Mary Mother of GOD
 Wednesday   Saint of the Day June 15 Décimo Septimo Kaléndas Júlii  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins. Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016

Sunday, November 23 2014 Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King

Mary's name appears in many Ethiopian names
 
One day in Ethiopia, a woman spoke to the Catholicos and said: “You Copts exaggerate your devotion to Mary. Mary is a woman like any other.” – “Very well,” said the Catholicos, “then give us another Christ.” This says it all.

Saint Frumentius (4th century) called the first church built in Axum, the capital of the kingdom, “Edda Mariam,” House of Mary. Mary is venerated under the name of Waladita Amlak, She who gave birth to God. Mary's name appears in many Ethiopian names. They reflect the confidence of the faithful towards Mary: Ghebié Mariam, Servant of Mary; Hailemariam, Strength of Mary; Laoke Mariam, Message of Mary; Tekle Mariam, Plant or Offspring of Mary; Hapte Mariam, Gift of Mary; Walda Maryam, Son of Mary; Newaia-Maryam, Treasure of Mary; Kafla-Maryam, Portion of Mary; Kidana-Maryam, Promise of Mary; Baeda-Maryam, Protected by Mary, etc ...

Ethiopia has its own feast day: Kidäma Mehret, Covenant of Mercy, on February 10th. Convinced that Mary’s prayer will always be heard, Ethiopians regard their country as the stronghold of Mary, placed under her protection.


 
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

St. Anthony of Padua, OFM, Priest, Doctor of the Church (Feast)
 284 St. Vitus the only son of a senator in Sicily, become a Christian when he was twelve. When his conversions and miracles became widely known to the  administrator of Sicily, Valerian, he had Vitus brought before him, to shake his faith. He was unsuccessful, but Vitus with his tutor, Modestus, and servant, Crescentia, fled to Lucania then Rome, freed Emperor Diocletian's son of an evil spirit.
 284  Sts Crescentia, Vitus and Modestus Christians gave their live for the Faith in Lucania southern Italy. Crescentia was Vitus'  attendant. Tortured at this juncture, a great storm arose which destroyed many temples, killing a multitude of pagans. An angel now descended from heaven, set the martyrs free, and led them back to Lucania, where they peacefully expired, worn out by their sufferings.
 380 Orsiesius the Cenobite favorite disciple of Saint Pachomius at Tabennisi, and his assistant in drawing up the rules for the cenobites succeeded Pachomius as abbot,  (AC)
 585 Vauge (Vorech) a holy priest of Armagh, Ireland, fled to Penmarch, Cornwall, to avoid apointed archbishop. built a hermitage. He often preached to the local people and instilled the desire for Christian perfection in their breasts.
853 St. Benildis Spanish woman martyr, converted by death of St. Athanasius. who died in the city of Córdoba by the Moors, the Islamic rulers of that era. Benildis converted during the martyrdom of St. Athanasius and she died at the stake the following day.
1053 Bardo of Mainz helmet, a lamb, and a Psalter were gifts presented to Bardo as a child, and these symbolized courage, gentleness, and piety, each of which marked his later career education came at Fulda, where he also received the Benedictine habit and became the dean. Upon his ordination as a priest in 1029; succeed the archbishop of Mainz;  to the end Bardo preserved the simple habits of a monk;  noted for his love of the poor, the destitute, and animals; lover of birds, many rare specimens of which he collected and tamed, and taught to feed from his own plate; advocated, especially to young people, the virtues of self-discipline and temperance
1299 BD JOLENTA OF HUNGARY, WIDOW
1537 Bls. Thomass', Scryven, and Reding English Carthusian martyrs starved to death at Newgate
1601 St. Germaine Cousin  The Rosary was her only book, and her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she used to fall on her knees at the first sound of the  bell, even though she heard it when crossing a stream.
1886 Bd Aloysius Palazolo founder of the brothers of the Holy Family and Sisters of the Poor; His charitable work was particularly concerned witht he reclaiming of prostitutes.


Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary  .

“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh,
was none other than the Father's eternal Son,
the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

June 15 - Our Lady of All Graces (Italy)  "
Is Our Heart the Same One as Yours?"
In 1865, Japan reopened its doors to foreigners
after more than 2 centuries of closed borders.  Fr Petitjean of the Foreign Missions of Paris
debarked in Nagasaki and fitted up a small church in this city.
"One day," he said, "a group of 12 to 15 men, women and children, stood outside the door of our church. I hastened to open it. A woman approached and said to me, putting her hand on her chest: "Is our heart, and the heart of us all here present, the same one as yours?" I answered her: "Certainly, but where do you come from?" -
"Almost all of us are from Urakami. In Urakami most people have the same heart."
And immediately this woman asked: "Where is the picture of the Blessed Virgin?"
Upon hearing this blessed name, I no longer had any doubts. I realized that I was certainly in the presence of true Japanese Christians. At one time there were fifteen thousand Christians in Japan and many have managed to conserve their faith even without priests, for two and a half centuries. I then led the small group to the Blessed Virgin's altar.
And filled with joy and emotion, they all knelt down in prayer."  Encyclopedia Maria, Vol. IV - Beauchesne 1956.


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Mary the Mother of God

June 15 – Feast of All the Churches of the Holy Land (Ethiopia)
- Apparitions of Deir Al-Maghti  A living Marian tradition in Ethiopia
 
According to the Marian tradition preserved in Ethiopia, the monastery of Al Maghti (Lower Egypt) was built at a place where the Holy Family stayed for five days during their flight into Egypt (1).

In the first year after the founding of the monastery, the monks gathered in the church saw a pillar of light touch the altar, which turned into a luminous boat carrying the Virgin Mary, some angels and saints, and also the Holy Innocents murdered by order of Herod. The Virgin asked the monks to associate the people to this miracle, so a pilgrimage was organized. It lasted five days in all, gathering Egyptian, Ethiopian, Maronite, Greek, Nestorian, Latin and even Muslim pilgrims, who stayed at huge campsites...

The apparitions at the Al-Maghti monastery were well known in Ethiopia, thanks to the Book of Miracles of Mary. According to this book, whose existence was confirmed by the geographer Al-Maqrizi (d. 1441),
the monastery was destroyed in 1438 during Ramadan, on order of the Mamluk sultan of the time.

(1) cf lalumierededieu.eklablog.com
René Laurentin & Patrick Sbalchiero
In Dictionnaire encyclopédique des apparitions de la Vierge, Fayard, Paris 2007

 
 284 St. Vitus the only son of a senator in Sicily, become a Christian when he was twelve. When his conversions and miracles became widely known to the  administrator of Sicily, Valerian, he had Vitus brought before him, to shake his faith. He was unsuccessful, but Vitus with his tutor, Modestus, and servant, Crescentia, fled to Lucania and then to Rome, where he freed Emperor Diocletian's son of an evil spirit.
 284  Sts Crescentia, Vitus and Modestus Christians who gave their live for the Faith in the Roman province of Lucania southern Italy. Crescentia was Vitus'  attendant. Tortured at this juncture, a great storm arose which destroyed many temples, killing a multitude of pagans. An angel now descended from heaven, set the martyrs free, and led them back to Lucania, where they peacefully expired, worn out by their sufferings.
 300  Tatian (Dulas) of Cilicia a Christian of Zepherinum, Cilicia, who was martyred after having undergone horrid tortures (Benedictines).M (RM)
 302 Hesychius of Dorostorum a Roman soldier martyred at Dorostorum (Sillistria) in Moesia (Bulgaria) together with the veteran Saint Julius (Benedictines,  Encyclopedia).M (RM)
 303 Lybe, Leonis, and Eutropia Lybe was beheaded; Leonis, her sister, died at the stake; and the 12-year-old slave girl, Eutropia, was used as a target for the soldiers to practice their shots. Their martyrdom took place under Diocletian at Palmyra in Syria (Benedictines). MM (RM) 
 310 St. Dulas Martyr from Zephyrium, Cilicia, he called Tatian Dulas in some lists. He was arrested and refused to worship Apollo and other Roman gods. Tortured, Dulas died while being taken to Tarsus.
 380 Orsiesius the Cenobite favorite disciple of Saint Pachomius at Tabennisi, and his assistant in drawing up the rules for the cenobites succeeded Pachomius as abbot,  (AC)
  480 St. Abraham hermit and confessor born near the Euphrates River in modern Iraq. While travelling to Egypt to visit monastic communities, Abraham was taken prisoner by bandits and held as a slave for five years. He escaped and made his way to Gaul where he became a hermit. Recognized for his sanctity, he was ordained a priest and became the abbot of St. Cyriacus Abbey.
 549 Melan of Viviers Saint Melan was consecrated bishop of Viviers in 519. He was still bishop in 549, when he sent representatives to a council at Orléans (Benedictines). B (AC)
6th v. St. Vouga Irish bishop, also called Vougar, Veho, and Fiech. He gave up his post and went to Briftany, France, where he lived as a hermit near Lesneven.
 585 Vauge (Vorech) a holy priest of Armagh, Ireland, fled to Penmarch, Cornwall, when it appeared he was to be consecrated archbishop. There he built himself a hermitage. But that doesn't mean that he kept to himself: He often preached to the local people and instilled the desire for Christian perfection in their breasts. Vauge appears to be the titular saint of Llanlivery in Cornwall under the name of Saint Vorech (Husenbeth). (AC) 
  6th v.  St. Trillo A Welsh saint patron saint of two sites in Gwynedd, Wales. In some lists he is called Drel or Drillo.
  686 St. Domitian & Hadelin Two disciples of St. Landelinus at abbey of Lobbes, Belgium.
  706 Constantine of Beauvais a monk under Saint Philibert at Jumièges later bishop of Beauvais (Benedictines)
853 St. Benildis Spanish woman martyr, converted by the heroic death of St. Athanasius. A priest, St. Athanasius, died in the city of Córdoba at the hands of the Moors, the Islamic rulers of that era. Benildis converted during the martyrdom of St. Athanasius and she died at the stake the following day.
  960 Edburga of Winchester; as a child, her royal father offered her precious jewels in one hand a penitential habit in the other: Edburga chose the latter joyfully relics enshrined; many miracles have taken place, OSB V Abbess (AC)
1053 Bardo of Mainz helmet, a lamb, and a Psalter were gifts presented to Bardo as a child, and these symbolized courage, gentleness, and piety, each of which marked his later career education came at Fulda, where he also received the Benedictine habit and became the dean. Upon his ordination as a priest in 1029; succeed the archbishop of Mainz;  to the end Bardo preserved the simple habits of a monk;  noted for his love of the poor, the destitute, and animals; lover of birds, many rare specimens of which he collected and tamed, and taught to feed from his own plate; advocated, especially to young people, the virtues of self-discipline and temperance
1204 Isfrid, O. Praem Born 1114;  The Norbertine Saint Isfrid was provost of the church of Jerichow in diocese of Havelberg; elected bishop of Ratzeburg (Regensburg), Germany; honored on this day by his order (Norbertines).
Orlando Catanii Servant of God Third Order Franciscan; St. Francis his spiritual director.
1250 St. Aleydis or Adelaide, Virgin born at Shaerbeck, near Brussels entered a Cistercian convent at seven named Camera Sanctae Mariae, and she remained there for the rest of her life  offered up her sufferings for the souls in purgatory and had visions of their being set free through her intercession
1299 BD JOLENTA OF HUNGARY, WIDOW
1537 Bls. Thomass', Scryven, and Reding English Carthusian martyrs starved to death at Newgate
1601 St. Germaine Cousin  The Rosary was her only book, and her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she used to fall on her knees at the first sound of the  bell, even though she heard it when crossing a stream.

1886 Bd Aloysius Palazolo founder of the brothers of the Holy Family and Sisters of the Poor; His charitable work was particularly concerned witht he reclaiming of prostitutes.

284  St. Crescentia Martyrs St. Crescentia, Vitus and Modestus were Christians who gave their live for the Faith in the Roman province of Lucania, in southern Italy. Crescentia was Vitus' attendant. They were racked on the iron horse until their limbs were dislocated. At this juncture, a great storm arose which destroyed many temples, killing a multitude of pagans. An angel now descended from heaven, set the martyrs free, and led them back to Lucania, where they peacefully expired, worn out by their sufferings.

284 St. Vitus the only son of a senator in Sicily, become a Christian when he was twelve. When his conversions and miracles became widely known to the administrator of Sicily, Valerian, he had Vitus brought before him, to shake his faith. He was unsuccessful, but Vitus with his tutor, Modestus, and servant, Crescentia, fled to Lucania and then to Rome, where he freed Emperor Diocletian's son of an evil spirit.

300?  Ss. Vitus, Modestus And Crescentia, Martyrs

The various texts of the acta of St Vitus and his companions are duly registered in BHL together with the accounts of the translations of the relics, etc. (nn. 8711—8723). The more important of these documents are printed in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. iii. A Greek version of the story was also current, and from this it has found its way into the synaxaries. See Delehaye’s edition of the Constantinopolitanum, c. 751. Everything points to the con­clusion that St Vitus was at first honoured alone, and that the names of Modestus and Crescentia were only joined to his after some romance-writer had fabricated the story now current. A good deal has been written on the cult of these martyrs. See for example Lanzoni, Le Diocesi d’Italia, pp. 320—322; and Huelsen, Le Chiese di Roma nel medio evo, pp. 499—500. At Corvey, in particular, owing to the presence there of the alleged relics, great interest has been taken in St Vitus, as may be learnt, e.g. from Philippi, Abhandlungen über Gorveyer Geschichtsschreibung (1906), pp. 49—100, and from K. Thiele, Die Reichsabtei Corvey (1928). In Sicily the people still come to the little church of Regalbuto to solicit St Vitus’s help for the cure of mad people, as is proved by a booklet of Mgr Salvatore, Breve Storia di S. Vito, published as recently as 1934.

The cultus of these three saints goes back to very early times: their names appear in the so-called martyrology of St Jerome or Hieronymianum, and it may be taken as certain that they were actually Christians who gave their lives for the faith in the Roman province of Lucania, in southern Italy. Nothing is known of their true history or of the circumstances of their martyrdom; their very date is a matter of conjecture. It is quite possible that they were natives of Sicily as tradition asserts, but their legends are fantastic compilations of a much later time. The reputed relics of St Vitus were conveyed to Saint-Denis, in Paris, in 775, and from thence were translated to Corvey, or New Corbie, in Saxony in 836. So great was the devotion to him which developed in Germany that he was included among the Fourteen Holy Helpers. He came to be regarded as the special protector of epileptics as well as of those suffering from the nervous affection called after him, St Vitus’s Dance, and he is regarded as the patron of dancers and actors. He was also invoked against storms, over-sleeping, the bites of mad dogs, the bites of serpents, and against all injuries that beasts can do to men. Hence he is often represented accompanied by an animal.

The story told in the popular legend may be summarized as follows: Vitus was the only son of a senator of Sicily named Hylas. The boy was converted to Christianity at the age of seven or twelve, and was baptized without the knowledge of his parents. The numerous miracles and conversions he effected, however, attracted the notice of Valerian, the administrator of Sicily, who joined with Hylas in trying to detach him from the faith. But neither promises nor threats nor even torture could shake the boy’s constancy. Moved by divine inspiration, Vitus escaped from Sicily with his tutor, Modestus, and his attendant, Crescentia. An angel guided their boat safely to Lucania, where they remained for a time preaching the Gospel to the people and sustained by food brought them by an eagle. They then went to Rome, and St Vitus cured the son of the Emperor Diocletian by expelling the evil spirit which possessed him; but because he would not sacrifice to the gods his powers were attributed to sorcery. He was cast into a cauldron filled with molten lead, pitch and resin, from which he emerged as from a refreshing bath; a lion to which he was exposed crouched before him and licked his feet. Then Modestus, Crescentia and he were racked on the iron horse until their limbs were dislocated. At this juncture a great storm arose which destroyed many temples, killing a multitude of pagans. An angel now descended from Heaven, set the martyrs free, and led them back to Lucania, where they peacefully expired, worn out by their sufferings.

When Vitus would not sacrifice to the gods, his cure was attributed to sorcery. He, Modestus, and Crescentia were subjected to various tortures from which they emerged unscathed, and were freed when during a storm, temples were destroyed and an angel guided them back to Lucania, where they eventually died. So much for the legend. What is fact is that their cult goes back centuries and that they were Christians who were martyred in Lucania. A great devotion to Vitus developed in Germany when his relics were translated to Saxony in 836. He is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers and is the patron of epileptics, those afflicted with St. Vitus' Dance (named after him}, dancers, and actors, and is a protector against storms.

Vitus, Modestus, & Crescentia MM (RM) (Vitus also known as Guy, Veit, Guido) the only son of Hylas, a senator in Sicily, become a Christian when he was very young-- between the ages of seven and 12--by the influence of the servants who tended him. His Christian tutor, Modestus, and his nurse, Crescentia (wife of Modestus), accompanied him on his journeys throughout Sicily. When his conversions and miracles became widely known to the administrator of Sicily, Valerian, he had Vitus brought before him to shake his faith. (Another version says that his incensed father gave him up to Valerian.) He was unsuccessful, but Vitus with his tutor and nurse fled to Lucania and then to Rome, where he exorcised Emperor Diocletian's son of an evil spirit.

When Vitus would not sacrifice to the gods his cure was attributed to sorcery. He, Modestus, and Crescentia were subjected to various tortures, including a cauldron of molten lead, from which they emerged unscathed. For example, when throw into the den of a hungry lion, the beast merely licked Vitus affectionately. One version says that the tormentors gave up and freed the trio when during a storm temples were destroyed and an angel guided them back to Lucania, where they eventually died.

The facts are that their cultus is ancient. We are not really even certain about when they lived, although most place their martyrdom at the time of Diocletian. There is even some confusion about the site of their martyrdom. It appears that they may be two separate groups: Vitus alone in Lucania (whose cultus is the oldest), and Vitus, Modestus, and Crescentia in Sicily.

The Vitus who is alone is celebrated in the Gelasian Sacramentary and an early South Italian Book of the Gospels, which assigns to his feast a pericope of the cure from demonic possession and sickness. The Martyrology of Bede and the Old English Martyrology also list Vitus by himself. There is an ancient church dedicated to him on the Esquiline Hill of Rome. Vitus's relics were moved to Saint-Denis in Paris. A great devotion to Vitus developed in Germany when his relics were translated to Corvey Abbey in Saxony in 836. Most of the medieval abbeys in England celebrated Vitus and Modestus without Crescentia, but five who followed the Sarum Rite added her name.

Saint Vitus is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, who, as a group, are especially venerated in France and Germany. The Holy Helpers were believed to possess especially efficacious intercessory power. The relics of Vitus are said to possess many healing properties, especially when epileptics prayed before them (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth, Sheppard, White).

In art, Saint Vitus is depicted as a boy with a rooster and a cauldron. At times he may be shown (1) with his Modestus and Crescentia as they refuse to worship idols; (2) being put into an oven; (3) with a palm and cauldron; (4) with a palm and dog; (5) with a chalice and dog; (6) with sword and dog; (7) with a sword and rooster; (8) with a book and rooster; (9) with a wolf or lion; or (10) as a young prince with a palm and sceptre (Roeder).

Saint Vitus is the patron of Prague, dogs, domestic animals, young people, dancers, coppersmiths, actors, comedians, and mummers. He is invoked against epilepsy, lightning, poisoning by dog or snake bite, sleeplessness, snakebite, storm, and Saint Vitus Dance (Sydenham's chorea, a nervous disorder) (Bentley, Roeder).

300 Tatian (Dulas) of Cilicia a Christian of Zepherinum, Cilicia, who was martyred after having undergone horrid tortures (Benedictines).M (RM)

302 Hesychius of Dorostorum a Roman soldier martyred at Dorostorum (Sillistria) in Moesia (Bulgaria) together with the veteran Saint Julius (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).M (RM)

302 St Hesychius, Martyr

See Delehaye, Les Origines du Culte des Martyrs, pp. 248—249, and 285—286, as well as his article “Saints de Thrace et de Mésie” in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxi (1912), pp. 161—300. On St Julius, see May 27.

All that we know about St Hesychius is derived from the Acts—admittedly genuine—of St Julius, a martyr of Durostorum in Moesia (the present Silistria in Bulgaria), about the year 302. When St Julius was being led to execution Hesy­chius said to him, “I pray, Julius, that you may happily complete your sacrifice and receive the crown: and that I may follow you. My warmest greetings to Pasicrates and Valentius.” (These were two other Christians of their acquaintance who had been martyred a very short time before.) Julius embraced Hesychius and replied, “Brother, make haste to come. They have already heard your message I can see them now standing beside me even as I see you.” The execution of St Hesychius actually took place soon after that of his friend. St Hesychius, “martyr of Durostorum”, is honoured in the Hieronymianum on June 15 and also in the present Roman Martyrology. Father Delehaye identifies him with the St Hesychius whom the Eastern church assigns to Constantinople and venerates, together with some anonymous companions on May 19. It is highly probable that the remains of St Hesychius were taken to Constantinople, the inhabitants of which (like some other places) were apt to claim as local martyrs any saints whose relics had been translated thither from elsewhere.

303 Lybe, Leonis, and Eutropia Lybe was beheaded; Leonis, her sister, died at the stake; and the 12-year-old slave girl, Eutropia, was used as a target for the soldiers to practice their shots. Their martyrdom took place under Diocletian at Palmyra in Syria (Benedictines). MM (RM)
There seems to be no separate biography of St Orsiesius, but in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. iii, an account has been compiled from what materials were then available con­cerning St Pachomius and St Theodore. See the bibliography to St Pachomius (May 9). Two letters are extant, addressed by St Athanasius to Orsiesius. See also the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xlvii (1929), pp. 376—377; Bardenhewer, Geschichte der altkirchlichen Literatur, vol. iii, pp. 85—86; and De L. O’Leary, The Saints of Egypt (1937), pp. 156—157.

380 Orsiesius the Cenobite favorite disciple of Saint Pachomius at Tabennisi, and his assistant in drawing up the rules for the cenobites succeeded Pachomius as abbot,  (AC)
(also known as Orsisius) Orsiesius was a favorite disciple of Saint Pachomius at Tabennisi, and his assistant in drawing up the rules for the cenobites. He succeeded Pachomius as abbot. He was praised by Saint Antony and Saint Athanasius, but some 12 years before his death he was forced by his monks to resign because of the harshness of his rule. He resumed that office several years later.
He is the author of an ascetical treatise that Saint Jerome translated into Latin (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
380 St Orsiesius, Abbot
While St Pachomius was ruling the great communities he had formed at Tabennisi and elsewhere in the Egyptian desert he numbered among his disciples two quite young men of exceptional promise: their names were Orsiesius (Horsi-isi) and Theodore. Pachomius trained them with special care, often made them his travelling companions and even consulted them about the rule he was composing. But when he set Orsiesius over the monastery of Khenoboski some of the older monks murmured at the appointment of so young a man. “Is the kingdom of God then only for the old?” asked Pachomius, and he went on to prophesy that Orsiesius would one day diffuse the splendour of a golden lamp over the house of God.

Petronius, who succeeded Pachomius, only survived his predecessor by fifteen days; Orsiesius was then chosen to fill his place. To deputations sent from Tabennisi to St Antony and St Athanasius to inform them of the death of Pachomius and the election of Orsiesius, both those great saints spoke in terms of high praise of their new superior. St Orsiesius indeed proved a holy ruler, but after a time his strictness in enforcing the regulations about property provoked discontent in certain monasteries not immediately under his eye. The opposition increased until at length he felt unable to cope with it.

Rather than be the occasion of a cleavage he resigned in favour of St Theodore who, however, accepted office with the utmost reluctance, and would do nothing without consulting St Orsiesius, to whom he was deeply attached. They even took it in turns to make visitations of the various communities. After the death of St Theodore, in 368, Orsiesius again assumed charge, and he continued to rule alone until his death, the exact date of which is uncertain. He left as a legacy to his monks an ascetic treatise in the form of an abridged compendium of the rules and maxims of the religious life. St Jerome at a later date translated it into Latin.

310 St. Dulas Martyr from Zephyrium, Cilicia, he called Tatian Dulas in some lists. He was arrested and refused to worship Apollo and other Roman gods. Tortured, Dulas died while being taken to Tarsus.

310? St Tatian Dulas, Martyr
About the year 310 a prefect of Cilicia named Maximus held an assize on the promontory of Zephyrium. The first prisoner to be brought before him was a well-known local Christian who had been arrested for his faith. Questioned as to his name, he said that it was Tatianus, but that he was commonly called Dulas, and a douloz he was indeed, the servant of Christ. As he refused to worship the gods, the magistrate ordered that he should be beaten to bring him to his senses. While the lashes were being administered, he rejoiced aloud that he was counted worthy to confess Christ’s holy name. Afterwards also, under cross-examination, he displayed great spirit, and did not scruple to denounce the heathen deities as wood and stone, the work of men’s hands. “Do you call the great god Apollo a work of men’s hands?” demanded the prefect sternly. Dulas in reply cited Apollo’s unsuccessful pursuit of Daphne, and scoffingly asked how a being so unchaste and so powerless could possibly be regarded as a god. The indignant judge ordered him to be scourged across the stomach and then roasted on a gridiron. Even these tortures did not daunt the confessor. The following day, when again led to the court, he once more began to deride the gods, and was punished by having hot coals applied to his head and pepper thrust up his nostrils. Although he refused to eat food which had been offered in sacrifice, some of it was forced down his throat. He was then strung up and his flesh was torn with iron rakes. Maximus was that day returning to Tarsus, and had given orders that all the Christian prisoners should be led after him in chains. But Dulas was so completely shattered by his sufferings that he died after the convoy started. His body was cast into a ditch, where it was discovered by a shepherd’s dog. The Christians obtained possession of the relics and gave them honourable burial.
This martyr seems to be identical with the “Dulas” who is mentioned as having been put to death at Nicomedia on March 25, an entry found in all the texts of the Hieronymianum see Delehaye’s Commentary, p. 160. For this we have the still more reliable testimony of the early Syriac Breviarium, again under March 25, and assigning Nicomedia as the place of his suffering. If this identification be accepted it is clear that the Greek passio, which the Bollandists in the eighteenth century printed under June 15 in the Act Sanctorum (June, vol. iii), and which has been summarized above, is not, as its editors then declared, of the highest character, but open to grave suspicion. Still, the identity of the martyr of Nicomedia with Tatian Dulas is not proved; though it is curious that the Constantinople Synaxary (see Delehaye’s edition, cc. 750—751), while telling the same story, speaks only of Dulas, omitting the name Tatianus.
480 St. Abraham hermit and confessor born near the Euphrates River in modern Iraq. While travelling to Egypt to visit monastic communities, Abraham was taken prisoner by bandits and held as a slave for five years. He escaped and made his way to Gaul where he became a hermit. Recognized for his sanctity, he was ordained a priest and became the abbot of St. Cyriacus Abbey.
Abraham of Saint-Cyrgues, Abbot (RM)  Born on the banks of the Euphrates River, Abraham travelled to Egypt, where he was attacked by thieves and held captive for five years. When he escaped, he boarded a ship sailing to Gaul. Thus, the Oriental settled as a hermit near Clermont in the Auvergne. Eventually he was made abbot of the nearby monastery of Saint-Cyrgues (Cyriacus) and ordained a priest. His is invoked against fever (Benedictines).

549 Melan of Viviers Saint Melan was consecrated bishop of Viviers in 519. He was still bishop in 549, when he sent representatives to a council at Orléans (Benedictines). B (AC)

6th v.  St. Vouga Irish bishop, also called Vougar, Veho, and Fiech. He gave up his post and went to Briftany, France, where he lived as a hermit near Lesneven.
Vouga of Lesneven B (AC) (also known as Vougar, Veho, Feock, Fiech) 6th century. Saint Vouga, an Irish bishop, settled in Brittany, where he lived as a hermit in a cell near Lesneven (Benedictines).

585 Vauge (Vorech) a holy priest of Armagh, Ireland, fled to Penmarch, Cornwall, when it appeared he was to be consecrated archbishop. There he built himself a hermitage. But that doesn't mean that he kept to himself: He often preached to the local people and instilled the desire for Christian perfection in their breasts. Vauge appears to be the titular saint of Llanlivery in Cornwall under the name of Saint Vorech (Husenbeth). (AC)

6th v.  St. Trillo A Welsh saint of whom little is known beyond his status as patron saint of two sites in Gwynedd, Wales. In some lists he is called Drel or Drillo.
Trillo (Drillo, Drel) of Wales (AC) 6th or 7th century. Trillo, son of a Breton chieftain, migrated to Wales with Saint Cadfan. He is the patron of two places named Llandrillo in Denbighshire (now Gwynedd) and Monmouth. At Gwynedd there is an ancient oratory in the Irish style built over a spring that is used for baptisms named after him. Another Llandrillo in Merionethshire (now Gwynedd) had a well where rheumatism was cured. A third church at Lladrygarn in Anglesey still celebrates his feast today in accordance with early Welsh calendars (Benedictines, Farmer).

686 St. Domitian & Hadelin Two disciples of St. Landelinus at abbey of Lobbes, Belgium.
Domitian and Hadelinus (Adelin) of Lobbes, disciples and companions of Saint Landelin at Lobbes Abbey and, apparently, at Créspin Abbey (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). OSB (AC) 

686 Landelinus, OSB Abbot (RM)

686 ST LANDELINUS, ABBOT

There are two short biographies of St Landelinus which profess to be of early date, but the earliest of these was written more than a century after his death and cannot be regarded as trustworthy. It has been critically edited in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. vi, pp 433—444. We have perhaps more reliable materials in the metrical life of St Ursmar and in the Gesta Abbatum Lobbiensium. On this life of Ursmar there is a useful article by K. Strecker, in the Neues Archiv for 1933, pp. 135—158. See also J. Warichez, L’Abbaye de Lobbes (1909), pp. 5 seq.; U. Berlière, Monasticon Beige, vol. i, pp. 200 seq.; and Van der Essen, Etude critique sur les Saints mérovingiens (1907), pp. 126—133
As the founder of the great abbeys of Lobbes and Crespin, and of two others less celebrated, St Landelinus was held in honour by succeeding generations, though we do not know much about his life. He was born about the year 625 at Vaux, near Bapaume, of Frankish parents, who entrusted him to St Autbertus, bishop of Cambrai. But at the age of eighteen he broke away from his guardian and fell in with evil companions, by whom he was led into robbery and other crimes. The sudden death of one of his associates roused him to a sense of his danger. A humble penitent, he returned to St Autbertus, and then determined to withdraw to one of the places of his former life, Lobbes, in the hope of atoning in solitude for his past excesses. But he soon found himself surrounded by disciples who wished to imitate his life; they were the nucleus from which grew the abbey of Lobbes.

St Landelinus constituted his follower St Ursmar its first abbot, for he regarded himself as totally unworthy to rule a religious house, and from Lobbes he went to Aulne and from thence to Wallens, where, according to one biographer, other communities sprang up round him. Still craving for solitude he penetrated, with St Adelinus and St Domitian, into the vast forest which stretched between Mons and Valenciennes. Even here he was followed, and for his new disciples he founded the abbey of Crespin, which he was obliged to govern himself. Nevertheless, he spent much of his time in a cell at some distance from the rest of the community. He is said to have died in 686 or thereabouts.

Born at Vaux near Bapaume, France, c. 625; Though carefully raised by Bishop Saint Aubert of Cambrai, Saint Landelinus went astray for a time. We often take it for granted that we must teach children about the lures and dangers of the world and the need for continual prayer and watchfulness to avoid the pitfalls. Apparently, Bishop Aubert instilled only innocence and virtue into Landelinus. Unprepared to handle the seductions of the world, Landelinus fell in with bad company and became a robber. He was struck with terror when one of his companions died suddenly. Recognizing his error, he flew to Saint Aubert and threw himself at the feet of the good bishop who had never ceased praying for Landelinus's repentance.

Aubert gave him the penance of making reparations in a monastery for some years. This Landelinus undertook with fervor and contrition. His zeal became such that Aubert ordained him deacon and, at the age of 30, priest. He was assigned to preach but begged to be allowed to continue his penitential life as a hermit. With Aubert's permission, Landelinus retired to Laubach on the banks of the Sambre.

He attracted several disciples to him, who each lived in a separate cell. In 654, they joined in community life by founding the Lobbes (Lanbacum) Abbey. When the abbey was complete, the brothers tried to convince Landelinus to govern them. Feeling himself unworthy to lead saints, he left them under the direction of Saint Ursmar and again sought solitude. A second time, disciples gathered leading to the establishment of Aulne Abbey in 656, which now belongs to the Cistercians. The pattern repeated itself with the founding of the abbey at Walers (657). Finally, Landelinus and his companions Saints Domitian and Hadelinus erected some cells in a thick forest between Mons and Valenciennes. Again, disciples found them and Créspin (Crepy, Crespiacum) Abbey was founded in 670. Realizing that God might be telling him something, Landelinus agreed to govern this flock, which he did until his death. While continuing his penitential courses, Landelinus began preaching in the nearby villages. Thus, he fulfilled God's plan for his life (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).

In art, Saint Landelin is portrayed as he is dying in sackcloth and ashes, while the devil carries his former companion to hell. He might also be shown in Mass vestments, striking water from the earth with his pastoral staff (Roeder). Landelinus is venerated in Cambrai (Roeder).

706 Constantine of Beauvais a monk under Saint Philibert at Jumièges. He later became bishop of Beauvais (Benedictines).B (AC).

853 St. Benildis Spanish woman martyr, converted by the heroic death of St. Athanasius. A priest, St. Athanasius, died in the city of Córdoba at the hands of the Moors, the Islamic rulers of that era. Benildis converted during the martyrdom of St. Athanasius and she died at the stake the following day.
Benildis of Cordova M (RM). Benildis was so moved by the fortitude displayed by St. Athanasius, a Spanish priest, during his martyrdom at the hands of the Moors, that she braved death at the stake on the following day. Her ashes were thrown into the Guadalquivir (Benedictines).

960 Edburga of Winchester; as a child, her royal father offered her precious jewels in one hand and a penitential habit in the other: Edburga chose the latter joyfully relics were enshrined and many miracles have taken place, OSB V Abbess (AC)

St Edburga, whose name, like other Anglo-Saxon names of this class, is variously spelt, seems to have enjoyed a considerable cultus in Worcestershire and the neighbouring region, probably because her relics, or part of them, were preserved at Pershore. See the list of calendar entries in Stanton’s Menology, p. 271. The account given above is derived almost entirely from William of Malmesbury, but there is also a life, apparently still unprinted, by Malmesbury’s contemporary, Osbert of Clare. There is also a life, still unpublished, in the Gotha MS.; see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lviii (1940), p. 100, n. 54. St Edburga’s fame rested largely on the miracles her relics were believed to have worked; a short summary of these is to be found in one of the Harleian manuscripts at the British Museum.

960 St Edburga Of Winchester, Virgin
Three Anglo-Saxon princesses of the name of Edburga are included in the calendars of the saints. The nun who is venerated on this day was the granddaughter of King Alfred, and the daughter of King Edward the Elder, by his third wife, Edgiva. Her parents, who seem to have destined her to the religious life from the cradle, determined to test her vocation when she was only three years old. Her father took her on his knees and, showing her on the one hand a chalice with a book of the Gospels, and on the other a little pile of necklaces and bracelets, asked her to choose which she would have. The little girl eyed the trinkets with obvious aversion, but held out her arms towards the sacred objects. She was placed in the abbey which King Alfred’s widow had founded at Winchester, and in due course rose to be abbess. She was famous for her charity, her humility and her miracles. It is recorded that she would sometimes rise during the night while the other nuns were sleeping and would silently remove their sandals, clean them, and replace them beside their beds.

Saint Edburga was a granddaughter of King Alfred and the daughter of Edward the Elder. It is reported that, while she was still a young child, her royal father offered her precious jewels in one hand and a penitential habit in the other. Edburga chose the latter joyfully. At that her parents placed her in Saint Mary's Convent, which was founded by Alfred's widow, Alswide, at Winchester, finished by her own father, and placed under the direction of Saint Etheldreda.
Having finished her education, Edburga became a nun and later the abbess of the foundation. After Edburga died of a fever, Bishop Saint Ethelwold placed her remains in a rich shrine, which Abbess Saint Elfleda covered with gold and silver. When the Earl Egilwald of Dorsetshire sought relics for his newly rebuilt foundation of Pershore in Worcestershire after its pillage by the Danes, the abbess give him part of Edburga's skull, some of her ribs, and other bones, which were enclosed in a rich case. She was especially venerated at Pershore in Worcestershire, where these relics were enshrined and many miracles have taken place, and at Saint Mary's in Winchester (Attwater, Benedictines, Husenbeth).

1053 Bardo of Mainz helmet, a lamb, and a Psalter were gifts presented to Bardo as a child, and these symbolized courage, gentleness, and piety, each of which marked his later career education came at Fulda, where he also received the Benedictine habit and became the dean. Upon his ordination as a priest in 1029;  succeed the archbishop of Mainz;  to the end Bardo preserved the simple habits of a monk;  is noted for his love of the poor, the destitute, and animals; lover of birds, many rare specimens of which he collected and tamed, and taught to feed from his own plate; advocated, especially to young people, the virtues of self-discipline and temperance OSB B (AC)

There is a short life by Fulkold, who was the chaplain of Bardo’s successor in the see of Mainz. It was edited for Pertz, MGH., Scriptores, vol. xi, pp. 317—321. This is a much better source than the longer biography by an anonymous monk of Fulda, which was alone accessible to Mabillon and the Bollandists, but which is mainly filled with hagiographical commonplaces. See also H. Bresslau in Jahrbiicher des Deutschen Reichs unter Konrad II (1879), pp. 473-479 F. Schneider, Der hl. Bardo (1871); C. Will, Regesten zur Gesch. der Mainzer Erzbischöfe, vol. i (1877), pp. 165—176; Strunck and Giefers, Westfalia Sancta (1855), pp. 143—153
1053 St Bardo, Archbishop of Mainz
St Bardo was born about the year 982 at Oppershofen in the Welterau, on the right bank of the Rhine. His parents, who were related to the Empress Gisela, sent him to be educated in the abbey of Fulda, where he received the habit. In after days his former fellow students liked to recall how, when they had found him poring over the famous book of St Gregory on the duties of pastors (Regula Pastoralis), he had jokingly remarked in reply to their surprise, “Well, perhaps some silly king will make me a bishop some day if no one else can be found for the work; so I may as well learn how it should be done.” About the year 1029 he was nominated abbot of Kaiserswerth by the Emperor Conrad II, and he subsequently became superior of Horsfeld. Still higher promotion was in store for him. In 1031, after the death of Aribo, he was chosen to occupy the important metropolitan see of Mainz. In his new office he retained all the simplicity and austerity of a monk whilst dispensing alms and hospitality as befitted a bishop. He was esteemed by all classes, but made himself particularly the champion of the poor, whom he defended from their oppressors and to whom his house was ever open.

Bardo played an important part in two synods of Mainz which met under the presidency of Pope Leo IX to put down simony and to enforce clerical celibacy. The pope took occasion on one of his visits to persuade Bardo to relax some of his austerities which were undermining his health and threatened to shorten his life. Always stern with himself, the good archbishop was extraordinarily merciful to others: insults or wrongs against himself he seemed never to resent. One day, at his own table, as he was denouncing the vice of intemperance, his eyes fell upon a young man whose mocking expression and tittering clearly indicated that he was making fun of his host. The archbishop ceased speaking and looked straight at the culprit. Then, instead of administering the rebuke which all present ex­pected, he took up a dish of food and directed that both the vessel and its contents should be presented to the young man.

Bardo’s kind heart also made him a lover of animals. He had a collection of rare birds, many of which he had tamed and had taught to feed from his hand. His death took place on June 10, 1053. He was universally mourned, Jews as well as Christians lamenting his loss.

Born at Oppershofen, Germany, in 982; died in Mainz, in 1053; feast day formerly June 10. A helmet, a lamb, and a Psalter were gifts presented to Bardo as a child, and these symbolized courage, gentleness, and piety, each of which marked his later career. He was a German of good birth, and received his first schooling from an old woman who taught him his letters and to read the Psalms as he sat in her lap.
 Years later he still remembered what he owed to her and made good provision for her care.
The balance of his education came at Fulda, where he also received the Benedictine habit and became the dean. Upon his ordination as a priest in 1029, Bardo was appointed an abbot at Werden am Ruhr because of his family connection with the empress. One day, when he was at court, the archbishop of Mainz, seeing in his hand his richly wrought abbot's staff, remarked: "Abbot, I think that staff would become my hand better than yours," to which Bardo replied: "If you think so, it will not be hard for you to get it."

On returning to his quarters, he called one of his attendants and, giving him the staff and other insignia of his office, told him to take them as a gift to the archbishop. When the attendant returned, Bardo asked him how the archbishop had received them, "Middling well," was the answer. "Only middling well?" said the abbot, "Heaven knows, perhaps before long they will be mine again."  And sure enough, before long his words came true: he was restored to his abbey. In 1031, Bardo was appointed abbot of Hersfeld and was also appointed to succeed the archbishop of Mainz.

He made, however, an unfortunate beginning. When preaching before the emperor one Christmas morning, through sickness or nervousness he made a very poor impression. "What a man for an archbishop!" said those who heard him. "He is a stick. He cannot preach. Why did your Majesty appoint such a boorish monk?" And the emperor himself felt that he had made a mistake in appointing an ignorant monk to the most important diocese in Germany.  Bardo was due to preach again before the emperor a few days later, and his friends advised him not to, but he replied: "To every man his own burden," and faced the ordeal. This time he preached with such ease and power and created so admirable an impression that the emperor was delighted, and said as he sat down to dinner: "The archbishop has restored my appetite."

For a time Bardo was chancellor and grand almoner of the empire, yet to the end Bardo preserved the simple habits of a monk. He practiced austerities so severe that Pope Saint Leo IX advised him to relax them. He was noted for his love of the poor, the destitute, and animals. He was also a lover of birds, many rare specimens of which he collected and tamed, and taught to feed from his own plate. Bardo was diligent in his diocese and, as a prelate, a true father in God. He completed the building of his great cathedral in honor of Saint Martin. He had a great sense of justice, and protected many from the harsh treatment or wrong conviction; and, hating drunkenness and other gross habits, he advocated, especially to young people, the virtues of self-discipline and temperance (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Gill).

1204 Isfrid, O. Praem.Born c. 1114;  The Norbertine Saint Isfrid was provost of the church of Jerichow in the diocese of Havelberg. He was elected bishop of Ratzeburg (Regensburg), Germany. He is honored on this day by his order (Norbertines).

Orlando Catanii Servant of God Third Order Franciscan; St. Francis his spiritual director.
June 15, 2010
An unexpected encounter with St. Francis of Assisi in 1213 was to forever change—and enrich—the life of Count Orlando of Chiusi.

On the day a festival was being organized for a huge throng, St. Francis, already well known for his sanctity, delivered a dramatic address on the dangers of worldly pleasures. One of the guests, Orlando (also known as Roland) was so taken by Francis' words that he sought out the saint for advice on how best to lead a life pleasing to God.

A short time later, Francis visited Count Orlando in his own palace, located at the foot of Mount La Verna. Francis spoke again of the dangers of a life of wealth and comfort. The words prompted Orlando to rearrange his life entirely according to the principles outlined by Francis. Furthermore, he resolved to share his wealth by placing at Francis' disposal all of Mount La Verna, which belonged to Orlando. Francis, who found the mountain's wooded recesses and many caves and ravines especially suitable for quiet prayer, gratefully accepted the offer. Orlando immediately had a convent as well as a church built there; later, many chapels were added. In 1224, two years before the death of Francis, Mount La Verna was the location where Francis received the holy wounds of Christ.


In return for his generous gift, Orlando desired only to be received into the Third Order and to have St. Francis as his spiritual director. Under Francis' guidance, Orlando completely detached himself from worldly goods. He zealously performed acts of charity as a Christian nobleman. After his happy death Orlando was laid to rest in the convent church on Mount La Verna.
Comment: Even Francis, Lady Poverty’s favorite knight, needed a suitable place to pray. Captivated by Francis’ preaching, Orlando restructured his life. One of the possessions he parted with was Mt. La Verna, which he offered to the Little Poor Man. There Francis found the solitude he sought. In one mountainside cave, he was branded with Christ’s own wounds. We may not be as wealthy as Orlando, but we have enough to spare. Only God can know who in Lady Poverty’s realm will be nurtured in sanctity because we imitate Orlando in generosity.
1250 St. Aleydis or Adelaide, Virgin born at Shaerbeck, near Brussels entered a Cistercian convent at seven named Camera Sanctae Mariae, and she remained there for the rest of her life;  offered up her sufferings for the souls in purgatory and had visions of their being set free through her intercession

1250 St Aleydis, Or Alice, Virgin
This is a very simple life but it leaves the impression of an absolutely sincere record, written down by a contemporary who was probably a Cistercian monk and confessor to the community. Aleydis was a charming and delicate little girl, born at Schaer­beek, near Brussels, who at the age of seven seems of her own choice to have been committed to the care of a community of Cistercian nuns in the neighbouring convent called “Camera Sanctae Mariae”, a name which still survives in the Bois de la Cambre just outside the city. She was, before all else, humble and retiring.

There are some simple miracles recorded of her, such as the spontaneous relighting of a candle which had fallen and been extinguished, and she devoted herself in every possible way to the service of her religious sisters. While still very young she contracted leprosy, and to the great sorrow of all the community had to be segre­gated. This was only the occasion, we are told, of her taking refuge more com­pletely than before in the wounds of Christ. Her one comfort lay in the reception of holy communion. She was not, however, on account of possible contagion from her lips touching the cup, allowed to receive in both kinds, as the others then did, and this was a matter of great distress to her until our Lord Himself assured her that she lost nothing thereby. “Where there is part”, she was told, “there also is the whole.” On the feast of St Barnabas, 1249, she suddenly became very ill and was anointed, but it was revealed to her that she would remain on earth yet a year longer. She then lived on in great suffering, losing the sight of both eyes, but offering her pains for the souls in purgatory. Moreover, she was sustained by ecstasies and revelations, which came to her more and more frequently as the end drew near. A year later, on Friday, June 10, she was again anointed, and the next morning Aleydis happily breathed her last at daybreak on the feast of St Barnabas.

The life is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. iii, and also in Henriquez, Quinque Prudentes Virgines. Pope Pius X in 1907 formally authorized her cultus under the title of Saint Aleydis. Her feast is kept in the Cistercian Order and in the diocese of Malines, on June 15.

Adelaide of La Cambre, OSB Cist. V (AC) (also known as Aleydis, Alice); cultus confirmed in 1907. Saint Adelaide was a young Cistercian nun of the La Cambre convent who endured many physical afflictions. She became blind, contracted leprosy, and then paralysed. She had to be segregated from her community. Adelaide offered up her sufferings for the souls in purgatory and had visions of their being set free through her intercession. Her life was written by a contemporary (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

1299 BD JOLENTA OF HUNGARY, WIDOW
JOLENTA, or Helena as she is called by the Poles, was one of four sisters who are honoured with the title of Blessed. They were the daughters of Bela IV, King of Hungary, the nieces of St Elizabeth, the great-nieces of St Hedwig, and lineal descendants of the Hungarian kings St Stephen and St Ladislaus. When she was five years old, Jolenta was committed to the care of her elder sister, Bd Cunegund, or Kinga, who had married Boleslaus II, King of Poland. Under their fostering care, the little girl grew up a pattern of virtue. She became the wife of Duke Boleslaus of Kalisz, with whom she spent a happy married life. Both of them were addicted to good works, and together they made various religious foundations. Jolenta was beloved by all, but especially by the poor, for whom she had a tender love. After the death of her husband, as soon as she had settled two of her daughters, she retired with the third and with Bd Cunegund, now, like herself, a widow, into the convent of Poor Clares which Cunegund had established at Sandeck. Jolenta's later years, however, were spent at Gnesen as superior of the convent of which she had been the foundress. She died there in 1299.
See J. B. Prileszky, Acta Sanctorum Hungariae, vol. ii, Appendix, pp. 54-55; Hueber, Menologium Franciscanum, p. 918; and cf. the bibliography attached to Bd Cunegund on July 24.
1537 Bls. Thomas Green, Thomas Scryven, and Thomas Reding English Carthusian martyrs starved to death at Newgate
Thomas Green studied at St. John's College, Cambridge, entering the London Charterhouse of the Carthusians where he took vows and received ordination. Arrested for opposing King Henry VIII's (r. 1509-1547) claim of spiritual supremacy over the English Church, Thomas was imprisoned with two other Carthusians, the lay brothers Thomas Scryven and Thomas Reding, and four other companions. All were starved to death at Newgate.
BB Thomas Green, Thomas Scryven & Thomas Reding, O.Cart. (AC); beatified in 1886. Thomas Green (or Greenwood), who was a fellow at Saint John's College in Cambridge, took monastic vows and was ordained a priest at the Carthusian Charterhouse in London. Scryven and Reding were lay brothers in the same house. The trio, plus an additional four companions, were starved to death in Newgate Prison because of their refusal to sign the Oath of Supremacy (Benedictines).

1299 Bd Jolenta Of Hungary, Widow
Jolenta, or Helena as she is called by the Poles, was one of four sisters who are honoured with the title of Blessed. They were the daughters of Bela IV, King of Hungary, the nieces of St Elizabeth, the great-nieces of St Hedwig, and lineal descendants of the Hungarian kings St Stephen and St Ladislaus. When she was five years old, Jolenta was committed to the care of her elder sister, Bd Cunegund, or Kinga, who had married Boleslaus II, King of Poland. Under their fostering care, the little girl grew up a pattern of virtue. She became the wife of Duke Boleslaus of Kalisz, with whom she spent a happy married life. Both of them were addicted to good works, and together they made various religious foundations. Jolenta was beloved by all, but especially by the poor, for whom she had a tender love. After the death of her husband, as soon as she had settled two of her daugh­ters, she retired with the third and with Bd Cunegund, now, like herself, a widow, into the convent of Poor Clares which Cunegund had established at Sandeck. Jolenta’s later years, however, were spent at Gnesen as superior of the convent of which she had been the foundress. She died there in 1299.

See J. B. Prileszky, Acta Sanctorum Hungariae, vol. ii, Appendix, pp. 54—55; Hueber, Menologium Franciscanum, p. 918; and cf. the bibliography attached to Bd Cunegund on July 24.
1601 St. Germaine Cousin  The Rosary was her only book, and her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she used to fall on her knees at the first sound of the bell, even though she heard it when crossing a stream.
And she had the most important prayer of all -- the Mass. Every day, without fail, she would leave her sheep in God's care and go to Mass.

1601 St Germaine of Pibrac, Virgin
“A SIMPLE maiden, humble, and of lowly birth, but so greatly enlightened by the gifts of divine wisdom and understanding, and so remarkable for her transcendent virtues, that she shone like a star not only in her native France but throughout the Catholic Church.” Such is the description of St Germaine Cousin set down in the apostolic brief which numbered her among the Blessed.

She was the daughter of Laurent Cousin, an agricultural labourer, and was born about the year 1579 at Pibrac, a village near Toulouse. Her mother, Marie Laroche, died when her. little girl was scarcely out of the cradle. From her birth Germaine suffered from ill-health; she was scrofulous, and her right hand was powerless and deformed. Her father had no affection for her, whilst his second wife actively disliked her. She treated her stepdaughter most harshly, and after the birth of her own children she kept Germaine away from her healthier step-brothers and sisters.

The poor girl was made to sleep in the stable, or under the stairs, was fed on scraps, and as soon as she was old enough was sent out to mind sheep in the pastures. She was destined to remain a shepherdess for the rest of her life.

Germaine accepted the treatment she received as though it were her due, and God made use of it to lead her to great perfection. Out in the fields, alone with nature, she learned to commune with her divine Creator, from whom she learnt directly all that she required to know. He spoke to her soul as He speaks to the humble and clean of heart, and she lived ever consciously in His presence. Nothing could keep her from Mass. If she heard the bell when she was in the fields, she would plant her crook and her distaff in the ground, commend her flock to her angel guardian, and hurry off to church. Never once on her return did she find that a sheep had strayed, or had fallen a prey to the wolves that lurked in the neighbouring forest of Boucône, ever-ready to pounce upon unattended sheep. As often as she could she made her communion, and her fervour was long remembered in the village. Although she took no part in the social life of her neighbours, and never mixed with girls of her own age, yet she would often gather the young children round her to teach them the simple truths of religion, and to lead them to love God.

Her neighbours at first accepted the estimate of her family, and were disposed to despise her and to turn her to ridicule. But gradually strange stories began to circulate respecting her. To reach the church from the pastureland, she had to cross a stream which was sometimes swollen by the rain. On one occasion, when it had become a torrent so strong that men feared to cross, people said, “Germaine will not come to Mass to-day!” But they were mistaken; and two villagers who had watched her at the stream confidently asserted that the waters had parted to let her cross, just as the Red Sea had parted for the Israelites of old.

It might have been thought that anyone so poor as Germaine would be unable to exercise the corporal works of mercy. Love, however, can always find a way, and the scanty food that was grudgingly doled out to her was shared with beggars. Even this was made a cause for complaint. One cold winter’s day her stepmother pursued her with a stick, declaring that she was concealing stolen bread in her apron. To the amazement of the pitying neighbours, who would have protected her, that which fell from the apron was not bread, but summer flowers. Contempt now gave way to veneration, and the inhabitants of Pibrac began to realize that they had a saint in their midst. Even her father and stepmother relented towards her; they would now have allowed her to take her proper place in their home, but Germaine chose to continue to live as before. It was not for long. Her feeble frame was worn out; her work on earth was done; and one morning she was found lying dead on her straw pallet under the stairs. She was twenty-two years old. Her body, which was buried in the church of Pibrac, was accidentally exhumed in 1644, forty-three years after her death, and was found in perfect preservation. It was afterwards enclosed in a leaden coffin, which was placed in the sacristy. Sixteen years later it was still flexible and well preserved. This circumstance, and the numerous miracles which were ascribed to her, encouraged a desire for official sanction of her cultus. Owing to the French Revolution, however, and other hindrances, her beatification and canonization were deferred until the pontificate of Pius IX. An annual pilgrimage takes place on June 15 to Pibrac church, where her relics still rest.

A painstaking biography is that of Louis Veuillot, which has been revised for the series “Les Saints”, by his nephew, Francois Veuillot. See also the attractive sketch of H. Ghéon, La Bergère au pays des loups (1923). The most authentic source is D. Bartolini, Commentarium actorum omnium cannonizationis . . . Germanae Cousin . . . (2 vols., 1868).
Born in 1579 of humble parents at Pibrac, a village about ten miles from Toulouse; died in her native place.
When Hortense decided to marry Laurent Cousin in Pibrac, France, it was not out of love for his infant daughter. Germaine was everything Hortense despised. Weak and ill, the girl had also been born with a right hand that was deformed and paralyzed. Hortense replaced the love that Germaine has lost when her mother died with cruelty and abuse.
Laurent, who had a weak character, pretended not to notice that Germaine had been given so little food that she had learned to crawl in order to get to the dog's dish. He wasn't there to protect her when Hortense left Germaine in a drain while she cared for chickens -- and forgot her for three days. He didn't even interfere when Hortense poured boiling water on Germaine's legs.
With this kind of treatment, it's no surprise that Germaine became even more ill. She came down with a disease known as scrofula, a kind of tuberculosis that causes the neck glands to swell up. Sores began to appear on her neck and in her weakened condition to fell prey to every disease that came along. Instead of awakening Hortense's pity this only made her despise Germaine more for being even uglier in her eyes. Germaine found no sympathy and love with her siblings. Watching their mother's treatment of their half-sister, they learned how to despise and torment her, putting ashes in her food and pitch in her clothes. Their mother found this very entertaining.

Hortense did finally get concerned about Germaine's sickness -- because she was afraid her own children would catch it. So she made Germaine sleep out in the barn. The only warmth Germaine had on frozen winter nights was the woolly sheep who slept there too. The only food she had were the scraps Hortense might remember to throw her way.  The abuse of Germaine tears at our hearts and causes us to cry for pity and justice. But it was Germaine's response to that abuse and her cruel life that wins our awe and veneration.  Germaine was soon entrusted with the sheep. No one expected her to have any use for education so she spent long days in the field tending the sheep. Instead of being lonely, she found a friend in God. She didn't know any theology and only the basics of the faith that she learned the catechism. But she had a rosary made of knots in string and her very simple prayers: "Dear God, please don't let me be too hungry or too thirsty. Help me to please my mother. And help me to please you." Out of that simple faith, grew a profound holiness and a deep trust of God. She frequented the Sacraments of Penance and the Holy Eucharist, and it was observed that her piety increased on the approach of every feast of Our Lady.
 The Rosary was her only book, and her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she used to fall on her knees at the first sound of the bell, even though she heard it when crossing a stream.
And she had the most important prayer of all -- the Mass. Every day, without fail, she would leave her sheep in God's care and go to Mass. Villagers wondered that the sheep weren't attacked by the wolves in the woods when she left but God's protection never failed her. On several occasions the swollen waters were seen to open and afford her a passage without wetting her garments..
No matter how little Germaine had, she shared it with others. Her scraps of food were given to beggars. Her life of prayer became stories of God that entranced the village children.
But most startling of all was the forgiveness to showed to the woman who deserved her hatred.
Hortense, furious at the stories about her daughter's holiness, waited only to catch her doing wrong. One cold winter day, after throwing out a beggar that Germaine had let sleep in the barn, Hortense caught Germaine carrying something bundled up in her apron. Certain that Germaine had stolen bread to feed the beggar, she began to chase and scream at the child. As she began to beat her, Germaine opened her apron. Out tumbled what she had been hiding in her apron -- bright beautiful flowers that no one had expected to see for months. Where had she found the vibrant blossoms in the middle of the ice and snow? There was only one answer and Germaine gave it herself, when she handed a flower to her mother and said, "Please accept this flower, Mother. God sends it to you in sign of his forgiveness."
As the whole village began to talk about this holy child, even Hortense began to soften her feelings toward her. She even invited Germaine back to the house but Germaine had become used to her straw bed and continued to sleep in it.
At this point, when men were beginning to realize the beauty of her life, God called her to Himself. One morning in the early summer of 1601, her father finding that she had not risen at the usual hour went to call her; he found her dead on her pallet of vine-twigs. She was then twenty-two years old, overcome by a life of suffering.
With all the evidence of her holiness, her life was too simple and hidden to mean much beyond her tiny village -- until God brought it too light again.
When her body was exhumed forty years later, it was found to be undecayed, what is known as incorruptible.
As is often the case with incorruptible bodies of saints, God chooses not the outwardly beautiful to preserve but those that others despised as ugly and weak. It's as if God is saying in this miracle that human ideas of beauty are not his. To him, no one was more beautiful than this humble lonely young woman.
After her body was found in this state, the villagers started to speak again of what she had been like and what she had done.
Soon miracles were attributed to her intercession and the clamor for her canonization began.
Her remains were buried in the parish church of Pibrac in front of the pulpit. In 1644, when the grave was opened to receive one of her relatives, the body of Germaine was discovered fresh and perfectly preserved, and miraculously raised almost to the level of the floor of the church. It was exposed for public view near the pulpit, until a noble lady, the wife of François de Beauregard, presented as a thanks-offering a casket of lead to hold the remains. She had been cured of a malignant and incurable ulcer in the breast, and her infant son whose life was despaired of was restored to health on her seeking the intercession of Germaine. This was the first of a long series of wonderful cures wrought at her relics. The leaden casket was placed in the sacristy, and in 1661 and 1700 the remains were viewed and found fresh and intact by the vicars-general of Toulouse, who have left testamentary depositions of the fact. Expert medical evidence deposed that the body had not been embalmed, and experimental tests showed that the preservation was not due to any property inherent in the soil. In 1700 a movement was begun to procure the beatification of Germaine, but it fell through owing to accidental causes. In 1793 the casket was desecrated by a revolutionary tinsmith, named Toulza, who with three accomplices took out the remains and buried them in the sacristy, throwing quick-lime and water on them. After the Revolution, her body was found to be still intact save where the quick-lime had done its work.
The private veneration of Germaine had continued from the original finding of the body in 1644,
supported and encouraged by numerous cures and miracles.
The cause of beatification was resumed in 1850. The documents attested more than 400 miracles or extraordinary graces, and thirty postulatory letters from archbishops and bishops in France besought the beatification from the Holy See. The miracles attested were cures of every kind (of blindness, congenital and resulting from disease, of hip and spinal disease), besides the multiplication of food for the distressed community of the Good Shepherd at Bourges in 1845. On 7 May, 1854, Pius IX proclaimed her beatification, and on 29 June, 1867, placed her on the canon of virgin saints. Her feast is kept in the Diocese of Toulouse on 15 June. She is represented in art with a shepherd's crook or with a distaff; with a watchdog, or a sheep; or with flowers in her apron.

In this way, the most unlikely of saints became recognized by the Church. She didn't found a religious order. She didn't reach a high Church post. She didn't write books or teach at universities. She didn't go to foreign lands as a missionary or convert thousands. What she did was live a life devoted to God and her neighbor no matter what happened to her. And that is all God asks.
In Her Footsteps:   Do you make excuses not to help others because you have so little yourself? Share something this week with those in need that may be painful for you to give up.
Prayer:   Saint Germaine, watch over those children who suffer abuse as you did. Help us to give them the love and protection you only got from God. Give us the courage to speak out against abuse when we know of it. Help us to forgive those who abuse the way you did, without sacrificing the lives of the children who need help. Amen

1601 St. Germaine Cousin 400 miracles parted waters
{see below for more}
Her remains were buried in the parish church of Pibrac in front of the pulpit. In 1644, when the grave was opened to receive one of her relatives, the body of Germaine was discovered fresh and perfectly preserved, and miraculously raised almost to the level of the floor of the church. It was exposed for public view near the pulpit, until a noble lady, the wife of François de Beauregard, presented as a thanks-offering a casket of lead to hold the remains. She had been cured of a malignant and incurable ulcer in the breast, and her infant son whose life was despaired of was restored to health on her seeking the intercession of Germaine. This was the first of a long series of wonderful cures wrought at her relics. The leaden casket was placed in the sacristy, and in 1661 and 1700 the remains were viewed and found fresh and intact by the vicars-general of Toulouse, who have left testamentary depositions of the fact. Expert medical evidence deposed that the body had not been embalmed, and experimental tests showed that the preservation was not due to any property inherent in the soil.
In 1700 a movement was begun to procure the beatification of Germaine, but it fell through owing to accidental causes. In 1793 the casket was desecrated by a revolutionary tinsmith, named Toulza, who with three accomplices took out the remains and buried them in the sacristy, throwing quick-lime and water on them. After the Revolution, her body was found to be still intact save where the quick-lime had done its work. The private veneration of Germaine had continued from the original finding of the body in 1644, supported and encouraged by numerous cures and miracles. The cause of beatification was resumed in 1850. The documents attested more than 400 miracles or extraordinary graces, and thirty postulatory letters from archbishops and bishops in France besought the beatification from the Holy See. The miracles attested were cures of every kind (of blindness, congenital and resulting from disease, of hip and spinal disease), besides the multiplication of food for the distressed community of the Good Shepherd at Bourges in 1845. On 7 May, 1854, Pius IX proclaimed her beatification, and on 29 June, 1867, placed her on the canon of virgin saints. Her feast is kept in the Diocese of Toulouse on 15 June. She is represented in art with a shepherd's crook or with a distaff; with a watchdog, or a sheep; or with flowers in her apron.
Her feast is kept in the Diocese of Toulouse on 15 June.

1601 St. Germaine Cousin Born in 1579 of humble parents at Pibrac, a village about ten miles from Toulouse; died in her native place.
When Hortense decided to marry Laurent Cousin in Pibrac, France, it was not out of love for his infant daughter. Germaine was everything Hortense despised. Weak and ill, the girl had also been born with a right hand that was deformed and paralyzed. Hortense replaced the love that Germaine has lost when her mother died with cruelty and abuse. Laurent, who had a weak character, pretended not to notice that Germaine had been given so little food that she had learned to crawl in order to get to the dog's dish. He wasn't there to protect her when Hortense left Germaine in a drain while she cared for chickens -- and forgot her for three days. He didn't even interfere when Hortense poured boiling water on Germaine's legs. With this kind of treatment, it's no surprise that Germaine became even more ill. She came down with a disease known as scrofula, a kind of tuberculosis that causes the neck glands to swell up. Sores began to appear on her neck and in her weakened condition to fell prey to every disease that came along. Instead of awakening Hortense's pity this only made her despise Germaine more for being even uglier in her eyes.
Germaine found no sympathy and love with her siblings. Watching their mother's treatment of their half-sister, they learned how to despise and torment her, putting ashes in her food and pitch in her clothes. Their mother found this very entertaining. Hortense did finally get concerned about Germaine's sickness -- because she was afraid her own children would catch it. So she made Germaine sleep out in the barn. The only warmth Germaine had on frozen winter nights was the woolly sheep who slept there too. The only food she had were the scraps Hortense might remember to throw her way.
The abuse of Germaine tears at our hearts and causes us to cry for pity and justice. But it was Germaine's response to that abuse and her cruel life that wins our awe and veneration. Germaine was soon entrusted with the sheep. No one expected her to have any use for education so she spent long days in the field tending the sheep. Instead of being lonely, she found a friend in God. She didn't know any theology and only the basics of the faith that she learned the catechism. But she had a rosary made of knots in string and her very simple prayers: "Dear God, please don't let me be too hungry or too thirsty. Help me to please my mother. And help me to please you." Out of that simple faith, grew a profound holiness and a deep trust of God.

The Cistercian community was inspired by her spirit of humility. However, at an early age, she contracted leprosy and had to be isolated. The disease caused Aleydis intense suffering, and eventually she became paralyzed and was afflicted with blindness.
Aleydis' greatest consolation came from reception of the Holy Eucharist, although she was not allowed to drink from the cup because of the danger of contagion. However, the Lord appeared to her with assurance that to receive under one species, was sufficient. Known for visions and ecstasies, she died in 1250. Devotion to her was approved in 1907 by Pope Pius X.
There is much sickness and related suffering in the world today. Like St. Aleydis, we must try to turn our suffering into good and pray that God will give us the strength to endure and that we may be consoled through the reception of the Sacraments.

Germaine Cousin V (RM) (also known as Germana of Pibrac) Born at Pibrac (near Toulouse), France, in 1579; died 1601; beatified on May 7, 1854; canonized on June 29, 1867 by Pope Pius IX.
Saint Germaine was the daughter of Laurent Cousin, a farm worker, and his wife, Marie Laroche. Her mother died while she was still an infant. A sickly child, she suffered scrofula among other conditions, and her right hand was deformed. Her father and his second wife (or her half-brother's wife) treated her badly. After her stepmother's children were born, Germaine was kept isolated from her siblings. She slept in the stable or in a cupboard under the stairs and was poorly fed on scraps. At the age of nine, Germaine was put to work as a shepherdess, which is not a terrible business for one who liked to pray.
Germaine was very devout, however, and refused to miss Mass. If she heard the bell calling the faithful to Mass while she was tending the sheep, she set her crook and her distaff in the earth, declared her flock to be under the care of her guardian angel, and went to church. Her sheep never came to any harm during her absences, even though ravening wolves inhabited the nearby forest of Boucône. It is reported that once she crossed the raging Courbet River by walking over the waters so that she could get to church.
Germaine was so poor that it is hard to imagine she would have the resources to exercise the corporal works of mercy. Yet love can always find a way. She was always ready to lend a hand to anyone needing it, especially the children whom she would gather in the fields to teach a simple catechism. She shared what little food she received with those poorer than herself.
The neighbors laughed at her religious devotion and called her 'the little bigot'; Germaine took it all in good humor. Once in the winter her stepmother accused her of stealing bread and pursued her threateningly with a stick. When Germaine opened her apron, summer flowers tumbled out. The neighbors and her parents were awed and began to treat her as a holy person. Her parents invited her to rejoin the household, but Germaine chose to continue living as before.
At 22, she was found dead on her straw pallet under the stairs. Her body was buried in the Church of Pibrac opposite the pulpit. When it was accidentally exhumed in 1644 by workmen renovating the church and identified by the withered hand, it was found incorrupt. After being exposed for one year for veneration, her relics were transferred to a leaden coffin and placed in the sacristy. Sixteen years later, her body was found to be still well preserved, and miracles were attributed to her. Her relics remain in the church at Pibrac, and an annual pilgrimage is made there. The process of canonization, begun in 1700, was delayed for Germaine because of the intervening French Revolution and similar problems. She was, however, successfully invoked by Popes Pius VII in 1813 and Pius IX in 1849 (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Walsh, White).
In art, Saint Germaine is depicted as a peasant girl with flowers falling around her in winter. She might also be portrayed tending sheep or dying alone in poverty (Roeder). She is venerated in Pibrac, Toulouse, France (Roeder). Germaine is the patroness of young country girls (Encyclopedia).

1886 Bd Aloysius Palazolo founder of the brothers of the Holy
Family and Sisters of the Poor; His charitable work was particularly concerned witht he reclaiming of prostitutes.
Born at Bergamo in 1827;  ordained priest, 1850. His charitable work was particularly concerned witht he reclaiming of prostitutes.  He died on 15 June, 1886 and was beatified in 1963.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

 
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die
 so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads,
 'The Gospel of Life'


"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel


Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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