreland, he studied for the priesthood at Douai, France, and was ordained there in 1609. The next year he returned to England but was arrested almost immediately upon his arrival. Escaping, Thomas was recaptured and taken to Norwich where he spent six years in confinement until finally being hanged, drawn, and quartered.
 While in prison, he joined the Benedictine Order.
1620 The Transfer of the Relics of the Monk Antonii of Leokhovo (1620). (The account about the saint is located under 17 October).
1920 St. Teresa de los Andes Discalced Carmelite mystic;  first Chilean to be beatified or canonized; a model for young people
She was baptized Juanita Fernandez Solar, born in Santiago, Chile. on July 13.1900. Devoted to Christ from a very young age, she entered the Discalced Carmelite monastery at Los Andes. on May 7, 1919. There she was given the religious name of Teresa of Jesus. She died on April 12, of the following year, having made her religious profession as a Carmelite. A model for young people, Teresa was beatified in 1987 in Santiago, Chile, and canonized by Pope John Paul II March 21, 1993
.

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
91 Romæ sancti Anacléti, Papæ et Mártyris, qui, post sanctum Cleméntem Ecclésiam Dei regens, eam glorióso martyrio decorávit.
    At Rome, St. Anacletus, pope and martyr, who governed the Church of God after St. Clement, and shed lustre upon it by a glorious martyrdom.
Pope St. Anacletus
The second successor of St. Peter. Whether he was the same as Cletus, who is also called Anencletus as well as Anacletus, has been the subject of endless discussion.


Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1). 

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew

Jesus Christ is the blessing for every man and woman ... The Church, in giving us Jesus, offers us the fullness of the Lord’s blessing. This is precisely the mission of the people of God: to spread to all peoples God’s blessing made flesh in Jesus Christ. And Mary, the first and most perfect disciple of Jesus, the first and most perfect believer, the model of the pilgrim Church, is the one who opens the way to the Church’s motherhood and constantly sustains her maternal mission to all mankind. Mary’s tactful maternal witness has accompanied the Church from the beginning. She, the Mother of God, is also the Mother of the Church, and through the Church, the mother of all men and women, and of every people. …

Let us look to Mary, let us contemplate the Holy Mother of God. I suggest that you all greet her together, just like those courageous people of Ephesus, who cried out before their pastors when they entered Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!” What a beautiful greeting for our Mother. There is a story – I do not know if it is true – that some among those people had clubs in their hands, perhaps to make the Bishops understand what would happen if they did not have the courage to proclaim Mary “Mother of God”! I invite all of you, without clubs, to stand up and to greet her three times with this greeting of the early Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!”  Pope Francis; Homily, Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Chinese Catholics Celebrate Pentecost, World Day of Prayer for Church in China
Sacraments of Initiation Administered During Course of Celebrations
Hail, Holy Mother of God -- Pope Francis
By Staff Reporter
Rome, May 27, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Many Chinese Catholic communities celebrated the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China last Sunday, reported Fides. Pope Benedict XVI instituted this day of prayer in 2007.

The May 24 prayer day coincides with the Marian feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians, and this year it coincided with the feast of Pentecost.  At the end of last Wednesday's General Audience in the Vatican, Pope Francis remembered the prayer day for the Asian nation.

In China on the prayer day, the sacraments of Christian initiation were administered to seven catechumans, 13 infants, and 38 adults in the He Bei province's parishes of Yan Jiao and of Bao Ding, as well as in the Zhe Jiang province's parish of Long Gang in the diocese of Wen Zhou.

The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians is celebrated at the Shrine of Our Lady of Sheshan in Shanghai and on the day, the parish of Chang Shu in the diocese of Su Zhou, along with many other communities, prayed: "Let us pray for the Church in China, that faces major challenges in the life of the Church and society. Let us pray so that the Holy Spirit guides us ... and may Our Lady Help of Christians protect us."  Four infants were also baptized during Mass in Chang Shu.

Also to celebrate, the parish of Yi Shan in the Diocese of Wen Zhou in the province of Zhe Jiang held a solemn Marian procession, so that, as observers noted, "the Church is one and united and a witness of love."

Moreover, religious and some lay people of the diocese of Nan Chong, located in the southern province of Sichuan, went on a pilgrimage not only to celebrate the special feasts of Sunday, but also to celebrate the Year of Consecrated Life. During it, those partaking exchanged their experiences of vocation, faith, mission and pastoral activity.

Pope Francis called for the Year of Consecrated Life at the end of his meeting with 120 superior generals of male institutes last November. The year started on the First Sunday of Advent, the weekend of Nov. 29, 2014, and ends on Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated Life. (D.C.L.)


  Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.
By Deborah Castellano Lubov VATICAN CITY, March 04, 2015 (Zenit.org) –

“Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.”
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is  very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding
.

 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

  Pope Francis: The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (Video)
He explained that it can also be found in day to day life By Staff

ROME, November 13, 2014 (Rome Reports) - To view the video click here.
     
At the end of its Constitution on the Church, the Second Vatican Council left us a very beautiful meditation on Mary Most Holy.
Let me (Pope Francis) just recall the words referring to the mystery we celebrate today: “The immaculate Virgin preserved free from all stain of original sin, was taken up body and soul into heavenly glory, when her earthly life was over, and exalted by the Lord as Queen over all things” (no. 59).
Then towards the end, there is: “The Mother of Jesus in the glory which she possesses in body and soul in heaven is the image and the beginning of the Church as it is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise, she shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come” (no. 68). Pope Francis
 
 
"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

January 5 – Our Lady of Good Counsel (Bergamo, Italy)  
Pope Francis: "Place your vocation in her hands"
At the opening of the seminarians’ pilgrimage in France, which was held at Lourdes through Monday, November 10, 2014, Pope Francis sent a special message in the form of three pieces of advice:
"Mary accompanied Jesus in his mission. She was present at Pentecost when the disciples received the Holy Spirit. She accompanied the first steps of the Church in a maternal way. During these days in Lourdes, confide in her, place your vocation in her hands, and ask her to make you pastors according to God’s own heart.  Let her strengthen you on these three key points that I mentioned: brotherhood, prayer, and mission.
I wholeheartedly give you my Apostolic Blessing and I ask you to pray for me. Thank you."
www.aleteia.org


Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"