Mary Mother of GOD
 Sunday  Saint of the Day June 07   Séptimo Idus Júnii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Even before her Assumption, Mary was venerated in Provence
 
June 7 – Apparition of Saint Joseph in Cotignac (France, 1660)
Blessed Marie-Therese Soubiran, foundress of the Congregation of Mary Auxiliatrix (d.1889)
 
It seems that the devotion to Mary began in Marseilles (France) even before her Assumption. At any rate, it quickly supplanted the cults of Diana, Apollo, Minerva, and Jupiter, as shrines dedicated to the Virgin quickly replaced the important pagan monuments atop Marseilles’ seven hills.

Today, the number and importance of the places dedicated to the “Good Mother,” “Our Lady” or the “Madonna” is significant in Provence. Fifteen are especially prominent, among them the Basilica of Our Lady of the Guard in Marseilles, and the Shrine of Our Lady of Cotignac.

The fourth century has been called the "brilliant century of Christianity in Provence," since it produced the two flagship abbeys of Saint Victor in Marseilles and Lérins Island near Cannes. With the Primacy in Arles and its influence on the Gallic churches, monasticism arrived in Gaul through Provence with Saint John Cassian in particular.

Thus Provence was the first region of France to welcome Christianity. By appearing at Cotignac, the Virgin Mary chose the perfect place and time to distribute her graces.

 
 Sunday  Saint of the Day June 07   Séptimo Idus Júnii.  
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  JUNE 2015
Universal: That immigrants and refugees may find welcome and respect in the countries to which they come.
Evangelization: That the personal encounter with Jesus may arouse in many young people the desire
to offer their own lives in priesthood or consecrated life.
Sunday, June 7, 2015
Exodus 24:3-8
; Psalms 116:12-13, 15-18 ; Hebrews 9:11-15 ;  Mark 14:12-16, 22-26 ;
 
1st v. Hesia and Susanna The Holy Women were disciples of the PriestMartyr Pankratios, Bishop of Tauromeneia (Comm. 9 July),  a disciple of the Apostle Peter.
 3rd v. St Sisinius deacon suffered at Rome along with hieromartyr Marcellus, Bishop of Rome, holy deacon Cyriacus; also Smaragdus, Largus, Apronian, Saturninus, Crescentian, Papias and Maurus and the holy women martyrs Priscilla, Lucy and the Emperor's daughter Artemia
610    Colman (Mocholmoc) of Dromore first abbot of Muckmore, County Antrim many miracles to the bishop; teacher of Saint Finnian of Clonard B (AC)
 786 St. Willibald Bishop and missionary native of Wessex England brother of Sts. Winebald and Walburga related to St. Boniface; Willibald was the first recorded English pilgrim to the Holy Land, and his vita the earliest travel book by an English writer.
1066 St. Gottschalk Martyr Prince of the Wends collected scattered tribes of the Slavs into one kingdom, and to make that Christian established monasteries at Oldenburg, Mecklenburg, Ratzeburg, Lubeck, and Lenzen
1159 St. Robert of Newminster priest from North Yorkshire who took the Benedictine habit at Whitby obtained permission to join monks of York became Cistercian
1527 BD BAPTISTA VARANI, VIRGIN; Poor Clare; mystical revelations on the Passion-revelations which under obedience she embodied in a book entitled The Sufferings of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus; she drew up a series of instructions upon how to attain perfection. They exhibit that shrewd common sense not unmixed with humour which characterizes some of the great mystics. Though written for a fifteenth-century monk, they would form an excellent rule of life for any devout twentieth-century Catholic.
1928 Joseph Perez Servant of God Franciscan "The blood of martyrs is the seed of the Church," said Tertullian in the third century. Joseph Perez carried on that tradition; body was later brought in procession to Salvatierra, it was buried there amid cries of "Viva, Cristo Rey!"



June 7 – Apparition of Saint Joseph in Cotignac (France, 1660) -
Blessed Marie Therese Soubiran, Founder of the congregation of Marie-Auxiliatrice (d. 1889)
 
In the presence of the Holy Family in Cotignac
 On June 7, 1660—a very hot day—a young shepherd from the village of Cotignac climbed the gentle slope of Mount Bessillon where he led his flock to graze. Tired and thirsty, he stopped for a while and lay down on the rocky ground, when a tall man appeared and showed him a rock, saying: “I am Joseph. Lift it up and you will find water to drink.”

Since that day, the same spring and divine favors have never stopped flowing from Mount Bessillon. The shrine of Cotignac is the only officially recognized place of an apparition of Saint Joseph in the history of the Church.

On August 10, 1519, the Virgin Mary appeared with the Child Jesus in her arms, on a nearby hill known as Mount Verdaille, asking for a church dedicated to “Our Lady of Graces” to be built and promising to grant many graces to pilgrims.

This pure and quiet Provencal atmosphere, blessed by the presence of the Holy Family,
offers retreats to pilgrims and brings authentic Marian graces.
 saintjosephdubessillon.org

 

June 07 - Our Lady of Marienthal (Germany, 13th C.)  Made Full of Grace
"Full of grace" is the name Mary possesses in the eyes of God. Indeed the angel, according to Saint Luke's account, uses this expression even before he speaks the name "Mary" and thus emphasizes the predominant aspect which the Lord perceived in the Virgin of Nazareth's personality.
The epithet full of grace is the translation of the Greek word kecharitomene, which is a passive participle. Therefore to render more exactly the nuance of the Greek word one should not say merely "full of grace" but "made full of grace" or more aptly "filled with grace", which would clearly indicate that this was a gift given from God to the Blessed Virgin.
Pope John Paul II, Blessed Virgin Filled with God's Grace, excerpt taken from:
L'Osservatore Romano, English Ed. Mary, 15, 1996.

As I Passed by the House of the Annunciation (II) June 07 - Our Lady of the Valley or Marienthal (Germany)

Some people cried out: "Padre, Padre! The crippled boy is here!" When I saw that kid walk straight up to the altar, I felt a cold chill all over my body. The Lord had really healed him. My arms jerked, I dropped the crutches, and my whole body went into a spasm of anxiety. I started crying out: "Lord, forgive me, I promise I'll never sneer again..."
What I didn't know was that the Lord had healed me too.
At the same time, the Lord inspired Father Tardif a word of science and he said: "A young fellow involved in drugs and on bad terms with his family is here. He had a bad childhood.
He is rebellious and lives a life of sin, but the Lord is touching and healing him right now."
I remember my whole body felt numb, as if I had swallowed a huge piece of ice, and it was slowly going down my throat. I knew the priest was talking about me. At the time, I didn't speak up. But the next day I went back to the House of the Annunciation and continued to pray. I talked with the priest and told him everything and I prayed non-stop.
My dad and all our neighbors realized I'd changed for real.
Our Lord's ways are unpredictable: To transform a community, God chooses the worst person, converts him and all the bystanders are seized by God's love. I gave up drugs and drinking, and forgave my dad with all my heart.
I told him I loved him and I hugged him. He forgave me too. I asked all those that I had offended by my behavior to forgive me--my brothers, the man who lives with my mother, etc. Now we live together happily in the peace of Christ.
Testimony of José Pimentel - printed in "Alabanza" magazine #70
Quoted in the book by Sister Emmanuel, "Emiliano Tardif, A Man of God" (Ed. Beatitudes)

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

 1st v. Hesia and Susanna The Holy Women were disciples of the PriestMartyr Pankratios, Bishop of Tauromeneia (Comm. 9 July),  a disciple of the Apostle Peter.
 304 Potamioena the Younger A young girl martyred at Alexandria VM (AC)
 3rd v. Theodotus The Holy Martyr lived in Ancyra of Galatia distinguished by his kindliness and concern
 3rd v. Hieromartyr Marcellinus Bishop of Rome Claudius, Cyrinus and Antoninus with him 17,000 men the Holy Martyrs
 3rd v. St Sisinius deacon suffered at Rome along with hieromartyr Marcellus, Bishop of Rome, holy deacon Cyriacus; also Smaragdus, Largus, Apronian, Saturninus, Crescentian, Papias and Maurus and the holy women martyrs Priscilla, Lucy and the Emperor's daughter Artemia
St. Lycarion A martyr of Egypt Virgin - martyrs: Martha with Mary and their brother Lycarion, in Egypt
 3rd v. Kyriake, Kaleria (Valeria), and Mary the holy women martyrs lived in Palestinian Caesarea; abandoned paganism, settled in a solitary place and spent their lives in prayer, beseeching the Lord that the persecution against Christians would come to an end, and that the Faith of Christ would shine throughout all the world
 310 Marcellus hieromartyr Bishop of Rome denounced the emperor openly before everyone for his cruelty toward innocent Christians
 350 St. Paul of Bishop of Constantinople during the period of bitter controversy in the Church over the Arian heresy
 610    Colman (Mocholmoc) of Dromore first abbot of Muckmore, County Antrim many miracles to the bishop; teacher of Saint Finnian of Clonard B (AC)
 643 St. Vulphy Hermit and miracle worker also called Vulfiafius
 688      Meriadoc of Vannes came to Cornwall and founded several churches, one of which at Camborne was once
            dedicated to him a life of abstinence and love for
the poor
 732      Aventinus of Bagnères hermit in Larboush Valley, where Saracens discovered him put him to death M (AC)
 786 St. Willibald Bishop and missionary native of Wessex England brother of Sts. Winebald and Walburga related to St. Boniface; Willibald was the first recorded English pilgrim to the Holy Land, and his vita the earliest travel book by an English writer.
 847 St. Deochar Hermit  Blessed Charlemagne founded Benedictine abbey of Herriedon appointed Deochar first
           abbot: 
Deochar  translated relics of St.
Boniface to Fulda
 851 St. Peter Spanish martyr with Wallabonsus, Sabinian, Wistremundus, Habentius, and Jeremias martyred in
       Cordoba at the order of
Emir Abd al-Rahman II for preaching against Muhammad.
 886 St. Meriadoc went to Cornwall then Brittany where became a hermit and elected bishop of Vannes, in Brittany
 967 Bld Odo of Massy, Benedictine abbot (935-967) of the Cluniac house of Massay (Benedictines). OSB Abbot (AC)
1066 St. Gottschalk Martyr Prince of the Wends collected scattered tribes of the Slavs into one kingdom, and to make that Christian established monasteries at Oldenburg, Mecklenburg, Ratzeburg, Lubeck, and Lenzen
1159   Robert of Newminster "gentle in companionship, merciful in judgment," studied in Paris OSB Cist. Abbot (RM)
1302 St. Meriadoc native of Brittany ordained then embraced the life of a hermit then Bishop of Vannes most
        conspicuous in his labors on behalf of the poor

         St. Lycarion A martyr of Egypt Virgin - martyrs: Martha with Mary and their brother Lycarion, in Egypt
1134 St. Landulf of Yariglia Benedictine bishop of Asti, Italy. He was a monk at San Michele, in Ciel d’Oro, Pavia.
1159 St. Robert of Newminster priest from North Yorkshire who took the Benedictine habit at Whitby obtained permission to join monks of York became Cistercian
1302 St. Meriadoc native of Brittany ordained then embraced the life of a hermit then Bishop of Vannes s most conspicuous in his labors on behalf of the poor
1527 BD BAPTISTA VARANI, VIRGIN; Poor Clare; mystical revelations on the Passion-revelations which under obedience she embodied in a book entitled The Sufferings of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus; she drew up a series of instructions upon how to attain perfection. They exhibit that shrewd common sense not unmixed with humour which characterizes some of the great mystics. Though written for a fifteenth-century monk, they would form an excellent rule of life for any devout twentieth-century Catholic.
1592 The Monk Antonii of Kensk (Kozheezersk), with schema-monk name Avramii disciple and successor of the Monk Serapion (Comm. 27 June) in the guiding
                of the Kozheezersk ("Leather-tanning Lake") monastery
1626 Bld Anne of Saint Batholomew shepherdess  the first to join Saint Teresa of Ávila's reformed order sent to France introduce the reform there appointed prioress of the convents at Pontoise and Tours; founded convent at Antwerp for English refugees OCD V (AC)
1846 St. Anthony Mary Gianelli Bishop of Bobbio, Italy founded a congregation of missionaries and a congregation of
        teaching sisters

1928 Joseph Perez Servant of God Franciscan "The blood of martyrs is the seed of the Church," said Tertullian in the third century. Joseph Perez carried on that tradition; body was later brought in procession to Salvatierra, it was buried there amid cries of "Viva, Cristo Rey!"


Hesia and Susanna The Holy Women were disciples of the PriestMartyr Pankratios, Bishop of Tauromeneia (Comm. 9 July), a disciple of the Apostle Peter.
304 Potamioena the Younger A young girl martyred at Alexandria VM (AC)
 under Diocletian (Benedictines).
3rd v. Theodotus The Holy Martyr lived in Ancyra of Galatia distinguished by his kindliness and concern
At the height of the persecution under Diocletian (284-305) he provided Christians with everything they needed, and gave them shelter in his home. There they secretly celebrated church services.
Theodotus_Bishop_of_Ancyra.
St Theodotus visited the Christian captives in prison, paid their bail, and reverently buried the bodies of martyrs who had been thrown to the wild beasts. Once he buried the bodies of seven holy women martyrs, who were drowned in the sea (May 18). They reported this to the governor.

After refusing to offer sacrifice to idols, and denouncing the folly of paganism, St Theodotus confessed Christ as God, for which they subjected him to terrible tortures and beheaded him with a sword. They wanted to burn the holy martyr's body, but could not do so because of a storm which had arisen, so they gave his holy relics to a certain Christian for burial.  St Theodotus is also commemorated on May 18.
3rd v. Hieromartyr Marcellinus Bishop of Rome Claudius, Cyrinus and Antoninus with him 17,000 men the Holy Martyrs  .
St Marcellinus was Bishop of Rome during the height of the persecution against Christians under Diocletian and Maximian (284-305), when 17,000 men were martyred a single month. During this time St Marcellinus was also arrested. Afaid of the fierce tortures, he burned incense and offered sacrifice to idols. The emperor called him his friend and clothed him in splendid robes. Although he had encouraged others to undergo torture for Christ, he gave in to cowardice. He wept bitterly, filled with remorse.
During this time, a Synod of 180 bishops and presbyters met at the city of Sinuessa (in Campania). St Marcellinus appeared at the assembly in penitential sackcloth, his head sprinkled with ashes. He confessed his sin before the delegates and asked them to judge him. The Fathers of the Council said, "Judge yourself! From your lips this sin came forth, from your lips let judgment be pronounced. We know that even St Peter denied Christ out of fear, but he wept bitterly for his sin, and received forgiveness from the Lord."
Then Marcellinus pronounced sentence upon himself, "I strip myself of the priestly dignity, of which I am unworthy. After death, do not bury my body, but instead throw it to the dogs. Cursed be the one who dares to bury it."

Upon his return to Rome Marcellinus went to the emperor, threw down the fine clothing given him, and said that he regretted his renunciation of Christ. The enraged emperor had him tortured, and sentenced him to death.
St Marcellinus prayed to the Lord Jesus Christ, Who mercifully receives sinners who repent, then willingly placed his head beneath the sword. The holy martyrs Claudius, Cyrinus and Antoninus were beheaded with him.
The body of St Marcellinus lay for thirty-six days along the wayside. Appearing in a vision to the new bishop Marcellus, the holy Apostle Peter said,
 "Why have you not buried the body of Marcellinus?"
"I fear his curse," replied St Marcellus.
"Perhaps you do not remember," said the Apostle Peter, "that it is written: 'He that humbles himself shall be exalted.' Therefore, go bury his body with reverence."
Fulfilling the command of the Apostle Peter, St Marcellus buried the body of St Marcellinus in a crypt, built for the burial of the bodies of martyrs by the illustrious Priscilla, along the Via Salaria.
3rd v. St Sisinius deacon suffered at Rome along with hieromartyr Marcellus, Bishop of Rome, holy deacon Cyriacus; also Smaragdus, Largus, Apronian, Saturninus, Crescentian, Papias and Maurus and the holy women martyrs Priscilla, Lucy and the Emperor's daughter Artemia
 during the persecution of Diocletian and Maximian (284-305) and their successors, Galerius (305-311) and Maxentius (305-312).
The emperor Maximian, ruler of the Western Roman Empire, deprived all Christians of military rank and sent them into penal servitude.
Priscilla_of_Rome
A certain rich Christian, Thrason, sent food and clothing to the prisoners through the Christians Sisinius, Cyriacus, Smaragdus and Largus. Marcellus thanked Thrason for his generosity, and ordained Sisinius and Cyriacus as deacons.  While rendering aid to the captives, Sisinius and Cyriacus also were arrested and condemned to harsh labor. They fulfilled not only their own work quota, but worked also for the dying captive Saturninus. Therefore, Maximian sent Sisinius to Laodicius, the governor of the district.  They locked the saint in prison. The head of the prison, Apronian, summoned Sisinius for interrogation but, seeing his face shine with a heavenly light, he believed in Christ and was baptized. Later, he went with Sisinius to Marcellus and received Chrismation. Marcellus served the Liturgy, and they partook of the Holy Mysteries.

On June 7, Sts Sisinius and Saturninus were brought before Laodicius in the company of Apronian. Apronian confessed that he was a Christian, and was beheaded. Sts Sisinius and Saturninus were thrown into prison. Then Laodicius gave orders to bring them to a pagan temple to offer sacrifice. Saturninus said,
 "If only the Lord would turn the pagan idols into dust!"

At that very moment the tripods, on which incense burned before the idols, melted. Seeing this miracle, the soldiers Papias and Maurus confessed Christ. After prolonged tortures Sisinius and Saturninus were beheaded, and Papias and Maurus were locked up in prison, where they prayed to receive illumination by holy Baptism. The Lord fulfilled their desire. Leaving the prison without being noticed, they received Baptism from Marcellus and returned to the prison.

At the trial they again confessed themselves Christians and died under terrible tortures. Their holy bodies were buried by the priest John and Thrason.  Sts Cyriacus, Smaragdus, Largus and other Christian prisoners continued to languish at hard labor.

Diocletian's daughter Artemia suffered from demonic oppression.
Having learned that the prisoner Cyriacus could heal infirmities and cast out devils, the emperor summoned him to the sick girl. In gratitude for the healing of his daughter, the emperor freed Cyriacus, Smaragdus and Largus. Soon the emperor sent Cyriacus to Persia to heal the daughter of the Persian emperor.

Upon his return to Rome, Cyriacus was arrested on orders of the emperor Galerius, the son-in-law of Diocletian, who had abdicated and retired as emperor. Galerius was very annoyed at his predecessor because his daughter Artemia had converted to Christianity. He gave orders to drag Cyriacus behind his chariot stripped, bloodied, and in chains, to be shamed and ridiculed by the crowds.
310 Marcellus hieromartyr Marcellus, Bishop of Rome denounced the emperor openly before everyone for his cruelty toward innocent Christians
The emperor ordered the holy bishop to be beaten with rods, and dealt severely with him. Sts Cyriacus, Smaragdus, Largus, and another prisoner, Crescentian, died under torture.
And at this time the emperor's daughter Artemia and another twenty-one prisoners were also executed with Cyriacus.

Marcellus was secretly freed by Roman clergy. Exhuming the bodies of the holy martyrs Cyriacus, Smaragdus and Largus, they reburied them on the estates of two Christian women, Priscilla and Lucy, on the outskirts of Rome, after they had transformed Lucy's house into a church.

Ascending the throne, Maxentius gave orders to destroy the church and turn it into a stockyard, and he sentenced the holy bishop to herd the cattle. Exhausted by hunger and cold, and wearied by the tortures of the soldiers, Marcellus became ill and died in the year 310.
Kyriake_Caesarea_Palestine
3rd v. Kyriake, Kaleria (Valeria), and Mary the holy women martyrs lived in Palestinian Caesarea  abandoned paganism, settled in a solitary place and spent their lives in prayer, beseeching the Lord that the persecution against Christians would come to an end, and that the Faith of Christ would shine throughout all the world
Caleria_Caesarea_Palestine

During persecution under Diocletian (284-305). Having received instruction in the Christian Faith, they abandoned paganism, settled in a solitary place and spent their lives in prayer, beseeching the Lord that the persecution against Christians would come to an end, and that the Faith of Christ would shine throughout all the world.

The governor tried to force them to worship idols, but they bravely confessed their faith in Christ. For this reason, they were tortured and received the crown of martyrdom.
350 St. Paul of Bishop of Constantinople during the period of bitter controversy in the Church over the Arian heresy
Constantinópoli natális sancti Pauli, ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopi, qui sæpe ab Ariánis ob fidem cathólicam pulsus, et a sancto Júlio Primo, Románo Pontífice, restitútus est; ac demum, ab Ariáno Imperatóre Constántio relegátus ad Cucúsum, Cappadóciæ oppídulum, ibídem, Arianórum insídiis crudéliter strangulátus, ad cæléstia regna migrávit.  Ipsíus autem corpus, Theodósio Imperatóre, Constantinópolim summo honóre, translátum fuit.
    At Constantinople, the birthday of St. Paul, bishop of that city.  For the Catholic faith, he was often driven out of his see by the Arians, but restored to it by the Roman Pontiff, St. Julius I.  Finally the Arian emperor Constantius banished him to Cucusum, a small town of Cappadocia.  There, by the intrigue of the Arians, he was barbarously strangled, and thus departed for the heavenly kingdom.  His body was taken to Constantinople with the greatest honour during the reign of Emperor Theodosius.
350 OR 351 ST PAUL I, BISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE
PAUL was a native of Thessalonica, but from his boyhood he had been secretary to Bishop Alexander by whom he was afterwards promoted to be a deacon in the church of Constantinople. When the aged hierarch lay on his death-bed-apparently in the year 336-he recommended St Paul as his successor and the electors endorsed his choice. Paul was accordingly consecrated by several orthodox bishops, and practically all that is known of himself and his life is the record of an episcopate made stormy by the heretical Arians, who had supported the candidature of an older deacon called Macedonius.
At their instigation the Emperor Constantius summoned a council of Arian bishops, by whom Paul was deposed and banished. The vacant see was bestowed, not upon Macedonius, but upon the neighbouring metropolitan Eusebius of Nicomedia. St Paul took shelter in the west, and could not regain possession of the see until after the death of his powerful antagonist, which, however, took place soon afterwards. He was then reinstated amid popular rejoicings. The Arians, who stilI refused to acknowledge him, set up a rival bishop in the person of Macedonius, and soon the opposing factions came into open conflict and the city became a prey to violence and tumult. Constantius therefore ordered his general Hermogenes to eject Paul from Constantinople. But the populace, infuriated at the prospect of losing their bishop, set fire to the general's house, killed him, and dragged his body through the streets. This outrage brought Constantius himself to Constantinople. He pardoned the people, but he sent St Paul into exile. On the other hand he refused to confirm the election of Macedonius which, like that of his rival, had taken place without the imperial sanction.
We find St Paul once more at Constantinople in 344, and Constantius then consented to re-establish him for fear of incurring the hostility of his brother Constans, who with Pope St Julius I supported Paul. But on the death of the Western emperor in 350 Constantius sent the praetorian prefect Philip to Constantinople with instructions to expel Paul and to instal Macedonius in his place. Too astute to risk incurring the fate of Hermogenes, Philip had recourse to a stratagem. He invited St Paul to meet him at the public baths of Zeuxippus and, whilst the people, suspicious of his designs, were gathered outside, he hustled Paul out of a side window and got him away by sea. The unfortunate bishop was exiled to Singara, in Mesopotamia, and from thence was removed to Emesa in Syria and finally to Cucusus in Armenia.
[*Fifty-four years later another bishop of Constantinople, St. John Chrysostom, was banished to the same place.] There he was left for six days and nights without food in a gloomy dungeon, and then strangled. This, at any rate, was the account given by Philagrius, an official who was stationed at Cucusus at the time.
The career of St Paul I of Constantinople belongs to general ecclesiastical history, and such works as Hefele-Leclercq, Histoire des Conciles, L. Duchesne, History of the Early Church, and Fliche and Martin, Histoire de l'Eglise, must be consulted to view the incidents in their proper setting. Of St Paul's private life as a man or as a pastor of souls we know little or nothing, though there are two late Greek biographies printed in Migne, PG (see BHG., nos. 1472, 1473). The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, have gathered up such references as could be found in early Christian literature. They give him, it may be noticed, the title Martyr, which is not explicitly conferred in the Roman Martyrology; but in the Oriental churches he is honoured as a martyr, his feast among the Greeks and Armenians being kept on November 6, among the Copts on October 5. It is remarkable that St Paul is commemorated in the Hieronymianum, and his name has passed from thence into the Félire of Oengus. See also DCB., vol. iv, pp. 256-257; and also vol. iii, pp. 775-777, under Macedonius.
Elected in 336 to succeed Alexander of Constantinople, the following year he was exiled to Pontus by Emperor Constantius II. Because of his staunch position against Arianism, Paul was replaced by the heretical bishop Macedonius. Allowed to return in 338, Paul was again exiled by the Arians, who had the support of many in the imperial government, but returned about 340. Once more he was seized and, at the order of Emperor Constantius, he was exiled to Mesopotamia. Brought back in 344, he was sent yet again into exile, this time to Cucusus, in Armenia. Here he was deliberately starved and finally strangled by Arian supporters. He is considered a martyr for the orthodox cause and was a close friend St. Athanasius.
Paul of Constantinople BM (RM)
Died c. 350. Patriarch Saint Paul spent most of his episcopate in exile. He was elected in 336; exiled to Pontus 337-338; exiled to Trèves by an Arian synod until 340; and, in 342, he was sent in chains to Mesopotamia by Emperor Constantius. Recalled in 344, he was banished for the last time to Kukusus, Armenia, where he was left without food for six days and then strangled (Benedictines). In art, Saint Paul is depicted as a bishop with a stole in his hand or as strangled with his own stole (Roeder).
610 Colman (Mocholmoc) of Dromore first abbot of Muckmore, County Antrim many miracles to the bishop teacher of Saint Finnian of Clonard B (AC)
6th v. ST COLMAN OF DROMORE, BISHOP 
THE first bishop of Dromore (Druim Mór), in County Down, was this St Colman, who founded a monastery there, probably about the year 514. He was venerated from early times in Scotland as well as in Ireland, and under the date of June 7 we find him mentioned in several of the ancient calendars of both countries- sometimes as Mocholmoc, or Mocholmog-"my dear little Colum". The Felire of Oengus describes him as "the great descendant of Artae", but nothing is actually known of his parentage and of his career, the manuscripts of a much later date which profess to relate his life being full of anachronisms and extravagant stories. As there are over two hundred Irish saints of the name of Colman, it is scarcely to be wondered at if their histories have become confused.
According to tradition, St Colman of Dromore was born in Dalriada (Argyllshire). After receiving his early training at Nendrum, or Mahee Island, from St Coelan, he became a disciple of St Ailbe of Emly. Amongst his friends was St Macanisius, whose advice he sought as to his future career. "It is the will of God that you erect a monastery within the bounds of Coba plain", was the answer he received. He accordingly set to work and established his community by the river Lagan which passes through Dromore. The most famous of his pupils was St Finnian of Moville. St Colman seems to have died about the middle of the sixth century or rather earlier, and was probably interred at Dromore, though the Breviary of Aberdeen gives Inchmacome as his place of burial. His feast is kept in all dioceses of Ireland.
There is a Latin life of St Colman, mutilated at the end, which has been printed by the Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, from the Codex Salmanticensis. Besides this, we have only the lessons in the Aberdeen Breviary. Some references to the same saint occur in Fr J. Ryan's Irish Monasticism. See also Forbes, KSS., pp. 304-305.
Born at Argyll, c. 516; cultus approved in 1903; he has a second feast on October 27. If you are confused by the many saints named Colman, join the club: there are 126 Irish saints bearing that illustrious name. Today's saint was the first abbot of Muckmore, County Antrim, then chosen as the abbot-founder and bishop of Dromore in County Down. He is said to have been the teacher of Saint Finnian of Clonard. Jocelin, in his life of Saint Patrick, tells us that Colman's virtue was foretold by Patrick. His legend ascribes many miracles to the bishop.
This Colman is titular saint of at least one church in Scotland, Inis Mo-Cholmaig, and one in Wales, Llangolman (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth, Montague).
643 St. Vulphy Hermit and miracle worker also called Vulfiafius
643 ST VULFLAGIUS, OR WULPHY
IN his early youth, St Vulflagius married and settled down in his native town of Rue, a little place near Abbeville. There he led so exemplary a life with his wife and three daughters that his fellow citizens upon the death of their priest elected him to be their pastor. Accordingly, with the consent of his wife, Vulflagius received ordination from St Richarius (Riquier). After a time, however, acting against his conscience, he resumed relations with his wife, to whom he was greatly attached. [* It must be remembered that at this date celibacy in the priesthood, though recommended, was not of general obligation.]
This he soon regretted and as part of his expiation undertook a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. When he returned he still regarded himself as unworthy to act as a shepherd to others. Accordingly he withdrew to a lonely place where he lived as a hermit. He was greatly tempted to abandon his solitude, but stood firm and was rewarded by the gifts of wisdom and of miracles. Men resorted to him from near and far to profit by his instructions and to be healed of their diseases. He died probably about 643. His relics were translated in the ninth century to Montreuil-sur-Mer and are still venerated there.
There is very little serious evidence for the story of St Wulphy (whose name is written in many different ways), but there can be no question that a vigorous cult was paid to him at Montreuil. The old legend will be found recounted in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii. See Braquehay, Le Culte de S. Wulphy (1896), and Corblet, Hagiographie d'Amiens (1874), vol. iv, pp. 96-106. Wulphy seems to be identical with, or to have been confused with, St Walfroy. See Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xvii (1898), p. 307, and xxi, p. 43.
Originally from Rue, near Abbeville, France. Vulphy was married but received his wife's permission to become a priest. He gave up an active life after a pilgrimage to become a hermit.  Vulflagius of Abbeville, Hermit (AC) (also known as Vulphy, Wulfalgius, Wulphy) Died c. 643. Though married, Vulflagius was chosen to be priest of a parish at Rue, near Abbeville. He later made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land and ended his life as a hermit. His memory is greatly venerated at Montreuil-sur-Mer (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
688 Meriadoc of Vannes came to Cornwall and founded several churches, one of which at Camborne was once dedicated to him a life of abstinence and love for the poor B (AC) (also known as Meriadec, Meriasek)
    "Poverty is a remover of cares and the mother of holiness."    -- Saint Meriadoc.
6th v. ST MERIADOC, BISHOP
ST MERIADOC, or Meriadec, is venerated in Brittany, and was formerly honoured also in Cornwall, where the parish church of Camborne was originally dedicated in his honour. His legend in Cornish, Beunans Meriasek, is the only complete miracle-play founded on the story of a saint and written in the vernacular in our own country which has survived to this day. No reliance can be placed on the popular biographies or other accounts of the saint (e.g. the breviary lessons used in the diocese of Vannes); all are based on a life compiled in the twelfth century, one object of which was to glorify the Rohan family by inventing a descent from the "royal" family of St Meriadoc.
Nothing is actually known of Meriadoc's history, but a conjectural outline of his career based on topographical data was suggested in a very learned investigation by Canon G. H. Doble.[ *In Wales, Cornwall and Brittany" it is not the Lives of the Saints that tell us most about the existence of the saints and the national organization of religion, but the names of places" (Joseph Loth). "Place-names", says M. Largilliere, "are documents of indisputable truthfulness."]
The point that the name is Welsh confirms the assumption that Meriadoc was a Welshman. From Wales he seems to have passed first to Cornwall, where he founded one or more churches, and then to Brittany. The circumstance that the parish of Camborne, with which he is associated, is adjacent to that of Gwinear, coupled with the fact that St Meriadoc and St Gwinear are both venerated in the Breton parish of Pluvigny, i.e. St Gwinear, suggests the hypothesis that the two holy men, both of whom have Welsh names, were companions who went together to Cornwall and Brittany. He may have been a regionary bishop, but he never was bishop of Vannes, although his name appears in the official list.
Canon Doble's contribution is no. 34 in his Cornish Saints series (1935). A text and translation of Beunans Meriasek was published by Whitley Stokes (1872); and an extract in handy form, by R. Morton Nance and A. S. D. Smith, was printed at Camborne in 1949. Little profit can be derived from the legendary materials accumulated by Albert Le Grand and Andre du Saussay, to which the Bollandists in 1698 were forced to have recourse for want of better sources. See, however, Duine, Memento, p. 71.

Meriadoc, though venerated especially in Cornwall and northern France (Brittany), was probably a Welshman who lived in the 5th or 6th century. He came to Cornwall and founded several churches, one of which at Camborne was once dedicated to him. He became renowned in these parts and a miracle play in Cornish still survives, recounting his legendary exploits. 
He then crossed over into Brittany, where his memory is still strong. In the 16th-century church at Plougasnou is a reliquary containing what may well be part of Meriadoc's skull. At Stival is preserved what purports to be his bell. Placed on the heads of the deaf and those suffering migraine, it is said to heal them. Some documents state that Meriadoc even became bishop of Vannes at a time when it was one of the most important cities of Brittany.

Meriadoc had been a rich man. Before becoming a hermit he gave all his money to poor clerics, distributing his lands to the needy. So great became his reputation for sanctity that he feared he would become vain and retired even further from the world. Instead of the silks and purple that he once wore, Meriadoc new dressed in rags, eating simple food, living in complete poverty.  When his relatives tried to make him leave his new life and return to the world, he told the viscount of Rohan who had come with these relatives that he would be better engaged extirpating the thieves and robbers of the neighborhood. The viscount took the saint at his word, and a great evil was removed from Brittany.
Although Meriadoc was unanimously elected bishop of Vannes, he took the bishopric reluctantly. After his consecration he continued a life of abstinence and love for the poor. He died kissing his brethren and crying, "Into your hands, Lord, I commend my Spirit" (Bentley).
732 Aventinus of Bagnères hermit in the Larboush Valley, where the Saracens discovered him and put him to death M (AC)
Born at Bagnères in the Pyrenees; died 732. Aventinus was a hermit in the Larboush Valley, where the Saracens discovered him and put him to death (Benedictines).
786 St. Willibald Bishop and missionary native of Wessex England brother of Sts. Winebald and Walburga related to St. Boniface; Willibald was the first recorded English pilgrim to the Holy Land, and his vita the earliest travel book by an English writer; honoured with many miracles.
786 ST WILLIBALD, BISHOP OF Eichstätt
WILLIBALD was born about the year 700, in the kingdom of the West Saxons, the son of St Richard (February 7) and so brother of SS. Winebald and Walburga.
When he was three years old his life was despaired of in a violent sickness. When all natural remedies proved unsuccessful, his parents laid him at the foot of a great cross which was erected in a public place near their house. There they made a promise to God that if the child recovered they would consecrate him to the divine service, and he was immediately restored to health. Richard put him under the abbot of the monastery of Waltham in Hampshire. Willibald left here about the year 720 to accompany his father and brother on a pilgrimage, as is narrated in the life of St Richard on February 7.
After staying for a time in Rome, where he suffered from malaria, Willibald set out with two companions to visit the holy places which Christ had sanctified by His presence on earth. They sailed first to Cyprus and thence into Syria. At Emesa (Homs) St Willibald was taken by the Saracens for a spy, and was imprisoned with his companions, but after a short time they were released. When first the prisoners were arraigned, the magistrate said, "I have often seen men of the parts of the earth whence these come travelling hither. They mean no harm, wishing but to fulfil their law." They then went to Damascus, Nazareth, Cana, Mount Tabor, Tiberias. Magdala, Capharnaum, the source of the Jordan (where Willibald noticed that the cattle differed from those of Wessex, having "a long back, short legs, large upright horns, and all of one colour"), the desert of the Temptation, Galgal, Jericho, and so to Jerusalem. Here he spent some time, worshipping Christ in the places where He wrought so many great mysteries, and seeing marvels that are still shown to the pious pilgrim to-day. He likewise visited famous monasteries, lauras and hermitages in that country, with a desire of learning and imitating the practices of the religious life, and whatever might seem most conducive to the sanctification of his soul. After visiting Bethlehem and the south, the coast towns, Samaria and Damascus, and Jerusalem several times again, he eventually took ship at Tyre and, after a long stay in Constantinople, reached Italy before the end of the year 730. Willibald was the first recorded English pilgrim to the Holy Land, and his vita the earliest travel book by an English writer.
The celebrated monastery of Monte Cassino having been lately repaired by Pope St Gregory II, Willibald chose that house for his residence, and his example contributed to settle it in the primitive spirit of its holy rule during the ten years that he lived there: indeed he seems to have had an important part in the restoration of observance there. At the end of that time. coming on a visit to Rome, he was received by Pope St Gregory III, who, being interested in his travels and attracted by his character, eventually instructed Willibald to go into Germany and join the mission of his kinsman Boniface. Accordingly he set out for Thuringia, where St Boniface then was, by whom he was ordained priest. His labours in the country about Eichstätt, in Franconia, were crowned with great success, and he was no less powerful in words than in works.
Very shortly afterwards he was consecrated bishop by Boniface and given charge of a new diocese of which Eichstätt was made the see. The cultivation of so rough a vineyard was a laborious and painful task; but his patience and energy overcame all difficulties. He set about founding, at Heidenheim, a double monastery, whose discipline was that of Monte Cassino, wherein his brother, St Winebald, ruled the monks, and his sister, St Walburga, the nuns. From this monastery the care and evangelization of his diocese was organized and conducted, and in it the bishop found a congenial refuge from the cares of his office. But his love of solitude did not diminish his pastoral solicitude for his flock. He was attentive to all their spiritual necessities, he often visited every part of his charge, and instructed his people with indefatigable zeal and charity, so that "the field which had been so arid and barren soon flourished as a very vineyard of the Lord". Willibald outlived both his brother and sister and shepherded his flock for some forty-five years before God called him to Himself. He was honoured with many miracles and his body enshrined in his cathedral, where it still lies. St Willibald's feast is kept in the diocese of Plymouth on this day, but the Roman Martyrology names him on July 7.
The materials for St Willibald's life are unusually abundant and reliable. We have in particular the account of his early history and travels (the "Hodoeporicon") taken down by a nun of Heidenheim, Hugeburc, an Englishwoman by birth and a relative of the saint. The best text is in Pertz, MGH., Scriptores, vol. xv. Besides this there are several minor biographies and references in letters, etc. All that is most important will be found both in Mabillon, vol. iii, and in the Bollandist Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. ii. For English readers a translation of the "Hodoeporicon" will be found in C. H. Talbot, Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in Germany (1954), and in the publications of the Palestine Pilgrims' Text Society (1891). There has been much debate over obscure questions of chronology. See also Hauck, Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands, vol. i; H. Timerding, Die christliche Frühzeit Deutschlands, part ii (1929); Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xlix (1931), pp. 353-397; Abbot Chapman in Revue Benedictine, vol. xxi (1904), pp. 74-80, and St Benedict and the Sixth Century (1929), p. 131; and W. Levison, England and the Continent in the Eighth Century (1946).

After studying in a monastery in Waitham, in Hampshire, he went on a pilgrimage to Rome (c. 722) with his father, who died on the way at Lucca, Italy. Willibald continued on to Rome and then to Jerusalem. Captured by Saracens who thought him a spy, he was eventually released and continued on to all of the holy places and then to Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey), where he visited numerous lauras, monasteries, and hermitages. Upon his return to Italy, he went to Monte Cassino where he stayed for ten years, serving as sacrist, dean, and porter. While on a visit to Rome, he met Pope St. Gregory III (r. 731-741), who sent him to Germany to assist his cousin St. Boniface in his important missionary endeavors. Boniface ordained him in 741 and soon appointed him bishop of Eichstatt, in Franconia. the Site of Willibald's most successful efforts as a missionary. With his brother Winebald, he founded a double monastery at Heidenheim, naming Winebald abbot and his sister Walburga abbess. Willibald served as bishop for some four decades. His Vita is included in the Hodoeporicon (the earliest known English travel book). An account of his journeys in the Holy Land was written by a relative of Willibald and a nun of Heidenheim.


Willibald (Willebald) of Eichstätt B (RM) Born in Wessex, October 21, c. 700; died on July 7, 786; canonized 938 by Pope Leo VII; feast day formerly on July 7.
The life of Saint Willibald had been despaired of as a child and he had been cured, so it was believed, by being placed at the foot of a market cross where his royal parents had prayed and made a vow that if his life were spared it should be dedicated to the service of God. As a result, when five years old, he was placed for education in Waltham Monastery in Hampshire.

In 721, he accompanied his father, King Saint Richard of the West Saxons, and brother, Saint Winebald, to Rome and the Holy Land. Richard died at Lucca in Italy. At some point Willibald was arrested at Emessa as a spy and imprisoned at Constantinople for two years. After an absence of six years, during which he visited many lauras, monasteries, and hermitages, Willibald settled in the great monastery of Monte Cassino, where he assisted Saint Petronax in its restoration. During his ten years there, Willibald was appointed sacristan, dean and, for eight years, porter.
While on a visit to Rome in 740, he met Pope Saint Gregory III, who sent him to Germany to join his uncle (or cousin) Saint Boniface in his missionary labors. Soon after his arrival, Boniface ordained him priest (741) and then consecrated him bishop of Eichstätt in Franconia (742). It was a hard and rough task in a barbarous land, for it was pioneering work demanding great qualities of energy and evangelism.

During that period he lived in the Heidenheim Abbey ruled by his brother, Saint Winebald, and afterwards by his sister, Saint Walburga. There he found a welcome retreat from the cares of his work, but was no less diligent in his pastoral oversight. "The field which had been so arid and barren soon flourished as a very vineyard of the Lord."
For over 50 years he labored for God in a foreign land and no story of missionary enterprise is more exhilarating than that of this faithful prince, who, whether as porter of a monastery or bishop of a diocese, served the needs of men and to the glory of God. And thus these three children of the good Saxon King Richard came to be numbered among the saints.

Willibald was the first known Englishman to visit the Holy Land. The account of his wanderings, Hodoeporicon, is the earliest known English travelogue. It was dictated from his memories and recorded by a nun at Heidesheim (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Gill).

Saint Willibald is depicted in art holding two arrows. Sometimes he may be shown (1) with a crown at his feet as he talks to a woodsman who fells a tree; (2) in infancy as he is dedicated by his parents at the foot of the cross; (3) as a pilgrim with his father and brother; (4) receiving the mitre from the pope; (5) with the words fides, spes, charitas on his cloak or arm; (6) with a broken glass; or (7) directing the building of a church (Roeder).
847 St. Deochar Hermit; Blessed Charlemagne founded Benedictine abbey of Herriedon; appointed Deochar first abbot:  Deochar  translated relics of St. Boniface to Fulda

Deochar, OSB Abbot (AC) (also known as Deocarus, Theutger, Gottlief). Saint Deochar was a hermit living in the wilds of Franconia until Blessed Charlemagne founded the Benedictine abbey of Herriedon and appointed Deochar its first abbot. In 802, he was appointed missus regius. In 819, he participated in the translation of Saint Boniface's relics to Fulda (Benedictines, Roeder). In art, Saint Deochar is portrayed before an open tomb (possibly that of Saint Boniface) that exhales a sweet odor or enthroned under Christ among the apostles with a mitre, crozier, and book (Roeder).
He was a hermit in Franconia. Emperor Charlemagne founded the abbey of Herriedon under the Benedictine rule, naming Deochar abbot. In some lists he is called Gottlieb or Theutger.
851 St. Peter Spanish martyr with Wallabonsus, Sabinian, Wistremundus, Habentius, and Jeremias martyred in Cordoba at the order of Emir Abd al-Rahman II for preaching against Muhammad
Córdubæ, in Hispánia, sanctórum Monachórum et Mártyrum Petri Presbyteri, Wallabónsi Diáconi, Sabiniáni, Wistremúndi, Habéntii et Jeremíæ, qui pro Christo, in persecutióne Arábica, sunt juguláti.

    At Cordova in Spain, the holy martyrs Peter, a priest, Wallabonsus, a deacon, Sabinianus, Wistremund, Habentius, and Jeremias, all of whom were monks.  Their throats were cut at the time of the Arab persecution because they had confessed Christ.

Peter, Wallabonso, Sabinianus, & Companions MM (RM) Died 851. This sextet was martyred at Cordova, Spain, by the Moorish Abderrahman II. Peter was a priest; Wallabonso, a deacon; Sabinianus and Wistremundus, monks of Saint Zoilus; Habentius, a monk of Saint Christopher's; and Jeremias, a very old man who had founded the nearby monastery of Tábanos. Jeremias was scourged to death; the others were beheaded or burned (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
886 St. Meriadoc went to Cornwall and then to Brittany where he became a hermit and was elected bishop of Vannes, in Brittany
Sometimes listed as Meriadoc or Meriasec, he was probably born in Wales. He went to Cornwall and then to Brittany where he became a hermit, and was elected bishop of Vannes, in Brittany. He is depicted in the Cornish miracle play, Beunans Meriosec. He shares his feast day with Meriadoc of Vannes.
967 Blessed Odo of Massy, Benedictine abbot (935-967) of the Cluniac house of Massay (Benedictines). OSB Abbot (AC)
1066 St. Gottschalk Martyr Prince of the Wends collected scattered tribes of the Slavs into one kingdom, and to
make that Christian established monasteries at Oldenburg, Mecklenburg, Ratzeburg, Lubeck, and Lenzen
1066 ST GOTTSCHALK, MARTYR a Wendish prince sought to convert his people, introducing Saxon missionaries and establishing monasteries.
GOTTSCHALK was a Wendish prince who repudiated Christianity when his father was murdered by a Christian Saxon. He fought in the service of Canute of Denmark, came to England with Sweyn, whose daughter he married, and returned to Christianity. Later he recovered his own territories, and sought to convert his people, introducing Saxon missionaries and establishing monasteries. But in 1066 his brother-in-law raised an anti-Christian and anti-Saxon revolt, in which many were killed. Gottschalk himself was one of the first, being attacked and slain at Lenzen on the Elbe.
In the past there seems to have been a sporadic cultus of Gottschalk, but no solid reason appears for regarding him as either a saint or a martyr.
There is no medieval life of Gottschalk, and his history has to be gathered, as in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, pp. 39 seq., from the chroniclers, notably Adam of Bremen. For his services to the Church, see E. Kreusch, Kirchengeschichte der Wendenlande (1902), pp. 28 seq., and A. Hauck's Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands, vol. iii, p. 654, with the Cambridge Medieval History, vol. iii, pp. 305-306.
(GODESCALCUS).
Martyr Prince of the Wends; died at Lenzen on the Elbe, 7 June 1066. His feast is noted for 7 June in the additions of the Carthusians at Brussels to the martyrology of Usuardus. He was the son of Udo, Prince of the Abrodites who remained a Christian, though a poor one ("male christianus", says Adam of Bremen, Mon. Germ. SS., VII, 329), after his father Mistiwoi had renounced the faith. He was sent to the monastery of St. Michael at Lenzen for his education. Udo, for some act of cruelty, was slain by a Saxon. At the news Gottschalk cast aside all Christian principles thinking only of revenge, he escaped from the monastery, crossed the Elbe, and gathered an army from his own and the other Slavic tribes who then lived on the northern and eastern boundaries of Germany. It is said that thousands of Saxons were slaughtered before they were aware of the approach of an army. But his forces were not able to withstand those of Duke Bernard II. Gottschalk was taken prisoner and his lands were given to Ratibor. After some years he was released, and went to Denmark with many of his people. Canute of Denmark employed them in his wars in Norway, and afterwards sent them to England with his new Sweyn. In these expeditions Gottschalk was very successful. He had now returned to practice of his faith, and married Sigrith, a daughter, some say, Canute, others of King Magnus of Norway.
After the death of Ratibor and his sons he returned to his home, and by his courage and prudence regained his princely position. Adam of Bremen calls him a pious and god-fearing rnan. But he was more; he was an organizer and an apostle. His object in life seems to have been to collect the scattered tribes of the Slavs into one kingdom, and to make that Christian. In the former he succeeded well. To effect the latter purpose he obtained priests from Germany. He would accompany the missionaries from place to place and would inculcate their words by his own explanations and instructions. He established monasteries at Oldenburg, Mecklenburg, Ratzeburg, Lubeck, and Lenzen; the first three he had erected into dioceses. He also contributed most generously to the building of churches and the support of the clergy. In all this he was ably seconded by Adalbert, Archbishop of Hamburg, and numerous conversions were the result of their efforts. But a reaction set in. Some of the tribes refused to adopt Christianty, and rose in rebellion; Gottschalk and many of the clergy and laity fell victims to the hatred of Christianity.

Gottschalk (Gotteschalk) M (AC). There is a long and a short version of this story about a man whom many doubt should be considered a martyr or a saint. The short version is that Gottschalk was murdered with 29 fellow missionaries in Lenzen, Pomerania, by assassins hired by his brother-in-law. The longer version requires weaving the details of the politics leading up to their deaths.

The Germanic tribes of the Winuli, Slavi, and Vandals were kept from overrunning Christendom only by fear of the arms of King Canute of Denmark and Duke Bernard of Saxony. These tribes were led respectively by Gneus and Anatrog, pagans, and Uto, a lapsed Christian and the father of Gottschalk--all of whom were vassals of Emperor Henry the Salic.

When Uto was murdered by a Christian Saxon for his extreme cruelty, Gottschalk, who had been educated in Lumburg Abbey by Bishop Gottschalk, renounced his faith. He joined in the vengeful plans of Gneus and Anatrog, harassing Saxony until he was captured by Bernard. When he was finally freed, he found that Ratibor had taken possession of his territories among the Slavi. So he went to Denmark with an army of his people. King Canute employed his troops against Norway and later sent Gottschalk with his nephew, Sweyn, on an expedition to England. Having acquitted himself well in England, Canute gave Sweyn's daughter to him in marriage. At some point Gottschalk returned to the faith.

Upon the death of Canute and his children, Gottschalk returned from England, subdued the whole country of the Slavi, and compelled part of the Saxons to pay him a yearly tribute to acknowledge their subjection. He reigned in peace for many years as one of the most powerful Slavi princes ever. His apostasy was replaced by zeal and piety that expressed itself in his efforts to convert his people. All the parts of his dominions, throughout northern Germany from the Elbe to Mecklenburg, he filled with churches and priests. He founded monasteries at Lübeck, Aldenburg, Lenz, Ratzeburg, Magdeburg, and elsewhere. He supported missionaries throughout his territories. Gottschalk himself often interpreted to the people in the Sclavonian tongue the sermons and instructions of the priests in the church.

During the reign of Emperor Saint Henry II, the Slavi, Bohemians, and Hungarians lived in peace and in subjection to his empire. But when his son, a child only eight years old, succeeded him, various rebellions arose. Duke Bernard, who had governed Saxony forty years, died soon after Saint Henry. His dominions were divided between his two sons Ordulf and Herman. Ordulf, who took the title of duke of Saxony, was not a military leader. With little now to hold them in check, within five years after Bernard's death the pagan Vandals or Slavi, led by Gottschalk's brother-in-law, revolted, and began their sedition by murdering Gottschalk and a priest named Ebbo, whom they stabbed upon the altar. The only reason for their demise was hatred of Christianity (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
1159 Robert of Newminster described as "gentle in companionship, merciful in judgment," studied in Paris OSB Cist. Abbot (RM)
Born at Gargrave, Yorkshire, England, in 1100; died at Newminster in 1159.
1159 ST ROBERT, ABBOT OF NEWMINSTER
GARGRAVE, in the Craven district of Yorkshire, was the birthplace of St Robert, and the name by which he is known to us comes not from his native town but from the abbey over which he ruled. Ordained to the priesthood, he ministered for a time as rector of Gargrave and then took the Benedictine habit at Whitby. Afterwards he obtained his abbot's permission to join a band of monks from St Mary's abbey, York, who, with the sanction of Archbishop Thurston and on land granted by him, proposed to revive the strict Benedictine rule. Making a beginning in the depth of winter under conditions of extreme poverty, they had settled in the desert valley of Skeldale, and founded the celebrated monastery which was known as Fountains Abbey on account of certain springs within its precincts. At their own request the monks were affiliated to the Cistercian reform, and Fountains became one of the most fervent houses of the order. The spirit of holy joy pervaded their life of devotional exercises, alternating with hard manual work. Pre-eminent amongst them stood St Robert by reason of his sanctity, his austerity, and the sweetness of his disposition. "He was modest of demeanour", says the Fountains Chronicle, "gentle in companionship, merciful in judgement and exemplary in his holy conversation."
Ralph de Merly, lord of Morpeth, who visited the abbey five years after its foundation, in 1138, was so impressed by the brethren that he decided to build a Cistercian monastery on his own territory. To people the house, which became known as the abbey of Newminster, he obtained from Fountains twelve monks over whom St Robert was appointed abbot. He retained that office until his death and made the abbey so flourishing that he was able to establish a second house at Pipewell in Northamptonshire in 1143, and two others later on at Sawley and Roche.
A great man of prayer, Robert wrote a commentary on the psalms, which has not survived. He was endowed with supernatural gifts and had power over evil spirits. A story illustrates his spirit of mortification. He fasted so rigorously during Lent that when Easter came one year he had entirely lost his appetite. "Oh, father! why will you not eat?" asked the refectory brother in distress. "I think I could eat some buttered oatcake", replied the abbot. But when it was brought he was afraid of yielding to what he regarded as greediness, and ordered the food to be given to the poor. A beautiful young stranger at the gate received it and then disappeared-dish and all. When the brother was relating the loss of the platter, the dish suddenly reappeared on the table in front of the abbot. The stranger, it was believed, must surely have been an angel. We are told that St Robert in his youth had studied at Paris, and there is record of a second journey of his across the seas when, being slandered by some of his monks, upon some false report of maladministration of his abbey, he went to St Bernard to give an account of himself; but Bernard knew his man and decided that no defence was needed to meet the charge which had been made. This visit must have taken place in 1147 or 1148, for Robert had an interview with Pope Eugenius III before he returned. The abbot of Newminster often visited the hermit St Godric, to whom he was much attached, and the night St Robert died his friend saw his soul ascending to Heaven like a ball of fire. This was on June 7, 1159. His feast is kept in the diocese of Hexham.
The account, borrowed from Capgrave's Nova Legenda Angliae, which the Bollandists printed in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, is itself a summary of a longer life preserved in Lansdowne MS. 436, at the British Museum. Dalgairns, when compiling a life of St Robert for the series of English Saints edited by Newman, used this manuscript, and was able to add details to pre-existing accounts. The manuscript was printed, with notes by Fr P. Grosjean, in Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lvi (1938), pp. 334-360. For a summary, see W. Williams in the Downside Review, vol. lvii (1939), pp. 137-149.
Saint Robert, described as "gentle in companionship, merciful in judgment," studied in Paris and wrote a commentary--since lost--on the Psalms. After being ordained and serving as a parish priest in his native place, he was made rector of Gargrave. He then became a Benedictine at Whitby and joined a band of monks from Saint Mary's Abbey, York, to establish a monastery in which the strict Benedictine Rule would be revived. They settled, in the middle of winter in 1132, in the valley of Skeldale on land given to them by Archbishop Thurston.

The monastery became known at Fountains Abbey due to the presence of springs within its borders. The group became affiliated with the Cistercian reform, and the house became famous for the holiness and austerity of its members and its way of life. Robert was one of its most devout monks. The abbey became one of the centers of the White Monks in north England.

Impressed by the establishment, Ralph de Merly, Lord of Morpeth, built a Cistercian monastery on his own land, the Abbey of Newminster. In 1137 he brought 12 monks from Fountains Abbey and appointed Robert abbot. The monastery flourished under Robert's rule, and he established a house at Pipewell in Northamptonshire in 1143, one at Sawley and another at Roche in the West Riding.

He is said to have had supernatural gifts, and visions and encounters with demons have been attributed to him. He fasted so rigorously during Lent that a brother asked him in concern why he would not eat. He responded that he might eat some buttered oatcake, but once it was placed before him, fearing gluttony, he asked that it be given to the poor. A beautiful stranger at the gate took it--and the dish. While a brother was explaining the loss, the dish suddenly appeared on the table before the abbot. It was thought that the stranger was an angel.

Robert travelled to France again to see Saint Bernard, after he was slandered by some monks about his relations with a pious woman. Saint Bernard appears to have decided that the accusations were false. As a symbol of his belief in Robert's innocence, he gave him a girdle, which was kept at Newminster for performing cures.
 Before he returned home, Robert had an interview with Pope Eugenius III, who asked the bishop of Durham to give Robert some land at Wolsingham. Robert frequently visited his close friend the hermit Saint Godric. The night Robert died, Godric is said to have seen his soul ascending to Heaven like a ball of fire.


His relics were translated to the church at Newminster. Miracles were reported at his tomb, including one in which a monk is said to have fallen unhurt from a ladder while whitewashing the dormitory. His tomb became a center of pilgrimage. He is depicted in art holding a church (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, White).
1134 St. Landulf of Yariglia Benedictine bishop of Asti, Italy. He was a monk at San Michele, in Ciel d’Oro, Pavia.
Landulf Variglia, OSB B (AC) Born at Asti, Piedmont, Italy, in 1070; died 1134. Landulf was a Benedictine at San Michele in Ciel d'Oro at Pavia, Italy, who was chosen as bishop of Asti in 1103 (Benedictines).
1159 St. Robert of Newminster priest from North Yorkshire who took the Benedictine habit at Whitby obtained permission to join monks of York became Cistercian
In Anglia sancti Robérti Abbátis, ex Ordine Cisterciénsi.    In England, St. Robert, an abbot of the Cistercian Order.

Robert Of Newminster, Saint, Abbot, (Benedictine) Cistercians (1100-1159) A priest from North Yorkshire who took the Benedictine habit at Whitby and obtained permission to join some monks of York who were attempting to live according to a new interpretation of the Benedictine rule at Fountains abbey (1132). Fountains soon became Cistercian and one of the centres of the White Monks in Northumberland England.
Newminster abbey in Northumberland was founded from it in 1137, and Robert became its first abbot. He is described as gentle and merciful in judgement.
1302 St. Meriadoc native of Brittany ordained then embraced the life of a hermit then Bishop of Vannes s most conspicuous in his labors on behalf of the poor
Sometimes called Meriadoc. A native of Brittany, he was ordained but then embraced the life of a hermit. Owing to his popularity and the fame of his holiness, he was elected bishop of Vannes, probably against his will because it forced him to give up his hermitage. As bishop, he was most conspicuous in his labors on behalf of the poor.
Meriadoc (Meriadec) II of Vannes B (AC)
Born in Brittany; Meriadoc was known for his charity when he lived in the world. After stripping himself of his estates, he became a priest and then retired to live a hermit's life in Rohan, Brittany. Against his will he was elected bishop of Vannes by its canons. The bishops of the province seconded that election and forced him to fill the episcopal seat. It did offer him an advantage: He had far greater resources as bishop to give to the poor. Under his episcopal finery he wore a rough hair shirt, and had no better to bring to his bed than sackcloth. The old breviaries of Nantes and Vannes contain an office in his honor on this day. He is titular saint of the chapel of the castle of Pontivi, and of several others in Brittany (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
1527 BD BAPTISTA VARANI, VIRGIN; Poor Clare; mystical revelations on the Passion-revelations which under obedience she embodied in a book entitled The Sufferings of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus; she drew up a series of instructions upon how to attain perfection. They exhibit that shrewd common sense not unmixed with humour which characterizes some of the great mystics. Though written for a fifteenth-century monk, they would form an excellent rule of life for any devout twentieth-century Catholic.
LITTLE Camilla Varani, only daughter of the lord of Camerino, was eight or ten years old when she was taken to hear Bd Mark of Montegallo preach. Writing to him many years later, she says it will surprise him to learn that his sermon that day was the foundation of her whole spiritual life. He had preached on the Passion, and concluded by entreating his congregation to meditate every Friday on our Lord's sufferings, or at any rate to bewail them. Soon afterwards the little girl made a vow to shed at least one tear every Friday out of love for our Saviour, and that vow she kept, although she sometimes found it exceedingly difficult. Her father, who anticipated that she would make a brilliant marriage, gave her an excellent education which included general literature and the Latin language as well as more frivolous accomplishments. While she was growing up she endeavoured to lead a devout and even, spasmodically, a penitential life, but once she had made her entry into society she became wholly absorbed in pleasure. “Except for the time I gave to meditation on the Passion", she writes, “all my life was spent in music, dancing, driving, dress and other worldly amusements: I felt a great repugnance to piety, and my aversion from monks and nuns was such that I could not bear the sight of them." This phase lasted for three years. She was then roused to a sense of her danger and overwhelmed with shame by a sermon preached by another Franciscan on the text: "Fear God". She made a general confession and abandoned her former frivolities.
Gradually she began to realize that God was calling her to the religious life.
After a hard struggle she surrendered herself to the divine will, and, to use her own words, God then gave her three lilies-a hatred of the world, a sense of her own unworthiness, and so ardent a craving for suffering that if God had permitted her to attain to Heaven without pain she would not herself have wished it. An infirmity which attacked her about that time and which lasted for many years she regarded as a fulfilment of her desire. By that time she had overcome herself; it remained for her to overcome her father's opposition, and it took her over two years to do it.
On November 14, 1481, she received the habit at the convent of Poor Clares in Urbino, assuming the name of Baptista. Immediately afterwards she began to have mystical revelations on the Passion-revelations which under obedience she embodied in a book entitled The Sufferings of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus. “During the two years I spent at Urbino", she writes, “a wonderful grace of the Holy Spirit led me into the depths of the heart of Jesus-an unfathomable sea of bitterness in which I should have been drowned had not God supported me." It was made known to her that meditation on our Lord's interior sufferings was even more profitable than contemplation of His physical torments. After her profession she was obliged to leave Urbino, for her father, determined to have her near him, built at Camerino a convent for Poor Clares to which he succeeded in having her transferred, together with several other nuns of the Varani family.
Bd Peter of Mogliano now became her director, and for three years she was the recipient of extraordinary favours. For a fortnight she rejoiced in the constant presence of St Clare: for two months she remained in spirit at the foot of the Cross, and for three months she seemed as though consumed with the fire of seraphic love. Her soul was drawn to contemplate in a vast sea of light God's love for His creatures, and she had great interior peace. This period of spiritual joy was followed by a long series of trials. At first they took the form of delusive apparitions: afterwards came assaults from the unseen powers of darkness, with spiritual desolation which she had to endure almost without assistance. Bd Peter, her former director, was no longer at hand, and although in 1490, to her great joy, he was reappointed minister provincial of the Marches, he died within a few months of his return to Camerino. Shortly afterwards she was moved to write the history of her spiritual life in the form of a letter which she sent to Bd Mark of Montegallo. Eight years later, for the benefit of a Spanish priest who regarded her as his spiritual mother, she drew up a series of instructions upon how to attain perfection. They exhibit that shrewd common sense not unmixed with humour which characterizes some of the great mystics. Though written for a fifteenth-century monk, they would form an excellent rule of life for any devout twentieth-century Catholic.
History has little more to tell us about Bd Baptista, although she survived till 1527. She had the grief of losing her father and three elder brothers under tragic circumstances, for they were murdered in an insurrection of their subjects provoked by Caesar Borgia. Camerino was afterwards restored to her only surviving brother by Pope Julius II. The same pontiff commissioned Baptista to establish a new house of her order at Fermo. She remained there a year, and then returned to the convent at Camerino, which she continued to rule until her death. During her life she had insisted on maintaining herself and her community in proper poverty, but after she was dead her brother accorded her a most magnificent funeral. Her cultus was formally approved in 1843.
Most of our information concerning Bd Baptista is derived from her own writings. The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii, print much of these in a Latin translation, as also a translation of considerable portions of the Italian life by Fr Pascucci, which appeared in 1680. A large number of biographies or studies of the spirit of Bd Baptista have seen the light since then. It will be sufficient to mention that of the Countess de Rambuteau in French (1906); and those of Marini (1882), Puliti (1915), Jörgensen (1919), and Aringoli (1928). Her works have been edited in the original Italian by Santoni, Le opere spirituali delta ba. Battista Varani (1894); and by Venanzio della Vergiliana, Beata Battista Varani (1926). Among her writings special interest attaches to that headed I Dolori mentali di Gesu, for it directs attention very explicitly to the interior sufferings of the heart of Jesus. It was written in 1488, published in 1490, and repeatedly afterwards, often as an appendix to that widely-popular book, the Spiritual Combat of Scupoli. The general diffusion of this little tractate must have contributed much to pave the way for an explicit recognition of devotion to the Sacred Heart. See on this, J. Heerinck, Devotio SS. Cordis in scriptis B. Baptistae Varani in the periodical Antonianum, 1935, January to April. There is a full account also of Bd Baptista in Leon, Aureole Seraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp. 315-348.
1592 The Monk Antonii of Kensk (Kozheezersk), with schema-monk name Avramii disciple and successor of the Monk Serapion (Comm. 27 June) in the guiding of the Kozheezersk ("Leather-tanning Lake") monastery
He reposed peacefully to the Lord on 27 June 1592. © 1998 by translator Fr. S. Janos.
1626 Blessed Anne of Saint Batholomew shepherdess the first to join Saint Teresa of Ávila's reformed order sent to France introduce the reform there appointed prioress of the convents at Pontoise and Tours; founded convent at Antwerp for English refugees;  regarded as a saint and was known to be a prophet and a wonder-worker. OCD V (AC) (also known as Anne García)
1626 BD ANNE OF ST BARTHOLOMEW, VIRGIN
IN the writings of St Teresa of Avila we find various allusions to a young lay-sister, Anne-of-St-Bartholomew, whom she made her special companion and whom she once described as a great servant of God. Anne was the child of Ferdinand Garcia and Catherine Mançanas, peasants living at Almendral, four miles from Avila. Until the age of twenty she was employed as a shepherdess, but she then obtained admission to the Carmelite convent of St Joseph at Avila. During the last seven years of her life St Teresa took Anne on nearly all her journeys, declaring that in her work of foundations and reforms she found her more useful than anyone else. Several times she proposed that Anne should receive the black veil, but Anne always refused, preferring to remain a lay-sister. Anne has left a graphic description of their journey from Medina to Alba and of the saint's death, pathetically recording the consolation she herself derived from being able to gratify the holy Mother's love of neatness up to the very end. “The day she died she could not speak. I changed all her linen, headdress and sleeves. She looked at herself quite satisfied to see herself so clean: then, turning her eyes on me, she looked at me smilingly and showed her gratitude by signs." It was in Anne's arms that St Teresa breathed her last.
For six years more Anne remained on quietly at Avila, and then a great change came into her life. Important personages in Paris-notably Madame Acarie and Peter de Bérulle-had for some time been anxious to introduce the Barefooted Carmelites into France. They now applied for some Spanish nuns to help in making a foundation, and Teresa's successor, Anne-of-Jesus, set out with five nuns, of whom Bd Anne-of-St-Bartholomew was one. Upon their arrival in Paris, whilst the rest were being welcomed by Princess de Longueville and ladies of the court, Anne slipped into the kitchen to prepare a meal for the community. Her superiors, however, had decided that St Teresa's chosen companion was fitted for higher work, and shortly afterwards Anne unwillingly found herself promoted to be a choir sister. She had signed her own profession with a simple cross, but according to the best authorities she had acted long before this as secretary to St Teresa: according to others, she now found herself miraculously able to write. It may be that the gift of letters was bestowed upon her with other wisdom when she was about to be faced with new responsibilities. Difficulties of various kinds attended the establishment of Carmel in France, and five of the six Spanish nuns went to the Netherlands. Anne, who remained in France, was appointed prioress at Pontoise and then at Tours. The prospect of being set to govern others at first distressed her greatly, and in fervent prayer she pleaded her incompetence, comparing herself to a weak straw. The answer she received reassured her: "It is with straws I light my fire", our Lord had replied.
A few years later Carmelite houses were opened in the Netherlands. Bd Anne was sent to Mons, where she remained a year. In 1612 she made a foundation of her own at Antwerp. It was soon filled with the daughters of the noblest families in the Low Countries,[* Among them was Anne Worsley (Anne-of-the-Ascension), the first English Teresian Carmelite. It was she who in 1619 established the English community at Antwerp, now at Lanherne in Cornwall. See Sr A. Hardman, English Carmelites in Penal Times (1936).]  all eager to tread the path of perfection under the guidance of one who already in her lifetime was regarded as a saint and was known to be a prophet and a wonder-worker. On two occasions, when Antwerp was besieged by the Prince of Orange and was on the point of capture, Anne prayed all night; the city was saved, and she was acclaimed the protectress and defender of Antwerp. Her death in 1626 was the occasion for extraordinary demonstrations, when twenty thousand persons touched her body with rosaries and other things as it lay exposed before burial. For many years afterwards the city continued to venerate her memory by an annual procession in which the members of the municipality, candle in hand, led the way to her convent. Bd Anne was beatified in 1917.
The apostolic letter pronouncing the decree of beatification is printed in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. ix (1917), pp. 257-261, and it contains the usual biographical summary. Bd Anne wrote an autobiography at the command of her superiors; the account is carried down to the first years of her residence in Antwerp, and the original document is preserved in the Carmelite convent there. An incomplete French translation was published in 1646, and Fr Bouix makes limited use of the autobiography in his life, "purement édifiante", of the beata (1872); see also Fr Bruno's La belle Acarie (1942). C. Henriquez published a life in Spanish in 1632, and a modern account in the same language, by Florencio del Niño Jesus, appeared in 1917: this was adapted into French by Abbe L. Aubert (1918). See also H. Bremond, Histoire littéraire..., t. ii, pp. 299-319 (there is an English translation of this volume).

Born at Almendral (diocese of Ávila), Spain, in 1549; died 1626; beatified in 1917. Anne was a shepherdess, the daughter of poor shepherds, who was the first to join Saint Teresa of Ávila's reformed order. She became Teresa's secretary and travelled throughout Spain with the foundress. In 1606, she was sent to France to introduce the reform there. Eventually, she was appointed prioress of the convents at Pontoise and Tours. She founded a convent at Antwerp for English refugees. Interestingly enough, though one would expect a shepherdess to be illiterate, Anne has left us some delightful religious verse (Benedictines).
1846 St. Anthony Mary Gianelli Bishop of Bobbio, Italy founded a congregation of missionaries and a congregation of teaching sisters
Placéntiæ sancti Antónii Maríæ Gianélli, Bobiénsis Epíscopi, Fundatóris Congregatiónis Filiárum Maríæ sanctíssimæ ab Horto nuncupatárum, quem Pius Papa Duodécimus inter sanctos Cælites adnumerávit.
    At Placentia, St. Anthony Mary Gianelli, bishop of Bobbio, and founder of the Congregation of Sisters of our Lady of the Garden.  Pope Pius XII numbered him among the saints of heaven.
1846 ST ANTONY GIANELLI, BISHOP OF BOBBIO, FOUNDER OF THE MISSIONERS OF ST ALPHONSUS AND THE SISTERS OF ST MARY DELL' ORTO
ANTONY GIANELLI was born in the diocese of Genoa in 1789 of a middle-class family. As a youth he was conspicuous for his gentle docility and industry and for the promise of more than ordinary intellectual gifts. A generous benefactress made it possible for him to pursue his studies at Genoa, and there, entering the ecclesiastical seminary, he so distinguished himself that when still only a subdeacon he was allowed to preach and attracted great crowds by his eloquence. By special dispensation he was ordained priest in 1812 before he had reached the canonical age.
Though employed in important educational work he still found time to deliver sermons and give missions resulting in a great harvest of souls, as well as to discharge the functions of an ordinary parish priest, his confessional being at all times besieged by penitents. Before he was forty he had organized two religious congregations, the one of priests who were known as the Missioners of St Alphonsus Liguori, the other of women living under rule whose activities in teaching poor children and nursing the sick were dedicated in honour of Santa Maria dell' Orto ("of the Garden"). These sisters are now well known in Italy and they have houses in other parts of Europe as well as in America and Asia. Meanwhile, in the year (1838, St Antony was appointed bishop of Bobbio, and in that office he gave an extraordinary example of virtue, prudence and firm government. He died, all too soon, in 1846, and he was canonized in 1951.
There are Italian biographies by L. Bodino (1924) and L. Sanguinetti (1925); this last is an illustrated volume of nearly six hundred pages. The decree of beatification is printed in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xvii (1925), pp. 176-179. The saint's canonization was the occasion of further biographies.

As a youth Antony was conspicuous for his gentle docility, industry, and intelligence. A generous benefactress made it possible for this middle-class boy to study in Genoa. He so distinguished himself in his seminary studies that he was allowed to preach while he was still only a subdeacon. Even then his eloquence drew crowds. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1812 by special dispensation because he was not of canonical age for ordination. He engaged in pastoral and educational work as a parish priest, gave numerous missions, and became known for his preaching and as a confessor besieged by penitents. He became archpriest of Chiavari in 1826. Before he was 40, he had founded a congregation of priests (in 1827), Missioners of Saint Alphonsus Liguori, and one of women (in 1829), Sisters of Santa Maria dell'Orto ('of the Garden'), who were devoted to teaching poor children and caring for the sick. These sisters spread to the United States and Asia. In 1838, he was appointed bishop of Bobbio, where he ruled wisely until his death. Because he was a man of extraordinary virtue and prudence, he gained the support of his priests. He also restored the cultus of Saint Columbanus (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Walsh).  Antony Mary Gianelli B (RM) Born at Cereta (near Genoa), Liguori, Italy, in 1789; died June 8, 1846; beatified in 1925; canonized in 1951.
St. Lycarion A martyr of Egypt Virgin - martyrs: Martha with Mary and their brother Lycarion, in Egypt
Hermópoli, in Ægypto, sancti Lycariónis Mártyris, qui laniátus, virgis férreis ignítis cæsus, áliaque sævíssima passus est, ac demum, gládio percússus, martyrium consummávit.
    At Hermopolis in Egypt, St. Licarion, martyr, who had his body lacerated, was scourged with heated iron rods, and endured other horrible torments, after which his martyrdom was completed by beheading.
1928 Servant of God Franciscan Joseph Perez "The blood of martyrs is the seed of the Church," said Tertullian in the third century. Joseph Perez carried on that tradition body was later brought in procession to Salvatierra, it was buried there amid cries of "Viva, Cristo Rey!"
Joseph was born 1890  in Coroneo, Mexico, and joined the Franciscans when he was 17. Because of Mexico’s civil unrest at that time (the forces of Pancho Villa had crossed into New Mexico on a raid the previous year), he was forced to take his philosophy and theology studies in California.

After ordination at Mission Santa Barbara, he returned to Mexico and served at Jerecuaro from 1922 on. The persecution under the presidency of Plutarco Calles (1924-28) forced Joseph to wear various disguises as he traveled around to visit the Catholics. In 1927 Church property was nationalized, Catholic schools were closed, and foreign priests and nuns were deported.

One day Joseph and several others were captured while returning from a secretly held Mass. Father Perez was stabbed to death by soldiers a few miles from Celaya on June 2, 1928. When Joseph’s body was later brought in procession to Salvatierra, it was buried there amid cries of "Viva, Cristo Rey!" (Long live Christ the King!).
Comment: The Catholic Church in Mexico today is much freer than it was in the 1920’s. Catholicism is very much alive in Mexico today, nurtured in part by martyrs like Father Perez.
Quote: Father Joseph’s memorial card includes these words: "May almighty God grant that our prayer, which is supported by the bloody sacrifice of this martyr, may graciously appear in his sight and bring salvation to us and redemption to our country" (Marion A. Habig, O.F.M., The Franciscan Book of Saints, p. 412).

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
The celebrated monastery of Monte Cassino having been lately repaired by Pope St Gregory II, Willibald chose that house for his residence, and his example contributed to settle it in the primitive spirit of its holy rule during the ten years that he lived there: indeed he seems to have had an important part in the restoration of observance there. At the end of that time. coming on a visit to Rome, he was received by Pope St Gregory III, who, being interested in his travels and attracted by his character, eventually instructed Willibald to go into Germany and join the mission of his kinsman Boniface.
Pope Eugenius III  We are told that St Robert St._Robert_of_Newminster_priest,  in his youth had studied at Paris, and there is record of a second journey of his across the seas when, being slandered by some of his monks, upon some false report of maladministration of his abbey, he went to St Bernard to give an account of himself; but Bernard knew his man and decided that no defence was needed to meet the charge which had been made. This visit must have taken place in 1147 or 1148, for Robert had an interview with Pope Eugenius III before he returned.

  Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew




Hail, Holy Mother of God -- Pope Francis
Jesus Christ is the blessing for every man and woman ... The Church, in giving us Jesus, offers us the fullness of the Lord’s blessing. This is precisely the mission of the people of God: to spread to all peoples God’s blessing made flesh in Jesus Christ. And Mary, the first and most perfect disciple of Jesus, the first and most perfect believer, the model of the pilgrim Church, is the one who opens the way to the Church’s motherhood and constantly sustains her maternal mission to all mankind. Mary’s tactful maternal witness has accompanied the Church from the beginning. She, the Mother of God, is also the Mother of the Church, and through the Church, the mother of all men and women, and of every people. …

Let us look to Mary, let us contemplate the Holy Mother of God. I suggest that you all greet her together, just like those courageous people of Ephesus, who cried out before their pastors when they entered Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!” What a beautiful greeting for our Mother. There is a story – I do not know if it is true – that some among those people had clubs in their hands, perhaps to make the Bishops understand what would happen if they did not have the courage to proclaim Mary “Mother of God”! I invite all of you, without clubs, to stand up and to greet her three times with this greeting of the early Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!”  Pope Francis; Homily, Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Chinese Catholics Celebrate Pentecost, World Day of Prayer for Church in China
Sacraments of Initiation Administered During Course of Celebrations

By Staff Reporter
Rome, May 27, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Many Chinese Catholic communities celebrated the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China last Sunday, reported Fides. Pope Benedict XVI instituted this day of prayer in 2007.

The May 24 prayer day coincides with the Marian feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians, and this year it coincided with the feast of Pentecost.  At the end of last Wednesday's General Audience in the Vatican, Pope Francis remembered the prayer day for the Asian nation.

In China on the prayer day, the sacraments of Christian initiation were administered to seven catechumans, 13 infants, and 38 adults in the He Bei province's parishes of Yan Jiao and of Bao Ding, as well as in the Zhe Jiang province's parish of Long Gang in the diocese of Wen Zhou.

The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians is celebrated at the Shrine of Our Lady of Sheshan in Shanghai and on the day, the parish of Chang Shu in the diocese of Su Zhou, along with many other communities, prayed: "Let us pray for the Church in China, that faces major challenges in the life of the Church and society. Let us pray so that the Holy Spirit guides us ... and may Our Lady Help of Christians protect us."  Four infants were also baptized during Mass in Chang Shu.

Also to celebrate, the parish of Yi Shan in the Diocese of Wen Zhou in the province of Zhe Jiang held a solemn Marian procession, so that, as observers noted, "the Church is one and united and a witness of love."

Moreover, religious and some lay people of the diocese of Nan Chong, located in the southern province of Sichuan, went on a pilgrimage not only to celebrate the special feasts of Sunday, but also to celebrate the Year of Consecrated Life. During it, those partaking exchanged their experiences of vocation, faith, mission and pastoral activity.

Pope Francis called for the Year of Consecrated Life at the end of his meeting with 120 superior generals of male institutes last November. The year started on the First Sunday of Advent, the weekend of Nov. 29, 2014, and ends on Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated Life. (D.C.L.)


  Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.
By Deborah Castellano Lubov VATICAN CITY, March 04, 2015 (Zenit.org) –

“Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.”
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is  very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding
.

 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

  Pope Francis: The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (Video)
He explained that it can also be found in day to day life By Staff

ROME, November 13, 2014 (Rome Reports) - To view the video click here.
     
At the end of its Constitution on the Church, the Second Vatican Council left us a very beautiful meditation on Mary Most Holy.
Let me (Pope Francis) just recall the words referring to the mystery we celebrate today: “The immaculate Virgin preserved free from all stain of original sin, was taken up body and soul into heavenly glory, when her earthly life was over, and exalted by the Lord as Queen over all things” (no. 59).
Then towards the end, there is: “The Mother of Jesus in the glory which she possesses in body and soul in heaven is the image and the beginning of the Church as it is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise, she shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come” (no. 68). Pope Francis
 
 
"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

January 5 – Our Lady of Good Counsel (Bergamo, Italy)  
Pope Francis: "Place your vocation in her hands"
At the opening of the seminarians’ pilgrimage in France, which was held at Lourdes through Monday, November 10, 2014, Pope Francis sent a special message in the form of three pieces of advice:
"Mary accompanied Jesus in his mission. She was present at Pentecost when the disciples received the Holy Spirit. She accompanied the first steps of the Church in a maternal way. During these days in Lourdes, confide in her, place your vocation in her hands, and ask her to make you pastors according to God’s own heart.  Let her strengthen you on these three key points that I mentioned: brotherhood, prayer, and mission.
I wholeheartedly give you my Apostolic Blessing and I ask you to pray for me. Thank you."
www.aleteia.org


Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"