Mary Mother of GOD
CEREMONY FOR SOLEMNITY OF STS. PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES

 

 Friday   Saints June 2Octávo Kaléndas Júlii.  




 













Romæ commemorátio sanctórum plurimórum Mártyrum, qui a Neróne Imperatóre
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum. RDeo grátias.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins. R.  Thanks be to God.
The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

 
Mary’s mercy will shine brightly, more than ever before
 
In these latter times Mary must shine forth more than ever in mercy, power and grace; in mercy, to bring back and welcome lovingly the poor sinners and wanderers who are to be converted and return to the Catholic Church; in power, to combat the enemies of God who will rise up menacingly to seduce and crush by promises and threats all those who oppose them; finally, she must shine forth in grace to inspire and support the valiant soldiers and loyal servants of Jesus Christ who are fighting for his cause.

Lastly, Mary must become as terrible as an army in battle array to the devil and his followers, especially in these latter times. For Satan, knowing that he has little time—even less now than ever—to destroy souls, intensifies his efforts and his onslaughts every day. He will not hesitate to stir up savage persecutions and set treacherous snares for Mary's faithful servants and children whom he finds more difficult to overcome than others.

 

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary.

Oh my Lord! How true it is that whoever works for you is paid in troubles!
And what a precious price to those who love you if we understand its value.-- St. Teresa


         
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

St. John the Baptist son of Zachary Jerusalem Temple priest in and Elizabeth kinswoman of Mary
Natívitas sancti Joánnis Baptístæ, Præcursóris Dómini, ac sanctórum Zacharíæ et Elísabeth fílii, qui Spíritu Sancto replétus est adhuc in útero matris suæ.
    The Nativity of St. John Baptist, precursor of our Lord, son of Zachary and Elizabeth, who, while yet in the womb of his mother, was filled with the Holy Ghost.


THE BIRTHDAY OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST
ST AUGUSTINE, remarking that the Church celebrates the festivals of saints on the day of their death, which in the true estimate of things is their great birthday, their birthday to eternal life, adds that the birthday of St John the Baptist forms an exception because he was sanctified in his mother's womb, so that he came into the world sinless.


Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

June 24 – Our Lady of Miracles (Saint Maur des Fossés, France) – Nativity of Saint John the Baptist
 
Our Lady of Miracles welcomes all families
 
The statue of Our Lady of Miracles was not man-made… A certain man called Guillaume de Corbeil, a feudal lord known as "Guerlenc" or William in English, was instrumental in bringing the miracle about… William petitioned for and received the charge of defendant of the Abbey des Fossés from the King of France Henri I. (…)

As William advanced in years, his health began to fail. He made a vow to the Virgin Mary to become a monk at the Abbey des Fossés if she obtained the grace of his recovery. His prayer was quickly answered and so William became a monk… When he noticed the bad state of repair of the statues of Christ and the Virgin Mary at the abbey, he resolved to order new ones made by the sculptor Rumolde.

It was decided to begin with the statue of the Virgin Mary. Rumolde, who was doing the repair work, had barely touched the wood when he heard his name called outside the chapel he was using as a workshop. After a quick investigation did not reveal anything, Rumolde went back to his work, and had the great surprise to find that it had been completed for him…

These events allegedly took place on July 10, 1068. Saint Nicholas Church, where the statue has been preserved since 1790, was one of the jubilee churches during the great Jubilee of 2000. In 2002, the traditional pilgrimage for families was resumed on the Saturday nearest to December 8, and several miraculous healings have taken place.
 
Philippe Lefèvre lerosairesaintmaur.org

 
The Queen of Peace 1187 June 24 Our Lady of Miracles (France)
When King Philip Augustus and the King of England were fighting for the Duchy of Aquitaine,
on June 24, 1187, Our Lady of Miracles at Deols intervened.
The King of France, having sought peace in vain, decided to fight battle so as to "at last put an end to such a long war by taking decisive action.  "The people of Deols, afraid of the all-out battle about to begin, bowed down in front of an image of Mary, begging her to prevent the bloodshed. As they were praying, the two armies had lined up in smart battle order; the signal for battle was going to sound when suddenly, the King of England came forward with his son and asked to speak to Philip Augustus. He came forth and the king declared to him that he accepted the conditions offered in the previous negotiations so that a peace treaty was signed.
Such unexpected news produced a general surge of emotion; kings and lords, people and soldiers recognized that a miracle had occurred in this sudden change of attitudes at the moment when anger was the highest and the battle ready to begin. The same feeling of admiration gathered them around the image of Mary, to give to thanks.
They were enemies no more: the French and the English, each one was part of a family of brothers
before one mother who had protected them and saved them all from death.
Journal of Deols Bibliotheca Nova

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
        St. John the Baptist son of Zachary Jerusalem Temple priest in and Elizabeth kinswoman of Mary
 304 St. Orentius Martyr with Heros Pharnacius Firminus Firmus Longinus and Cyriacus army Romans
 304 St. Amphibalus Martyr traditional companion of St. Alban of Verulam
 360 St. Simplicius of Autun B (RM)
5th v. Agoard, Agilbert, and Others MM (RM)
 575 St. Germoc Confessor of the faith Irish chieftain
 640 Saint Alena of Brussels invoked for eye troubles and toothache VM (AC)
 775 St. Rumold Bishop martyr; patron saint of Malines, Flanders, Belgium
776 St. Theodulphus Abbot of the Benedictine monastery of Lobbes, near Liege, Belgium
 845 Saint Ivan of Bohemia renounced brilliant career as courtier hermit life (AC)
 880 Henry (Heric) of Auxerre Benedictine monk and the headmaster of Saint-Germain abbey school OSB (AC)
9th v. St. John of Tuy
1050 Blessed Erembert I of Kremsmünster, OSB Abbot (AC)
1193 St. Bartholomew of Farne; Benedictine hermit on the island of Farne 42 yrs; miracle worker
1292 St. Kunegunda founded Poore Clare Convent of Sandeck built churches hospitals ransomed Christians served the
        poor and ill.
   St. Faustus and Companions
1815 Bl. Joseph Yuen Martyr of Tonkin, Vietnam. A native priest,
Mary the Mother of God


St. John the Baptist son of Zachary Jerusalem Temple priest in and Elizabeth kinswoman of Mary
Natívitas sancti Joánnis Baptístæ, Præcursóris Dómini, ac sanctórum Zacharíæ et Elísabeth fílii, qui Spíritu Sancto replétus est adhuc in útero matris suæ.
    The Nativity of St. John Baptist, precursor of our Lord, son of Zachary and Elizabeth, who, while yet in the womb of his mother, was filled with the Holy Ghost.


THE BIRTHDAY OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST
ST AUGUSTINE, remarking that the Church celebrates the festivals of saints on the day of their death, which in the true estimate of things is their great birthday, their birthday to eternal life, adds that the birthday of St John the Baptist forms an exception because he was sanctified in his mother's womb, so that he came into the world sinless. Indeed, the majority of divines are disposed to think that he was already invested with sanctifying grace, which would have been imparted by the invisible presence of our divine Redeemer at the time that the Blessed Virgin visited her cousin, St Elizabeth. But in any case the birth of the Forerunner was an event which brought great joy to mankind, announcing that their redemption was at hand. - [* To-day is of course the general feast day of the Baptist, and not simply a commemoration of his birth. But for convenience an account of his life is deferred herein until the commemoration of his beheading, on August 29. ]

John's father, Zachary, was a priest of the Jewish law, and Elizabeth his wife was also descended of the house of Aaron; and the Holy Scriptures assure us that both of them were just, with a virtue which was sincere and perfect- “and they walked in all commandments and justifications of the Lord without blame." It fell to the lot of Zachary in the turn of his ministration to offer the daily morning and evening sacrifice of incense; and on a particular day while he did so, and the people were praying outside the sanctuary, he had a vision, the angel Gabriel appearing to him standing on the right side of the altar of incense. Zachary was troubled and stricken with fear, but the angel encouraged him, announcing that his prayer was heard, and that in consequence his wife, although she was called barren, should conceive and bear him a son.
   The angel told him: "Thou shalt call his name John, and thou shalt have joy and gladness, and many shall rejoice in his birth, for he shall be great before the Lord." The commendations of the Baptist are remarkable in this that they were inspired by God Himself. John was chosen to be the herald and harbinger of the world's Redeemer, the voice to proclaim to men the eternal Word, the morning star to usher in the sun of justice and the light of the world. Other saints are often distinguished by certain privileges belonging to their special character; but John eminently excelled in graces and was at once a teacher, a virgin and a martyr. He was, moreover, a prophet, and more than a prophet, it being his office to point out to the world Him whom the ancient prophets had foretold obscurely and at a distance.
Innocence undefiled is a precious grace, and the first-fruits of the heart are particularly due to God. Therefore the angel ordered that the child should be consecrated to the Lord from his very birth, and as an indication of the need to lead a mortified life if virtue is to be protected, no fermented liquor would ever pass his lips. The circumstance of the birth of John proclaimed it an evident miracle, for Elizabeth at that time was advanced in years and according to the course of nature past child-bearing. God had so ordained all things that the event might be seen to be the fruit of long and earnest prayer. Still, Zachary was amazed, and he begged that a sign might be given as an earnest of the realization of these great promises. The angel, to grant his request, and in a measure to rebuke the doubt which it implied, answered that he should continue dumb until such moment as the child was born. Elizabeth conceived; and in the sixth month of her pregnancy received a visit from the Mother of God, who greeted her kinswoman: "and it came to pass that when Elizabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the infant leaped in her womb."
Elizabeth, when the nine months of her pregnancy were accomplished, brought forth her son, and he was circumcised on the eighth day. Though the family and friends wished him to bear his father's name, Zachary, the mother urged that he should be called John.
The father confirmed the desire by writing on a tablet "John is his name"; and immediately recovering the use of speech, he broke into that great canticle of love and thanksgiving, the Benedictus, which the Church sings every day in her office and which she finds it not inappropriate to repeat over the grave of every one of her faithful children when his remains are committed to the earth.
The Birthday of St John the Baptist was one of the earliest feasts to find a definite place in the Church's calendar, no other than where it stands now, June 24. The Hieronymianum locates it there, the first edition stressing the point that this commemorates the earthly birthday of the Forerunner. The same day is indicated in the Carthaginian Calendar, and before that we have sermons of St Augustine delivered on this particular festival which sufficiently indicate the precise time of year by referring to those words of John reported in the Fourth Gospel: "He must increase, but I must decrease." St Augustine finds this appropriate, for he tells us that after the birthday of St John the days begin to get shorter, whereas after the birthday of our Lord, the days begin to grow longer. Duchesne is probably right in urging that the connection of the feast with June 24 must have originated in the West and not in the East. He says: "It is to be noted that the festival is on the 24th and not on the 25th  of June, and we may well ask why the latter figure was not adopted, since it would have given the exact interval of six months between the Baptist and Christ. The reason is [he 'goes on] that the calculation was made according to the Roman calendar; the 24th  of June is the octavo kalendas Julii, just as the 25th  of December is octavo kalendas Januarii." At Antioch, and in the East generally, the days of the month were numbered continuously forward from the first day just as we do, and June 25 would have corresponded with December 25 without attention being paid to the fact that the former month counted thirty days and the latter thirty-one. But just as the Roman date of Christmas was adopted at Antioch (very possibly through St John Chrysostom's acquaintance with St Jerome) in the last quarter of the fourth century, so it was not very long before the birthday of the Baptist was celebrated at Antioch, Constantinople, and in the other great Eastern churches on the same day as it was in Rome.
St John the Baptist was a very popular saint in the middle ages, and much might be written about the religious orders, institutions, churches and shrines which were placed under his patronage; but all that we know for certain about his life is to be found in the pages of the four gospels. The story told in the apocryphal Protevangelium, otherwise known as the Gospel of James, which represents Zachary in the capacity of high priest, and as taking a prominent part in the marriage of Mary and Joseph, is altogether unreliable. Neither can we place unqualified trust in the little additional information which may be gleaned from the historian Josephus; Dr. Robert Eisler's book, The Messiah Jesus and John the Baptist (1931), which purports to be founded on the Slavonic text of Josephus, raises far too many doubts to be taken as a serious contribution to the subject. There are a number of books on St John the Baptist more or less devotional in character. One, that of the Abbe Denis Buzy, which has been translated into English, The Life of St John the Baptist, discusses the question very fully from the theological and exegetical point of view, and also contains an adequate bibliography. On liturgical aspects of the subject, see Duchesne's Christian Worship; Schuster, The Sacramentary, vol. iv, pp. 265-271; DAC., vol. vii,. cc. 2167-2184; and on the folklore associated especially with Midsummer night, Bächtold-Stäubli, Handwörterbuch des deutschen Aberglaubens, vol. iv, pp. 704 seq.
   John the Baptist was the son of Zachary, a priest of the Temple in Jerusalem, and Elizabeth, a kinswoman of Mary who visited her. He was probably born at Ain-Karim southwest of Jerusalem after the Angel Gabriel told Zachary that his wife would bear a child even though she was an old woman. He lived as a hermit in the desert of Judea until about A.D. 27. When he was thirty, he began to preach on the banks of the Jordan against the evils of the times and called men to penance and baptism "for the Kingdom of Heaven is close at hand". He attracted large crowds, and when Christ came to him, John recognized Him as the Messiah and baptized Him, saying, "It is I who need baptism from You".
       When Christ left to preach in Galilee, John continued preaching in the Jordan valley. Fearful of his great power with the people, Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Perea and Galilee, had him arrested and imprisoned at Machaerus Fortress on the Dead Sea when John denounced his adultrous and incestuous marriage with Herodias, wife of his half brother Philip. John was beheaded at the request of Salome, daughter of Herodias, who asked for his head at the instigation of her mother.
    John inspired many of his followers to follow Christ when he designated Him "the Lamb of God," among them Andrew and John, who came to know Christ through John's preaching.
John is presented in the New Testament as the last of the Old Testament prophets and the precursor of the Messiah. The feast for his beheading is August 29th.
Romæ commemorátio sanctórum plurimórum Mártyrum, qui a Neróne Imperatóre, ut a se incénsæ Urbis ódium avérteret, calumnióse accusáti, divérso mortis génere jussi sunt sævíssime intérfici.  Horum síquidem álii, ferárum tergis contécti, laniátibus canum expósiti sunt; álii crúcibus affíxi; aliíque incéndio tráditi, ut, ubi defecísset dies, in usum noctúrni lúminis deservírent.  Erant hi omnes Apostolórum discípuli, et primítiæ Mártyrum, quas Romána Ecclésia, fértilis ager Mártyrum, ante Apostolórum necem transmísit ad Dóminum.
    At Rome, in the time of Nero, the commemoration of many holy martyrs.  Being falsely accused of having set fire to the city, they were cruelly put to death in various manners by the emperor's order.  Some were covered with the skins of wild beasts and torn to pieces by dogs, other were fastened to crosses, others again were delivered to the flames to serve as torches in the night.  All these were disciples of the apostles, and the first fruits of the martyrs which the Roman Church, a field so fertile in martyrs, offered to God even before the death of the Apostles.
THE MARTYRS UNDER NERO (A.D. 64)
THESE confessors, whose number and names are known only to God, are described in the Roman Martyrology as "the first fruits with which Rome, so fruitful in that seed, had peopled heaven". It is interesting to note that the first of the Caesars to persecute Christians was Nero, perhaps the most unprincipled of them all.
In July 64, the tenth year of his reign, a terrible fire devastated Rome. It began near the Great Circus, in a district of shops and booths full of inflammable goods, and quickly spread in all directions. After it had raged for six days and seven nights and had been got under by the demolition of numerous buildings, it burst forth again in the garden of Tigellinus, the prefect of the praetorian guard, and continued for three days more. By the time it had finally died down, two-thirds of Rome was a mass of smouldering ruins. On the third day of the fire Nero came from Antium to survey the scene. It is said that, clad in theatrical costume, he went to the top of the Tower of Maecenas, and to the accompaniment of his lyre recited Priam's lament over the burning of Troy. His savage delight at watching the flames gave rise to the belief that he had ordered the conflagration, or at any rate had prevented it from being extinguished.
The belief rapidly gained ground. It was said that flaming torches were thrown into houses by mysterious individuals who declared themselves to be acting under orders. How far Nero was responsible remains a moot point to this day. In view of the numerous destructive fires which have afflicted Rome throughout the ages, it is more than likely that this, perhaps the worst of them all, was due to accident. At the time, however, suspicion was so widespread that Nero was alarmed, and sought to divert it from himself by accusing the Christians of setting fire to the city.
Although, as we know from the historian Tacitus, no one believed them to be guilty of the crime, they were seized, exposed to the scorn and derision of the people, and put to death with the utmost cruelty. Some were sewn up in the skins of wild beasts and delivered to hungry dogs who tore them to pieces; some were crucified; others again were smeared Over with wax, pitch and other combustible material, and after being impaled with sharp stakes under their chins were ignited to serve as torches. All these barbarities took place at a public nocturnal fete which Nero gave in his own gardens. They served as side-shows whilst the emperor diverted his guests with chariot races, mixing with the crowd in plebeian attire or driving himself in a chariot. Hardened though the Romans were to gladiatorial shows, the savage cruelty of these tortures aroused horror and pity in many of those who witnessed them.
Tacitus, Suetonius, Dio Cassius, Pliny the Elder, and the satirist Juvenal, all make reference to the fire; but it is only in Tacitus that we have a mention of Nero's attempt to fasten the outrage upon a particular sect. Tacitus definitely specifies the Christians by name, but Gibbon and others maintain that under that designation he included the Jews, because those who had adopted the teaching of our Lord Jesus Christ were not yet sufficiently numerous in Rome to be a source of alarm. This view, however, which seems only prompted by a desire to belittle the influence of Christianity, has not won many adherents. There is an excellent article on the subject in DCB., vol. iv, pp. 24-27.
St. Faustus and Companions
Item Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum Fausti et aliórum vigínti trium.
    In the same city, the holy martyrs Faustus and twenty-three others.
Roman martyrs, 24. Possibly they can be identified with the martyrs commemorated on June 25, Lucilla, Flora, etc.
Faustus and Companions MM (RM). The acta of this group of 24 Roman martyrs headed by Faustus have been lost. They may be identical to the Roman martyrs, including Saint Lucy, celebrated on June 25 (Benedictines).
Sátalis, in Arménia, sanctórum Mártyrum septem fratrum, scílicet Oréntii, Heróis, Pharnácii, Firmíni, Firmi, Cyríaci et Longíni mílitum; qui a Maximiáno Imperatóre, eo quod Christiáni essent, cíngulo militári priváti sunt, et, ab ínvicem separáti atque in divérsa loca abdúcti, in dolóribus et ærúmnis pósiti, quievérunt in Dómino.
    At Satalis in Armenia, seven saintly brothers, all martyrs: Orentius, Heros, Pharnacius, Firminus, Firmus, Cyriacus and Longinus, who owe their martyrdom to Emperor Maximian.  Because they were Christians, they were deprived of the military belt by his command, then separated from one another, hurried away to different places, and in the midst of painful trials found their repose in the Lord.
   
   According to the pre-1970 Roman Martyrology, they were seven brothers who were stripped of their positions in the Roman army and executed during the reign of co-Emperor Maximian.
304 St. Amphibalus Martyr traditional companion of St. Alban of Verulam
   According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Amphibalus was the name of the underground Christian priest, sheltered by Britain's protomartyr, St. Alban, at his house in the Roman town of Verulamium (now St. Albans). The latter took his place when the authorities arrived to arrest Amphibalus. He suffered execution for his trouble. Bede describes these events as occurring during the religious persecutions of the Emperor Diocletian (c.AD 304), though modern historians have argued the reigns of Decius (c.254) or Septimus Severus (c.209).
   Unfortunately, though Amphibalus may have existed in person, this was almost certainly not his name. Rather, the word is a misunderstanding of the Latin used for the cloak from which Alban created his disguise. All other details of the man's life are, no doubt, later medieval embellishments. He was supposedly a native of Isca (Caerleon), converted numerous Romano-Britons after his brush with death - including SS. Stephanus & Socrates - and fled with them to western Britannia Superior (Wales). He was, later, caught and returned to Verulamium where he too suffered martyrdom.
Amphibalus' body was supposedly discovered at Redbourne, in 1178, and translated to a fitting shrine in the Abbey Church of St. Albans. He is, doubtfully, said to have had a church dedicated to him in post-Roman Winchester.

   Amphibalus of Verulam M (AC) Died c. 304. The original acta of Saint Alban say only that the protomartyr put on the cloak (amphibalus) of the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was martyred. Geoffrey of Monmouth took the word amphibalus as the name of the priest. Thus, in later versions of the story, the priest is martyred with or just after Saint Alban (Benedictines).

360 Simplicius of Autun B (RM)
Augustodúni deposítio sancti Simplícii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
    At Autun, the death of St. Simplicius, bishop and confessor.
4th 5th v.  ST SIMPLICIUS, BISHOP OF AUTUN
EXCEPT that he was bishop of Autun, highly esteemed for his integrity and charity, nothing definite is known about this St Simplicius. He would seem to have succeeded Bishop Egemonius about the year 390. On the other hand, it is possible that he was the Bishop Simplicius mentioned by St Athanasius as one of the signatories to decrees of the Council of Sardica in 347.
    According to his legend, as related by Gregory of Tours, he came of a distinguished Gallo-Roman family and married a maiden, young and wealthy like himself, with whom he made a pact that they should live in continence and devote themselves to good works. After Simplicius had been elected bishop, misunderstandings arose and some scandal was caused in the still largely pagan city because the hew prelate and his wife continued to dwell under the same roof. To vindicate themselves they voluntarily submitted to an ordeal by fire. They took red-hot coals, laid them in the folds of their clothing, and stood up before the people for an hour without sustaining any injury to themselves or to their garments.
So convincing was this miracle that it led over a thousand pagans to seek baptism.
Another wonder, and one equally fruitful in conversions, was wrought by St Simplicius on the day of the goddess Berecynthia, which was always an occasion for disgraceful orgies. The holy bishop met the statue of the deity as it was being conveyed in a chariot to bless the fields, and with a prayer for divine assistance he upraised his hand to make the sign of the cross. Instantly the image fell to the ground, from which no efforts could dislodge it. Moreover, the beasts which drew the chariot refused to proceed any further.
The fantastic story just recounted is to be found in Gregory of Tours, De Gloria Conf., nn. 73-76. There is also a short medieval life of Simplicius (it is printed in the Catalogus of Brussels Hagiographical MSS., vol. i, pp. 127-129), and it has been held that this was the source from which Gregory derived his information, but Bruno Krusch (in the Neues Archiv, vol. xxxiii, pp. 18-19) denies this. A Simplicius, Bishop of Autun, is commemorated in the Hieronymianum, not only today but also on November 19, and there are certain chronological data which suggest that there may have been two bishops of Autun of that name. See also Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, pp. 174-178.
Saint Simplicius lived in continence with his wife, prior to being made bishop of Autun. He worthily bore the pastoral staff as he zealously and successfully uprooted paganism (Benedictines).
5th v. Agoard, Agilbert, and Others MM (RM)
In vico Christólio, in território Parisiénsi, pássio sanctórum Mártyrum Agoárdi et Aglibérti, cum áliis innúmeris promíscui sexus.
    In the diocese of Paris, at Creteil, the martyrdom of the Saints Agoard and Aglibert, with a great multitude of others of both sexes.
5th-7th century. The Roman Martyrology repeats the legend: "In the neighborhood of Paris, in the village of Creteil, the passion of the holy martyrs Agoard and Aglibert, and numberless others of both sexes." The Jesuit Bollandists date their martyrdom between the 1st and 3rd centuries, but some claim it was more likely to have occurred at a later date--perhaps about AD 400. They were said to have migrated to Creteil, been converted by Saint Altinus, pulled down a pagan temple, and suffered the consequence of death by the sword. A church was later erected over their burial site, where their relics are now enshrined.
 There feast is kept in the diocese of Paris on June 25 (Benedictines, Husenbeth).
575 St. Germoc Confessor of the faith Irish chieftain
He was the brother of St. Breaca.
Germoc settled in Cornwall, England.
640 Saint Alena of Brussels invoked for eye troubles and toothache VM (AC)
Born near Brussels, Belgium; Saint Alena was baptized without the knowledge of her pagan parents. She was killed while secretly travelling to hear Mass (Benedictines). Saint Alena is depicted in art as a princess with one arm torn off. She might also be portrayed healing a blind man or with an angel encouraging her (Roeder). She is venerated in Brussels and is invoked for eye troubles and toothache (Roeder).

775 St. Rumold Bishop martyr patron saint of Malines, Flanders, Belgium
Mechlíniæ, in Brabántia, pássio sancti Rumóldi, Epíscopi Dublinénsis et Mártyris, e Scotórum Rege progéniti.
    At Mechlin in Brabant, the passion of St. Rumold, bishop of Dublin and martyr.  He had been the son of the king of the Scots.
Also called Rombaut. He was an Irish monk who was consecrated a bishop in Rome and then joined St. Willibrord on the Continent. He was martyred in the area of Malines by two men that he had denounced for their evil ways.
Rumold is also commemorated as a bishop of Dublin, Ireland, the son of a Scottish king.
776 St. Theodulphus Abbot of the Benedictine monastery of Lobbes, near Liege, Belgium
Láubiis, in Bélgio, sancti Theodúlphi Epíscopi.    At Lobbes in Belgium, St. Theodulphus, bishop.
Theodulphus is also called Thiou. He had the rank of bishop as well. Prelate, poet, and one of the leading theologians of the Frankish Empire.
   A member of Charlemagne's court, Theodulf became bishop of Orléans in 775 and abbot of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire in 781. He worked for reform of the clergy within his diocese and established a hospice. In 800 he was in Rome for Charlemagne's coronation, and in 804 he succeeded the English scholar Alcuin as Charlemagne's chief theological adviser. Charlemagne involved Theodulf in the dispute concerning the Filioque clause in the Nicene Creed, which describes the procession of the Holy Ghost from the Father "and from the Son" and which is one of the causes of the division between the Greek and Roman churches. At Charlemagne's request, Theodulf defended the Filioque clause in his treatise De Spiritu Sancto ("Concerning the Holy Spirit"). It was also at Charlemagne's urging that Theodulf wrote his treatise on Baptism, De ordine Baptismi ("Concerning the Ordinance of Baptism").
   Theodulf received the pallium, the symbol of episcopal authority, from Pope Stephen IV in 816. Charlemagne's son and successor Louis I the Pious, deposed Theodulf in 818 for participation in a revolt by Louis's nephew Bernard and imprisoned him in a monastery in Angers, where he died.
    Theodulf's poem Ad Carolum regem ("To Charles the King") depicts Charlemagne surrounded by family and courtiers. A patron of the arts and a builder and restorer of churches, Theodulf had a palace and chapel built at Germigny-des-Prés c. 806 that survives in the département of Loiret as an important example of Carolingian architecture.
880 Henry (Heric) of Auxerre Benedictine monk and the headmaster of Saint-Germain abbey school OSB (AC)
Born in Hery (Yonne); Saint Henry was a Benedictine monk and the headmaster of Saint-Germain abbey school at Auxerre. He was also a hagiographer (Benedictines).

845 Saint Ivan of Bohemia, Hermit renounced brilliant career as courtier; hermit life; Bohemia (AC)
Saint Ivan renounced a brilliant career as a courtier to live as a hermit in Bohemia. He was buried by Duchess Saint Ludmilla of Bohemia (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
In art, Saint Ivan is a hermit with a horse near him. He is venerated in Bohemia (Roeder).

1050 Blessed Erembert I of Kremsmünster, OSB Abbot (AC)
Erembert was elected abbot, in 1050, of Kremsmünster monastery in Austria (Benedictines).

1193 St. Bartholomew of Farne Benedictine hermit on the island of Farne 42 yrs miracle worker
ST BARTHOLOMEW OF FARNE (A.D. 1193)
OF the many pious men who were led by the example of St Cuthbert to become solitaries on the island of Farne, off the Northumbrian coast, not the least remarkable was this Bartholomew, for he spent no less than forty-two years upon that desolate haunt of birds. He was a north-countryman, a native of Whitby. His parents, who may have been of Scandinavian origin, called him Tostig, but because the name made him a laughing-stock it was changed to William. He determined to go abroad, and his wanderings led him to Norway, where he remained long enough to receive ordination as a priest. He returned home, and went to Durham, where he took the monastic habit, assuming the name of Bartholomew. A vision he had of St Cuthbert inspired him to dedicate the rest of his life to God in the cell which Cuthbert had once occupied at Farne.
Upon his arrival he found another hermit already installed-a certain Brother Ebwin, who strongly resented his intrusion and who strove by petty persecution to drive him away. Bartholomew attempted no reprisals, but made it quite evident that he had come to stay, and Ebwin eventually retired, leaving him in solitary possession. The mode of life he embraced was one of extreme austerity, modelled upon that of the fathers in the desert. Later he was joined by a former prior of Durham called Thomas; but they could not agree. Their chief cause of dissension -sad to relate-was the amount of the food ration. Thomas could not manage with as little as Bartholomew, and he went so far as to question the genuineness of what appeared to be his brother's extraordinary abstemiousness. Bartholomew, who seems to have been sensitive to criticism, was so offended at being charged with hypocrisy that he left the island and returned to Durham. There he remained in spite of the apologies of Thomas, until the bishop, a year later, ordered him back to Farne, when a reconciliation then took place. Forewarned of his approaching death, Bartholomew announced it to some monks, who were with him when he died, and buried him in the island. He left a reputation for holiness and miracles, but there is no evidence of liturgical cultus.
There is a medieval life which gives Bartholomew's history in some detail, and which was apparently written by a contemporary. It is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. v. See also Stanton's Menology, pp. 287-288; T. D. Hardy, Catalogue of Materials (Rolls Series), vol. ii, pp. 226-227, where a very different date is suggested for his death; and a short life in the Hermit Saints in the Anglican series edited by J. H. Newman (1844). The Latin text of the saint's miracles is given in Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lxx (1952), pp. 5-19.
A Benedictine hermit and miracle worker associated with Durham, England. He was born in Whitby, in Northumbria, England, and was called Tostig. After going to Norway, Bartholomew was ordained and returned to Durham, where he entered the Benedictine Order. He became a hermit on the island of Farne, on the coast of Northumbria, remaining there for forty-two years. Bartholomew was noted as a miracle worker.
Of the many pious men who were led by the example of Saint Cuthbert to become solitaries on the island of Farne, off the Northumbrian coast, not the least remarkable was this Bartholomew, for he spent no less than 42 years upon that desolate haunt of birds. His parents, who may have been of Scandinavian origin, called him Tostig, but because the name made him a laughing-stock it was changed to William. He determined to go abroad, and his wanderings led him to Norway, where he remained long enough to receive ordination as a priest. He returned home, and went to Durham, where he took the monastic habit and took the name Bartholomew. A vision he had of Saint Cuthbert inspired him to dedicate the rest of his life to God in the cell which Cuthbert had once occupied at Farne.
Upon his arrival he found another hermit already installed--a certain Brother Ebwin, who strongly resented his intrusion and who strove by petty persecution to drive him away. Bartholomew attempted no reprisals, but made it quite clear that he had come to stay. Ebwin eventually retired, leaving him in solitary possession.
The mode of life he embraced was one of extreme austerity, modelled upon that of the desert fathers. Later he was joined by a former prior of Durham called Thomas; but they could not agree. Their chief cause of dissension--sad to relate--was the amount of food ration. Thomas could not manage with as little as Bartholomew, and he went so far as to question the authenticity of what appeared to be his brother's extraordinary abstemiousness. 
     Bartholomew, who seems to have been sensitive to criticism, was so offended at being charged with hypocrisy that he left the island and returned to Durham. There he remained in spite of the apologies of Thomas, until the bishop, a year later, ordered him back to Farne, when a reconciliation took place. Forewarned of his approaching death, Bartholomew announced it to some monks, who were with him when he died, and buried him on the island.
He left a reputation for holiness and miracles, but there is no evidence of a liturgical cultus (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Walsh).
   "From ancient time long past, this island has been inhabited by certain birds whose name and race miraculously persists. At the time of year for building nests, they gather here. And such gracious gentleness have they learned from the holiness of the place, or rather from those who made the place holy by their way of living there, that they have no shrinking from the handling or the gaze of men. They love quiet, and yet no clamor disturbs them. Their nests are built everywhere. Some brood above their eggs beside the altar. No man presumes to molest them or touch the eggs without leave... And they in turn do harm to no man's store for food. They seek it with their mates upon the waves of the seas. The ducklings, once they are reared, follow behind their mothers who lead the way, and once they have entered their native waters, come no more back to the nest.
    "The mothers too, their mild and gentle way of life forgotten, receive their ancient state and instinct with the sea. This is the high prerogative of the island, which, had it come to the knowledge of the scholars of old time, would have had its fair fame blazoned through the earth.
   "But at one time it befell, whilst a mother was leading her brood, herself going on before that one of the youngsters fell down a cleft of a creviced rock. The mother stood by in distress, and let no one doubt but that she was then endowed with human reason. For she forthwith turned about, left her youngsters behind, came to Bartholomew, and began tugging at the hem of his cloak with her beak, as if to say plainly: 'Get up and follow me and give me back my son.'
     "He rose at once for her, thinking that he must be sitting on her nest. But as she kept on tugging more and more, he perceived at last that she was asking something from him that she could not come at by voice. And indeed her action was eloquent, if not her discourse. On she went, she first and he after, till coming to the cliff she pointed to the place with her bill, and gazing at Bartholomew, intimated with what signs she could that he was to peer inside. "Coming closer, he saw the duckling, with its small wings clinging to the rock, and climbing down he brought it back to its mother, who in high delight seemed by her joyous look to give him thanks. Whereupon she took to the water with her sons, and Bartholomew, dumb with astonishment, went back to his oratory" (Geoffrey).

Bartholomew of Farne, OSB Hermit (AC) (also known as Bartholomew of Durham) Born at Whitby, England; died c. 1193. Of the many pious men who were led by the example of Saint Cuthbert to become solitaries on the island of Farne, off the Northumbrian coast, not the least remarkable was this Bartholomew, for he spent no less than 42 years upon that desolate haunt of birds. His parents, who may have been of Scandinavian origin, called him Tostig, but because the name made him a laughing-stock it was changed to William. He determined to go abroad, and his wanderings led him to Norway, where he remained long enough to receive ordination as a priest. He returned home, and went to Durham, where he took the monastic habit and took the name Bartholomew. A vision he had of Saint Cuthbert inspired him to dedicate the rest of his life to God in the cell which Cuthbert had once occupied at Farne.
9th v. St. John of Tuy
Hermit of Spanish Galicia who lived near Tuy. His relics are enshrined in the Dominican church there.

1292 St. Kunegunda founded Poore Clare Convent of Sandeck built churches hospitals ransomed Christians served the poor and ill.
b. 1224 Daughter of King Bela IV and niece of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, she married King Boleslaus V of Poland at sixteen. On his death in 1279 she became a Poore Clare at the Convent of Sandeck, which she had founded. She also built churches and hospitals, ransomed Christians captured by the Turks, and served the poor and ill. She is also known as St. Kinga. Her cult was confirmed in 1690.
1815 Bl. Joseph Yuen Martyr of Tonkin, Vietnam. A native priest,
he was imprisoned, then strangled. Joseph was beatified in 1900.



Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

 
 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die
 so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads,
 'The Gospel of Life'


"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel


Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency,
which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).-
Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
The Pope said this today before reciting the midday Angelus with several thousand people gathered in the courtyard of the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, south of Rome.
Referring to the Gospel reading for today's Mass, the Holy Father reflected on the faith of Peter, which is shown to be "still immature and too much influenced by the 'mentality of this world.'”  He explained that when Christ spoke openly about how he was to "suffer much, be killed and rise again, Peter protests, saying: 'God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you.'"
"It is evident that the Master and the disciple follow two opposed ways of thinking," continued the Pontiff. "Peter, according to a human logic, is convinced that God would never allow his Son to end his mission dying on the cross.  "Jesus, on the contrary, knows that the Father, in his great love for men, sent him to give his life for them, and if this means the passion and the cross, it is right that such should happen."