Thursday  Saint of the Day June 04 Prídie Nonas Júnii  
 "War is always a terrible thing ... War is truly 'the mother of all poverty,' it impoverishes the family,
 a great predator of life, of souls, and affects the most sacred and dearest ones,"

  "cultivate...a serene dialogue with all, with meekness, mildness and humility..."  Pope Francis
     40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com , 
Please help save the unborn; they are the future for the world

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary  .

 Thursday  Saint of the Day June 04 Prídie Nonas Júnii  
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  JUNE 2015
Universal: That immigrants and refugees may find welcome and respect in the countries to which they come.
Evangelization: That the personal encounter with Jesus may arouse in many young people the desire
to offer their own lives in priesthood or consecrated life.
Thursday, June 4, 2015
Tobit 6:10-11; 7:1, 9-17; 8:4-9
; Psalms 128:1-5 ;  Mark 12:28-34 ;
1st v. Sts Martha and Mary the righteous sisters were believers in Christ even before He raised their brother St Lazarus (October 17) from the dead
175 Concordius The Holy Martyr son of the presbyter Gordian, was raised in piety and faith in Christ, and therefore Bishop Pius of Rome made him a subdeacon generously distributed alms to the needy
325 St. Metrophanes Bishop of Byzantium  first Patriarch of Constantinople His devotion to the faith as bishop was so remarkable that Emperor Constantine the Great was supposedly influenced by him in placing the new imperial capital at Byzantium, on the Hellespont -- Constantinople.
564 St. Petroc Welsh became a monk and with some of his friends, went to Ireland to study pilgrimage to Rome and Jerusalem known for his miracles
1150 St. Walter Benedictine abbot English served as a monk and then abbot of Fontenelle, France, the famed Benedictine spiritual center.  Pope Innocent II (r. 1130-1143)  noted his zeal and holiness.
1392 Saint Methodius, Igumen of Peshnosha founder of the Peshnosha monastery under guidance St Sergius of Radonezh
1847 ST VINCENTIA GEROSA, VIRGIN, COFOUNDRESS OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY OF LOVERE  

June 4 – First visit of Saint John Paul II to Poland, at Czestochowa (1979) 
 
In Poland, a light has always shone…
The monastery of Jasna Gora, near Czestochowa in Poland, dates from the 14th century. In the 17th century, as Poland attempted to expand to the east, a major counter-offensive led by the Russians and the Swedes ensued. Then, in 1655, the Virgin appeared to the religious of the monastery of Czestochowa who managed to repel the Swedes’ attack. On April 1st, 1656, the Polish King Casimir consecrated the country to Mary and proclaimed Our Lady of Czestochowa the Patroness of Poland.

In the 20th century, Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany. The German governor in Poland wrote in his diary: "At a time when Poland was completely submerged in darkness, a light always remained lit: the shrine of Czestochowa and the Church."

At the end of the war, Poland regained its independence but with a communist government. It was then that Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski, to mark the millennium of the evangelization of Poland, organized a house to house pilgrimage of a reproduction of the image of Our Lady of Częstochowa. This event had a very strong popular impact and planted the seed of resistance to Communism.
The Mary of Nazareth Team


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.


  June 4 - Our Lady of the Hill (Lombardy, Italy, 4th C.) All Holy Vessel of Honor
Saint John's Gospel (...) seems to emphasize her role as an intercessor. There we see that it was Mary who triggered Jesus' public ministry. She point out a need: the wedding feast had hardly begun, and the newlyweds had already run out of wine. Though Jesus gave no clear indication that He would fulfil her request, she remained confident He would. She said to the servants: "Do whatever He tells you" (Jn 2:5).
And Jesus turned the jars full of water into the finest wine. (...)
Christ honored His mother. That is the key to understanding the ancient Christian doctrines regarding Mary, especially her immaculate conception, her perpetual virginity, and her bodily assumption into heaven. (...)
Mary was to be filled with Christ and only with Christ. That is the meaning of her holiness. (...) Everything in her is holy.
So, like the Temple vessels, she could not be returned to ordinary earthly use. She remained "perpetually virgin."
She had no sexual relations with her husband, Joseph. She had no children after Jesus.
This has been the constant faith of Christians.
It was held firmly by the classic reformers, including Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and John Wesley.

Excerpts from Scott Hahn, Reasons To Believe, Darton, Longmont and Todd Ltd, 2007, pp. 103, 107-108

Mary Receives the Holy Spirit (I) June 4 - Our Lady of the Hill (Lombardy, Italy)
 On the day of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit sent the disciples rays of his sacred fire, but he especially concentrated his gifts on Mary, penetrating and kindling her with his heat. He espoused her anew, and gave himself to her more fully and more intimately than he had ever done before.
Let us not limit divine power; but we can say in truth that the Holy Spirit never communicated himself with a creature more profusely than he did with Mary, and never will.
On that day a prodigious change came upon the Apostles,
 who from the coarse and lusty men they were, became wholly spiritual and divine...
But something still greater occurred in Mary, who unlike the Apostles did not go from a state of imperfection to one of holiness,
but from a sublime degree of perfection to another more sublime degree, absolutely without comparison.
Obviously, there is nothing excessive in this statement. If we are able to comprehend that the holiness of God is infinite in itself, nothing can limit his communication to the outside world and with respect to Mary the only limit he set was to give what an essentially finite pure creature could hold. Since this capacity can always become greater, without ceasing to be finite, let us not struggle to believe that Mary surpassed the intelligence of all men and angels.
"The Most Beautiful Texts about the Virgin Mary" Father Grou (1731-1803)
Presented by Father Pie Regamey (1946)
Mary the Mother of God
1st v. sister Sts Martha and Mary the righteous sisters were believers in Christ even before He raised their brother St Lazarus (October 17) from the dead
41-54 Sts. Frontasius, Severinus, Severianus, and Silanus The Holy Martyrs suffered for Christ preach the Word of God in southern Gaul (now France) by Bishop Frontonus of Petragorium
64 St. Clateus Martyred bishop. He was one of the earliest bishops of Brescia, Italy. He died in the persecution launched by Emperor Nero.
98-117 Astius The Hieromartyr was bishop of the city of Dyrrachium (Macedonia)
175 Concordius The Holy Martyr son of the presbyter Gordian, was raised in piety and faith in Christ, and therefore Bishop Pius of Rome made him a subdeacon generously distributed alms to the needy
270 St. Aretius Roman martyr with Dacian relics of martyrs were discovered in the catacombs along the Appian Way.
308 St. Quirinus Bishop and martyr of Siscia, Croatia
St. Rutilius and Companions group of martyrs put to death at Sabaria, in the province of Pannonia during the Roman
persecutions.
St. Quirinus martyr put to death at Tivoli, Italy, and mentioned in the Roman Martyrology under the same feast day as
the Quirinus of Pannonia.
325 St. Metrophanes Bishop of Byzantium  first Patriarch of Constantinople His devotion to the faith as bishop was so remarkable that Emperor Constantine the Great was supposedly influenced by him in placing the new imperial capital at Byzantium, on the Hellespont -- Constantinople.
387 St. Optatus of Milevis Bishop of Milevis, Numidia, in Africa a convert from paganism best known for his opposition to the heresy of Donatism and his six treatises composed against them Martyrs of Niculitsel graves of Saints Zoticus, Atallus, Camisius and Philip were discovered in 1971.
5th v. Saint Zosimus, Bishop of Babylon, was born in Cilicia (Asia Minor) settled on Mount Sinai, and later he withdrew to a  more solitary place in Lebanon
5th-6th v. St. Breaca Disciple of St. Brigid went from Ireland to Cornwall, England, about 460 Breaca and her companions settled on the bank of the Hoyle River
 564 St. Petroc Welsh became a monk and with some of his friends, went to Ireland to study pilgrimage to Rome and Jerusalem known for his miracles
6th v. St. Croidan disciple of St. Petroc with St. Medan and Degan.
6th v. St. Buriana Irish hermitess of Cornwall, known for penitential practices and holiness. She is venerated at Buryan,  opposite the Isles of Scilly. 
St. Nennoc British virgin. She served as an abbess of a convent in Armorica, France, after following St. Germanus of Auxerre there.
Saint Sophia was born in Aenus, Rhodope mother of six children occupied with worldly cares and responsibilities still kept the commandments of God and lived a  virtuous life.

8th v. St. Alexander Bishop of Verona, Italy.
1015 St. Elsiar Benedictine monk at Saint-Savin Monastery in Lavedan.
1150 St. Walter Benedictine abbot English served as a monk and then abbot of Fontenelle, France, the famed Benedictine spiritual center.  Pope Innocent II (r. 1130-1143)  noted his zeal and holiness.
1176 St. Cornelius Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland Irishman, he joined the Augustinians at Armagh died returning from a pilgrimage to Rome
1250 St. Walter Benedictine hermit, abbot, founder and first abbot of
Serviliano monastery in the Marches of Ancona, Italy. This monastery involved in the renaissance of the spirit that was pioneered by religious orders in that er St. Saturnina virgin martyr reportedly a maiden from Germany who journeyed to France and there died while defending herself against some attack upon her chastity.
1392 Saint Methodius, Igumen of Peshnosha founder of the Peshnosha monastery under guidance St Sergius of Radonezh
1608 St. Francis Caracciolo priest Founder of the Minor Clerks Regular with St. John Augustine Adorno

Archbishop Andronicus of Perm The holy New Martyr was an outspoken critic of the Communist decree which ordered the separation of Church and State
1847 ST VINCENTIA GEROSA, VIRGIN, COFOUNDRESS OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY OF LOVERE
1886 Charles Lwanga and Companions; One of 22 Ugandan martyrs, Charles Lwanga is the patron of youth and Catholic action in most of tropical Africa.
June 4 - Pope John Paul II’s First Visit to Poland (Czestochowa, 1979)
Mary Has a Role in Jesus’ Saving Mission (II)
Simeon’s prophecy is followed by the meeting with the prophetess Anna:
“She began to praise God, and spoke of the child to all who were looking forward to the deliverance of Jerusalem” (Lk 2:38).
The faith and prophetic wisdom of the old woman who nurtures the expectation of the Messiah by “serving God night and day with fasting and prayer” (Lk 2:37), offer the Holy Family a further incentive to put their hope in the God of Israel. At this particular moment, Anna’s behavior would have appeared to Mary and Joseph as a sign from the Lord, a message of enlightened faith and persevering service.
Beginning with Simeon’s prophecy, Mary intensely and mysteriously unites her life with Christ’s sorrowful mission:
she is to become her Son's faithful coworker for the salvation of the human race.
Pope John Paul II  General Audience, December 18, 1996



1st v. sister Sts Martha and Mary the righteous sisters were believers in Christ even before He raised their brother St Lazarus (October 17) from the dead
< Martha                                                                                                                                   Mary >
After the murder of the holy Archdeacon Stephen a persecution against the Jerusalem Church broke out, and Righteous Lazarus was cast out of Jerusalem.
The holy sisters then assisted their brother in the proclaiming of the Gospel in various lands.

Sts Martha and Mary are also commemorated on the Sunday of the Myrrh-bearing Women.

41-54 Sts. Frontasius, Severinus, Severianus, and Silanus The Holy Martyrs suffered for Christ preach the Word of God in southern Gaul (now France) by Bishop Frontonus of Petragorium

under the emperor Claudius (41-54). They had been sent to preach the Word of God in southern Gaul (now France) by Bishop Frontonus of Petragorium. The governor, a pagan named Squiridonus, arrested them and demanded that they renounce Christ. But the martyrs firmly confessed their faith, saying they had but one desire, to either live or die for Christ. The enraged Squiridonus ordered that the saints be taken out before the city, tied to pillars, and have nails thrust into their heads like a crown of thorns. After this they were beheaded.

Tradition says that the holy martyrs continued to live by the power of God. They picked up their heads and went to the church of the Mother of God, where the holy bishop Frontonus, who had sent them preaching, was at prayer. Placing their heads at the feet of the bishop, they crossed themselves and died.
64 St. Clateus Martyred bishop. He was one of the earliest bishops of Brescia, Italy. He died in the persecution launched by Emperor Nero
Medioláni, sancti Clatéi, Epíscopi Brixiénsis et Mártyris, qui, sub Neróne Imperatóre, jussu Præfécti urbis illíus tentus, et, cum renuntiáre Christo nollet, multis verbéribus afflíctus et cápite obtruncátus est.
    At Milan, in the reign of Emperor Nero, St. Clateus, bishop of Brescia and martyr.  By order of the prefect of the city he was arrested, and when he would not deny Christ he was cruelly scourged and beheaded.
98-117 Astius The Hieromartyr was bishop of the city of Dyrrachium (Macedonia)
During the time of the emperor Trajan (98-117), a persecutor of Christians. The saint once had a dream, a foreboding of his impending suffering and death for Christ. He was arrested and beaten fiercely with leaden rods and oxhide whips, but St Astius did not renounce Christ. They smeared his body with honey, so as to increase his suffering with the stings of hornets and flies, and crucified him. The martyr's body was reverently buried by Christians.
175 Concordius The Holy Martyr son of the presbyter Gordian, was raised in piety and faith in Christ, and therefore Bishop Pius of Rome made him a subdeacon generously distributed alms to the needy
Together with his father, St Concordius fasted and prayed, and he generously distributed alms to the needy. With the permission of his father he settled not far from Rome with his kinsman Eutychius, spending his days in prayer and good deeds. The report of his pious life reached Torquatus, the head of the Tussa region. He summoned the saint and urged him to renounce Christ, promising to make him a priest of the pagan gods.

St Concordius in turn urged Torquatus to turn to the true God, Jesus Christ. They beat the martyr and threw him in prison. Bishop Anthimus, a friend of Torquatus, asked him to release the prisoner to him. St Concordius lived with him for a while and was ordained presbyter. When Torquatus again summoned the saint and asked him what he thought about his life, the saint replied that life, for him, is Christ. They bound him and locked him up in prison, chaining him to the wall by his neck and hands.

Three days later Torquatus sent his assistant to the prison, ordering the martyr to offer sacrifice to the gods, or be condemned to death. The saint cried out, "Glory to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ," and spat on the idol of Zeus carried by the soldiers. For this, he was beheaded around the year 175. His relics rest in Italy, not far from the city of Spoleto.
270 St. Aretius Roman martyr with Dacian relics of these martyrs were discovered in the catacombs along the Appian Way
Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum Arétii et Daciáni.    At Rome, the holy martyrs Aretius and Dacian.
Under Emperor Aurelian (214-279 ad). The relics of these martyrs were discovered in the catacombs along the Appian Way.
308 St. Quirinus Bishop and martyr of Siscia, Croatia
Sísciæ, in Illyrico, sancti Quiríni Epíscopi, qui, sub Galério Præside, pro fide Christi (ut Prudéntius scribit), molári saxo ad collum ligáto, in flumen præcipitátus est; sed, lápide supernatánte, cum circumstántes Christiános, ne ejus terreréntur supplício neve titubárent in fide, diu fuísset hortátus, ipse, ut martyrii glóriam assequerétur, précibus a Deo, ut mergerétur, obtínuit.
    At Sissek in Illyria, in the time of Governor Galerius, St. Quirinus, bishop.  Prudentius relates that for the faith of Christ he was thrown into a river with a millstone tied to his neck.  But the stone floated, and he for a long time exhorted the Christians who were present not to be terrified by his punishment, nor to waver in the faith, and then obtained of God by his prayers that he should be drowned in order to attain the glory of martyrdom.
308 ST QUIRINUS, BISHOP OF SISCIA, MARTYR
OF the many martyrs who suffered in the Danubian provinces during the reign of Diocletian, one of the most celebrated was Quirinus whose praises have been sounded-by St Jerome, by Prudentius and by Fortunatus. The “acts" which record his trial, sufferings and death are substantially genuine, although they have undergone amplification and interpolations at the hands of later copyists.
He was bishop of Siscia, now Sisak in Croatia. As he had been informed that orders were out for his arrest, he left the city, but was pursued, captured and brought before the magistrate Maximus. Questioned with regard to his attempted escape he replied that he was only obeying his Master, Jesus Christ, the true God, who had said: "When they persecute you in one city, fly to another." "Do you not know that the emperor's orders would find you anywhere?”', asked the magistrate. "He whom you call the true God cannot help you when you are caught-as you must now realize to your cost." "God is always with us and can help us," declared the bishop. "He was with me when I was taken and He is with me now. He it is who strengthens me and speaks through my lips." "You talk a great deal", observed Maximus," and by talking you postpone obeying the commands of our sovereigns: read the edicts and do as they bid you!” Quirinus protested that he could not consent to do what would be sacrilege: "The gods whom you serve are nothing!" he exclaimed. "My God, whom I serve, is in Heaven and earth, and in the sea and everywhere, but He is higher than all, because He contains all things in Himself: all things were created by Him, and; by Him alone they subsist," "You must be in your second childhood to believe such fables!" declared the judge. "See, they are offering you incense: sacrifice and you shall be well rewarded; refuse and you will be tortured and put to a horrible death."
Quirinus replied that the threatened pains would be glory to him, and Maximus ordered him to be beaten. Even while the sentence was being carried out, he was urged to sacrifice and was told that if he did so he would be made a priest of Jupiter. "I am exercising my priesthood here and now by offering myself up to God", cried the martyr undaunted. "I am glad to be beaten; it does not hurt me. I would willingly endure far worse treatment to encourage those over whom I have presided to follow me by a short road to eternal life," As Maximus had not the authority to pronounce a death-sentence, he arranged to send Quirinus to Amantius, the governor of Pannonia Prima. The bishop was taken through various towns on the Danube until he reached the town of Sabaria (now Szombathely in Hungary), destined a very few years later to be the birthplace of St Martin. Here he was brought up before Amantius who, after reading the report of the previous trial, asked him if it was correct. The saint answered in the affirmative and said, "I have confessed the true God at Siscia, I have never worshipped any other. Him I carry in my heart, and no man on earth shall succeed in separating me from Him." Amantius declared himself unwilling to torture and destroy one of his venerable age, and urged him to fulfil the conditions which would enable him to end his days in peace. Neither promises nor threats, however, could move the saint. The governor therefore had no option but to condemn him,
Quirinus was sentenced to death, and thrown into the river Raab, with a stone round his neck. He did not immediately sink and was heard to utter words of prayer or of exhortation before he disappeared from sight. His body, carried a little way down the stream, was rescued by Christians. In the early fifth century, refugees driven from Pannonia by the barbarians bore the relics to Rome, where they rested in the Catacomb of St Sebastian, until in 1140 they were translated to Santa Maria in Trastevere.
The text of the passio is printed by Ruinart, and in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. i. Much interest has been taken in this St Quirinus since the researches of Mgr de Waal in the Platonia and its surroundings revealed the existence of a fragment of a great inscription engraved there in honour of the saint. See de Waal's monograph, Die Apostelgruft "ad Catacumbas", printed as a "Supplementheft" to the Römische Quartalschrift (1894); and also Duchesne, "La Memoria Apostolorum de la Via Appia", in Memorie della pontificia Accademia romana di Archeol., vol. i (1923), pp. 8-10; with CMH., p. 303.

He reportedly fled his see during the persecutions of Emperor Galerius but was arrested and dragged back to Siscia. There he was ordered to make sacrifices to the gods by Maximus, the Roman magistrate. Upon his refusal, he was tortured and then given into the hands of Amantius, the governor of Pannonia Prima. Stubborn in his refusal to become an apostate, he was tied to a millstone and hurled into the Raab River, where he drowned at Sabaria. In the fifth century and the invasion of the Danube Valley by Germanic hosts, the inhabitants fled to Italy, taking the
 relics of Quirinus with them. They were eventually carried to Rome and interred in the Church of St. Sebastian on the Via Appia.
325 St. Metrophanes Bishop of Byzantium  first Patriarch of Constantinople nephew of Emperor Probus, he was a convert and entered the Church studying for the priesthood ordained by Bishop Titus of Byzantium whom he succeeded in 313.
His devotion to the faith as bishop was so remarkable that Emperor Constantine the Great was supposedly influenced by him in placing the new imperial capital at Byzantium, on the Hellespont. The new city was named Constantinople
Constantinópoli sancti Metróphanis, Epíscopi et Confessóris insígnis.
   At Constantinople, St. Metrophanes, bishop and renowned confessor.


325 ST METROPHANES, BISHOP OF BYZANTIUM
NEXT to nothing is actually known about St Metrophanes, who was bishop of Byzantium in the days of Constantine; he was probably its first bishop, for the town had previously been included in the diocese of Heraclea. He had a great reputation for sanctity throughout eastern Christendom. A church was built in his honour soon after the death of Constantine, and when it was falling into ruin in the sixth century it was restored by Justinian.
The Greek Synaxaries and the Menaia - never a very reliable authority - give his story as follows: Metrophanes was the son of Dometius, brother to the Emperor Probus. Dometius was converted to Christianity and went to live at Byzantium, where he contracted a close friendship with its Bishop Titus, by whom he was ordained, being himself invested at his death with the same dignity. Dometius in his turn was succeeded first by his two sons, Probus, who ruled the see twelve years, and then Metrophanes. The holy life of Bishop Metrophanes, it is alleged, weighed as much with Constantine in his choice of Byzantium for his capital as did the exceptionally favourable position of the city. Old age and infirmity prevented Metrophanes from attending the Council of Nicaea, but he sent his chief presbyter Alexander to represent him. Upon the return of the emperor and the clergy who had attended the council, Metrophanes was inspired to announce to them that Alexander would be his successor and that the boy reader Paul would eventually follow Alexander as bishop. His death took place a few days later.
The text of a late and quite untrustworthy life of Metrophanes has been printed by L. Gedeon, in vol. xx (1900)  
and there is also another text noticed in BHG. See, further, the notice in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. i, and in Nilles, Kalendarium Utriusque Ecclesiae, vol. i, p. 172. Cf. also Texte und Untersuchungen, vol. xxxi, part 3 (1903), pp. 188 seq. Metrophanes is commemorated in the Roman Martyrology, where he is described as confessor insignis.
Saint Metrophanes, Patriarch of Constantinople, was a contemporary of St Constantine the Great (306-337). His father, Dometius, was a brother of the Roman emperor Probus (276-282). Seeing the falseness of the pagan religion, Dometius came to believe in Christ. During a time of terrible persecution of Christians at Rome, St Dometius set off to Byzantium with two of his sons, Probus and Metrophanes. They were instructed in the law of the Lord by Bishop Titus, a man of holy life. Seeing the ardent desire of Dometius to labor for the Lord, St Titus ordained him presbyter. After the death of Titus first Dometius (272-303) was elevated to the bishop's throne, and thereafter his sons, Probus (303-315) and in 316 St Metrophanes.

The emperor Constantine once came to Byzantium, and was delighted by the beauty and comfortable setting of the city. And having seen the holiness of life and sagacity of St Metrophanes, the emperor took him back to Rome. Soon Constantine the Great transferred the capital from Rome to Byzantium and he brought St Metrophanes there. The First Ecumenical Council was convened in 325 to resolve the Arian heresy. Constantine the Great had the holy Fathers of the Council bestow upon St Metrophanes the title of Patriarch. Thus, the saint became the first Patriarch of Constantinople.

St Metrophanes was very old, and was not able to be present at the Council, and he sent in his place the chorepiscopos (vicar bishop) Alexander. At the close of the Council the emperor and the holy Fathers visited with the ailing Patriarch. At the request of the emperor, the saint named a worthy successor to himself, Bishop Alexander. He foretold that Paul (at that time a Reader) would succeed to the patriarchal throne after Alexander. He also revealed to Patriarch Alexander of Alexandria that his successor would be the archdeacon St Athanasius.
St Metrophanes reposed in the year 326, at age 117. His relics rest at Constantinople in a church dedicated to him.
It should be noted that the Canons to the Holy Trinity in the Midnight Office in the Octoechos were not composed by this Metrophanes, but by Bishop Metrophanes of Smyrna, who lived in the middle of the ninth century.
St. Rutilius and Companions group of martyrs put to death at Sabaria, in the province of Pannonia during the Roman persecutions
In Pannónia sanctórum Mártyrum Rútili et Sociórum.    In Hungary, the holy martyrs Rutilus and his companions.
St. Quirinus A relatively unknown martyr put to death at Tivoli, Italy, and mentioned in the Roman Martyrology under the same feast day as the Quirinus of Pannonia
Tíbure sancti Quiríni Mártyris.      At Tivoli, St Quirinus, martyr.
 Martyrs of Niculitsel graves of Saints Zoticus, Atallus, Camisius and Philip were discovered in 1971.

Lesser Scythia (modern Romania), between the Danube and the Black Sea in the northeastern territory of the Roman Empire, was a place of exile or death for Christians who refused to worship the pagan gods. During the persecutions of Decius (249-251), Diocletian and Maximilian (284-305), and Licinius (308-324) thousands of people died there from cold, hunger, or torture. The relics of those who endured martyrdom because they openly proclaimed their faith in Christ were taken by Christians and buried in secret places. Accounts of the lives and sufferings of these holy martyrs were written and preserved so they would not be forgotten. When the persecutions ended, the relics were moved from their temporary resting places and placed in special crypts (martyria). Churches were built over these crypts, and the ruins of some of them may be seen today in Dobrogea.

In September 1971 a creek overflowed its banks near the village of Niculitsel in the county of Tulcea, revealing one of the oldest of these martyria. The crypt, which is made of bricks, is divided into two rooms, one on top of the other. In the upper room, the relics of four martyrs were found in a single wooden coffin. All had been decapitated. The heads of three martyrs were found atop their necks, while the head of the fourth martyr was resting on his chest. An inscription on the left wall reads: "Christ's martyrs." The names of the four martyrs (Zoticus, Attalus, Camasius, and Philip) were scratched into the right wall.

According to the records which have been preserved, these martyrs were tried by the Roman authorities of Noviodunum (modern Isaccea) and sentenced to death. They were beheaded, then buried at Niculitsel. The exact date of their martyrdom is not known. Some believe that they were slain early in the fourth century during the persecutions of Diocletian or Licinius. Others, however, think the four men may have been martyred north of the Danube during the persecution of the Gothic king Athanaric (370-372) against the Christians.

About a hundred fragments of the bones of two men (aged between 45-50) were found in the lower crypt. It is thought that they died during the persecution of Decius, and then their relics were reinterred at Niculitsel around 370-380. The names of these martyrs are not known.

The Syrian Martyrologion and St Jerome's Martyrologion give June 4 as the date of the martyrs' execution. The Synaxaria list these four martyrs along with six others: Eutychius, Quirinus, Julia, Saturninus, Ninita, Fortunio. Twenty-five others were also beheaded with these martyrs, but are not named.  The relics of these holy martyrs were moved to the Cocosh Monastery in 1971, where they are venerated by the faithful.
387 St. Optatus of Milevis Bishop of Milevis, Numidia, in Africa a convert from paganism best known for his opposition to the heresy of Donatism and his six treatises composed against them
Milévi, in Numídia, sancti Optáti Epíscopi, doctrína et sanctitáte conspícui, quem sancti Ecclésiæ Patres Augustínus et Fulgéntius suis láudibus celebrárunt.
    At Milevi in Numidia, St. Optatus, bishop, celebrated for his learning and holiness.  The holy Fathers of the Church, Augustine and Fulgentius, prasied him highly.
387 ST OPTATUS, Bishop OF Milevis
ONE of the most illustrious champions of the Church during the fourth century was St Optatus, a bishop of Milevis in Numidia. St Augustine styles him a prelate of venerable memory who was by his virtue an ornament to the Catholic Church, and in another passage he couples him with St Cyprian and St Hilary, converts like Optatus from paganism. St Fulgentius not only honours him with the title of saint, but places him in the same rank as St Ambrose and St Augustine.
  He was the first bishop to attempt in his writings to refute the errors of the Donatists, who were rending the Church in Africa by their schism, setting up a rival hierarchy, repudiating the validity of the orders as well as of the sacraments of Catholics, and declaring that they alone were the true Church of Christ. Their claims were set forth and published in a treatise written by one of their bishops, a man of ability named Parmenian. To expose the fallacy of these claims, St Optatus, about the year 370, brought out a book, to which he added some fifteen years later, when he appears to have revised his earlier work. The treatise of Parmenian has long since perished, but that of St Optatus is extant. Written in vigorous and spirited terms, it breathes a conciliatory spirit, for the bishop, though he denounces schism as a greater sin than parricide, is primarily concerned with winning over his opponents.
Throughout he makes a clear distinction between heretics, “deserters or falsifiers of the creed”, who have no true sacraments or worship, and schismatics, rebellious Christians who have true sacraments derived from a common source. Whilst agreeing with Parmenian that there is only one church, he points out that one of its essential marks is universality, or catholicity in extension. He asks how the Donatists can claim to be The Church—cooped up as they are in one corner of Africa and in one very small colony in Rome. Another of the Church’s prerogatives is the chair of Peter “which”, says he, “is ours”. “Peter sat first in this chair and was succeeded by Linus.” He then gives a list of popes (incorrect) from the earliest times to the reigning pontiff Siricius, “with whom”, he says, “we and the world are united...It was to Peter that Jesus Christ declared ‘I will give thee the keys of the kingdom of Heaven and the gates of hell shall not prevail against thee.’ By what right do you claim the keys—you who presume to contend against Peter’s chair? You cannot deny that the episcopal chair was originally given to Peter in the city of Rome that he sat there first as head of the Apostles that this chair was one-—-unity being maintained through union with it that the other apostles did not claim rival chairs and that only schismatics have ever ventured to do so.”
In opposition to the teaching of the Donatists he sets forth the Catholic doctrine that sacraments are holy in themselves and that their operation is not dependent on the character of those who administer them.
As regards the connection between church and state, he declares that the state is not in the Church, but the Church is in the state, i.e. the Roman Empire. In treating of original sin and the necessity for baptismal regeneration, he alludes to the exorcism and anointing which took place at baptisms. He also describes the ceremonies used at Mass, which he speaks of as a sacrifice, and he mentions the penances which the Church exacted in his day and the veneration then paid to relics.
Nothing further is known of the history of St Optatus: he was living in 384, but the date of his death is not recorded. His name was added to the Roman Martyrology by Baronius.
There is a short notice of St Optatus in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. i, but little in­formation was obtainable regarding his personal history. His writings, however, present many points of interest, which have been discussed by scholars in recent times. See, for example, 0. R. Vassall-Phillips, The Work of St Optatus against the Donatists (1911); L. Duchesne, in Mélanges d’Archéologie et d’Histoire (1890), pp. 589—650; N. H. Baynes, in Journal of Theological Studies (1924), pp. 37—44, and (1925), pp. 404—406 P. Monceaux, Histoire littéraire de l’Afrique chrétienne, vol. v; and cf. A. Wilmart iii Recherches (1922), pp. 271—302, and in Revue Bénédictine, vol. xli (1929), pp. 197—203; Gebhardt, Acta Mar­tyrum Selecta (1902), pp. 187 seq.; and Abbot Chapman in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. xi.
One of them, Against Parmenian, is still extant, and was mentioned by St. Jerome in his De Viris Illustribus as having been composed in six books.  The treatise stresses the need for unity and is conciliatory in tone, but it criticizes Donatist teachings on Baptism, and stresses that the Church cannot be limited to Africa but is “catholic.”
Optatus was much praised by such contemporaries as Augustine and Fulgentius of Ruspe.
5th v. Saint Zosimus, Bishop of Babylon, was born in Cilicia (Asia Minor) settled on Mount Sinai, and later he withdrew to a more solitary place in Lebanon
While still a youth he left the world and settled on Mount Sinai, and later he withdrew to a more solitary place in Lebanon. One time he encountered an elderly ascetic, who foretold that he would be bishop in Babylon. When Zosimus returned to Sinai, he was sent on an errand to Alexandria. The Patriarch of Alexandria made him Bishop of Babylon, and into old age he wisely guided his flock. Sensing the approach of death, he returned to Sinai and peacefully fell asleep in the Lord .
6th v. St. Buriana Irish hermitess of Cornwall, known for penitential practices and holiness. She is venerated at Buryan, opposite the Isles of Scilly.
5th-6th v. St. Breaca Disciple of St. Brigid went from Ireland to Cornwall, England, about 460 Breaca and her companions settled on the bank of the Hoyle River.
also called Breque, Branca, and Branka.
564 St. Petroc Welsh became a monk and with some of his friends, went to Ireland to study pilgrimage to Rome and Jerusalem known for his miracles
6th v. ST PETROC, ABBOT
THE numerous churches in Devon and several in Cornwall dedicated to God in honour of St Petroc show in how great esteem this saint was formerly held in Dumnonia. A Welshman by birth, he came south with some of his followers during the sixth century, and made his headquarters in the monastic buildings of Lanwethinoc, founded by the holy bishop Wethinoc. Afterwards, when the cultus of St Petroc displaced that of Wethinoc, Lanwethinoc became Padristowe, and ultimately Padstow. Some time before the eleventh century the monks moved to Bodmin, taking St Petroc’s body with them, and the centre of his cultus was hence-forward there. In 1177 the relics were stolen by one of the canons of Bodmin priory, who gave them to the abbey of Saint-Méen in Brittany, but King Henry II, to whom the prior of Bodmin appealed, obliged this community to restore them. Thereupon, according to the Chronicles of Roger of Hoveden and Benedict of Peterborough, “the above-named prior of Bodmin, returning to England with joy, brought back the body of blessed Petroc in an ivory shrine”.[ * The annual ‘‘riding”‘ custom at Bodmin was apparently in commemoration (If this restoration. See A. K. Hamilton Jenkin, Cornwall and Its People (1945), pp. 466—469.]
This shrine or reliquary was the gift of Walter of Coutances, and there were put therein the skull and other adjacent bones, the rest being enclosed in a wooden coffin. In the eighteenth century this reliquary was discovered in the room over the south porch of Bodmin church, where it had been hidden at the Reformation. It has now found a safe but incongruous resting-place in a local bank. The medieval life of St Petroc written at Saint-Méen seems to be simply a copy of one composed probably at Bodmin priory—a collection of legends compiled from an earlier biography, embodying a certain amount of Cornish folklore.
According to this composition St Petroc was the son of a Welsh “king”, the grandfather of St Cadoc. He and some of his friends became monks and repaired to Ireland, where they studied for some years. They then took ship to Cornwall, to the estuary of the river Camel, where St Petroc proceeded to visit first the holy hermit Samson (perhaps the St Samson) and then St Wethinoc, who yielded up his residence to him and his companions. After living a most austere life in that place for thirty years, St Petroc is said to have made a pilgrimage to Rome and Jerusalem, and even to have reached the Indian ocean, where he spent some time on a tiny island. After his return to Cornwall he spent his time in prayer and in deeds of charity to man and beast. Thus we read that he healed many sick persons, tamed a terrible and destructive monster, prescribed successfully for a poor dragon which came to him with a splinter in its eye, and not only saved the life of a stag, which took refuge with him from its pursuers, but also converted the hunter and his attendants. Another story tells that once when Petroc and Wethinoc were “conversing sweetly together about heavenly things” a handsome cloak fell between them from Heaven. And when, “‘eager to give one another precedence‘, each offered it to the other and in holy contention piled reason upon reason why the other should have it, straightway it was taken away before their eyes. And at once two cloaks appeared, one for each”.
Further particulars, some of them more convincing, can he extracted from a version of the Saint-Méen life made by a canon at Bodmin, included in a fourteenth-century manuscript found at Gotha in Germany in 1937. According to this, Petroc built a chapel and a mill at Little Petherick, near Padstow, at a spot afterwards known as Nanceventon. After his return from the East he established himself here with some of his brethren. Later he withdrew to the recesses of Bodmin Moor, where a hermit named Wronus (Guron) gave up his cell to him, and here he was again joined by some brethren. When he foresaw his end was at hand, Petroc went to say farewell to the communities at Nanceventon and Lanwethinoc; between the two places his strength failed and he turned into the house of one Rovel, where he died. The present farmhouse called Treravel must be close to the spot.

There is a considerable literature connected with St Petroc, as the references in DNB. (under Pedrog), DCB and LBS, alone suffice to show. By far the best and most critical account of the unpromising materials is Canon Doble’s St Petroc, the 3rd edition of which (1938) takes account of the vita in the Gotha MS. See also “Grimspound, a Dartmoor Laura”, by Abbot Vonier, in The Month, March, 1928, pp. 193—200, and “St Petroc’s Cell on Bodmin Moor”, by Dom J. Stonor, in the Downside Review, no. 203 (1948), pp. 64—74.  The medieval priory at Bodmin housed Austin canons regular, so it is fitting that the same canons should have their English novitiate there to-day. The Catholic churches at Padstow and Bodmin bear St Petroc’s name. The long account in the Gotha MS. of the theft and return of the saint’s relics is translated in G. H, Doble’s The Relics of St Petroc, reprinted from Antiquity, December 1939, pp. 403—415. The text is to be printed in Analecta Bollandiana.

Born in 490 Petroc was born in Wales, possibly the son of a Welsh king. He became a monk and with some of his friends, went to Ireland to study. They immigrated to Cornwall in England and settled at Lanwethinoc (Padstow). After thirty years there, he made a pilgrimage to Rome and Jerusalem, at which time he is also reputed to have reached the Indian ocean where he lived for some time as a hermit on an island.  He then returned to Cornwall, built a chapel at Little Petherick near Padstow, established a community of his followers, and then became a hermit at Bodmir Moor, where he again attracted followers and was known for his miracles. He died between Nanceventon and Lanwethinoc while visiting some of his disciples there.
6th v. St. Croidan disciple of St. Petroc with St. Medan and Degan. 
St. Nennoc British virgin. She served as an abbess of a convent in Armorica, France, after following St. Germanus of Auxerre there.
8th v. St. Alexander Bishop of Verona, Italy
Verónæ sancti Alexándri Epíscopi.      At Verona, St. Alexander, bishop.
Saint Sophia was born in Aenus, Rhodope mother of six children occupied with worldly cares and responsibilities still kept the commandments of God and lived a virtuous life.
After her children died, she became a mother to orphans, and gave assistance to widows. She sold her property and gave the money to the poor. She led an austere life, eating bread and water. The Psalms of the Prophet-King David were always on her lips, and tears flowed continuously from her eyes. She would do without the necessities of life herself rather than allow a poor person to leave her home with empty hands.

Because of her humility and her love for the poor, God blessed her in the following way. In her home was a container of wine which she reserved for the poor. She noticed that no matter how much she took from the container, it remained full. However, as soon as she told someone about the miracle and glorified God, the container became empty. St Sophia became sorrowful, believing that the wine diminished because of her unworthiness. Therefore, she increased her ascetical efforts until her health suffered.  Sensing that the end of her life was near, she received the monastic tonsure. St Sophia fell asleep in the Lord at the age of fifty-three.

Saint Sophia  {Self-Ruled Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America }
Every mother wins the “Mother of the Year” award in her own family, but if a vote were taken for the “Mother of the Thousand Years of the Byzantine Empire,” the unanimous choice would be a valiant woman named Sophia who turned a personal tragedy into a triumph of the spirit in the name of the Lord and so glorified His name in her every thought and deed that she was sainted by popular acclaim. She symbolizes motherhood in the purest sense, sanctifying the role all mothers play in the daily grind of raising a family, elevating the mothers of the world to a sacred level in the eyes of God and giving them their due recognition in the divine plan of the universe. A woman acquires a spark of divine grace in bearing a child, and thereafter in caring for it she labors not only for herself but for the property of the Almighty as well, for we are the children of God.

The Noble Sophia came into the world with every advantage, including wealth of beauty and intelligence, as well as an abiding faith in Jesus Christ, and at maturity she left nothing to be desired as a model wife. When she married, she took leave of her parents to make a home of her own with the prayer that she would be blessed with children, a prayer which was answered. She became the mother of six children, all of whom she loved deeply and none of whom lacked the religious fervor of their mother.

It was in her thirty-fourth year, when her happiness knew no bounds, that her greatest joy turned to stark tragedy. A plague swept over the land and she watched helplessly as one by one her children died; and when the pestilence had spent itself she had lost all of her loved ones, including her husband. In numbing grief she yearned to be stricken and join her family in death, but then her Christian faith asserted itself, reminding her that there was much she could do, not only for the Lord but in memory of her family. She returned to her empty house intent upon putting it to good use, and her life thereafter came to be a total commitment to the glory of the Savior.

She lost no time in seeking out the clergy of the community and announcing plans to dispense her wealth among the poor, keeping enough to maintain her house, which she hoped would shelter underprivileged or orphaned children. In a span of twenty years, Sophia’s house became a haven not only for little wanderers but for the dispossessed on any age as well. She actually adopted over one hundred children in this period, raising each of them as though it were her own child and sending them out into the world full of the love of Jesus Christ and quite prepared to make a useful place in society. She came to be known as the “Mother of Orphans,” marveled at by other mothers of the empire whose burdens were made lighter when they compared their cares and worries to those of the woman who had the strength and grace to make her life worthwhile after suffering a loss that would have overwhelmed the average mother.

Many stories of tenderness and sacrifice are attached to Sophia but the one that stands out as an example of her proximity to God is the one concerning the bottomless wine pitcher, if it can be called that. Her hospitality extended to all comers, and when adults sought refuge in her house she customarily poured them a glass of rare vintage from a Grecian urn. After she had first filled the urn, she noticed that no matter how much she dispensed for her guests, the wine was always at the same level when she went to use it again. At first she presumed that someone had surreptitiously refilled the urn when she was otherwise engaged, but she soon realized that it was a phenomenon that could not be explained. She mentioned it, however, to no one.
1015 St. Elsiar Benedictine monk at Saint-Savin Monastery in Lavedan.
1150 St. Walter Benedictine abbot English served as a monk and then abbot of Fontenelle, France, the famed Benedictine spiritual center. Pope Innocent II (r. 1130-1143) noted his zeal and holiness.
1176 St. Cornelius Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland Irishman, he joined the Augustinians at Armagh died returning from a pilgrimage to Rome
Also called Cornelius Mac Conchailleadh or McConchailleach. An Irishman, he joined the Augustinians at Armagh in 1140 and was made abbot in 1151. In 1174, he was made bishop. Cornelius died in Canbery, Savoy, France, while returning from a pilgrimage to Rome.
1250 St. Walter Benedictine hermit, abbot, and the founder and first abbot of the monastery of Serviliano in the Marches of Ancona, Italy. This monastery was involved in the renaissance of the spirit that was pioneered by religious orders in that era.
St. Saturnina virgin martyr reportedly a maiden from Germany who journeyed to France and there died while defending herself against some attack upon her chastity
Atrébati, in Gálliis, sanctæ Saturnínæ, Vírginis et Mártyris.    At Arras in France, St. Saturnina, virgin and martyr.
1392 Saint Methodius, Igumen of Peshnosha founder of the Peshnosha monastery under guidance St Sergius of Radonezh
In his youth he went to St Sergius of Radonezh and spent several years under his guidance. Later on, with the blessing of St Sergius, he withdrew to a solitary place and built himself a cell in the forest beyond the River Yakhroma. Soon several disciples came to him in this marshy place, wishing to imitate his life. St Sergius visited him and advised him to build a monastery and church. St Methodius himself toiled at the construction of the church and the cells, "on foot carrying" wood along the river, and from that time the monastery began to be called "the Peshnosha."

In 1391 St Methodius became igumen of this monastery. At times he withdrew two versts from the monastery and struggled in prayer. Here also St Sergius came to him for spiritual conversation, therefore this spot became known as "Beseda" ("Conversation-place").

St Methodius died in 1392 and was buried at the monastery he founded. A church dedicated to Sts Sergius of Radonezh and Methodius of Peshnosha was built over his relics in 1732. The beginning of his local veneration dates from the late seventeenth - early eighteenth centuries. 
St Macarius is also commemorated on June 14.
1608 St. Francis Caracciolo priest Founder of the Minor Clerks Regular with St. John Augustine Adorno
Agnóni, in Aprútio citerióre, sancti Francísci, ex nóbili Neapolitána família Carácciolo, Confessóris, Congregatiónis Clericórum Regulárium Minórum Fundatóris, qui mira in Deum et próximum caritáte et ardentíssimo sacræ Eucharístiæ cultus propagándi stúdio flagrávit; atque a Pio Séptimo, Pontífice Máximo, Sanctórum cánoni adscríptus est.  Ipsíus corpus Neápolim, in Campánia, translátum fuit, ibíque religiosíssime cólitur.
    At Agnone in Abruzzo, St. Francis of the noble Neapolitan family Caracciolo, confessor, and founder of the Congregation of Minor Clerks Regular.  He burned with an admirable love of God and of neighbour, and a most ardent desire to spread devotion to the Most Holy Eucharist.  His body was taken to Naples in Campania, where it is religiously honoured.  He was inscribed in the catalogue of the saints by Pius VII.
1608 ST FRANCIS CARACCIOLO, FOUNDER OF THE MINOR CLERKS REGULAR
THE saint whom the Church specially honours on this day was born on October 13, 1563, at Villa Santa Maria, in the Abruzzi. His father belonged to the Pisquizio. branch of the Neapolitan princes of Caraccioli, and his mother's family could claim relationship with St Thomas Aquinas. In his baptism he received the name of Ascanio. Well trained by pious parents, he grew up fulfilling their highest hopes, a devout and charitable young man. In other respects he lived the usual life of a young nobleman in the country, being addicted to sport, especially hunting.
When he was twenty-two, he developed a skin disease which seemed akin to leprosy and it soon assumed so virulent a form that his case was considered hopeless. With death staring him in the face, he vowed that if he regained his health he would devote the rest of his life to God and to the service of his fellow men. He recovered so speedily that the cure was held to be miraculous. Eager to carry out his promise, he went to Naples to study for the priesthood. After his ordination he joined a confraternity called the Bianchi della Giustizia, the members of which were specially concerned with caring for prisoners and with preparing condemned criminals to die a holy death. It was a fitting prelude to the career which was about to disclose itself to the young priest.
In the year 1588, John Augustine Adorno, a Genoese patrician who had taken holy orders, was inspired with the idea of founding an association of priests pledged to combine the active with the contemplative life. He consulted Fabriccio Caracciolo, the dean of the collegiate church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Naples, and a letter inviting the co-operation of another Ascanio Caracciolo-a distant kinsman-was by mistake delivered to our saint. So entirely, however, did Adorno's aspirations coincide with his own, that the recipient at once recognized in the apparent error the finger of God, and hastened to associate himself with Adorno. By way of preparation they made a forty-days' retreat in the Camaldolese settlement near Naples where, after a strict fast and earnest prayer, they drew up rules for the proposed order. Then, as soon as their company numbered twelve, Caracciolo and Adorno went to Rome to obtain the approval of the sovereign pontiff. On June I, 1588, Sixtus V solemnly ratified their new society, under the title of the Minor Clerks Regular, and on April 9 of the following year, the two founders made their solemn profession, Caracciolo taking the name of Francis, out of devotion to the great saint of Assisi. In addition to the usual three vows, the members of the new association took a fourth, viz. never to seek any office of dignity either within the order or outside it. To ensure unceasing penance, it was decided that each day one brother should fast on bread and water, another should take the discipline, and a third should wear the hair shirt. In the same manner, St Francis, either at this period or when he became superior, decreed that everyone should spend an hour a day in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament.
No sooner had Francis and Adorno settled their companions in a house in a suburb of Naples than the two set off for Spain in compliance with the pope's desire that they should establish themselves there, seeing that it was a country with which Adorno was well acquainted. However, the time was not yet ripe: the court of Madrid would not allow them to found a house, and they had to return without attaining their object. On the way home they were shipwrecked, but when they reached Naples they discovered that their new foundation had not been allowed to suffer in their absence. Indeed, the house could not contain all who wished to enter and soon afterwards they were invited to take over Santa Maria Maggiore, the former superior of which, Fabriccio Caracciolo, had become one of their number. The Minor Clerks Regular worked mainly as missioners, but some of them devoted themselves to priestly work in hospitals and prisons. They also had places which they called hermitages for those who felt called to a life of contemplation.
St Francis contracted a serious illness, from which he had scarcely recovered when he had the great grief of losing his friend Adorno, who died at the age of forty, shortly after his return from a visit to Rome in connection with the affairs of the institute of which he was superior. Very much against his wishes, Francis was chosen to take his place; he thought himself unworthy of holding office, and habitually signed his letters Franciscus Peccator. He insisted on taking his turn with the others in sweeping rooms, making beds and washing up in the kitchen, and the few hours he gave to sleep were passed on a table or on one of the altar-steps. The poor, whom he loved, knew that they could find him every morning in his confessional. For them he would beg in the streets, with them he would share the greater part of his scanty meals, and sometimes in winter he would even give away his outer garments. In the interest of his society he paid a second and a third visit to Spain in the years 1595 and 1598, and succeeded in founding houses in Madrid, Valladolid and Alcala.
For seven years Francis was obliged to retain the position of general superior, though it was a severe strain upon him, not only because he was a delicate man, but because in establishing and extending the order he found himself and his brethren faced by opposition, misrepresentation, and sometimes by malicious calumnies. At last he obtained permission from Pope Clement VIII to resign, and then he became prior of Santa Maria Maggiore and novice-master. He still carried on his apostolic work in the confessional and in the pulpit, discoursing so constantly and movingly on the divine goodness to man that he was called "The Preacher of the Love of God”. We are also told that with the sign of the cross he restored health to many sick persons.
In 1607 he was relieved of all administrative duties and was allowed to give himself to contemplation and to preparing for death. He chose as his cell a recess under the staircase of the Neapolitan house and was often found lying there in ecstasy with outstretched arms. It was in vain that the pope offered him bishoprics; he had never desired dignities and now his eyes and heart were directed only towards Heaven. But he was not destined to die in Naples. St Philip Neri had offered the Minor Clerks Regular a house at Agnone, in the Abruzzi, as a novitiate, and it was thought desirable that St Francis should go to help with the new foundation. On his way he visited Loreto, where he was granted the favour of spending the night in prayer in the chapel of the Holy House. As he was invoking our Lady's help on behalf of his brethren, Adorno appeared to him in a dream or vision, and announced his approaching death. He arrived at Agnone apparently in his usual health, but he himself was under no illusion. On the first day of June he was seized with a fever which rapidly increased, and he dictated a fervent letter in which he urged the members of the society to remain faithful to the rule. He then seemed absorbed in meditation until ail hour before sunset when he suddenly cried out, "Let us go ! Let us go!" "And where do you want to go, Brother Francis?" inquired one of the watchers. "To Heaven! To Heaven!" came the answer in clear and triumphant accents. Scarcely had the words been uttered when the wish was realized, and the speaker passed to his reward. He was forty-four years of age.
St Francis was canonized in 1807. His order of Minor Clerks Regular was at one time a very flourishing body, but to-day it is hardly known outside of Italy, where there are a few small communities.
A considerable number of lives of St Francis Caracciolo were published in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; for example, those by Vives (1654), Pistelli (1701), and Cencelli (1769). In more modern times we have a biography by Ferrante (1862), and in 1908 a book entitled Terzo Centenario di S. Francesco Caracciolo, by G. Taglialatela. A good account of the rise and development of the Minor Clerks Regular is given in M. Heimbucher's Orden und Kongregationen…, third edition.
He was born in 1563, a member of a noble Neapolitan family. Though he had a rare skin disease, much like leprosy, Francis became a priest, at which time his skin disease disappeared. In 1588, he co-founded the Minor Clerks Regular and spent the rest of his life as the superior. He was canonized in 1807. His cult is now confined to local calendars.
Archbishop Andronicus of Perm The holy New Martyr was an outspoken critic of the Communist decree which ordered the separation of Church and State
Upon reading the Moscow Overland Assembly's instructions on the matter, Archbishop Andronicus ordered his archdeacon to anathematize the Communists. The Archbishop was arrested, shot by two members of the Perm CHEKA, then buried on the road from Perm to Motoviliha.

Bishop Theophanes, an assistant to Archbishop Andronicus, was also arrested about this time. He was then drowned in the River Kama. When they learned of the execution of the Perm bishops, the Moscow Church Assembly sent a special commission, headed by Bishop Basil of Chernigov, to investigate their murder. The Communists, however, took steps to conceal the facts from the investigators.

As the members of the commission were on their way back to Moscow, their train was attacked by Red soldiers somewhere between Perm and Viatka. Bishop Basil and the others were killed, and their bodies were thrown from the coach. The bodies were buried by peasants, but were later dug up and burned by the Communists when pilgrims began flocking to the graves.

1847 ST VINCENTIA GEROSA, VIRGIN, CO-FOUNDRESS OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY OF LOVERE
UNDER July 26 will be found an account of St Bartholomea Capitanio, foundress of the “Suore della Carità” of Lovere—an institute closely resembling both in its spirit and its activities the world-famous Sisters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul.
   In the work of giving life to this project Bartholomea was assisted from the first by a companion much older than herself, who was also a native of Lovere. Catherine Gerosa—the name Vincentia only came to her when she assumed the habit of a nun—had been born in 1784 and for forty years had led a most holy life, devoted almost entirely to works of charity and the domestic duties which had devolved upon her after the early death of her parents. It seems to have been in 1823 or 1824 that she was brought into intimate contact with Bartholomea Capitanio, both of them having been deeply moved by an appeal of Mgr Nava, bishop of Brescia, who called for volunteers to help in rescue work, especially through the education of the young. This was at the time sadly neglected in that part of Italy under Austrian rule. Though Catherine Gerosa’s attrait was rather in the direction of the service of the sick and poor, she was persuaded to join forces with her younger friend who felt specially called to the work of instructing children.

In the end both aims were combined in the institute which they planned in close dependence upon the rule of the Sisters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul. They would gladly have affiliated themselves to the great French order, but the political theories of the then government refused recognition of any organization which depended upon foreign control. The work prospered astonishingly, despite the lack of all resources and despite the death in 1833 of the more active of its foundresses at the early age of twenty-six. But Vincentia, though she had to carry on alone, was truly possessed by the spirit of God. She seems also to have been an admirable organizer and under her rule recruits and new foundations continued to multiply. She herself was the humblest of creatures and found the marks of respect paid to her a great trial. She turned continually to the remembrance of our Lord’s sufferings on the cross for strength and guidance. Hence she used to say, “He who has not learnt, what the crucifix means knows nothing, and he who knows his crucifix has nothing more to learn”. After a long illness most patiently borne, Mother Vincentia died on June 29, 1847. She was canonized in 1950.
Fr Luigi Mazza, s.j. who published in 1905 a full account of Bd Bartholomea Capitanio and her institute, supplemented this in 1910 with a Life of Mother Vincenza Gerosa. The decree of beatification (in Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xxv, 1933, pp. 300—303) includes a biographical summary. See also Kempf, The Holiness of the Church in the Nineteenth Century, pp. 204—207.
1886 Charles Lwanga and Companions; One of 22 Ugandan martyrs, Charles Lwanga is the patron of youth and Catholic action in most of tropical Africa.
   
He protected his fellow pages (aged 13 to 30) from the homosexual demands of the Bagandan ruler, Mwanga, and encouraged and instructed them in the Catholic faith during their imprisonment for refusing the ruler’s demands.

For his own unwillingness to submit to the immoral acts and his efforts to safeguard the faith of his friends, Charles was burned to death at Namugongo on June 3, 1886, by Mwanga’s order.

Charles first learned of Christ’s teachings from two retainers in the court of Chief Mawulugungu. While a catechumen, he entered the royal household as assistant to Joseph Mukaso, head of the court pages.

On the night of Mukaso’s martyrdom for encouraging the African youths to resist Mwanga, Charles requested and received Baptism. Imprisoned with his friends, Charles’s courage and belief in God inspired them to remain chaste and faithful.

When Pope Paul VI canonized these 22 martyrs on October 18, 1964, he referred to the Anglican pages martyred for the same reason.

Comment: Like Charles Lwanga, we are all teachers and witnesses to Christian living by the examples of our own lives. We are all called upon to spread the word of God, whether by word or deed. By remaining courageous and unshakable in our faith during times of great moral and physical temptation, we live as Christ lived. Quote: On his African tour in 1969, Pope Paul VI told 22 young Ugandan converts that "being a Christian is a fine thing but not always an easy one."

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today

1150 St. Walter Benedictine abbot English served as a monk and then abbot of Fontenelle, France, the famed Benedictine spiritual center. 
Pope Innocent II (r. 1130-1143)  noted his zeal and holiness.

Non est inventus similis illis
  Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew




Hail, Holy Mother of God -- Pope Francis
Jesus Christ is the blessing for every man and woman ... The Church, in giving us Jesus, offers us the fullness of the Lord’s blessing. This is precisely the mission of the people of God: to spread to all peoples God’s blessing made flesh in Jesus Christ. And Mary, the first and most perfect disciple of Jesus, the first and most perfect believer, the model of the pilgrim Church, is the one who opens the way to the Church’s motherhood and constantly sustains her maternal mission to all mankind. Mary’s tactful maternal witness has accompanied the Church from the beginning. She, the Mother of God, is also the Mother of the Church, and through the Church, the mother of all men and women, and of every people. …

Let us look to Mary, let us contemplate the Holy Mother of God. I suggest that you all greet her together, just like those courageous people of Ephesus, who cried out before their pastors when they entered Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!” What a beautiful greeting for our Mother. There is a story – I do not know if it is true – that some among those people had clubs in their hands, perhaps to make the Bishops understand what would happen if they did not have the courage to proclaim Mary “Mother of God”! I invite all of you, without clubs, to stand up and to greet her three times with this greeting of the early Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!”  Pope Francis; Homily, Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Chinese Catholics Celebrate Pentecost, World Day of Prayer for Church in China
Sacraments of Initiation Administered During Course of Celebrations

By Staff Reporter
Rome, May 27, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Many Chinese Catholic communities celebrated the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China last Sunday, reported Fides. Pope Benedict XVI instituted this day of prayer in 2007.

The May 24 prayer day coincides with the Marian feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians, and this year it coincided with the feast of Pentecost.  At the end of last Wednesday's General Audience in the Vatican, Pope Francis remembered the prayer day for the Asian nation.

In China on the prayer day, the sacraments of Christian initiation were administered to seven catechumans, 13 infants, and 38 adults in the He Bei province's parishes of Yan Jiao and of Bao Ding, as well as in the Zhe Jiang province's parish of Long Gang in the diocese of Wen Zhou.

The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians is celebrated at the Shrine of Our Lady of Sheshan in Shanghai and on the day, the parish of Chang Shu in the diocese of Su Zhou, along with many other communities, prayed: "Let us pray for the Church in China, that faces major challenges in the life of the Church and society. Let us pray so that the Holy Spirit guides us ... and may Our Lady Help of Christians protect us."  Four infants were also baptized during Mass in Chang Shu.

Also to celebrate, the parish of Yi Shan in the Diocese of Wen Zhou in the province of Zhe Jiang held a solemn Marian procession, so that, as observers noted, "the Church is one and united and a witness of love."

Moreover, religious and some lay people of the diocese of Nan Chong, located in the southern province of Sichuan, went on a pilgrimage not only to celebrate the special feasts of Sunday, but also to celebrate the Year of Consecrated Life. During it, those partaking exchanged their experiences of vocation, faith, mission and pastoral activity.

Pope Francis called for the Year of Consecrated Life at the end of his meeting with 120 superior generals of male institutes last November. The year started on the First Sunday of Advent, the weekend of Nov. 29, 2014, and ends on Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated Life. (D.C.L.)


  Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.
By Deborah Castellano Lubov VATICAN CITY, March 04, 2015 (Zenit.org) –

“Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.”
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is  very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding
.

 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

  Pope Francis: The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (Video)
He explained that it can also be found in day to day life By Staff

ROME, November 13, 2014 (Rome Reports) - To view the video click here.
     
At the end of its Constitution on the Church, the Second Vatican Council left us a very beautiful meditation on Mary Most Holy.
Let me (Pope Francis) just recall the words referring to the mystery we celebrate today: “The immaculate Virgin preserved free from all stain of original sin, was taken up body and soul into heavenly glory, when her earthly life was over, and exalted by the Lord as Queen over all things” (no. 59).
Then towards the end, there is: “The Mother of Jesus in the glory which she possesses in body and soul in heaven is the image and the beginning of the Church as it is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise, she shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come” (no. 68). Pope Francis
 
 
"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

January 5 – Our Lady of Good Counsel (Bergamo, Italy)  
Pope Francis: "Place your vocation in her hands"
At the opening of the seminarians’ pilgrimage in France, which was held at Lourdes through Monday, November 10, 2014, Pope Francis sent a special message in the form of three pieces of advice:
"Mary accompanied Jesus in his mission. She was present at Pentecost when the disciples received the Holy Spirit. She accompanied the first steps of the Church in a maternal way. During these days in Lourdes, confide in her, place your vocation in her hands, and ask her to make you pastors according to God’s own heart.  Let her strengthen you on these three key points that I mentioned: brotherhood, prayer, and mission.
I wholeheartedly give you my Apostolic Blessing and I ask you to pray for me. Thank you."
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Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"
Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand?