Mary Mother of GOD
 Friday   Saint of the Day June 10  Quarto Idus Júnii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.


 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016


June 10 - Our Lady of Cranganor (India, 52)            
      Roy H. Schoeman's Own Conversion (I)
It was early one morning in early June, during a midweek break I had given myself two or three days on Cape Cod before the crowds arrived. I was walking in the dunes between Provincetown and Truro, alone with the singing birds before the world woke up, when I, for lack of better words, "fell into heaven".
That is, I found myself most consciously and tangibly in the presence of God.
67 St. Crispulus & Restitutus 1st century Martyrs who died in Rome in the reign of Emperor Nero. Some scholars state that they were martyred in Spain.
 313 Sts Alexander and Antonina the Virgin Martyrs saint bravely confessed Christ she urged the governor to renounce worship of demons idols; he didn't, after martyring them he became numb, unable to eat nor to drink died after seven days of terrible torment.
  362 St. Timothy Martyr and bishop. The Prusa, in Bithynia (modern Turkey), death under Emperor Julian the Apostate.
 365 St. Asterius Convert from Arianism, bishop of Petra, Jordan attacked at the Council of Sardica in 347 for denouncing Arian heresy
4th v. Construct first church of St. George in the cities of Birma and Beer Maa (Water Well) in the Oases.  {Coptic Departure of St. Martha of Egypt. {Coptic}
 430 Saint Bassian, Bishop of Lodi friend of St Ambrose, Bishop of Milan (Dec.7)  miracles providing flock by example virtuous life
 661 St. Landericus (or Landry) Bishop of Paris, from 650-661 A sincere and dedicated servant of God great love for the poor and the lowly; erect the city's first real hospital
 729  Departure of Pope Cosmas, the 44th Patriarch from the village of Abi-Sair monk in the monastery of St. Macarius. {Coptic}
1093 MARGARET of Scotland see Memorial 16 November; formerly 10 June; 16 June in Scotland  founded abbeys and used her position to work for justice and improved conditions for poor.
14th v.  Silvanus of the Kiev Caves The Holy Schemamonk labored in asceticism in the Far Caves during 13th v. 14th v.
1315 Bd Henry of Treviso; 276 miracles, wrought by his relics, recorded within days of death by notaries appointed by the magistrates: they occupy thirty-two closely printed columns of the Acta Sanctorum.
1609 Saint Basil, Bishop of Ryazan Uncovering and Transfer of the Holy Relics into the Ryazan-Dormition (afterwards Nativity) church in the Kremlin of Ryazan-Pereslavl
1626 Bl. Caspar Sadamazu Japanese martyr a Jesuit received into the Order at Bungo in 1582 served as secretary to several provincials before being arrested as a Christian
1854 Blessed Joachima marriage to a young lawyer, Theodore de Mas deeply devout, they became secular Franciscans they raised eight children he died and she she established the Carmelite Sisters of Charity known admired for prayer, deep trust in God selfless charity
1914 Departure of St. Abraam, bishop of El-Fayyoum ordained a monk and  priest; meek, humble, had a pure life, and he prayed much in seclusion; Many patients, of different religions, came to him, seeking the blessing of his prayers and were healed miracles tomb became and still is a pilgrimage for many who have special needs or infirmities.

I saw everything that I would be pleased about and everything I would regret. I also knew, from one instant to the next, that the meaning and purpose of my life was to love and serve my Lord and God; I saw how His Love enveloped and sustained me every moment of my existence; I saw how everything I did had a moral content, for good or for ill, and which mattered far more than I would ever know; I saw how everything that had ever happened in my life was the most perfect thing that could be arranged for my own good by an all-good, all-loving God, especially those things which caused me the most suffering at the time; I saw that my two greatest regrets at the moment of death would be all the time and energy I had wasted worrying about not being loved, when every moment of my existence I was held in the sea of God's unimaginably great love, and every hour I had wasted not doing anything of value in the eyes of God.

The answer to any question I mentally posed was instantly presented to me; in fact, I could not hold a question in my mind without already being shown the answer, with one, all-important exception - the name of this God who was revealing Himself to me as the meaning and purpose of my life. I did not think of Him as the God of the Old Testament whom I held in my imagination from my childhood. I prayed to know His name, to know what religion to follow to serve and worship Him properly. I remember praying, "Let me know your name - I don't mind if you are Buddha, and I have to become a Buddhist; I don't mind if you are Apollo, and I have to become a Roman pagan; I don't mind if you are Krishna, and I have to become a Hindu; as long as you are not Christ and I have to become a Christian!" As a result, although this God Who revealed Himself to me on the beach had heard my prayer to know His name, He also heard, and respected, my refusal to know it, too, and so gave no answer at t he time to the question.

Our Lady of Mantara in Lebanon (I) June 10 - Our Lady of Cranganor (India)
The Shrine of the Blessed Virgin of Mantara is located in the Greek-Melkite-Catholic Archbishopric of the Diocese of Saida and Deir-El-Kamar, in Lebanon. The word "Mantara" comes from the Arabic root word "Natar" = to wait.

According to tradition, Mantara is the cave where the Virgin Mary waited for Jesus while he was preaching in Sidon (today's Saida), because Jewish women were not allowed to enter pagan villages. The Gospels testify to the coming of Christ to Sidon, where he healed the daughter of the Canaanite woman (Mt 15: 21-28 and Mk 7: 24-31).

By a stroke of luck the cave was rediscovered by a shepherd who was keeping his flock in the vicinity. While he was sitting under an oak tree, playing his flute, he suddenly heard the squeal of one of his young goats. He ran in the direction of the squeal and found that a kid had fallen into a well (the hole is in the roof of the cave over the altar). He took out his knife to clear the area and open the way through the bramble bushes. He was happy to discover a narrow path leading to the back of a cave! He crawled inside on his hands and knees. His anxiety turned into joy when he found an icon of the Virgin Mary on an ancient altar. Then he rushed out, leaving his flock, and ran to announce the good news to the villagers of Maghdouche.
See entire article: http://www.mariedenazareth.com/10445.0.html?&L=1
Excerpt from Roy H. Schoeman, Salvation Is from the Jews: The Role of Judaism in Salvation History,
(Ignatius Press April 2003), pp. 359-360


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.


  Heavenly Georgia— the legion of Georgian saints, extolling the Lord in the Heavenly Kingdom with a single voice—is infinitely glorious
Saints of North America  the Orthodox Church in America remembers them On the second Sunday after Pentecost
"This Is a Miracle"; Not Your Typical Audience Corpus Christi Brings Out the Faith in Catholics
By Irene Lagan ROME, JUNE 14, 2007 (Zenit.org).- "This is a miracle," said the man standing beside me as we watched the Eucharist procession outside of the Basilica of St. Mary Major last Thursday.  The faith-filled exclamation expressed in real terms the immediate effect of the Eucharistic presence that inspired Pope Urban IV to declare the feast of Corpus Christi in 1264.  Thousands silently lined the streets of Via Merulana to meet the procession led by Benedict XVI, in much the same way as the faithful in 1263 processed with the miraculous bloodstained corporal from Bolsena to Orvieto, some 13 miles away.

The Eucharistic procession that takes place each year on the feast of Corpus Christi begins with Mass celebrated by the Pope at the Basilica of St. John Lateran, and ends with Benediction at St. Mary Major. The spontaneous sentiment of the man standing next to me was a joy and reverence that was tangible, and not unlike the reverence that restored the faith of Father Peter of Prague. In 1263, Father Peter of Prague was on a pilgrimage to Rome. Having lost faith in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist, Father Peter was merely going through the motions of Mass.  A t the time of consecration, the blood from the body of Christ trickled onto the corporal and floor beneath the altar. Needless to say, Father Peter's faith was restored.
He stopped the Mass and went to nearby Orvieto, where Urban IV was residing.
As chance would have it, St. Thomas Aquinas was also in Orvieto, and was deeply impressed by the Eucharistic miracle and procession. It was St. Thomas Aquinas who recounted the deta ils of the event, and wrote the hymns "O Salutaris Hostia" and "Tantum Ergo," which are still sung today.  A year later, Urban IV issued a bull establishing the feast of Corpus Christi to commemorate the miracle and to dispel widespread doubt about the Real Presence.  Aquinas' hymns eloquently express the transcendent unity accomplished through this mystery in which, as G.K. Chesterton once said, every man, prince or pauper, may recognize his high calling.
Last week's procession visibly moved Karen Hall, a visitor to Rome and convert to the Catholic Church.
"This is a real experience of God's transcendence, in such mundane and even profane surroundings," Hall remarked as Benedict XVI, who was kneeling in adoration, passed.  "I will probably never see these people again and can't speak a word of Italian, but in some ways I am closer to the people standing next to me now than I am to my family at home. This is for me a visible sign of our unity," she added.  An artist and writer, Hall said that watching the procession was like "watching the colors of the Church."   "It's such an unpalatable cast that is genuinely transformed into something beautiful. Grace is so palpably evident," she said.  Noting the camaraderie among strangers as the throngs began to disperse after Benediction, Hall remarked, "Only God can get a crowd like this to behave."

This experience stood in marked contrast to my experience several days later when a crowd less numerous than the one outside St. Mary Major banded together to protest globalization and war on the occasion of U.S. President George Bush's visit to Rome.  After the president's meetings with Benedict XVI, the Community of Sant'Egidio and Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi, riot police were forced to close off several main piazzas when protester s exhibited signs of violence.  In contrast to the silence that united those gathered around the Eucharist, the tenor of the quiet imposed by police following the near-riot was, to say the least, disturbing .
  67 St. Crispulus & Restitutus 1st century Martyrs who died in Rome in the reign of Emperor Nero. Some scholars state that they were martyred in Spain.
 120 St. Getulius Martyr with Amantius, Caerealis, and Primitivus the husband of St. Symphorosa; officer in the Roman army, he resigned when became a Christian returned to his estates near Tivoli, Italy. There he converted Caerealis, an imperial legate sent to arrest him. At Rome, on the Salarian Way, the martyrdom of blessed Getulius, a very learned nobleman, and his companions, Caerealis, Amantius, and Primitivus.  By order of Emperor Hadrian they were arrested by the ex-consul Licinius, scourged, thrown into prison, and then delivered to the flames.  But the fire did not injure them, and their heads were crushed with clubs, thus ending their martyrdom.  Their bodies were taken by Symphorosa, wife of blessed Getulius, and reverently interred on her own estate.
 275 St. Basilides and Companions 23 martyrs, including Mandal and Tripos, slain in Rome on the Aurelian Way Nicomedíæ sancti Zacharíæ Mártyris.    At Nicomedia, the martyr St. Zachary.
 313 Sts Alexander and Antonina the Virgin Martyrs saint bravely confessed Christ she urged the governor to renounce the worship of demons in the form of idols; he didn't, after martyring them he  became numb, unable to eat nor to drink died after seven days of terrible torment.
  362 St. Timothy Martyr and bishop. The Prusa, in Bithynia (modern Turkey), he was put to death during the persecutions of the Church under Emperor Julian the Apostate.
 365 St. Asterius Convert from Arianism, bishop of Petra, Jordan attacked at the Council of Sardica in 347 for denouncing Arian heresy
369 Sts. Pansemne and Theophanes of Antioch zealously taught keeping the commandments of God to everyone who came to him; exhorted people to lead a pure /chaste life, condemned debauchery of the people of Antioch.St. Aresius and Companions African martyrs, seventeen in number, including Rogatus these martyrs were included in early martyrologies.
4th v. Construct first church of St. George in the cities of Birma and Beer Maa (Water Well) in the Oases.  {Coptic Departure of St. Martha of Egypt. {Coptic}
4th v. St. Maximus   Martyred bishop of Naples, from 359; died in exile from his see and is venerated as a martyr.
 371 Martyrdom of St. Alladius (Hilarius or Hilarion) the Bishop.  {coptic}
 430 Saint Bassian, Bishop of Lodi friend of St Ambrose, Bishop of Milan (December 7)  glorified by miracles providing his flock example of a virtuous life
 486 St. Censurius Bishop of Auxerre, France, the successor of St. Germanus. Censurius governed Auxerre from 448 until his death. He was buried in the church of St. Germanus
 656 St Ithamar, Bishop Of Rochester

 661 St. Landericus (or Landry) Bishop of Paris, from 650-661 A sincere and dedicated servant of God great love for the poor and the lowly; erect the city's first real hospital
 690 St. Amelberga Benedictine nun widow relative of Blessed Pepin of Landen mother of Sts. Cludula, Emebert, and Reinildis. Her husband,  Count Witger, became a religious, and she entered a convent.
 
729  Departure of Pope Cosmas, the 44th Patriarch from the village of Abi-Sair monk in the monastery of St. Macarius. {Coptic}
9th V. Bd Olive Of Palermo, Virgin And Martyr
1053 St. Bardo Benedictine archbishop official of the Holy Roman Empire
1093 MARGARET of Scotland see Memorial 16 November; formerly 10 June; 16 June in Scotland  founded abbeys and used her position to work for justice and improved conditions for poor.
1182 St. Bogumilus Archbishop and founder joined the Camaldolese at Uniedow, Poland
1270 Bl. Amata Dominican co-foundress. Amata was a Dominican nun in Rome. She co-founded the convent of St. Agnes at Valle di Pietro, in the Bologna area of Italy.
Bl. Olive (Olivia) achieved a large following when her story from biography;  held in great esteem by Christians and Muslims.
14th v.  Silvanus of the Kiev Caves The Holy Schemamonk labored in asceticism in the Far Caves during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries
1315 Bd Henry of Treviso; 276 miracles, wrought by his relics, recorded within days of death by notaries appointed by the magistrates: they occupy thirty-two closely printed columns of the Acta Sanctorum
        St. Gezelin A hermit honored at Slebusrode, near Colonge, Germany. He is listed as Ghislain, Gisle, and Jocelyn.
1386 Bd Bonaventure of Peraga, Cardinal of The Holy Roman Church

         St. Maurinus Abbot and martyr. He probably governed St. Pantaleon Abbey in Cologne, Germany He is revered as a martyr, but his Acta are not extant.
1419 Bd John Dominici, Archbishop of Ragusa and Cardinal;  instrumental in helping to end the great schism,
1609 Saint Basil, Bishop of Ryazan Uncovering and Transfer of the Holy Relics into the Ryazan-Dormition (afterwards Nativity) church in the Kremlin of Ryazan-Pereslavl
1626 Bl. Caspar Sadamazu Japanese martyr a Jesuit received into the Order at Bungo in 1582 served as secretary to several provincials before being arrested as a Christian
1715 Saint John, Metropolitan of Tobolsk and All Siberia Wonderwonder teacher of the Latin language Kiev Spiritual
       Academy monasticism at the Kiev Caves "How ought man to conform his will with the will of God?"

1854 Blessed Joachima marriage to a young lawyer, Theodore de Mas deeply devout, they became secular Franciscans they raised eight children he died and she she established the Carmelite Sisters of Charity known and admired for her high degree of prayer, deep trust in God and selfless charity
1914 Departure of St. Abraam, bishop of El-Fayyoum ordained a monk and  priest; meek, humble, had a pure life, and he prayed much in seclusion; Many patients, of different religions, came to him, seeking the blessing of his prayers and were healed miracles were manifested through him after his departure, and his tomb became and still is a pilgrimage for many who have special needs or infirmities.


Saints of North America; the Orthodox Church in America remembers them On the second Sunday after Pentecost
Each local Orthodox Church commemorates all the saints, known and unknown, who have shone forth in its territory.
North_America_All_Saints
Saints of all times, and in every country are seen as the fulfillment of God's promise to redeem fallen humanity. Their example encourages us to "lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily besets us" and to "run with patience the race that is set before us" (Hebrews 12:1).
The saints of North America also teach us how we should live, and what we must expect to endure as Christians

Although it is a relatively young church, the Orthodox Church in America has produced saints in nearly all of the six major categories of saints: Apostles (and Equals of the Apostles); Martyrs (and Confessors); Prophets; Hierarchs; Monastic Saints; and the Righteous.
Prophets, of course, lived in Old Testament times and predicted the coming of Christ.

The first Divine Liturgy in what is now American territory (northern latitude 58 degrees, 14 minutes, western longitude 141 degrees) was celebrated on July 20, 1741, the Feast of the Prophet Elias, aboard the ship Peter under the command of Vitus Bering. Hieromonk Hilarion Trusov and the priest Ignatius Kozirevsky served together on that occasion.
Several years later, the Russian merchant Gregory I. Shelikov visited Valaam monastery, suggesting to the abbot that it would be desirable to send missionaries to Russian America.

On September 24, 1794, after a journey of 7,327 miles (the longest missionary journey in Orthodox history) and 293 days, a group of monks from Valaam arrived on Kodiak Island in Alaska. The mission was headed by Archimandrite Joasaph, and included Hieromonks Juvenal, Macarius, and Athanasius, the Hierodeacons Nectarius and Stephen, and the monks Herman and Joasaph.
St Herman of Alaska (December 13, August 9), the last surviving member of the mission, fell asleep in the Lord in 1837.
Born: around 1756-1760 (Serpukhov, Moscow Diocese, Russia)
Died: December 25, 1837 (Spruce Island, Alaska)
Glorification Date:
August 9, 1970 August 9 (glorification)
Commemoration Dates:
 
Throughout the Church's history, the seeds of faith have always been watered by the blood of the martyrs. The Protomartyr Juvenal was killed near Lake Iliamna by natives in 1799, thus becoming the first Orthodox Christian to shed his blood for Christ in the New World.
In 1816, St Peter the Aleut was put to death by Spanish missionaries in California when he refused to convert to Roman Catholicism.

Missionary efforts continued in the nineteenth century, with outreach to the native peoples of Alaska. ^Tikhon_of_Moscow^_Apostle_to_America.jpg
Two of the most prominent laborers in Christ's Vineyard were St Innocent Veniaminov (March 31 and October 6) and St Jacob Netsvetov (July 26), who translated Orthodox services and books into the native languages.
Father Jacob Netsvetev died in Sitka in 1864 after a life of devoted service to the Church.
Father John Veniaminov, after his wife's death, received monastic tonsure with the name Innocent. He died in 1879 as the Metropolitan of Moscow.

As the nineteenth century was drawing to a close, an event of enormous significance for the North American Church took place. On March 25, 1891, Bishop Vladimir went to Minneapolis to receive St Alexis Toth (May 7) and 361 of his parishioners into the Orthodox Church.
This was the beginning of the return of many Uniates to Orthodoxy.
St Tikhon (Belavin), the future Patriarch of Moscow (April 7, October 9), came to America as bishop of the diocese of the Aleutians and Alaska in September 1898. As the only Orthodox bishop on the continent, St Tikhon traveled extensively throughout North America in order to minister to his widely scattered and diverse flock. He realized that the local church here could not be a permanent extension of the Russian Church. Therefore, he focused his efforts on giving the American Church a diocesan and parish structure which would help it mature and grow.
St Tikhon returned to Russia in 1907, and was elected as Patriarch of Moscow ten years later. He died in 1925, and for many years his exact burial place remained unknown.
St Tikhon's grave was discovered on February 22, 1992 in the smaller cathedral of Our Lady of the Don in the Don Monastery when a fire made renovation of the church necessary.

St Raphael of Brooklyn (February 27) was the first Orthodox bishop to be consecrated in North America. Archimandrite Raphael Hawaweeny was consecrated by Bishop Tikhon and Bishop Innocent (Pustynsky) at St Nicholas Cathedral in New York on March 13, 1904. As Bishop of Brooklyn, St Raphael was a trusted and capable assistant to St Tikhon in his archpastoral ministry. St Raphael reposed on February 27, 1915.

The first All American Council took place March 5-7, 1907 at Mayfield, PA, and the main topic was "How to expand the mission." Guidelines and directions for missionary activity, and statutes for the administrative structure of parishes were also set forth.

John_Kochurov.jpg
In the twentieth century, in the aftermath of the Russian Revolution, countless men, women, and children received the crown of martyrdom rather than renounce Christ.                     Alexander_Hotovitzky.jpg
Sts John Kochurov (October 31) and Alexander Hotovitzky (December 4 and August 7) both served the Church in North America before going back to Russia.
St John became the first clergyman to be martyred in Russia on October 31, 1917 in St Petersburg. St Alexander Hotovitzky, who served in America until 1914, was killed in 1937.
In addition to the saints listed above, we also honor those saints who are known only to God, and have not been recognized officially by the Church.
As we contemplate the lives of these saints, let us remember that we are also called by God to a life of holiness.
Heavenly Georgia— the legion of Georgian saints, extolling the Lord in the Heavenly Kingdom with a single voice—is infinitely glorious
Having examined the history of Georgia and the hagiographical treasures attesting to the faith of the Georgian nation, we become convinced that. It is unknown how many cleansed themselves of their earthly sins in merciless warfare with the enemy of Christ, or how many purified their souls in unheated cells through prayer, fasting, and ascetic labors.
To God alone are known the names of those ascetics, forgotten by history, who by their humble labors tirelessly forged the future of the Georgian Church and people.
St. George of the Holy Mountain wrote: “From the time we recognized the one true God, we have never renounced Him, nor have our people ever yielded to heresy.”

A decree of the Church Council of Ruisi-Urbnisi states: “We will not depart from thee, the Catholic Church which bore us in holiness, nor will we betray thee, our pride—Orthodoxy—to which we have always been faithful, for we have been granted the honor to know thee, the witness of the Truth Itself!” This relationship to Orthodoxy is the cornerstone of the life of every Georgian believer.

It is impossible to count the names of all those Christians who have been raised up from the earthly Church in Georgia to the heavens, let alone to describe all the godly deeds they have performed. For this reason December 11 has been set aside for the commemoration not only of the saints whose Lives are known to us but also of the nearly three hundred more whose names, but not stories, have been preserved as well.
Most Georgian people bear the name of a saint who is commemorated on this day, and they entreat the saint to intercede before the Lord in their behalf.

67 St. Crispulus & Restitutus 1st century Martyrs who died in Rome in the reign of Emperor Nero. Some scholars state that they were martyred in Spain
In Hispánia sanctórum Mártyrum Críspuli et Restitúti.    In Spain, the holy martyrs Crispulus and Restitutus.
At Rome, on the Salarian Way, the martyrdom of blessed Getulius, a very learned nobleman, and his companions, Caerealis, Amantius, and Primitivus.  By order of Emperor Hadrian they were arrested by the ex-consul Licinius, scourged, thrown into prison, and then delivered to the flames.  But the fire did not injure them, and their heads were crushed with clubs, thus ending their martyrdom. 

Romæ, via Salária, pássio beáti Getúlii, claríssimi et doctíssimi viri, ac susceptórum e sancta uxóre Symphorósa beatórum septem fratrum Mártyrum patris, ejúsque Sociórum Cæreális, Amántii et Primitívi.  Hi omnes, Hadriáni Imperatóris jussu, a Licínio Consulári tenti, primum cæsi sunt, deínde in cárcerem trusi; postrémum, incéndio tráditi, sed nullo modo ab igne læsi, martyrium suum, fústibus illíso cápite, complevérunt.  Ipsórum autem córpora Symphorósa, beáti Getúlii uxor, collégit, et in arenário prædii sui honorífice sepelívit.
    At Rome, on the Salarian Way, the martyrdom of blessed Getulius, a very learned nobleman, and his companions, Caerealis, Amantius, and Primitivus.  By order of Emperor Hadrian they were arrested by the ex-consul Licinius, scourged, thrown into prison, and then delivered to the flames.  But the fire did not injure them, and their heads were crushed with clubs, thus ending their martyrdom.  Their bodies were taken by Symphorosa, wife of blessed Getulius, and reverently interred on her own estate..
Their bodies were taken by Symphorosa, wife of blessed Getulius, and reverently interred on her own estate..
120 St. Getulius Martyr with Amantius, Caerealis, and Primitivus the husband of St. Symphorosa; officer in the Roman army, he resigned when became a Christian returned to his estates near Tivoli, Italy. There he converted Caerealis, an imperial legate sent to arrest him. With his brother Amantius and with Caerealis and Primitivus, Getulius was tortured and martyred at Tivoli.
120 Ss. Getulius And His Companions, Martyrs
Getulius the husband of St Symphorosa, had been an officer in the Roman army under Trajan and Hadrian: but after his conversion to the Christian faith he 
resigned his commission and withdrew to his estate in the Sabine Hills, near Tivoli. Here he lived in retirement, surrounded by a little band of Christians whom he taught and supported. He was one day engaged in instructing some of his people when he was surprised by a visit from Cerealis, the imperial vicar, who had been sent to arrest him. But Cerealis himself was won over to Christianity as the result of conversations with Getulius and with his brother Amantius who, though an ardent believer, still remained a tribune in the Roman army. As soon as the emperor had been informed of the conversion and baptism of Cerealis, he ordered the consul Licinius to apprehend the three men and to condemn them to death unless they consented to abjure their faith. All made a bold confession, and after suffering imprisonment for twenty-seven days, at Tivoli, with divers tortures, they were beheaded or burnt at the stake on the Via Salaria. With them perished another Christian, of the name of Primitivus. The relics of the saints were buried by St Symphorosa in an arenarium upon her estate.

St Getulius is honoured with an unusually long elogium in the Roman Martyrology, but his passio, printed in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, is of the legendary type, and his name is lacking in the Depositio Martyrum, and other early records. There are also conflicting statements as to his resting-place. It is possible, however, that the early date of the martyr­dom may in part explain these difficulties. See also Dufourcq, Étude sur les Gesta Martyrum romains, vol. i, pp. 197—199 and 227; H. Quentin, Martyrologes historiques, p. 542 F. Scavini, Septem Dioeceses Aprutienses (1914), where see the index.
275 St. Basilides and Companions 23 martyrs, including Mandal and Tripos, slain in Rome on the Aurelian Way. They died in the persecution under Emperor Aurelian
Item Romæ, via Aurélia, natális sanctórum Basílidis, Trípodis, Mándalis et aliórum vigínti Mártyrum, sub Imperatóre Aureliáno et Urbis Præfécto Platóne.
    Also at Rome, on the Aurelian Way, the birthday of the Saints Basilides, Tripos, Mandal, and twenty other martyrs, under Emperor Aurelian and Plato, the governor of the city..
Alexander_Antonina_Pansemnas { see below}
313 Alexander and Antonina the Virgin The Holy Martyrs saint bravely confessed Christ she urged the governor to renounce the worship of demons in the form of idols
St Antonina was from the city of Krodamos (Asia Minor). She was arrested for being a Christian, and was brought before the governor Festus. He urged her to worship the pagan gods, promising to make her a priestess of the goddess Artemis. But the saint bravely confessed Christ, and she urged the governor to renounce the worship of demons in the form of idols. Festus gave orders to strike the saint on the face and lock her up in prison.
The martyr spent all her time at prayer, she ate and drank nothing, but then she heard the voice of God, "Antonina, fortify yourself with food and be brave, for I am with you." When they led her before the governor again, the martyr continued to stand up for the Christian Faith and to denounce the pagans.
The governor decided to give the holy virgin over for defilement by soldiers, but the Lord inspired one of them, St Alexander, to save the holy virgin. He sought permission to go in to her on the pretext that he might be able to convince her to obey the governor's will.
St Alexander then suggested that she put on his military attire and flee. St Antonina was afraid, but the Lord ordered her to agree.

No one recognized her dressed as a soldier, and she walked out of prison. The soldiers sent by Festus found St Alexander alone in the cell. He would not respond to the questions of the governor, and so he was tortured and mercilessly beaten.
Through the inspiration of the Lord Jesus Christ, St Antonina also came to stand before Festus.

Soldiers cut off their hands, then they smeared them with pitch and threw them into a pit where a fire was burning. When the fire went out, they threw snakes into the pit, so that Christians would not be able to gather up the bones of the martyrs. Returning home, Festus became numb, and was able neither to eat nor to drink. He died after seven days of terrible torment.
Sts Alexander and Antonina were martyred on May 3, 313. In the Prologue their memory is listed under June 10.
The relics of the saints were transferred to Constantinople and placed in the Maximov monastery.
369 Saint Pansemnas and Theophanes of Antioch who zealously taught the keeping of the commandments of God to everyone who came to him. He exhorted people to lead a pure and chaste life, and he condemned the debauchery of the people of Antioch.
He was the son of pagans. At a youthful age he entered into marriage, but after three years his wife died. St Theophanes then came to believe in Christ and accepted Baptism. He gave up everything and began to live beyond the city in a manner of self-denial. He zealously taught the keeping of the commandments of God to everyone who came to him. He exhorted people to lead a pure and chaste life, and he condemned the debauchery of the people of Antioch. When St Theophanes learned about a certain profligate woman, Pansemne, who was caught up in the snares of the devil, he wanted to save her. Knowing how difficult it would be to fulfill such an intention, and conscious of his own infirmity, St Theophanes prayed and he besought the Lord to help him save the sinful woman.
Finally, the saint dressed up in fine clothing, took along much gold and then went to Pansemne.

The monk gave her the gold and he asked her to forsake the dissolute life to marry him. Pansemne happily consented and gave him her word to become his wife. The sole condition which St Theophanes set for Pansemne was that she should accept Baptism. Because of the attractive marriage offer, Pansemne consented. In preparing her to accept Baptism, St Theophanes instructed her in the Christian Faith. He explained that the truth of God does not tolerate sin and corruption, but that the love of God is gracious to those that repent.

Having accepted Baptism, St Pansemne by the grace of God was completely reborn as a person. She distributed all the riches that she had acquired through profligacy, and she settled into a hut beside the cell of the monk and began to live the life of an ascetic. After 22 months she died on the very same day as the monk (+ 369).
4th v. Construction of the first church of St. George in the cities of Birma and Beer Maa (Water Well) in the Oases.

On this day, the first church in the name of St. George was built in Egypt in the city of Beer Maa in the Oasis. As was consecrated also on this day a church in his name in the city of Birma, district of Tanta. For after the perishing of Diocletian, and the reign of the righteous Emperor Constantine, all the temples of the idols were destroyed. Churches were built after the name of the heroic martyrs, who strived with their blood to defend the faith.

Some Christian soldiers in the land of Egypt, had donated a piece of the land where the city of Birma is now located. One of them was a righteous and meek young man, who lived on a piece of this land with some of the farmers. In this area there was a well of water. This young man heard of the wonders of the great among the martyrs, St. George. He searched until he found his biography. He wrote it, and it comforted him to read it, which he did without boredom.

While he stood praying, on the evening of the twenty-fourth of the month of Bashans, he saw that an assembly of the saints had come down beside the well. They were praising God and chanting with angelic voices. They were surrounded by heavenly light, and he was astounded. One of them, who was in the uniform of a soldier, came forward and informed him that he was Gawargios (George) who was martyred at the hands of Diocletian. He ordered him to build a church for him on that site, for that was the Will of God. The assembly left him, and raised up to heaven while they were glorifying the Most High.

The young man spent that night awake till morning. Few days passed during which he was thinking about how he could build this church, knowing that he did not have the money for a small piece of it. One night, while he stood praying, the great martyr St. George appeared to him. The Saint pointed out to him the place to build the church. Then he directed the young man to another place and told him, "Dig here and you shall find what you need to build the church." When he woke up in the morning, he went where the honorable martyr had directed him. He dug there and found a vessel filled with gold and silver. He praised God, and glorified his patron saint. He built the church and called the father the Patriarch who consecrated it on this day.

The relics of St. George, that were kept in his church in the city of Beer Maa in the Oasis, were relocated to the monastery of Anba Samuel by its monks. That was during the days of the Saint Abba Mattheos (87th Patriarch), and the monastery was under the direction of Fr. Zachary Ebn-Elkomos and Fr. Soliman El-Qualamony.
During the Papacy of Pope Gabriel (88th Patriarch) the relics of the saint were relocated to his well-known church in Old Cairo. That was on the 16th day of Abib, 1240 A.M. (July 10, 1024 A.D.).
A great celebration takes place annually, where the church was built beside the water well, to commemorate this venerable event. There, many signs of casting out of evil spirits and healing of the sick take place with the intercession of this great martyr.  May his prayers be with us. Amen.
Departure of St. Martha of Egypt.
On this day also, the ascetic and fighter St. Martha, departed. She was born in the city of Mesr (Cairo) to wealthy Christian parents. She loved fornication and unchastity in her youth and her works became known. However, the mercy of God from above encompassed her, and moved her to go to the church. That was on the Nativity of Our Lord. When she came to its door and wished to go inside, the servant delegated to watch the door told her, "It is not meet for you to go into the holy church, for you know what you are?" A confrontation took place between them, and when the Bishop heard the clamor, he came to the door of the church to see what had happened. When he saw the girl, he said to her, "Do you not know that the house of God is holy, and only the pure enter it." She wept and said, "Accept me O father, for I am repentant from this instant, and have decided not to go back to my sin." The bishop replied, "If it is true what you have said, go and bring back here all your silk clothes and gold ornaments."

She went quickly and brought back all of her clothes and ornaments and gave them to the Bishop. He ordered that they be burned immediately, then he shaved off the hair of her head. He put on her the monastic garb and sent her to one of the convents. She fought a great spiritual fight, and she frequently said in her prayers: "O Lord, if I could not bear the disgrace from the servant of Your house, so please do not put me to shame before Your angels and saints." She continued the spiritual fight for twenty-five years, during which she did not go out of the door of the convent, then departed in peace.
May her prayers be with us. Amen
St. Gezelin A hermit honored at Slebusrode, near Colonge, Germany. He is listed as Ghislain, Gisle, and Jocelyn.
St. Maurinus Abbot and martyr. He probably governed St. Pantaleon Abbey in Cologne, Germany He is revered as a martyr, but his Acta are not extant
Colóniæ Agrippínæ sancti Mauríni, Abbátis et Mártyris.    At Cologne, St. Maurinus, abbot and martyr
371 Martyrdom of St. Alladius (Hilarius or Hilarion) the Bishop.  {coptic}
Today also marks the martyrdom of St. Alladius (Hilarius or Hilarion), bishop of one of the countries of the East. One day, he rebuked Emperor Julian for worshipping the idols. The Emperor replied, "If I am, in your opinion infidel, because I do not worship that whom was crucified, I shall make you also forsake worshipping him." Then the Emperor handed him to one of his officers and commanded him to torture Alladius without mercy for one year. When he did not turn away from his firm intention, he lit a fire in a pit and threw him in it, but no harm came upon him. Many believed, and the Emperor ordered their heads to be cut off. Finally, they brought the saint out of the pit, and ordered to cut off his head. He delivered up his soul in the hand of the Lord Christ and received the crown of martyrdom.
May his prayers be with us. Amen.
4th v. St. Maximus   Martyred bishop of Naples, Italy, from 359 . He died in exile from his see and is venerated as a martyr
Neápoli, in Campánia, sancti Máximi, Epíscopi et Mártyris; qui, ob strénuam Nicǽnæ fídei confessiónem, a Constántio Imperatóre in exsílium pulsus, ibídem, ærúmnis conféctus, decéssit.
    At Naples in Campania, St. Maximus, bishop and martyr.  For having vigorously defended the Nicene Creed he was exiled by Emperor Constantius, where he died worn out by his trials..
362 St. Timothy Martyr and bishop. The Prusa, in Bithynia (modern Turkey), he was put to death during the persecutions of the Church under Emperor Julian the Apostate
Prusæ, in Bithynia, sancti Timóthei, Epíscopi et Mártyris, qui, sub Juliáno Apóstata, cum Christum ejuráre noluísset, idcírco, ipsíus Imperatóris jussu, cápite abscíssus est.
    At Prusias in Bithynia, St. Timothy, bishop and martyr.  He was beheaded during the reign of Julian the Apostate because he refused to deny Christ.
The Hieromartyr Timothy, Bishop of Prusa (Bithynia), received from the Lord the gift of wonderworking because of his purity and sanctity of life. At Prusa he converted many pagans to the faith in Christ.
The emperor Julian the Apostate (361-363), upon hearing about St Timothy had him locked up in prison, but even there also the saint continued to preach the Gospel.
Julian forbade him to teach about Jesus Christ, but the saint continued to spread the Christian Faith.
Finally, the emperor gave orders to behead the saint. His holy relics were afterwards transferred to Constantinople.
365 St. Asterius Convert from Arianism, bishop of Petra, Jordan attacked at the Council of Sardica in 347 for denouncing Arian heresy
Petræ, in Arábia, sancti Astérii Epíscopi, qui, ob fidem cathólicam, ab Ariánis multa passus et ab Imperatóre Constántio in Africam relegátus est, ac tandem, in Ecclésiam suam restitútus, Conféssor gloriósus occúbuit.
    At Petra in Africa, St. Asterius, a bishop who suffered greatly for the Catholic faith at the hands of the Arians.  He was banished to Africa by Emperor Constantius, and there died as a glorious confessor.
Exiled to Libya by the pro-Arian Emperor Constantius TI.
In 362, Emperor Julian the Apostate restored him, and he attended the Council of Alexandria, Egypt. Asterius was named the delegate of this council to bear a letter to the Church of Antioch, where he provided leaders with a report of the proceedings. He died in Petra soon after
St. Aresius and Companions African martyrs, seventeen in number, including Rogatus these martyrs were included in early martyrologies
In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Arésii, Rogáti et aliórum quíndecim.    In Africa, the holy martyrs Aresius, Rogatus, and fifteen others.
430 Saint Bassian, Bishop of Lodi friend of St Ambrose, Bishop of Milan (December 7)  glorified by miracles  providing his flock example of a virtuous life
St Bassian's father governed the Syracuse region (in Sicily) and he prepared his son to follow in his footsteps. He sent him to Rome to receive his education. While still in his childhood St Bassian had heard about the Christians and he wanted to learn more about them and become familiar with the Christian Faith. Gordian the priest taught him the essentials of the Christian Faith, and the youth was filled with the desire to accept Baptism.
At the time of the performing of the Mystery St Bassian beheld an angel in the Baptismal font, holding the garment in which the newly-baptized would be clothed.

The saint made bold to ask who he was and where he was from.
The angel replied that he was sent from afar to help him fulfill his holy intent to know Christ. Then he became invisible.

St Bassian began to lead a strict life, eating little food, and spending his nights at prayer. His servants were astonished at such temperance, and they surmised that he had accepted Christianity. They reported about this to St Bassian's father, who ordered him to return to Syracuse. Praying in the church of St John the Theologian, the saint received from the Apostle the command to leave Rome. And so St Bassian distributed all his substance to the poor and together with his faithful Christian servant, he set off to Ravenna to his kinsman, Bishop Ursus.
Bishop Ursus set him up at a solitary place outside the city near the church in honor of the Hieromartyr Apollinarius.
St Bassian quickly advanced spiritually, and soon he was glorified by miracles. During this time a judge had been falsely accused and was sentenced to death by decapitation. Along the way to he prayerfully called out for help to St Bassian. When the executioner was already holding the sword over his head, the sword suddenly was knocked from his hands and flew off to the side. This occurred three times. The same thing happened with another executioner.
When they reported this to the Emperor, the Emperor set the judge free. He then told how he had been saved through the intercession of St Bassian.

The people of the city, believing that the prayer of St Bassian was powerful before God, asked Bishop Ursus to ordain him to the priesthood. Upon the death of the bishop of the city of Lodium (Lodi in Liguria, Northern Italy), the priest Clement of the cathedral church had a revelation that St Bassian would be chosen Bishop of Lodium.
Both St Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, and Bishop Ursus officiated at at his consecration.

St Bassian taught the people not only by word, but also by deed, providing his flock example of a virtuous life. At Lodi he built a beautiful church dedicated to the holy Apostles. St Bassian often exchanged letters with St Ambrose, and he was present at his blessed repose, and buried his body.  St Bassian died peacefully in the year 430, having served as archbishop for 35 years.
486 St. Censurius Bishop of Auxerre, France, the successor of St. Germanus. Censurius governed Auxerre from 448 until his death. He was buried in the church of St. Germanus Antisiodóri sancti Censúrii Epíscopi.    At Auxerre, St. Censurius, bishop.
656 St Ithamar, Bishop Of Rochester; reputation for miracles
St Ithamar has a special claim upon our interest, because he was the first English­man to occupy an English bishopric. Unfortunately, we know very little about him. St Honorius, archbishop of Canterbury, consecrated him to the see of Rochester after the death of St Paulinus, and Bede tells us that “though he was a man of Kent, yet in piety as well as in learning he was the equal of his prede­cessors, St Justus and St Paulinus, both of whom had been Italian missionaries under St Augustine. In 655 St Ithamar consecrated a fellow-countryman---­Frithona or Deusdedit—to be archbishop of Canterbury. His death appears to have taken place the following year. On account of his reputation for miracles, several churches were dedicated in his honour, and his relics were enshrined in 1100.

The very little we know about St Ithamar is derived almost wholly from Bede’s Ecclesias­tical History; see C. Plummer’s edition, and the notes. There is a considerable catalogue (compiled in the twelfth century) of miracles wrought at his shrine; the full text has never been edited, but the Bollandists, in Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, have printed a compendium which had been incorporated by Capgrave. See T. D. Hardy, Catalogue of Materials for British History (Rolls Series), vol. i, pp. 251—252.

690 St. Amelberga Benedictine nun widow relative of Blessed Pepin of Landen mother of Sts. Cludula, Emebert, and Reinildis. Her husband, Count Witger, became a religious, and she entered a convent.
729  Departure of Pope Cosmas, the 44th Patriarch from the village of Abi-Sair monk in the monastery of St. Macarius. {Coptic}
This day also marks the departure of Pope Cosmas the First (44th Patriarch), in the year 446 A.M. (June 24, 730 A.D.). He was from the village of Abi-Sair. He became a monk in the monastery of St. Macarius. He was ordained against his will a patriarch on Sunday the 30th day of Baramhat, 445 A.M. (March 729 A.D.). He did not cease, since his enthronement, from asking God to repose his soul speedily. God responded to his request after one year and three months of his enthronement.  May his prayers be with us. Amen.

9th v. Bl. Olive (Olivia) achieved a large following when her story from a biography  held in great esteem by Christians and Muslims.
She was described as a ravishing beauty of 13 years when Saracens captured her at Palermo, Sicily in the 9th century. She was deported to Tunis where she began to perform miracles and convert Muslims to Christianity. Wishing to get rid of her, but fearing her power, her captors abandoned her in a forest, giving her to the beasts. Some hunters found her and took her themselves as a slave, but she converted them to the Faith. Exasperated Muslim authorities arrested, tortured, and beheaded her. At the moment of her death, her soul was seen to fly to heaven in the form of a dove.
She has been honored in Carthage and Palermo, and was held in great esteem by Christians and Muslims. The great mosque of Tunis is called the Mosque of Olivia, and Tunisian Muslims say that who speaks ill of her is always punished by God.

661 St. Landericus (or Landry) Bishop of Paris, from 650-661 A sincere and dedicated servant of God great love for the poor and the lowly; erect the city's first real hospital
He labored zealously to improve their lot. And when the proceeds from the sale of all his possessions did not suffice to relieve their hungry during a famine, he went so far as to sell some of the Church vessels and furniture. St. Landericus became increasingly aware that the sick poor of his diocese were not really cared for by the custom then in vogue of housing them in little hostels dependent on the casual alms of charitable persons. This led him to erect the city's first real hospital, dedicated to St. Christopher, which in time became the famous Hotel-Dieu. Always on the alert to provide spiritual help for his people, this saintly bishop welcomed the Benedictines into his diocese and encouraged them to set up the Abbey of Denis. In 653, in company with twenty-three other bishops, he signed the foundation charter granted by King Clovis to the Abbey.
He died about 661 after having commissioned the monk Marculfus to compile a collection of Ecclesiastical Formulas.

660  St Landericus, Or Landry, Bishop Of Paris
During the reign of Clovis II and in the year 650 St Landericus became bishop of Paris. He was a very earnest and devout man, distinguished especially by his great love of the poor; to relieve them, during a time of famine, he sold not only his personal possessions, but also some of the vessels and furniture of the church. Before his day the only facilities for the care of the sick poor of Paris were provided by a few little hostels, matriculae, dependent for their upkeep from day to day on casual alms. To St Landericus is attributed the foundation of the city’s first real hospital, near Notre-Dame, and dedicated under the name of St Christopher. It subsequently developed into the great institution which was famous in later ages as the Hôtel-Dieu. In 653 Landericus signed an exemption of the newly estab­lished abbey of St Denis from episcopal jurisdiction. The date of the death of St Landericus is uncertain, but it cannot have taken place earlier than 66o, for in that year a monk named Marculf dedicated to him a collection of ecclesiastical formulae which he had compiled under his instructions.

Not much information is available concerning St Landry, but the Bollandists, in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, have pieced together an account mainly derived from breviary lessons of much later date. On the beginnings of Saint-Denis, see J. Havet, in the Bibl. de l’Ecole des Chartes, vol. Ii (1890), pp. 562. Cf. also Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, p. 472.

9th V. Bd Olive Of Palermo, Virgin And Martyr

The story of Bd Olive, or St Olive as she is generally styled, belongs to the realm of pious fiction, and it is through the religious drama that her cultus seems to have been propagated in Italy. Her feast, however, is observed to this day in the diocese of Carthage, as well as in Palermo. In a fifteenth-century codex in the library of the cathedral of Palermo, her legend is given in nine lessons. A beautiful Christian maiden of thirteen, she was carried off from her home in Palermo by the Saracens, who conveyed her to Tunis. At first, in consideration of her noble lineage, she was allowed to live in a cave near the city; there she effected a number of cures. But when it came to light that Mohammedans were being converted by her to the Christian faith, she was arrested and subjected to various tortures. She was shut up in a dungeon without light or food; she was scourged until her flesh was cut tc the bone; she was extended on the rack and torn with the iron comb; she was plunged into boiling oil. As she emerged from her steaming bath, unhurt but saturated with oil, she was stretched again upon the rack and executioners were directed to set light to her with torches; the burning brands fell from the hands of the men, who were instantaneously converted. Finally, Olive was beheaded, and her soul was seen to escape from her body in the form of a dove, which soared up to Heaven.

This is the fantastic story which the Bollandists have summarized mainly from Cajetan, De Vitis Sanctorum Siculorum, who professes to have drawn his materials from earlier manu­script sources. There is, however, a text of the supposed passio printed in Analecta Bol­landiana, vol. iv (1885), pp. 5—10. It is curious that Bd Olive seems to be held in veneration by the Mohammedans of Tunis; the great mosque in that city bears the name of Jams as-­Zituna, i.e. the mosque of Olive, and it seems to be a popular belief among the Arabs of that region that those who speak ill of her are always visited by calamity. See S. Romano in the Archivio Storico Siciliano, vol. xxvi (1901), pp. 11—21. There are several small popular accounts of Bd Olive which have been published in Sicily and elsewhere. See also A. d’Ancona, Origini del Teatro italiano, vol. i, pp. 436—437, and C. Courtois in Miscellanées G. de Jerphanion (1947), t. i, pp. 63—68.

1053 St. Bardo Benedictine archbishop official of the Holy Roman Empire
He was born in Oppershafen, Wetterau, Germany, in about 982. Educated at Fulda Abbey, he became a Benedictine and was made the abbot of two monasteries, becoming the archbishop of Mainz in 1031. He served as chancellor and chief almoner alms distributor for the empire. Pope St. Leo IX advised Bardo to lighten his duties and relax some of his personal austerities and mortifications.

1093 MARGARET of Scotland Memorial 16 November; formerly 10 June; 16 June in Scotland  founded abbeys and used her position to work for justice and improved conditions for the poor
Sanctæ Margarítæ Víduæ, Scotórum Regínæ, quæ sextodécimo Kaléndas Decémbris obdormívit in Dómino.
    St. Margaret, widow, queen of Scotland, who slept in the Lord on the 16th of November..
Granddaughter of King Edmund Ironside of England. Great-niece of Saint Stephen of Hungary. Born in Hungary while her family was in exile due to the Danish invasion of England, she still spent much of her youth in the British Isles. While fleeing the invading army of William the Conqueror in 1066, her family's ship wrecked on the Scottish coast. They were assisted by King Malcolm III Canmore of Scotland, whom Margaret married in 1070. Queen of Scotland. They had eight children, one of whom as Saint Maud, wife of Henry I. Margaret founded abbeys and used her position to work for justice and improved conditions for the poor.
Born c.1045 in Hungary Died 16 November 1093 at Edinburgh Castle, Scotland, four days after her husband and son died in defense of the castle; buried in front of the high altar at Dunfermline, Scotland; relics later removed to a nearby shrine; the bulk of her relics were destroyed in stages during the Protestant Reformation and the French Revolution
Canonized 1251 by Pope Innocent IV

1093 ST MARGARET OF SCOTLAND, MATRON * In Scotland the feast of St Margaret is observed on the anniversary of her death, November 16.

MARGARET was a daughter of Edward d’Outremer (“The Exile”), next of kin to Edward the Confessor, and sister to Edgar the Atheling, who took refuge from William the Conqueror at the court of King Malcolm Canmore in Scotland. There Margaret, as beautiful as she was good and accomplished, captivated Malcolm, and they were married at the castle of Dunfermline in the year 1070, she being then twenty-four years of age. This marriage was fraught with great blessings for Malcolm and for Scotland. He was rough and uncultured but his disposition was good, and Margaret, through the great influence she acquired over him, softened his temper, polished his manners, and rendered him one of the most virtuous kings who have ever occupied the Scottish throne. To maintain justice, to establish religion, and to make their subjects happy appeared to be their chief object in life. “She incited the king to works of justice, mercy, charity and other virtues”, writes an ancient author, “in all which by divine grace she induced him to carry out her pious wishes. For he, perceiving that Christ dwelt in the heart of his queen, was always ready to follow her advice.” Indeed, he not only left to her the whole management of his domestic affairs, but also consulted her in state matters.

What she did for her husband Margaret also did in a great measure for her adopted country, promoting the arts of civilization and encouraging education and religion. She found Scotland a prey to ignorance and to many grave abuses, both among priests and people. At her instigation synods were held which passed enactments to meet these evils. She herself was present at these meetings, taking part in the discussions. The due observance of Sundays, festivals and fasts was made obligatory, Easter communion was enjoined upon all, and many scandalous practices, such as simony, usury and incestuous marriages, were strictly prohibited. St Margaret made it her constant effort to obtain good priests and teachers for all parts of the country, and formed a kind of embroidery guild among the ladies of the court to provide vestments and church furniture. With her husband she founded several churches, notably that of the Holy Trinity at Dunfermline.
God blessed the couple with a family of six sons and two daughters, and their mother brought them up with the utmost care, herself instructing them in the Christian faith and superintending their studies. The daughter Matilda afterwards married Henry I of England and was known as Good Queen Maud,* whilst three of the sons, Edgar, Alexander and David, successively occupied the Scottish throne, the last named being revered as a saint. St Margaret’s care and attention was extended to her servants and household as well as to her own family; yet in spite of all the state affairs and domestic duties which devolved upon her, she kept her heart disengaged from the world and recollected in God. Her private life was most austere: she ate sparingly, and in order to obtain time for her devotions she permitted herself very little sleep. Every year she kept two Lents, the one at the usual season, the other before Christmas. At these times she always rose at midnight and went to the church for Matins, the king often sharing her vigil. On her return she washed the feet of six poor persons and gave them alms.
She also had stated times during the day for prayer and reading the Holy Scriptures. Her own copy of the Gospels was on one occasion inadvertently dropped into a river, but sustained no damage beyond a small watermark on the cover: that book is now preserved amongst the treasures of the Bodleian Library at Oxford. Perhaps St Margaret’s most outstanding virtue was her love of the poor. She often visited the sick and tended them with her own hands. She erected hostels for strangers and ransomed many captives—preferably those of English nationality. When she appeared outside in public she was invariably surrounded by beggars, none of whom went away unrelieved, and she never sat down at table without first having fed nine little orphans and twenty-four adults. Often—especially during Advent and Lent—the king and queen would entertain three hundred poor persons, serving them on their knees with dishes similar to those provided for their own table.

In 1093 King William Rufus surprised Ainwick castle, putting its garrison to the sword. King Malcolm in the ensuing hostilities was killed by treachery, and his son Edward was also slain. St Margaret at this time was lying on her death-bed. The day her husband was killed she was overcome with sadness and said to her attendants, “Perhaps this day a greater evil hath befallen Scotland than any this long time.” When her son Edgar arrived back from Ainwick she asked how his father and brother were. Afraid of the effect the news might have upon her in her weak state, he replied that they were well. She exclaimed, “ I know how it is
Then raising her hands towards Heaven she said, “I thank thee, Almighty God, that in sending me so great an affliction in the last hour of my life, thou wouldst purify me from my sins, as I hope, by thy mercy.” Soon afterwards she repeated the words, “0 Lord Jesus Christ who by thy death hast given life to the world, deliver me from all evil ! “ and breathed her last. She died four days after her husband, on November 16, 1093, being in her forty-seventh year, and was buried in the church of the abbey of Dunfermline which she and her husband had founded. St Margaret was canonized in 1250 and was named patroness of Scotland in 1673.
The beautiful memoir of St Margaret which we probably owe to Turgot, prior of Durham and afterwards bishop of St Andrews, a man who knew her well and had heard the confession of her whole life, leaves a wonderfully inspiring picture of the influence she exercised over the rude Scottish court. Speaking of the care she took to provide suitable vestments and altar linen for the service of God, he goes on: 

These works were entrusted to certain women of noble birth and approved gravity of manners who were thought worthy of a part in the queen’s service. No men were admitted among them, with the sole exception of such as she permitted to enter along with herself when she paid the women an occasional visit. There was no giddy pertness among them, no light familiarity between them and the men; for the queen united so much strictness with her sweetness of temper, so pleasant was she even in her severity, that all who waited upon her, men as well as women, loved her while they feared her, and in fearing loved her. Thus it came to pass that while she was present no one ventured to utter even one unseemly word, much less to do aught that was objectionable. There was a gravity in her very joy, and something stately in her anger. With her, mirth never expressed itself in fits of laughter, nor did displeasure kindle into fury. Sometimes she chid the faults of others—her own always—with that commendable severity tempered with justice which the Psalmist directs us unceasingly to employ, when he says “Be ye angry and sin not “. Every action of her life was regulated by the balance of the nicest discretion, which impressed its own distinctive character upon each single virtue. When she spoke, her conversation was seasoned with the salt of wisdom; when she was silent, her silence was filled with good thoughts. So thoroughly did her outward bearing correspond with the staidness of her character that it seemed as if she had been born the pattern of a virtuous life. I may say, in short, every word that she uttered, every act that she performed, showed that she was meditating on the things of Heaven.
By far the most valuable source for the story of St Margaret’s life is the account from which the above quotation is taken, which was almost certainly written by Turgot who, in spite of his foreign-sounding name, was a Lincolnshire man of an old Saxon family. The Latin text is in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, and elsewhere; there is an excellent English translation by Fr W. Forbes-Leith (1884). Other materials are furnished by such chroniclers as William of Malmesbury and Simeon of Durham; most of these have been turned to profit in Freeman’s Norman Conquest. An interesting account of the history of her relics will be found in DNB., vol. xxxvi. There are modern lives of St Margaret by S. Cowan (1911), L. Menzies (1925), J. R. Barnett (1926) and others. For the date of her feast, see the Acta Sanctorum, Decembris Propylaeum, p. 230.

1182 St. Bogumilus Archbishop and founder joined the Camaldolese at Uniedow, Poland
Also called Bogimilus and Theophilus. He was born into a noble family near Dobrow, Poland. While studying in Paris, France, with his twin brother, Boguphalus, he was ordained a priest in a church near Dobrow. His uncle, the archbishop of Gnesen, made him the chancellor of that city. When his uncle died, Bogumilus succeeded him. Bogumilus founded a Cistercian abbey at Coronawa. He resigned his see in 1172, opposed by his archdiocesan clergy because of his strictness. Bogumilus joined the Camaldolese at Uniedow, Poland.

1182 St Bogumilus, Archbishop of Gniezno
Bogumilus and Boguphalus are said to have been the twin sons of noble Polish parents. The brothers, who were born near Dobrow, on the Werthe, received an excellent education, completing their studies at Paris. Boguphalus then received the habit in a Cistercian monastery, and Bogumilus built at Dobrow a church which he dedicated to the Holy Trinity. Having been raised to the priesthood he took charge of the parish himself. His uncle John, who was archbishop of Gniezno, appointed him his chancellor and nominated him his successor; and in 1167, after his uncle’s death, he was accordingly consecrated and ruled the archdiocese for nearly five years. He founded the Cistercian monastery of Coronowa, and endowed it with some of his family estates. Though a wise and zealous pastor, he proved quite unable to enforce discipline upon his clergy. Unwilling to countenance abuses which he was unable to remedy, he asked and obtained permission to resign his office. He subsequently entered the Camaldolese Order and spent the re­mainder of his life in one of its hermitages at Uniow. He died there in 1182, but his body was afterwards translated to the church at Dobrow which he had founded.

The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, have reprinted in a contracted form a Latin life which was written by Stephen Damalewicz and published by him at Warsaw in 1649. The cultus was formally approved by the Holy See in 1925, for which see the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xvii (1925),  pp. 384—387. “Bogomil” means “friend of God”, or “loved of God”, i.e. Theophilus.

1270 Bl. Amata Dominican co-foundress. Amata was a Dominican nun in Rome. She co-founded the convent of St. Agnes at Valle di Pietro, in the Bologna area of Italy.

1315 Bd Henry of Treviso; 276 miracles, wrought by his relics, recorded within days of death by notaries appointed by the magistrates: they occupy thirty-two closely printed columns of the Acta Sanctorum
Henry of Treviso, or San Rigo as he is often called in Italy, was born at Bolzano in the Trentino. His parents were very poor, and he never learnt to read or write. He went as a young man to Treviso, where he supported himself as a day labourer, secretly giving away to the poor whatever he could save from his scanty wages. Throughout his whole life his one object was the service of God. He heard Mass daily, frequently making his communion, and every day he went to confession—not from scrupulosity, but to preserve the utmost purity of conscience. All the time that was not employed in labour and in necessary duties he spent in devotion, either at church or in private; the penitential instruments he used for the discipline of his body were preserved after his death in the cathedral. Men marvelled at his extraordinary equanimity, which nothing could ever ruffle. Foolish people and children sometimes mocked or molested the shabby, thick-set little man, with his sunken eyes, long nose, and crooked mouth, but he never resented their treatment or replied to it, except to pray for them.

When he could no longer work, a citizen called James Castagnolis gave him a room in his house and, when necessary, food. Usually, however, Bd Henry subsisted on the alms of the charitable, which he shared with beggars, never holding anything over from one day to the next. Even extreme bodily weakness in ad­vancing age could not keep him from God’s house and from visiting all the churches within walking distance of Treviso. He died on June 10, 1315. His little room was immediately thronged with visitors eager to venerate him and to secure some fragment of his possessions, which consisted of a hair-shirt, a wooden log which had been his pillow, and some cords and straw that had served as his bed. Extra­ordinary scenes were witnessed after his body had been removed to the cathedral. The people broke into the basilica at night, and the bishop and the podestà, roused from their sleep, were obliged to go and protect the body by putting a wooden palisade round it. No fewer than 276 miracles, said to have been wrought by his relics, were recorded within a few days of Bd Henry’s death by the notaries appointed by the magistrates: they occupy thirty-two closely printed columns of the Acta Sanctorum. The cultus of Bd Henry was confirmed by Pope Benedict XIV.

A life of Bd Henry, by his contemporary Bishop Pierdomenico de Baone, has been printed by the Bollandists, June, vol. ii. See also R. degli Azzoni Avogaro, Memorie del Beato Enrico (2 vols., 1760); A. Tschöll (1887); Austria Sancta, Die Heiligen und Seligen Tirols, vol. ii (1910), pp. 41 seq. ; and II B. Enrico . . . (Treviso, 1915).

14th v. Silvanus of the Kiev Caves The Holy Schemamonk labored in asceticism in the Far Caves during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries
One time, by the power of his prayer, he held fast to the spot robbers, who had come into the monastery garden, and for three days they were not able to move.
When they repented, the monk then freed them. The memory of St Silvanus is celebrated also on August 28, and on the second Sunday of Great Lent.
The Monk Siluan, Kievo-Pechersk SchemaMonk, asceticised in the Farther Caves during the XIII-XIV Centuries. One time, by the power of his prayer, he held fast to the spot robbers, who had come into the monastery garden, and for three days they were not able to move. When they repented, the monk then freed them. The memory of the Monk Siluan is celebrated also on 28 August and on the 2nd Sunday of Great Lent.

1386 Bd Bonaventure of Peraga, Cardinal of The Holy Roman Church.
The first member of the Augustinian Order of Hermits to be raised to the dignity of a cardinal was Bonaventure Baduario. He belonged to one of the leading families of Padua, and was born at Peraga at a short distance from the city. Having received the Augustinian habit at an early age, he was sent to the University of Paris, and when Pope Innocent VI established a theological faculty at the University of Bologna, Bonaventure was one of the earliest occupants of a chair. In addition to his teaching he wrote a number of treatises and commentaries, and he was interested in profane as well as in sacred literature. Community of tastes and mutual attraction led him to form a close friendship with the poet Petrarch, whose funeral oration he preached. In 1377 he was chosen prior general of his order: the following year he was created cardinal of St Cecilia. On several occasions he acted as ambassador for Pope Urban VI during the Schism. He always stoutly defended the rights of the Church, and in so doing came into conflict with his kinsman, Francis, Prince of Carrara, who was the ruler of Padua. On the occasion of a visit to Rome, as Bonaventure was crossing the Tiber to visit the Vatican, he was struck by an arrow and killed. The perpetrator of the deed was never identified, but it was generally believed that the murder had been committed by order of the Prince of Carrara.

Cardinal Bonaventure’s claims to the title Blessed seems a little doubtful, though his own order venerated him as a martyr shortly after his death. The Bollandists, in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. ii, have compiled an account based mainly on T. de Ferrera’s Alpha­betum Augustinianum. In modern times, D. A. Perini has published a small volume, Il b. Bonaventura Baduario-Peraga (1952).
1419 Bd John Dominici, Archbishop of Ragusa and Cardinal; instrumental in helping to end the great schism, Amongst the almost contemporary records of Bd John Dominici which have come down to us are a short biography written by one of his most famous sons— St Antoninus, archbishop of Florence—and a portrait painted by another—Fra Angelico—on the walls of San Marco. A Florentine of humble parentage, born in 1376, John received the Dominican habit at the age of eighteen in the priory of Santa Maria Novella, in spite of some opposition caused by his lack of education and a tendency to stammer. An unusually retentive memory and great persever­ance enabled him soon to remedy these defects and he became one of the leading theologians of his day as well as an eloquent preacher. In addition to commentaries on the Holy Scriptures and one or two treatises, he wrote laudi or hymns in the vernacular. For twelve years after completing his studies at the University of Paris he taught and preached in Venice. He was then prior of Santa Maria Novella and elsewhere. At Fiesole and in Venice he founded new houses for men-and in the latter city he established the convent of Corpus Christi for Dominican nuns. He it was who contributed most to the reform movement in Italy, introducing or restoring the strict rule of St Dominic in several priories, with the approval of the master general, Bd Raymund of Capua. It should be further noticed that he took the keenest interest in the Christian education of the young and that he was one of the first to detect and resist the pernicious tendencies of the new paganism that was growing up with the humanists. In 1406 he attended the conclave which elected Pope Gregory XII, and he afterwards became confessor and adviser to that pope, who created him archbishop of Ragusa and cardinal of San Sisto.

By encouraging Pope Gregory to resign—as the only possible means of inducing the antipopes likewise to forego their claims—Bd John was instrumental in helping to end the great schism, and it was he who conveyed Gregory’s resignation to the Council of Constance. The next pope, Martin V, appointed him legate to Bohemia and Hungary, charged especially with the duty of counteracting the influence of the Hussites. He found Bohemia in a turmoil: public opinion had been roused to the verge of frenzy by the execution of John Huss; and King Wenceslaus would not take the repressive measures advocated by the nuncio. As he could do nothing there, Dominici passed on to Hungary, but he caught fever soon after his arrival and died at Buda on June 10, 1419. His cultus was confirmed in 1832.

In the Acta Sanctorum, two lives are printed: one, a short memoir by St Antoninus of Florence; the other, of much greater length, by John Caroli. Unfortunately this last is not very accurate or reliable. But a good deal has been written otherwise concerning Bd John’s life and work, particularly in relation to the later phases of the great schism. See especially the articles of J. Hollerbach in the Römische Quartalschrift for 1909 and 1910, and H. Finke’s Acta Concilii Constantiensis. Bd John’s two works on education, Lucula Noctis (new ed. by E. Hunt, U.S.A., 1940) and Regola del governo di cura familiare, are of notable importance in the history of pedagogy. He also wrote a very edifying tractate of an ascetical character, II Libro d’amore di caritâ. Consult further the preface of Fr Coulon to his edition of the Lucula Noctis (1908), and Fr Mortier’s Histoire des Maîtres Généraux OP., vols. iii and iv; with Taurisano’s Catalogus Hagiographicus OP.

1609 Saint Basil, Bishop of Ryazan Uncovering and Transfer of the Holy Relics into the Ryazan-Dormition (afterwards Nativity) church in the Kremlin of Ryazan-Pereslavl
(Saint Basil, Bishop of Ryazan  July 3), was done by Archbishop Theodoret of Ryazan (1605-1617). It pleased Divine Providence during the Time of Troubles to glorify St Basil. The uncovering of his relics and their transfer into the Ryazan-Dormition (afterwards Nativity) church in the Kremlin of Ryazan-Pereslavl took place on July 10, 1609.
This had been the cathedral church from the time of the Ryazan bishop Jonah II (1522-1547). The relics of St Basil were placed in a reliquary at the left kleros, beside the iconostasis. A troparion and kontakion were then composed. From that time the name of St Basil was "commemorated throughout all the churches of the Ryazan diocese." People had recourse to him as to "their constant intercessor, a helper in sorrow and peril." Under Archbishop Moses (1638-1651), a stone crypt was built over the relics of St Basil in 1638, and over it was put the Murom Icon of the Most Holy Theotokos "the Supplication of Basil."

During this period services of thanksgiving to St Basil were served in the Ryazan churches. The first solemn celebration of the transfer of the relics of the saint took place on June 10, 1645 under Archbishop Moses. Especially fervent in veneration of the Ryazan hierarch was Archbishop Misael (1651-1655). By his command, in 1653, an inscription was made on a large silver vessel for the blessing of water, "This cup is from Ryazan-Pereslavl, in the cathedral church of the Dormition and the holy Passion-Bearers Boris and Gleb, and our Father among the saints Basil, Bishop of Ryazan, Wonderworker".

In 1655 St Basil was depicted upon a silver cross together with St John the Forerunner and St Jonah, Metropolitan of Moscow. In 1712 during the time of Metropolitan Stephen Yavorsky, a stone chapel was constructed over the original burial place of St Basil, at the Borisoglebsk church , through the zeal of the clerk Nikita Altukhov. In the years 1722-1723 under Tsar Peter I a formal investigation of the saint was conducted, after which St Basil was depicted upon an icon together with other Russian saints. Metropolitan Demetrius (Sechenov) of Novgorod, during his time as Bishop of Ryazan (1752-1757) compiled the service to St Basil, "having in mind first of all the writing of the troparion, kontakion and canon".

Through his efforts a new crypt was constructed over the relics of St Basil, containing a reliquary with an icon of the saint. In 1782 the reliquary was elegantly adorned by the Archbishop of Ryazan and Zaraisk, Simon (Lagova) (1778-1804). In 1810 under the Ryazan and Zaraisk archbishop Theophylakt (Rusanov), a decree of the Holy Synod was promulgated concerning the celebration of St Basil on the Sunday of All Saints. On October 4, 1836 a new memorial was unveiled at the spot of the uncovering of the relics of St Basil. It was set up through the zeal of the churchwarden of the Borisoglebsk church, Simeon Panov. In 1871, Archbishop Alexis (Rzhanitsky, 1867-1876) served the Divine Liturgy at the Borisoglebsk church on the Feast day of St Basil, July 3, for the first time.

Under Archbishop Palladius (Raev, 1876-1882) the Holy Synod in 1881 appointed the following days for commemoration of St Basil: July 3, the day of his blessed repose, and June 10, the day of the transfer of his holy relics. Even today, St Basil is especially venerated in the Ryazan lands.  In each temple of the Ryazan diocese there is his icon.

In the majority of the churches, moreover, is found a mural of the saint sailing along on the water on his mantiya with the Murom Icon of the Mother of God in hand. In the cathedral church each Wednesday evening an Akathist is sung to him.

1626 Bl. Caspar Sadamazu Japanese martyr a Jesuit received into the Order at Bungo in 1582 served as secretary to several provincials before being arrested as a Christian
His superior, who joined him in prison, was Blessed Francis Pacheco. Caspar was burned alive in Nagasaki. He was beatified in 1867.

1715 Saint John, Metropolitan of Tobolsk and All Siberia Wonderwonder teacher of the Latin language Kiev Spiritual Academy monasticism at the Kiev Caves "How ought man to conform his will with the will of God?"
The Wonderwonder, in the world was named John Maximovitch, and he was born in the city of Nezhino in 1651. His father Maxim Vasil'evich and mother Euphrosyne had seven sons, of which John was the eldest. Upon his completion of the Kiev-Mogilyansk College (afterwards the Kiev Spiritual Academy), the future hierarch emerged from it as a teacher of the Latin language. Thereafter, in 1680, he accepted monasticism at the Kiev Caves monastery and became absorbed in inner spiritual activity. With the general consent of the brethren, the young monk was given the obedience of preaching. From this period he demonstrated an exceptional eloquence. He attached a special significance to inner religious knowledge. The chief theme of his life can be defined at a stroke as, "How ought man to conform his will with the will of God?" He developed this theme both in his preachings, and in his subsequent missionary service. In answer to it appeared the work, published towards the end of his long ascetic life, and entitled "Heliotropion" or "Sunflower," or "Conforming the Human Will to the Divine Will." Of the many works of the holy Fathers of the Orthodox Church, this work gives a very thorough answer to this great question of Christian soteriology.

In 1658 they sent him on a mission to Moscow. There he was appointed by Patriarch Joachim (1674-1690) as vicar of the Briansk-Svensk monastery, which was then under the Kiev Caves Lavra.
St Theodosius, Archbishop of Chernigov, in 1695 shortly before his own death (February 5) appointed Hieromonk John as Archimandrite of the Chernigov Eletsk monastery, and designated him as his successor as bishop. (St John revered the memory of St Theodosius, believing in the power of his prayerful intercession before the Lord. Because of his faith, he received healing from a serious illness through the prayers of St Theodosius. At the very height of the sickness, St Theodosius appeared to him and said, "Serve tomorrow, you will be well." On the following day St John, completely well and to the amazement of everyone, served the Divine Liturgy. This miracle of St John's healing marked the beginning of the veneration of St Theodosius as a grace-bearing saint of God.)

On January 10, 1697 Patriarch Adrian of Moscow and All Rus (1690-1700) consecrated Archimandrite John as Bishop of Chernigov, in the Dormition cathedral of the Moscow Kremlin.  Upon entering into the administration of the diocese, Bishop John created a Collegium near the archbishop's cathedral, similar to the Kiev Academy, which the saint intended should serve as an "Athens at Chernigov," a school of pious enlightenment.  In view of its high level of theological education and training, St John's school received wide renown. In essence, this was the first seminary in Russia. Seminaries on the model of this one began opening in other dioceses of the Russian Church.
The saint also later opened a printing press, at which he and his successors published many works of spiritual and moral content.

The life of St John was illumined by lofty virtues, and especially humility. It is reflected also in his works, "The Moral-Didactic Reflector" (Chernigov, 1703 and 1707); "The Alphabet, with Rhymes Added" (1705); "The Virgin Mother of God" (1707); "The Theatre, or Moral-Didactic Disgrace" (1708); "Excursus on Psalm 50" (Chernigov, 1708); "Excursus on the "Our Father" and "The Eight Gospel Beatitudes" (1709); "The Royal Way of the Cross" (Chernigov, 1709); "Thoughts on God to the Benefit of Right-Belief" (1710 and 1711); "Synaxarion Commemoration on the Victory of Poltava" (1710); "The Pilgrim" (in manuscript); "Spiritual Thoughts" (Moscow, 1782).

At Chernigov in 1714 the saint also first published his chief work, written in the Latin language. It was a peculiarity of the graduates of the Kiev school was that they wrote their works in classical Latin. Professor I. A. Maximovich in 1888 translated the "Heliotropion" into the modern Russian language and published it at first in parts in the "Chernigov Diocesan Newsletter", and later on in a separate book (Kiev, 1896). With his name is connected also "The Latin-Greek-Russian Lexicon."
Saint John was known to have connections with Mount Athos.

He had a special interest in the fate of Russian inhabitants on the Holy Mountain, and sent them substantial material aid during these difficult years. His archbishopal grammota to the Russian monastery of St Panteleimon has been preserved, and it testifies to his concern for those on Mount Athos.
On August 14, 1711, after his elevation to the dignity of metropolitan, St John arrived at the see of Tobolsk and All Siberia.

The saint concerned himself constantly with the enlightening of his diocese. There he continued with his work, started at Chernigov. He improved the school which had been opened by his predecessor, the renowned missionary Metropolitan Philotheus (Leschinsky, + 1727), and he continued the apostolic preaching among the pagans of Siberia, converting many thousands to Christ.
In 1714 St John set off to Peking to head a mission with Archimandrite Hilarion (Lezhaisky).

 At Tobolsk he again undertook publishing activity, using the printing press he set up at Chernigov. To this time belongs also the publication by Metropolitan John of the "Heliotropion" in the Slavonic-Russian language (1714), so that the Siberians could also understand it.  The chronicler describes the life of the saint in Siberia:
"He was quiet and unpretentious, graciously considerate, sympathetic to the poor, and merciful." He often helped people secretly, and sometimes in the garb of a simple monk, he would bring generous alms to the homes of the needy saying, "Accept this in the Name of Jesus Christ."
His home at Tobolsk was always open to all those in need of help or a word of comfort. Even on the day he died, June 10, 1715, after Divine Liturgy St John had set up a dining-hall at his home for the clergy and the impoverished, and he himself served at table. Later on, having taken his leave of everyone, the saint withdrew to his chambers. When the church bells rang for Vespers, he died at prayer on his knees. The saint was buried in the chapel of St John Chrysostom at the Tobolsk Dormition-Sophia cathedral.
St John has long been venerated in Siberia.
In light of numerous miracles and the longstanding local veneration of St John, in 1916 the Church established the all-Russian celebration of the saint on June 10, the day of repose.
St John's memory is fervently kept by Siberians and by all the believing Russian people. He at present rests in the Tobolsk cathedral of the Protection of the Mother of God. The service to him was republished, with the blessing of His Holiness Patriarch Alexis I, by Metropolitan Bartholomew (Gorodtsov) in 1947 at the city of Novosibirsk.

1854 Blessed Joachima marriage to a young lawyer, Theodore de Mas deeply devout, they became secular Franciscans they raised eight children he died and she she established the Carmelite Sisters of Charity known and admired for her high degree of prayer, deep trust in God and selfless charity
Born 1783 into an aristocratic family in Barcelona, Spain, Joachima was 12 when she expressed a desire to become a Carmelite nun. But her life took an altogether different turn at 16 with her marriage to a young lawyer, Theodore de Mas. Both deeply devout, they became secular Franciscans. During their 17 years of married life they raised eight children.
The normalcy of their family life was interrupted when Napoleon invaded Spain. Joachima had to flee with the children; Theodore, remaining behind, died. Though Joachima reexperienced a desire to enter a religious community, she attended to her duties as a mother. At the same time, the young widow led a life of austerity and chose to wear the habit of the Third Order of St. Francis as her ordinary dress. She spent much time in prayer and visiting the sick.
Four years later, with some of her children now married and younger ones under their care, Joachima confessed her desire to a priest to join a religious order. With his encouragement she established the Carmelite Sisters of Charity. In the midst of the fratricidal wars occurring at the time, Joachima was briefly imprisoned and, later, exiled to France for several years.
Sickness ultimately compelled her to resign as superior of her order. Over the next four years she slowly succumbed to paralysis, which caused her to die by inches. At her death in 1854 at the age of 71, Joachima was known and admired for her high degree of prayer, deep trust in God and selfless charity.

Comment:  Joachima understands loss. She lost the home where her children grew up, her husband and, finally, her health. As the power to move and care for her own needs slowly ebbed away, this woman who had all her life cared for others became wholly dependent; she required help with life’s simplest tasks. When our own lives go spinning out of control, when illness and bereavement and financial hardship strike, all we can do is cling to the belief that sustained Joachima: God watches over us always.

1914 Departure of St. Abraam, bishop of El-Fayyoum ordained a monk and  priest; meek, humble, had a pure life, and he prayed much in seclusion; Many patients, of different religions, came to him, seeking the blessing of his prayers and were healed miracles were manifested through him after his departure, and his tomb became and still is a pilgrimage for many who have special needs or infirmities..
Today also, the saint Anba Abraam, Bishop of El-fayyoum and El-Giza, departed. This was in the year 1630 A.M. (June 10, 1914 A.D.). This saint, whose name was Paul (Boulos), was born in 1545 A.M. (1829 A.D.) in the Estate of "Gilda", district of Mallawi, governate of Miniah, to righteous parents. They brought him up in a Christian manner. They sent him to the church school, where he learned religious subjects and the church hymns. As he was a very bright student, Anba Yousab, the Bishop of Sunabbo ordained him a deacon for the church of Gilda. His heart longed for the monastic life, so he went to El-Muharrak monastery where he was ordained a monk by the name of Paul Gabriel El-Muharraki. He was nineteen years old.
He was meek, humble, had a pure life, and he prayed much in seclusion. Accordingly, the monks loved him exceedingly.

When Anba Yakoubos, bishop of El-Meniah, heard of him, he summoned him. He retained him in the episcopate for a period of time during which he promoted him to a priest. When he returned to his monastery, the monks with a consensus decided to make him the abbot over the monastery after the death of their Abbot. He was then promoted to archpriest (hegumen) in the days of Abba Demitrius the second (111th Patriarch). He remained Abbot of the monastery for five years, during which the monastery was the refuge for thousands of the poor. So he was called the father of the poor and the destitute. During his time as abbot, he did not spare an effort to improve the condition of the monastery spiritually and physically. He improved its finances by developing its agricultural land. As he increased his charity toward the poor, the orphans and the widows, some of the monks became more resentful of him, for they considered these charitable works as squandering and extravagant acts. They complained against him to Anba Morcos, Metropolitan of El-Behira, who was the acting Patriarch after the death of Pope Demitrius. Anba Morcos accepted their complaints and deposed him as the abbot of their monastery. Shortly after his dismissal, he left El-Muharrak monastery and went to the monastery of El-Baramous. Several monks from the El-Muharrak monastery went to the monastery of El-Baramous, with archpriest Bolous (Abba Abraam), because they did not like the attitudes of the complaining monks. He stayed there for some time studying the Bible and teaching the monks.

The abbot of the monastery of El-Baramous at that time was archpriest Youhanna the Scribe, who became later on Pope Kyrillos the fifth (112th Patriarch). In the year 1597 A.M. (1881 A.D.), Pope Kyrillos the Fifth chose and ordained him a bishop for the parish of El-Fayyoum and El-Giza. He replaced its reposed bishop, Anba Eisak, and was ordained with the name of Abba Abraam.

During his episcopate, he became famous for two attributes:
The First: His charity to the multitude of poor that came to the bishopric residence. He gave them all what he had of money. He made the bishopric residence a shelter for many of them. He offered clothing for those who had no clothes and food for those who were hungry. He never allowed anyone to offer him food that was better than that offered to the poor. Once he went down to visit the poor while they were eating, and found that the food he was offered that day was better than that offered to them. He became very sad, and immediately relieved the nun supervising the feeding service of the poor from her duties.

The Second: He was famous for his prayer of faith. Many miracles were performed, through his prayers, on his hands. His fame was spread to all parts of Egypt and also to some parts of Europe. Many patients, of different religions, came to him, seeking the blessing of his prayers and were healed. Anba Abraam was well read of the holy books. He always gave to his visitors advice, instructions and sermons which showed the great depth of his knowledge. More important was that he possessed a pure nature and many virtues. Particularly, his severe denial of himself, and his true renouncement of the pleasures of life and its vain glory. His food and clothing were just bare necessities. His ambition never looked up to the glory of higher ranks or positions. When the Patriarch wanted to promote him to the rank of metropolitan he apologized saying that the Holy Bible did not mention any ranks in the priesthood except the ranks of the priest and the bishop.

He was also straightforward in revealing his own opinion, looking only for the truth. He never gave any attention to the rank and greatness of people in higher places, for their greatness was far less than the greatness of the truth. For this reason, all the metropolitans and bishops of the church avoided his anger and sought to please him.

Abba Abraam departed to the heavenly bless on the 3rd day of Baouna, 1630 A.M. (June 10, 1914 A.D.).

More than ten thousand Christian and Moslems walked in his funeral precession. His pure body was laid in the tomb, which was prepared for him in the monastery of the Virgin Mary in El-Ezab. Many miracles were manifested through him after his departure, and his tomb became and still is a pilgrimage for many who have special needs or infirmities.  May his prayers be with us and Glory be to God forever. Amen.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints