Mary Mother of GOD
“‘Not a single rose is plucked from this world without thorns.’
The great Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli:
"We must bear our suffering with love, since suffering is the fruit of love
and in suffering we will find our strength!"

  Georgian martyr Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II 1918
 Monday   Saint of the Day June 27 Quinto Kaléndas Júlii.   


Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins. 

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Who are you, my Lady?
 
In Poland, after the fall of Warsaw, the Soviet army occupied the city of... The hospital was crowded with wounded Russians and Poles. We isolated two serious tetanus cases, a 17-year-old Polish boy and a 40-something Russian man. Hania, the Polish nurse, counted her phials: there were enough for one patient, not two. She hesitated—which one should she choose?  
The Russian showed Hania a medal of the miraculous Virgin: “Who is the woman on this medal that I found on the floor?” he asked. Hania was offended. She said to herself, “So this is how low the Russians have fallen with their atheism!” – “That lady is Our Lady! She is the Mother of God!”

Hania was about to share the injection between the two patients, but the Russian noticed. “Don’t do that! You don’t have enough for two.” He pointed to the young Pole: “He’s young. I'm old. He has a mother. I have neither father nor mother. So let me choose for you.”
During the night, a slight noise startled the nurse who had dozed off for a second. The Russian was staring at the corner of the room. His eyes were riveted in one place. Suddenly he spoke softly: “Oh! She smiled at me! She’s calling me! But who are you, Madam? Yes, I’m on my way... Mother of God!” And with this exclamation, he expired...

             
 
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40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
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It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel


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Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

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Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

"The priests will be freed; the sick will be healed…"
 
Gietrzwald is in northern Poland. In 1877, when the country was divided between Russia, Prussia and Austria, the Virgin Mary appeared there to two children, Justyna Szafrynska and Barbara Samulowska, between June 27th and September 16th.   These apparitions occurred daily, at different times. One day the Virgin Mary said, in Polish: "I want you to recite the Rosary every day." On July 1st, she said: "I am the Blessed Virgin Mary Immaculate."

Many people joined the two girls over the following months. They asked the Virgin questions about imprisoned priests, missing people, and the freedom of Poland. Others asked her for the grace of healing, especially from alcoholism. The Virgin Mary’s reply was always: "Pray and recite the Rosary: priests will be released, the sick will be healed, and Poland will regain its independence through your prayers."

With Gietrzwald, the Poles acquired the sense of being reunited as one nation. On September 11, 1977, a hundred years after the apparitions, the local bishop officially recognized the authenticity of the apparitions, with the approval of the Holy See.


June 27 - Our Lady of Perpetual Help (1866) -- Saint Cyril of Alexandria (d. circa 444)
We Salute You, O Mary, Mother of God
We salute you, O Mary, Mother of God, treasure of the universe, inextinguishable flame, crown of virginity, sceptre of the true Faith, indestructible temple, and tabernacle of the One Whom the world cannot contain.
In your virginal womb you enclosed the Immense and Incomprehensible One. (...)It is through you that the only-begotten Son of God, Who is light, shone amid the nations who were seated in darkness and the shadow of death. What human voice can ever worthily celebrate the ineffable greatness of Mary? She is Mother and Virgin at the same time. Through her, peace has been restored to the world. What peace?
Our Lord Jesus Christ, Whom Mary has brought forth! 
Saint Cyril of Alexandria (c.376-444) At Council of Ephesus, Cyril favored Theotokos
title, Mary as God-bearer (431)

“‘Not a single rose is plucked from this world without thorns.’
The great Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli:
"We must bear our suffering with love, since suffering is the fruit of love
and in suffering we will find our strength!"

  Georgian martyr Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II 1918

St. Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, Priest (Optional Memorial)
Departure of Elisha, the Prophet a servant to the holy prophet Elijah raised son of the Shunammite woman from the dead. {Coptic}
1st v. Saint Joanna the Myrrh-bearer, wife of Chusa, household steward of King Herod (Luke 8:3 and 24:10) anoint the Holy Body of the Lord with myrrh after His death on the Cross, she heard from the angels the joyful proclamation of His All-Glorious Resurrection.
2nd v.  St. Crescens Bishop of Galatia martyr mentioned by St. Paul  into Galatia (2 Timothy 4:10)
 444 St. Cyril of Alexandria Bishop Doctor of the Church (June 27) "Seal of the Fathers" in the East
 473 St. Deodatus deacon to Saint Paulinus of Nola successor of Paulinus
 500 St. Samson Xenodochius "the Hospitable," priest a doctor, renowned figure of charity; Lord blessed the efforts of St Sampson and endowed him with the power of wonderworking  He healed the sick not only through being a skilled physician, but also as a bearer of the grace of God
1045 St. Emma a relative of Emperor St. Henry II raised at Henry's court by St. Cunegund gave liberally to the poor, founded several religious houses and a double monastery at Gurk,  Austria,
1095  King Ladislaus I of Hungary, He fought just and successful wars against Poles, Russians, and the Tartars (RM) renowned for his miracles even to this day
1232 Blessed Benvenuto of Gubbio uncouth soldier; endowed with supernatural gifts of a high order: these spread his fame far and wide;  many miracles; received into Franciscan order by Saint Francis
1611 Saint Serapion of Kozhe Lake brought to Moscow among Kazan Tatar captives in the year 1551; built two churches; in honor of the Holy Theophany, and in honor of St Nicholas. Patriarch Job
1794 B Madeleine Fontaine And Companions, Virgins Martyrs Sisters of Charity St Vincent de Paul convent of Arras
1918, Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II murdered in patriarchal residence at Martqopi Monastery;  a tireless researcher, with a broad range of scholarly interests. more than forty monographs on various themes relating to the history of the Georgian Church and Christian culture in Georgia. compiled short terminological dictionary of ancient Georgian language with linguist Grigol Qipshidze, History of Georgian Philology.

June 27 – Our Lady of Perpetual Help (1866) - Saint Cyril of Alexandria 
 
Our Lady of Perpetual Help He has spread worldwide
 
This June 27, 2015, the Redemptorists from around the world will commence celebrations of the 150th anniversary (1866) of the return of the image of Our Lady of Perpetual Help to the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Redemptorists) by Blessed Pope Pius IX, with the intention of making it known worldwide.

The celebrations, whose theme is "Mother of Perpetual Help, Icon of Love," will conclude on June 27, 2016. The icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Help came to Rome from Crete around 1500 AD. For nearly 300 years, it was displayed in the church of Saint Matthew in Rome and considered miraculous by the population. With the arrival of French troops in 1798, Saint Matthew’s church was destroyed, the icon carried to a private chapel of the Augustinian Fathers, and forgotten.

In 1855, the Redemptorists bought the land on which Saint Matthew’s stood, to build their General House. Remembering that in this place the miraculous image of Our Lady had been exposed, they searched for it and found it, and asked the Pope to put it back where it was before. This was done in 1866. Since then, the devotion to Our Lady of Perpetual Help has spread worldwide.
 
Fides Agency 04/13/2015


June 27 – Feast of the Sacred Heart – Our Lady of Colombo (Sri Lanka)
– The 160 apparitions of the Immaculate Queen of the Rosary to Justina Szafrynska and Barbara Samulowska (Gietrzwald, Poland, 1877, approved in 1977)
 
Taking the path that God himself chose to take
Miré Saralta comes from Chad and works in Canada in a health center. She was asked about her conversion by the Feu et Lumière Magazine:

F&L: Why did you choose to become a Catholic?
MS: I found peace and silence in the Catholic Church. During Eucharistic adoration you are alone, face to face with God and in communion with Him… And of course, there is the Virgin Mary! At first, she had no place in my life. I had a lot of questions, and asked her to help me understand why and how I should love her. Then I read a text explaining in essence that God, to become a man among us, went through the Virgin Mary.
This was a revelation to me! There's nothing more beautiful for us than to take a path that God himself chose to take. This is how my relationship with the Virgin Mary started.
 
Feu et Lumière Magazine # 338, May 2014  www.feuetlumière.org

 
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh,
was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Cyril insisted on two essential facts about Jesus--however difficult Christians might find it to hold them together:
(1) that Jesus was begotten by God the Father before all ages; and
(2) that Jesus was also begotten in the flesh of the Virgin Mary.
 
Tell the Truth Boldly, Urges Pontiff Reflects on Life of St. John the Baptist

Departure of Elisha, the Prophet a servant to the holy prophet Elijah raised son of the Shunammite woman from the dead. {Coptic}
1st v. Saint Joanna the Myrrh-bearer, wife of Chusa, household steward of King Herod (Luke 8:3 and 24:10) anoint the Holy Body of the Lord with myrrh after His death on the Cross, she heard from the angels the joyful proclamation of His All-Glorious Resurrection.
2nd v.  St. Crescens Bishop of Galatia martyr mentioned by St. Paul  into Galatia (2 Timothy 4:10)
 301 St. Zoilus Martyr of Spain at Cordoba
 303 St. Anectus Martyr probably martyred in Caesarea, in Palestine
 444 St. Cyril of Alexandria Bishop Doctor of the Church (June 27) "Seal of the Fathers" in the East
 473 St. Deodatus deacon to Saint Paulinus of Nola successor of Paulinus
 500 St. Samson Xenodochius "the Hospitable," priest a doctor, renowned figure of charity; Lord blessed the efforts of St Sampson and endowed him with the power of wonderworking  He healed the sick not only through being a skilled physician, but also as a bearer of the grace of God
Venerable George of Mt. Athos; brothers Sts. George the Scribe and Saba remained; with St. George the Recluse (the God-bearer) for 3 years translation of theological texts from the  Greek to the Georgian language
6th v. St. John of Chinon Hermit famed as prophet Many pilgrims were restored to health at his intercession
6th v. Saint Severus the Presbyter served in a church of the Most Holy Theotokos in the village of Interocleum in Central Italy; noted for his virtuous and God-pleasing life the dead man  came alive and related to everyone that the demons wanted to seize his soul, but one of the angels said, "Give him back, since the priest Severus weeps over him, and on account of his  tears the Lord has granted him this man."
 700 Saint Hadelin of Crespin, OSB Abbot (AC)
1045 St. Emma a relative of Emperor St. Henry II raised at Henry's court by St. Cunegund gave liberally to the poor, founded several religious houses and a double monastery at Gurk,  Austria, may have become a nun there
1066 St George Mtasmindeli, Abbot doctor of the Georgian (Iberian) Church
1066 St. Arialdus Martyr of Milan remains recovered ten months later uncorrupt and sweet smelling
1095  King Ladislaus I of Hungary, He fought just and successful wars against Poles, Russians, and the Tartars (RM) renowned for his miracles even to this day

1100 St. Laszlo son of King Bela of Hungary
1143 Blessed Eppo of Mallersdorf, OSB 2nd Abbot (AC)
1146 Saint Martin of Turov served as cook under the Turov bishops Simeon, Ignatius, Joachim (1144-1146), and George; Sts Boris and Gleb appeared to him, gave him a sip of water, and  miraculous healing him of his illness
1232 Blessed Benvenuto of Gubbio uncouth soldier; endowed with supernatural gifts of a high order: these spread his fame far and wide;  many miracles; received into Franciscan order by Saint Francis himself OFM (AC)
1250 St. Ferdinand of Aragon
13th v. Ferdinand of the Angels fifth bishop of Cajazzo B (AC)
1611 Saint Serapion of Kozhe Lake brought to Moscow among Kazan Tatar captives in the year 1551; built two churches; one in honor of the Holy Theophany, and the other in honor of St Nicholas. Patriarch Job
1654 Johann Valentin Andreä Er schrieb mehrere kleine Schriften in lateinischer Sprache, in denen er die Mißstände in der Christenheit anprangerte und ein wahres Christentum forderte.
1794 B Madeleine Fontaine And Companions, Virgins Martyrs Sisters of Charity St Vincent de Paul convent of Arras
1840 Bl. Thomas Toan Vietnamese native Martyr
Blessed Joseph Heiu (Hien, Yeun) a native Dominican priest of Annam (Vietnam), beheaded at Nam-Dinh, OP
1918, Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II was found murdered in the patriarchal residence at Martqopi Monastery;  Bishop Kirion was a tireless researcher, with a broad range of scholarly interests. To his pen belong more than forty monographs on various themes relating to the history of the Georgian Church and Christian culture in Georgia. He compiled a short terminological dictionary of the ancient Georgian language and, with the linguist Grigol Qipshidze, a History of Georgian Philology.
Mary the Mother of God


Departure of Elisha, the Prophet a servant to the holy prophet Elijah; raised son of the Shunammite woman from the dead. {Coptic}
On this day, of the year 3195 of the world, the holy prophet Elisha, departed. This prophet was born in one of the villages of Israel called Alamut. His father's name was Shaphat. Elisha was a servant to the holy prophet Elijah. When the Lord would take up Elijah the prophet into heaven, he went with him to the river Jordan. Elijah said to Elisha, "Ask what I shall do for you, before I be taken away from you." Elisha asked, "I pray you, let a double portion of your spirit be upon me," and it was as he asked. (2 Kings 2:1-18)
Elisha divided the river and passed through it. Then he went to Jericho and went up from there to Bethel; and as he was going up the road, some youths came from the city and mocked him, and said to him, "Go up, you baldhead! Go up, you baldhead!" So he turned around and looked at them, and pronounced a curse on them in the name of the LORD. And two female bears came out of the woods and mauled forty-two of the youths. (2 Kings 2:23-24)
A certain woman of the wives of the sons of the prophets cried out to Elisha, saying, "Your servant my husband is dead, and the creditor is coming to take my two sons to be his slaves." So Elisha said to her, "What shall I do for you? Tell me, what do you have in the house?" And she said, "Your maidservant has nothing in the house but a jar of oil." Then he said, "Go, borrow vessels from everywhere, from all your neighbors; empty vessels; do not gather just a few." With his prayers the Lord blessed the oil and all the vessels became full. The woman sold the oil and paid off her debt. (2 Kings 4:1-7) He also raised the son of the Shunammite woman from the dead.
When Naaman the Syrian came to him, he healed him from his leprosy. Naaman offered him much money and costly clothes, but he refused them. Nevertheless, when his servant Gehazi took them for himself, the prophet knew that by the spirit. Elisha became angry and told him, "Therefore the leprosy of Naaman shall cling to you and your descendants forever."
Elisha had performed many signs and miracles. He prophesied for about fifty years. When Elisha died, they buried him. And the raiding bands from Moab invaded the land in the spring of the year. So it was, as they were burying a man, a plundering band was seen, and they cast the man in the tomb of Elisha; and when the man was let down and touched the bones of Elisha, he revived, stood on his feet, and went back to his people. (2 Kings 13:20-21)  May his prayers be with us and Glory be to God forever. Amen.

1st v. Saint Joanna the Myrrh-bearer, wife of Chusa, the household steward of King Herod (Luke 8:3 and 24:10) anoint the Holy Body of the Lord with myrrh after His death on the Cross, and she heard from the angels the joyful proclamation of His All-Glorious Resurrection.
One of the women following and attending the Lord Jesus Christ during the time of His preaching and public ministry. She is mentioned in Luke 8:3 and 24:10. Together with the other Myrrh-bearing Women, St. Joanna went to the Sepulchre to anoint the Holy Body of the Lord with myrrh after His death on the Cross, and she heard from the angels the joyful proclamation of His All-Glorious Resurrection. According to Tradition, she recovered the head of St. John the Baptist after Herodias had disposed of it (February 24).
St. Joanna is also commemorated on the Sunday of the Myrrh-bearing Women.
2nd v.  St. Crescens Bishop of Galatia martyr mentioned by St. Paul into Galatia (2 Timothy 4:10)
In Galátia sancti Crescéntis, qui fuit beáti Pauli Apóstoli discípulus.  Hic, in Gállias tránsitum fáciens, verbo prædicatiónis multos ad fidem Christi convértit; regréssus vero ad gentem cui speciáliter datus erat Epíscopus, demum, sub Trajáno, cum Gálatas ipsos usque ad finem vitæ suæ in ópere Dómini confírmásset, martyrium consummávit.
    In Galatia, St. Crescens, disciple of the blessed apostle Paul.  In passing through Gaul he converted many to the Christian faith by his preaching.  Returning to the people for whom he had been especially made bishop, he confirmed the Galatians in the service of the Lord to the end of his life.  He finally completed his martyrdom under Trajan.

Orthodoxe Kirche: 30. Juli  Katholische Kirche: Crescens - 27. Juni   Katholische Kirche: Silas - 13. Juli    Andronikus siehe 17. Mai
He was appointed bishop of Galatia. He had an apostolate in France, founding the diocese of Mainz, Germany. Returning to the east, he was martyred in the persecution conducted by Emperor Trajan. There is some confusion about the actual identity of the individual or two individuals in this account
Crescens BM (RM) 2nd century; second feast day on December 29. Saint Crescens was a disciple of Saint Paul mentioned as having gone into Galatia (2 Timothy 4:10). He is said to have been appointed bishop of the Galatians. Tradition tells us about his apostolate in France and also that he founded the see of Mainz in Gaul (now Germany). The Roman Martyrology adds that he returned to the east and was martyred under Trajan. It is certain that the Crescens who was first bishop of Vienne and the Crescens who worked at Mainz were not the disciples of Saint Paul, though they were real saints (Benedictines).
Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus und Andronikus
Orthodoxe Kirche: 30. Juli  Katholische Kirche: Crescens - 27. Juni   Katholische Kirche: Silas - 13. Juli    Andronikus siehe 17. Mai
Crescens (Kreszens), ein Schüler des Apostels Paulus (2. Tim. 4, 10) wurde von diesem demnach nach Galatien gesandt. Gemeint ist aber möglicherweise Gallien. Crescens soll nach verschiedenen Legenden Bischof von Chankedon, Vienne und Mainz gewesen sein. Er soll auch nach Wien gekommen sein, wo er Zacharias als ersten Bischof einsetzte. Er starb unter Trajan (98-117) den Märtyrertod in Gallien.
In Mainz wird auch des Bischofs Crescens von Mainz am 27.06. gedacht. Dieser Bischof starb bei einem Germaneneinfall um 406 als Märtyrer.
Silas hat Paulus lange begleitet. Er wird mehrmals in der Apostelgeschichte erwähnt 15, 22 ff/16,12 ff/18,5). nach der Legende wurde Silas von Paulus zum Bischof von Korinth geweiht. Dort starb er auch.
Silvanus inst nach heutiger katholischer Auffassung mit Silas identisch. Er wird in dn beiden Thessalonicherbriefen erwähnt und war nach 1. Petr. 5, 12 an der Abfassung des Briefes beteiligt. Nach orthodoxer Überlieferung war Silvanus Bischof von Thessaloniki, wo er den Märtyrertod starb.

301 St. Zoilus Martyr of Spain at Cordoba with 19 companions
Córdubæ, in Hispánia, sanctórum Mártyrum Zóili, et aliórum decem et novem.
    At Cordova in Spain, St. Zoilus and nineteen other martyrs.

A young man from Spain executed at Cordoba under Emperor Diocletian (r. 284-305). His relics were enshrined, along with those of nineteen other martyrs, in the Benedictine monastery of San Zoil de Carrion, in Leon province of northem Spain.
Zoilus and Companions MM (RM) Zoilus was a youth martyred with 19 companions at Cordova, Spain, under Diocletian. The Benedictine abbey of San Zoil de Carrión, province of Leon, in northern Spain, was founded to enshrine their relics (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

Ss. Zoilus And His Companions, Martyrs:  In the Roman Martyrology for this day St Zoilus is commemorated together with nineteen other martyrs, his reputed companions. All are supposed to have perished at Cordova, in Spain, during the persecution of Diocletian. Nothing whatever is known about the rest, but Zoilus is said to have been the son of a local patrician, a Christian from infancy, and to have suffered martyrdom when he was still only a youth. A body identified as his was discovered in the reign of King Reccared, and a church dedicated in his honour was built to enshrine the relics. Shortly before 1083 the remains of St Zoilus and of St Acisclus were translated by Ferdinand, Count of Carrion, to the Benedictine abbey which his mother, Tarasia, had founded at Carrion.
Prudentius couples the two saints, Zoilus and Acisclus, in one of his poems. A point that has not escaped the notice of the critics is that the names of the first seven of the companions of St Zoilus appear, and in the same order, in the spurious acts of St Symphorosa, where they are assigned to the Tivoli martyr's seven sons.
The Bollandists in discussing this commemoration, Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. vii, do not print any passio, but quote various hymns, etc., found in Mozarabic liturgical sources. There are, however, two texts of the passio, which, though seemingly of little value, were published by Florez in his España Sagrada, vol. x, pp. 502-520. That Zoilus was an authentic martyr may fairly be presumed from the fact that Prudentius in the fifth century already regarded him as one of the glories of Cordova, and also from the insertion of his name in the Hieronymianum. See also Dom Ferotin, Le Liber Ordinum, pp. 468-469, and Le Liber Sacramentorum, pp. 373-377, and 824. On the finding of the relics, see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. Ivi (1938), pp. 361-369.
303 St. Anectus Martyr probably martyred in Caesarea, in Palestine
Cæsaréæ, in Palæstína, sancti Anécti Mártyris, qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, sub Urbáno Præside, cum álios ad martyrium hortátus esset et idóla oratióne sua prostrásset, a decem milítibus verberári jussus est; ac tandem, mánibus pedibúsque præcísis, truncátus cápite, martyrii corónam accépit.
    At Caesarea in Palestine, in the persecution of Diocletian, under the governor Urban, St. Anectus, martyr.  For having exhorted others to suffer martyrdom, and having overthrown idols by his prayers, he was scourged by ten soldiers, had his hands and feet cut off, and merited the crown of martyrdom by beheading.
Also called Anicetus. He was probably martyred in Caesarea, in Palestine, during the persecution conducted by Emperor Diocletian.
Anectus (Anicetus) M (RM). Baronius, who wrote the laus for the Roman Martyrology, places his martyrdom at Caesarea in Palestine under Diocletian; notes the Greek acta are vague (Benedictines).
The Holy Martyr Anektos of Caesarea was beheaded by the sword for his confession of faith in Christ during the persecution by Diocletian (284-305).

444 St. Cyril of Alexandria Bishop Doctor of the Church (June 27) "Seal of the Fathers" in the East; feast day formerly on January 28 and February 9.
Orthodoxe Kirche: 18. Januar und 9. Juni   Katholische und Anglikanische Kirche: 27. Juni
444 ST CYRIL, ARCHBISHOP OF ALEXANDRIA, DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH
ST CYRIL has been called the Doctor of the Incarnation, as St Augustine was styled the Doctor of Divine Grace: in the great intercession of the Syrian and Maronite Mass he is commemorated as "a tower of truth and interpreter of the Word of God made flesh". Throughout his life he made it a rule never to advance any doctrine which he had not learnt from the ancient fathers, but his books against Julian the Apostate show that he had also read the profane writers. He often said himself that he neglected human eloquence, and it is certainly to be regretted that he did not cultivate a clearer style and write purer Greek.
   Upon the death of his uncle Theophilus in 412, he was raised to the see of Alexandria. He began to exert his authority by causing the churches of the Novatians to be closed and their sacred vessels to be seized-an action condemned by the church historian Socrates, but we do not know his reasons and the grounds upon which he acted. He next drove out the Jews, who were numerous and who had enjoyed privileges in the city since the time of Alexander the Great. Their generally seditious attitude and several acts of violence committed by them decided him to take this step, which incensed Orestes the governor, although it was approved by the Emperor Theodosius.
This unhappy disagreement with Orestes led to grievous results. Hypatia, a pagan woman of noble character, was the most influential teacher of philosophy at that time in Alexandria, and her reputation was so great that disciples flocked to her from all parts. Among these was the great Bishop Synesius, who submitted his works to her criticism. She was much respected by the governor, who used to consult her even on matters of civil administration. Nowhere was the populace more unruly or more prone to lawless acts of violence than in Alexandria. Acting upon a suspicion that Hypatia had incensed the governor against their bishop, the mob in 417 attacked her in the streets, pulled her out of her chariot, and tore her body in pieces-to the great grief and scandal of all good men, and especially, it may be believed, of St Cyril.
   Only one other fact is known to us concerning this earlier period of his episcopate. He had imbibed certain prejudices against St John Chrysostom, having been with Theophilus at the Synod of The Oak; Cyril had something of his uncle's obstinacy, and it was no easy matter to induce him to insert Chrysostom's name in the diptychs of the Alexandrian church.


In the year 428 Nestorius, a priest-monk of Antioch, was made archbishop of Constantinople; and he there taught with some of his clergy that there were two distinct persons in Christ, that of God and that of man, joined only by a moral union whereby, according to them, the Godhead dwelt in the manhood merely as its temple. Consequently he denied the Incarnation, that God was made man. He also said that the Blessed Virgin ought not to be styled the mother of God, but only of the man Christ, whose humanity was but the temple of the divinity and not a nature hypostatically assumed by the divine Person. His homilies gave great offence, and protests arose from all sides against the errors they contained. St Cyril sent him a mild expostulation, but was answered with haughtiness and contempt. Both parties appealed to Pope St Celestine I who, after examining the doctrine in a council at Rome, condemned it and pronounced a sentence of excommunication and deposition against Nestorius unless, within ten days of receiving notice of the sentence, he publicly retracted his errors. St Cyril, who was appointed to see the sentence carried out, sent Nestorius, with his third and last summons, twelve propositions with anathemas to be signed by him as a proof of his orthodoxy. Nestorius, however, showed himself more obstinate than ever. [It is debatable whether Nestorius in fact held all the opinions attributed to him; in any case he was hardly the originator of the heresy that bears his name.]
This occasioned the summoning of the third general council which was held at Ephesus in 431, attended by two hundred bishops with St Cyril at their head as senior bishop and Pope Celestine's representative. Nestorius was present in the town, but refused to appear; so after his sermons had been read and other evidence received against him, his doctrines were condemned, and a sentence of excommunication and deposition was pronounced. Six days later there arrived at Ephesus Archbishop John of Antioch, with forty-one bishops who had not been able to reach Ephesus in time. They were in favour of Nestorius, although they did not share his errors, of which indeed they deemed him innocent. Instead of associating themselves with the council, they assembled by themselves and presumed to depose St Cyril, accusing him in turn of heresy. Both sides appealed to the emperor, by whose order St Cyril and Nestorius were both arrested and kept in confinement. When three legates arrived from Pope Celestine, the matter took another turn. After a careful consideration of what had been done, the legates confirmed the condemnation of Nestorius, approved Cyril's conduct, and declared the sentence pronounced against him null and void. Thus he was vindicated with honour and, though the bishops of the Antiochene province continued their schism for a while, they made peace with St Cyril in 433, when they condemned Nestorius and gave a clear and orthodox declaration of their own faith. Nestorius retired to his old monastery at Antioch, but later was exiled to the Egyptian desert.
     St Cyril, who had thus triumphed over heresy by his intrepidity and courage, spent the rest of his life in maintaining the faith of the Church and in the labours of his see, until his death in 444. The Alexandrians gave him the title of Teacher of the World, whilst Pope Celestine described him as "the generous defender of the Catholic faith" and "an apostolic man". He was a man of strong and impulsive character, brave but sometimes over-vehement, indeed violent. Abbot Chapman has suggested that more patience and diplomacy on his part might have prevented the rise of the Nestorian Church which was for so long a power in the East. But we have to thank him for the firm and uncompromising stand he took with regard to the dogma of the Incarnation-an attitude which led to the clear statements of the great council over which he presided.
Although since his day Nestorianism and Pelagianism have, from time to time and under different names, tried to rear their heads in various quarters of the world, they have never again been a real menace to the Catholic Church as a whole. We ought indeed to be grateful that we, in our generation, are left in no doubt as to what we should believe with regard to that holy mystery upon which we base our faith as Christians. He was declared a doctor of the Universal Church in 1882, and at the fifteenth centenary of his death in 1944 Pope Pius XII issued an encyclical letter, "Orientalis ecclesiae", on "this light of Christian wisdom and valiant hero of the apostolate ".

   The great devotion of this saint to the Blessed Sacrament is manifest from the frequency with which he emphasizes the effects it produces upon those who receive it worthily. Indeed, he says that by holy communion we are made concorporeal with Christ. And it must surely be difficult for those who profess to hold the same faith as that defined in the first six general councils to shut their eyes to the vigour and conviction with which St Cyril before the year 431 affirmed his eucharistic doctrine. In a letter to Nestorius, which received the general and formal assent of the fathers at Ephesus, he had written:
Proclaiming the death according to the flesh of the only begotten Son of God, that is, Jesus Christ, and confessing His resurrection from the dead and ascent into Heaven, we celebrate the bloodless sacrifice in our churches; and thus approach the mystic blessings, and are sanctified by partaking of the holy flesh and the precious blood of Christ the Saviour of us all. And we receive it, not as common flesh (God forbid), nor as the flesh of a man sanctified and associated with the Word according to the unity of merit, or as having a divine indwelling, but as really the life-giving and very flesh of the Word Himself (Migne, PG., lxxvii, 113).
And he wrote to Calosyrius, Bishop of Arsinoe:
I hear that they say that the sacramental consecration does not avail for hallowing if a portion of it be kept to another day. In saying so they are crazy. For Christ is not altered, nor will His holy body be changed; but the power of the consecration and the life-giving grace still remain in it (Migne, PG., lxxvi, 1073).
Our knowledge of St Cyril is derived principally from his own writings and from the church historians Socrates, Sozomen and Theodoret. The view of his life and work presented by Butler is the traditional view, and we are not here directly concerned with the discussions which, owing mainly to the discovery of the work known as The Bazaar of Heracleides, have since been devoted to the character of Nestorius and his teaching. The literature connected with St Cyril is very copious. A sufficient account will be found in the two articles in DTC., "Cyrille d'Alexandrie" and "Ephèse, Concile de"-as well as in Bardenhewer's Patrology. See also Duchesne, Histoire ancienne de l’Église, vol. iii (Eng. trans.); Abbot Chapman in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. iv, pp. 592-595; and A. Fortescue, The Greek Fathers (1908).

Cyril was born at Alexandria, Egypt. He was nephew of the patriarch of that city, Theophilus. Cyril received a classical and theological education at Alexandria and was ordained by his uncle. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople in 403 and was present at the Synod of the Oak that deposed John Chrysostom, whom he believed guilty of the charges against him. He succeeded his uncle Theophilus as patriarch of Alexandria on Theophilus' death in 412, but only after a riot between Cyril's supporters and the followers of his rival Timotheus.
Cyril at once began a series of attacks against the Novatians, whose churches he closed; the Jews, whom he drove from the city; and governor Orestes, with whom he disagreed about some of his actions. In 430 Cyril became embroiled with Nestorius, patriarch of Constantinople, who was preaching that Mary was not the Mother of God since Christ was Divine and not human, and consequently she should not have the word theotokos (God-bearer)

Celestine directed Cyril to depose Nestorius, and in 431, Cyril presided over the third General Council at Ephesus, attended by some two hundred bishops, which condemned all the tenets of Nestorius and his followers before the arrival of Archbishop John of Antioch and forty-two followers who believed Nestorius was innocent. When they found what had been done, they held a council of their own and deposed Cyril. Emperor Theodosius II arrested both Cyril and Nestorius but released Cyril on the arrival of Papal Legates who confirmed the council's actions against Nestorius and declared Cyril innocent of all charges.
Two years later, Archbishop John, representing the moderate Antiochene bishops, and Cyril reached an agreement and joined in the condemnation, and Nestorius was forced into exile. During the rest of his life, Cyril wrote treatises that clarified the doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation and that helped prevent Nestorianism and Pelagianism from taking long-term deep root in the Christian community.

He was the most brilliant theologian of the Alexandrian tradition. His writings are characterized by accurate thinking, precise exposition, and great reasoning skills. Among his writings are commentaries on John, Luke, and the Pentateuch, treatises on dogmatic theology, and Apologia against Julian the Apostate, and letters and sermons. applied to her. He persuaded Pope Celestine I to convoke a synod at Rome, which condemned Nestorius, and then did the same at his own synod in Alexandria.
He was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII in 1882.

Cyril of Alexandria B, Doctor (RM) Born in Alexandria, Egypt, c. 376-80; died there 444; named "Doctor of the Incarnation" by Pope Leo XIII in 1882; known as the "Seal of the Fathers" in the East; feast day formerly on January 28 and February 9.    "Hail, Mother and Virgin, imperishable temple of the Godhead, venerable treasure of the whole world, crown of virginity, support of the true faith on which the Church is founded throughout the whole world.    "Mother of God, who contained the infinite God under your heart, whom no space can contain: Through you the Most Holy Trinity is adored and glorified, demons are vanquished, satan cast down from heaven and into hell, and our fallen nature again assumed into heaven.
    "Through you the human race, held captive in the bonds of idolatry, arrives at the knowledge of the truth. What more shall I say of you? Hail, through whom kings rule, through whom the only-begotten Son of God has become a star of light to those who were sitting in darkness and in the shadow of death. Amen.    "All of us are united with Christ inasmuch as we have received Him who is one and indivisible in our bodies. Therefore we owe the service of our members to Him rather than to ourselves."
--Saint Cyril of Alexandria.
Bishop Cyril of Alexandria was severe, authoritarian, and violent in an age of the same. Though he had read the profane writers during his classical and theological studies, he made it a rule never to advance any doctrine that he had not learned from the ancient fathers. Although his writing revealed great precision of thought, he often said that he regretted that he did not use a clearer style and write purer Greek.
He was ordained by his uncle Patriarch Theophilus of Alexandria, whom he accompanied to Constantinople in 403. He was present at the Synod of Oak during which Theophilus engineered the deposition of Saint John Chrysostom's, patriarch of Constantinople, whom he himself believed to be guilty. After his uncle's death in 412, he was raised to the see of Alexandria following a riot between Cyril's supporters and those of his rival Timotheus.
He immediately moved to close the churches of the Novatians and have their sacred vessels seized. He drove out the Jews and stirred up the monks. Cyril then attacked the Neoplatonists, angering the imperial prefect, Orestes, although his actions were approved by Emperor Theodosius. This disagreement had a tragic outcome.
Hypatia, a pagan woman, was the most influential teacher of Neoplatonic philosophy in Alexandria. Disciples flocked to her from everywhere. Acting upon the belief that Hypatia had turned the governor against Cyril, a mob attacked her in her chariot, dragged her into the street, and tore her body to pieces. It has never been established that Cyril was directly concerned with the crime, but it was the work of those who looked to him as their leader.
In 428, Nestorius, a priest-monk of Antioch, was made archbishop Constantinople. He taught the clergy that there were two distinct persons in Christ: that of God and that of man, joined only by a moral union. He also held that Mary was not the Mother of God since Christ was divine and not human, and thus should not be called Theotokos, or God-bearer.
In 430, Cyril sent him a mild expostulation explaining that such a division made it impossible to be certain that Jesus preached the truth about God the Father. Nestorius answered rudely. Both appealed to Pope Saint Celestine I, who condemned the Nestorian doctrine and excommunicated Nestorius unless he were to publicly retract his position within ten days of receiving the sentence.
Cyril was appointed to see the sentence fulfilled, and sent Nestorius his third and last summons--
twelve anathemas to be signed by him as proof of his orthodoxy.
Nestorius held fast, and Cyril, who enjoyed conflict, persuaded the pope to summon the third general council at Ephesus in 431. Cyril presided over the council attended by 200 bishops. Nestorius was present in town but would not appear. His sermons were read, and condemned, and a sentence of excommunication and deposition were read.

Six days later, archbishop John of Antioch arrived with 42 bishops who had been unable to reach the meeting in time. They supported Nestorius, although they did not follow his practice. Instead of meeting with the council, they met together and presumed to depose Cyril, accusing him of heresy. Both sides appealed to the emperor, and he ordered Cyril and Nestorius to be arrested. When three legates from Pope Celestine arrived, they confirmed the council's condemnation of Nestorius, approved Cyril's conduct, and invalidated the sentence against him.
In the years after the council, Cyril was moderate and conciliatory in seeking reconciliation with the less extreme Nestorians, perhaps surprisingly so for a man of his character. Two years later Patriarch John, representing the moderate Antiochene bishops, and Cyril reached an agreement and joined in the condemnation of Nestorius, who was forced into exile.

Monophysite Copts, Syrians, and Ethiopians venerate Cyril as their chief teacher because,
in stressing the truth of Christ's divinity.

Cyril uses a terminology that sometimes appears to favor Monophysitism (that Christ had only one nature). Cyril wrote treatises that clarified doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation, and thus prevented Nestorianism and Pelagianism from taking root in the Christian community.
Cyril insisted on two essential facts about Jesus--however difficult Christians might find it to hold them together:
(1) that Jesus was begotten by God the Father before all ages; and
(2) that Jesus was also begotten in the flesh of the Virgin Mary.

He is considered the most brilliant theologian of Alexandrian tradition, although his stubborn rejection and occasional misinterpretation of his opponents' beliefs have been criticized by scholars. Nevertheless, it is as a theologian rather than a bishop that his memory is held in honor.
His writings are characterized by accurate thinking, precise exposition, and great reasoning skill. Among his writings are commentaries on John, Luke, and the Pentateuch, treatises on dogmatic theology, an apologia against Julian the Apostate, and letters, including one on hymns, and sermons (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney,22 Encyclopedia, White).
Saint Cyril will be recognized as an old, bearded bishop in the vestments of the Eastern Church with a book, pointing towards heaven. He may have the Virgin and Child appearing before him (Roeder). When represented with the other Greek fathers, such as in this Greek icon with Saint Athanasius, he is generally distinguished by name (White).

June 27, 2010 St. Cyril of Alexandria (376?-444) 
Saints are not born with halos around their heads. Cyril, recognized as a great teacher of the Church, began his career as archbishop of Alexandria, Egypt, with impulsive, often violent, actions. He pillaged and closed the churches of the Novatian heretics, participated in the deposing of St. John Chrysostom and confiscated Jewish property, expelling the Jews from Alexandria in retaliation for their attacks on Christians.
Cyril’s importance for theology and Church history lies in his championing the cause of orthodoxy against the heresy of Nestorius.
The controversy centered around the two natures in Christ. Nestorius would not agree to the title “God-bearer” for Mary. He preferred “Christ-bearer,” saying there are two distinct persons in Christ (divine and human) joined only by a moral union. He said Mary was not the mother of God but only of the man Christ, whose humanity was only a temple of God. Nestorianism implied that the humanity of Christ was a mere disguise.
Presiding as the pope’s representative at the Council of Ephesus (431), Cyril condemned Nestorianism and proclaimed Mary truly the “God-bearer” (the mother of the one Person who is truly God and truly human). In the confusion that followed, Cyril was deposed and imprisoned for three months, after which he was welcomed back to Alexandria as a second Athanasius (the champion against Arianism).
Besides needing to soften some of his opposition to those who had sided with Nestorius, Cyril had difficulties with some of his own allies, who thought he had gone too far, sacrificing not only language but orthodoxy. Until his death, his policy of moderation kept his extreme partisans under control. On his deathbed, despite pressure, he refused to condemn the teacher of Nestorius.
Comment: Lives of the saints are valuable not only for the virtue they reveal but also for the less admirable qualities that also appear. Holiness is a gift of God to us as human beings. Life is a process. We respond to God's gift, but sometimes with a lot of zigzagging. If Cyril had been more patient and diplomatic, the Nestorian Church might not have risen and maintained power so long. But even saints must grow out of immaturity, narrowness and selfishness. It is because they—and we—do grow, that we are truly saints, persons who live the life of God.
Quote: Cyril's theme: "Only if it is one and the same Christ who is consubstantial with the Father and with men can he save us, for the meeting ground between God and man is the flesh of Christ. Only if this is God's own flesh can man come into contact with Christ's divinity through his humanity. Because of our kinship with the Word made flesh we are sons of God. The Eucharist consummates our kinship with the word, our communion with the Father, our sharing in the divine nature—there is very real contact between our body and that of the Word" (New Catholic Encyclopedia).
Cyrill von Alexandria
Orthodoxe Kirche: 18. Januar und 9. Juni   Katholische und Anglikanische Kirche: 27. Juni
Cyrill wurde um 380 in Alexandria geboren. Er lebte sechs Jahre in einem Kloster, bevor er 412 zum Patriarchen von Alexandria gewählt wurde. Seine theologischen Schriften und Bibelauslegungen sind von hohem Wert. Er wandte sich mit aller Schärfe gegen alle, die nicht seiner Theologie folgten. So verurteilte er nicht nur in seinen Schriften und auf dem Konzil die Arianer und Nestorianer. Er ließ mehrere Kirchen plündern und zerstören und inszenierte 414 ein Judenpogrom in Alexandria, durch das die jüdische Gemeinde vernichtet wurde. 415 wurde auf seine Veranlassung die Universität gestürmt und dabei die bekannte Mathematikerin und Philosophin Hypatia ermordet.
Nachdem der Streit zwischen den Patriarchen Cyrill und Nestor von Konstantinopel um die Natur Christi eskalierte (an der Frage, ob Maria die Gottesgebärerin oder die Mutter Jesu sei). berief der Kaiser 431 das Konzil zu Ephesus ein. Cyrill und seine Anhänger trafen früher ein als die Gegenseite und exkommunizierten Nestor und seine Anhänger. Nachdem die Nestorianer ihrerseits auf einem Gegenkonzil Cyrill und seine Anhänger exkommunizierten, erklärte der Kaiser beide Beschlüsse für gültig (da er ja nur ein Konzil einberufen hatte) und ließ Nestor und Cyrill und ihre exkommunizierten Anhänger einkerkern. Nestor gab den Kampf auf und zog sich in ein Kloster zurück. Cyrill erreichte in der Folgezeit die weitgehende Anerkennung der Zwei-Naturen-Lehre. Er starb am 27.6.444 in Alexandria. Die Katholische Kirche erklärte ihn 1882 zum Kirchenlehrer.
473 St. Deodatus deacon to Saint Paulinus of Nola successor of Paulinus
A bishop of Nola, in Italy. He was the successor of St. Paulinus. His relics were translated to Benevento in 839.
Deodatus of Nola B (AC) Saint Deodatus was a deacon to Saint Paulinus of Nola, and his successor in that see. His relics were brought to Benevento in 839 (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

500 St. Samson Xenodochius "the Hospitable," priest a doctor and renowned figure of charity Lord blessed the efforts of St Sampson and endowed him with the power of wonderworking. He healed the sick not only through being a skilled physician, but also as a bearer of the grace of God
Constantinópoli sancti Sampsónis Presbyteri, páuperum exceptóris.
    At Constantinople, St. Sampson, a priest, who harboured the poor.


Also called Samson Xenodochius "the Hospitable," a doctor and renowned figure of charity. A physician in Constantinople (modern Istanbul), he also became a priest in order to tend to both the physical and spiritual welfare of his patients. Samson also founded a well known hospital near the Hagia Sophia, in Constantinople. He was revered as "the Father of the Poor."
Samson (Sampson) Xenodochius (RM) (also known as Samson or Sampson the Hospitable) Samson was a distinguished citizen of Constantinople who studied medicine and was ordained priest in order to devote his life to the spiritual and physical care of the sick and destitute.
He founded and equipped a magnificent hospital near Santa Sophia (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
Saint Sampson the Hospitable was the son of rich and illustrious Roman parents. In his youth he received an excellent education, he studied the medical arts, and doctored the sick without charge. After the death of his parents St Sampson generously distributed alms and set his slaves free, preparing himself to go into the wilderness.  With this intent in mind he soon journeyed from Rome to the East. But the Lord directed him onto a different path, that of service to neighbor, and so St Sampson came to Constantinople.
Settling into a small house, the saint began to take in homeless wanderers, the poor and the sick, and he attended to them. The Lord blessed the efforts of St Sampson and endowed him with the power of wonderworking. He healed the sick not only through being a skilled physician, but also as a bearer of the grace of God. News of St Sampson spread abroad. The patriarch heard of his great virtue and ordained him to the holy priesthood.

It was revealed to the grievously ill Emperor Justinian (527-565), that he could receive healing only through St Sampson. In praying, the saint put his hand on the afflicted area, and Justinian was healed. In gratitude the emperor wanted to reward his healer with silver and gold, but the saint refused and instead asked Justinian to build a home for the poor and the sick. The emperor readily fulfilled his request.

St Sampson devoted the rest of his life to serving his neighbor. He survived into old age and after a short illness he departed peacefully to the Lord. The saint was buried at the church of the holy Martyr Mocius, and many healings were effected at his grave. His hospice remained open, and the saint did not cease to care for the suffering. He appeared twice to a negligent worker of the hospice and upbraided him for his laziness. At the request of an admirer of St Sampson the hospice was transformed into a church, and beside it a new edifice was built for the homeless. During the time of a powerful fire at Constantinople the flames did not touch the hospice of St Sampson. Through his intercession a heavy rain quenched the fire.

St Samson Of Constantinople
AT some time during the fifth century, probably about the middle, a rich and philanthropic man named Samson founded at his own expense a great hospital for the sick poor in Constantinople. He is said to have been a physician as well as a priest, and to have ministered himself to those who suffered either in body or in soul. The hospital was called by his name. Honoured during his life as "the hospitable" and" father of the poor", he was venerated as a saint after his death. In the sixth century his hospital, which had been burnt to the ground some nfty years before, was rebuilt by the Emperor Justinian.
At a later period, with sublime indifference to the exigencies of chronology, an attempt was made to connect the two founders. St Samson was represented as having miraculously cured Justinian of an otherwise deadly disease, and as having persuaded him, when he was building the Holy Wisdom church, to erect at the same time a hospital for the poor. It was the only reward which the grateful emperor could induce him to accept. As a matter of fact, St Samson died before 500, and it was not until 527 that Justinian ascended the throne.
A sufficient account, which includes the Greek text of a detailed biography attributed to the Metaphrast, will be found in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. vii. See also the Synaxary of Constantinople (ed. Delehaye), cc. 773-776; Samson is here stated to have been a Roman by birth, and a relative of the Emperor Constantine. His name was added to the Roman Martyrology by Baronius.
St Sampson the Hospitable (June 27)  SerbianOrthodoxChurch.net
This saint was born of rich and eminent parents in ancient Rome, where he studied all the secular wisdom of that time, devoting him-self in particular to the study of medicine. Sampson was a compassionate and liberal physician, and gave the sick medicine for both soul and body, counselling each man to fulfil the requirements of the Christian faith. He moved to Constantinople, where he lived in a tiny house from which he distributed alms, comfort, advice, hope, medicine and all possible aid to those suffering in spirit and in body. The Patriarch heard of Sampson's great virtue and ordained him priest. At that time the Emperor Justinian the Great became ill with what his doctors believed to be an incurable disease. The Emperor prayed with great fervour, and God revealed to him in his sleep that Sampson would heal him. When the Emperor summoned Sampson to court, the old man had only to put his hand on the diseased place and the Emperor was healed. When Justinian offered him an immense sum of money, Sampson thanked him but would accept nothing, saying to the Emperor: `O Emperor, I had silver and gold and other riches, but I left it all for the sake of Christ, that I might gain heavenly and eternal wealth.' When the Emperor insisted on doing something for him, Sampson asked him to build a home for the poor. In that home, Sampson cared for the poor as a father cares for his children. His compassion for the poor and weak was second nature to him. This holy man, filled with heavenly power and goodness, entered peacefully into rest on June 27th, 530. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Martyr Mocius, his kinsman. After his death, Sampson appeared many times to those who called upon him for aid.
6th v. Saint Severus the Presbyter served in a church of the Most Holy Theotokos in the village of Interocleum in Central Italy; noted for his virtuous and God-pleasing life the dead man came alive and related to everyone that the demons wanted to seize his soul, but one of the angels said, "Give him back, since the priest Severus weeps over him, and on account of his tears the Lord has granted him this man."

One time, when the saint was working in his garden, cutting grapes in the vineyard, they summoned him to administer the Holy Mysteries for the dying. St Severus said: "Go back, and I'll catch up with you soon."
There remained only but a few more grapes to cut off, and St Severus dallied for awhile in the garden to finish the work. When he arrived at the sick person's home, they told him that the person was already dead. St Severus, regarding himself as guilty in the death of a man without absolution, started to tremble and loudly he began to weep. He went into the house where the deceased lay.

With loud groans and calling himself a murderer, in tears he fell down before the dead person. Suddenly the dead man came alive and related to everyone that the demons wanted to seize his soul, but one of the angels said, "Give him back, since the priest Severus weeps over him, and on account of his tears the Lord has granted him this man." St Severus, giving thanks to the Lord, confessed and communed the resurrected man with the Holy Mysteries. That man survived for another seven days, then joyfully went to the Lord.

Venerable George of Mt. Athos; brothers Sts. George the Scribe and Saba remained with St. George the Recluse (the God-bearer) for 3 years translation of theological texts from the Greek to the Georgian language
Saint George’s family had its roots in the region of Samtskhe in southern Georgia. George was born in Trialeti to the pious Jacob and Mariam.

When George reached the age of seven, the God-fearing and wise Abbess Sabiana of Tadzrisi Monastery in Samtskhe took him under her care. George spent three years at Tadzrisi, and when he was ten his father sent him to Khakhuli Monastery, to his own brothers Sts. George the Scribe and Saba.

Soon after, Prince Peris Jojikisdze of Trialeti invited George’s uncle, George the Scribe, to stay with him, and George’s uncle took his young nephew with him. But the Byzantine emperor Basil II subsequently summoned Peris and his family to Constantinople, accused him of conspiring against the throne, and had him beheaded. (At that time Trialeti was under the jurisdiction of Byzantium.) Peris’ faithful wife remained in Constantinople for twelve years and sent the young George to study with the finest philosophers and rhetoricians of that time.
Eventually Emperor Basil was moved with compassion for the prince’s family and permitted them to return to Georgia. The twenty-five-year-old George returned to Khakhuli Monastery and “bowed his neck to the sweet yoke of monastic life.”

Later George secretly left the monastery and, clad in beggars’ rags, journeyed to Jerusalem. After enduring many deprivations and overcoming a great number of obstacles, he reached the Black Mountains near Antioch and, after venerating the holy places and visiting several elders, began to search for a spiritual father and guide. He found the great Georgian elder St. George the Recluse (the God-bearer) in an isolated cave and remained there with him for three years.  St. George the Recluse tonsured his disciple, “who had reached perfection of age, wisdom and understanding,” into the great schema and sent him to Jerusalem on a pilgrimage. According to his teacher’s counsel, George then moved from Jerusalem to the Iveron Monastery on Mt. Athos to continue the work of St. Ekvtime—the translation of theological texts from the Greek to the Georgian language. George considered himself unworthy and unqualified to continue St. Ekvtime’s great work, but St. George the Recluse was insistent, so he set off for the Holy Mountain in humble obedience.
The monks of the Iveron Monastery received St. George with great joy. But instead of translating the patristic texts as his spiritual father had advised him, George soon grew slothful and for seven years performed only the work of a novice. When St. George the Recluse heard this, he sent his disciple Tevdore to Mt. Athos to rebuke him and remind him of the reason he had been sent there. Finally George of the Holy Mountain obeyed the will of his teacher, and soon he was enthroned as abbot of the monastery.  From that time on St. George of the Holy Mountain pursued his work with great earnestness. He gathered information on Sts. Ekvtime and John, compiled their Lives, translated their holy relics to ornate burial vaults covered in precious jewels, and enhanced the life of the monastery in many other ways.

During a visit to the Byzantine emperor Constantine Monomachus, the Georgian king Bagrat IV Kuropalates offered George the opportunity to return to Georgia to be consecrated bishop of Chqondidi and serve as his own spiritual adviser. But George declined, having already been drawn far from the vanity of the world.
Leadership of the monastery was demanding, and George was forced to choose between his literary work and the life of the monastery.  He resigned as abbot and returned to St. George the Recluse for counsel. But his teacher blessed him to return to the Iveron Monastery, so George set off again for Mt. Athos. 
The God-fearing king Bagrat IV Kuropalates continued to ask St. George to return to Georgia, and he finally consented to the will of the king and the catholicos. In accordance with their request, the pious father instituted general guidelines for the qualifications and conduct of the clergy and wisely administered the affairs of the Church. Five years later St. George returned to the Iveron Monastery. Before he departed, King Bagrat bestowed upon him much of his own wealth and saw him off with great respect.

Departing for Mt. Athos, Blessed George took with him eighty orphans. En route he stopped in Constantinople, and sensing that the day of his repose was near, he arranged for the orphans to be received in the emperor’s court. He personally requested that the emperor make provision for the orphaned children.
Venerable George of the Holy Mountain reposed peacefully the next day, the Feast of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul.
His Athonite brothers buried him on the monastery grounds with great reverence.
6th v. St. John of Chinon Hermit famed as prophet Many pilgrims were restored to health at his intercession
In castro Cainóne, in Gállia, sancti Joánnis, Presbyteri et Confessóris.
   In the town of Chinon in France, St. John, priest and confessor.

He was a native of Brittany who became a recluse at Chinon, Touraine, France. He also served as the spiritual director of Queen St. Radegund of Neustria, who became a nun after her husband murdered her brother.
John of Chinon, Hermit (RM)Born in Brittany; 6th century. Saint Gregory of Tours tells us that Saint John became a hermit at Chinon (or Caion) in Touraine, there he confined himself to a little cell and oratory near the church. He attempted to withdrew from superfluous commerce with others, preferring to tend his orchard, including some laurels under which he would sit to read or write. He was the spiritual adviser of Queen Saint Radegund. He was interred at his cell after his death. Many pilgrims were restored to health at his intercession (Benedictines, Husenbeth).

St John Of Chinon
WHEN Clotaire I was king of Neustria, there was living not far from Chinon a holy hermit of the name of John. He was a stranger, a native of Brittany, of whose antecedents nothing was known. Attached to his cell was a little garden, and he would often sit reading or writing under the shelter of some laurels he had planted. Although he led a life of retirement, yet he acquired a great reputation as a healer and a seer. One day there came to him a messenger from St Radegund, bringing him a present and asking for his hair-shirt and his prayers. She was then in a state of deep anxiety because she believed that King Clotaire, her brutal husband, was about to drag her from her retreat. After a whole night spent in prayer, the solitary was able the following morning to send back a reassuring message: he said that she might set her mind at ease, for she had nothing to fear from Clotaire. St John died a holy death, and was buried in his oratory near the church of St Maximus.

This recluse, who is also known in France as St Jean du Moustier (Monasterii), or Jean de Tours, is commemorated on this day in the Roman Martyrology, in which his name was inserted by Baronius. The Bollandists, however, in the Acta Sanctorum, treat of him on May 5. We know little more than what is to be found in Gregory of Tours, De gloria confessorum, ch. xxiii.
700 Saint Hadelin of Crespin, OSB Abbot (AC)
Saint Landelin appointed his monk, Saint Crespin, as abbot of Crespin in Hainault (Benedictines).

1045 St. Emma a relative of Emperor St. Henry II raised at Henry's court by St. Cunegund gave liberally to the poor, founded several religious houses and a double monastery at Gurk, Austria, may have become a nun there
Orthodoxe und Katholische Kirche: 27. Juni
Emma was a relative of Emperor St. Henry II and also known as Hemma. She was raised at Henry's court by St. Cunegund, and according to legend was married to Landgrave William of Friesach. Their two children were murdered during an uprising of mines owned by William. Grief-stricken, he made a pilgrimmage to Rome and died on the way back. Emma then decided to devote her life to God. She gave liberally to the poor, founded several religious houses and a double monastery at Gurk, Austria, may have become a nun there.
   Despite the above legend, scholars believe she was of the Friesach family rather than William and that her son was killed in a battle twenty years after the death of her husband, Count William of Sanngan, about the year 1015, and it was at this time that she began her foundations. Her cult was confirmed in 1938.


Emma von Gurk
Hemma (Emma, althochdeutsch Schützerin) wurde um 980 in Kärnten geboren. Sie war mit Heinrich II. verwandt und wurde am Königshof erzogen. Ihr ehemann starb sehr früh (vor 1016) und ihr Sohn wurde 1036 ermordet. Emma unterstützte die Armen und schenkte ihren Grundbesitz an zahlreiche geistliche Stiftungen, besonders für die Benediktinerstifte Admont und Gurk. Sie starb am 29.6.1045 und wurde im Volk nach ihrem Tod sehr verehrt. Das Benediktinerinnenstift Gurk wurde 1072 Residenz der Bischöfe von Kärnten. Hemma ist Patronin der Diözese Gurk-Klagenfurt. Ihr Heiligsprechungsprozeß wurde 1466 begonnen und 1938 abgeschlossen
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1066 St George Mtasmindeli, Abbot doctor of the Georgian (Iberian) Church
THIS George, whose surname means " of the Black Mountain", was a doctor of the Georgian (Iberian) Church. He was born in 1014, and as a young man became a disciple of a monk well known for the holiness of his life, Hilarion Tvaleli; afterwards he lived as a hermit in Syria. St George Mtasmindeli's fame rested on his writings and translations into the Iberian language, notably treatises on "The Months" and "The Fasts" and his revision of the biblical translations made by St Euthymius (May 13). In spite of such work, he spent a rather wandering life, visiting the holy places of Palestine, being for some years abbot of Iviron on Mount Athos, and living on the Black Mountain in Armenia.

A few days before his death on June 27, 1066, he is said to have replied to a question about eucharistic bread, addressed to him by the Emperor Constantine X Dukas, that, "The Greeks use leavened bread out of humility, because they have been several times stained by heresy. The Latins use unleavened bread, following the example of our Lord and St Peter, as a sign that they have kept the faith pure as Jesus Christ and His apostles taught it."
Whatever may be thought of St George's views on the history of the use of azyme, this reply at any rate shows what he thought about events in Constantinople a dozen years earlier, when Rome's "horrible disease" of using unleavened bread at Mass had been one of the excuses for the revolt of the Patriarch Cerularius.
There is nothing easily available about this saint. References to him may be found in Tamarati, L'eglise georgienne (1910); in Martynov, Annus ecclesiasticus Graeco-Slavicus; in Maltsev, Menologium; and in Bessarione, vol. ii, pp. 133 seq.
The Monk George of Iveria and Athos, was born at Trialeti (a region of Southern Gruzia, the European Georgia) in the year 1009 (or 1014 by some sources) into the family of illustrious landowners named Maria and Yakov. And his father under a commission of the Gruzian emperor George I (1014-1027) journeyed to the Persian shah in the capacity of an envoy.  When the boy turned age 7, his parents brought him to the Tadzri women's monastery, where his elder sister Tekle (Thekla) was being educated. Saint George spent three years here, and during this time he was twice miraculously saved from perishing by the Providence of God (in the River Ktsia, and another time from the flames of a fire that raged through the monastery).

In 1019 at the request of his uncles (his father's brothers) -- George the Scribe and Savva, who pursued ascetic life at the Khakhul' men's monastery, -- the lad George received the blessing of the Khakhul' monastery head Makarios to be tutored under the strict ascetic Ilarion Tualevi, who was reknown for his knowledge and profound spiritual life.  In 1022 Saint George was sent off to Constantinople, where over the course of twelve years he diligently studied the sciences (i.e. various disciplines) and he received quite an excellent education.  After his return to Gruzia in 1034 he took monastic tonsure at the Khakhul' monastery under the blessed elder Ilarion Tualevi. A certain while later the Monk George gave away all his clothing to the poor whilst attiring himself in old tatters of clothing, and set off to venerate the holy places in Palestine.

After a short stay at various monasteries on Black Mountain near Antioch, the Monk George set off to the Wondrous Mount, to the monastery of Saint Simeon Divnogorets ("of Wondrous Mount", + 459). He found there a spiritual guide in the elder George the Silent (+ 1068), who was also a Gruzinian, living in the crevice of a cliff. He spent three years at the monastery of Saint Romanos (from 1036- to 1039). At thirty years of age the Monk George accepted the monastic great schema from the elder George the Silent. And then in parting from him, he set off to Athos, to the Iveria monastery. Along the way the saint visited Jerusalem and prayed prostrating himself at the Sepulchre of the Lord.

The Monk George arrived at Athos in the year 1040. Here he continued with the transcription work of the Divine-service books and the works of the holy fathers of the Church, a task that had been started by the Monk Euphemios of Iveria (Comm. 13 May).  And at present the Gruzian-Georgian Orthodox Church recognises as canonical and permissible for church useage only this redaction of the Holy Scripture, ascribed to the pen of the Monk George of Iveria, who worthily completed the work of the Monk Euphemios.

In the Vita-Life of the Monk George there is included an incomplete list of his translations from the Greek: the Great Synaxarion, the Acts and the Epistles of the Holy Apostles, the twelve Divine-service Meneions (i.e. for each month), the Oktoikon ("Eight Tones"), the Triodions (the Lenten and the Bright-Paschalion), the Trebnik (or Euchologion, "Book of Needs"), the Psalter, the complete Chasoslov ("Book of Hours"), the "Hexaemeron" ("Six Days") of Saint Basil the Great, the Letters of Saint Ignatios the God-Bearer, the OEcumenical Letters of Saint Cyril of Alexandria, a Book of Saint Gregory of Nyssa, a Book of Saint Theodore the Studite, a Book of the Proceedings of the Sixth OEcumenical Council, and "many another useful and holy book".

From the translations of Saint Gregory of Iveria, from the Latin into the Greek there has come down to us the reknown work of bishop Dorotheos: "Concerning the Seventy Disciples of the Lord". Widely reknown also is an original work by the Monk George of Iveria, the "Vitae of John and Euphemios", which provides a detailed account about the founding and inner life of the Athos Iveria monastery under its first elders and heads -- the Monks John and Euthymios (Comm. 12 July and 13 May).

After a year of obedience, the Monk George in 1042 was ordained to the dignity of priest and was appointed elder priest-monk at the cathedral church. He fulfilled likewise the duties of regent (choir-master). His time not involved in Divine-services he devoted to translation activity and poetic creativity. The Athos hymn-writing of the Monk George of Iveria, in particular the reknown "Evening Bell" was afterwards translated into many an European language.  After the death of the Iveria monastery hegumen Stephanos Khartulyari, the Monk George was chosen the new hegumen (the lots thrice pointed to him). Under the charge of the new hegumen, the monastery cathedral church in honour of the Dormition of the MostHoly Mother of God was rebuilt and made more substantial, and Gruzian dominion over the Iveria monastery was acknowledged. To this end the Monk George made visit to Constantinople, where he was admitted by the emperor Constantine IX Monomakhos (1042-1055), and received from him a grammota deed of endowment.

Having returned to the Iveria monastery, the monk left as its head George Oltiseli in place of himself, and he set off to the Black Mountain near Antioch. Actually, he was compelled to do so, since he had to defend before the Antioch Patriarch Theodosios III (1057-1076) the brethren of his Iveria monastery, who were suspected by the Greeks of being non-Orthodox. The Monk George succeeded not only in accomplishing this task, but he also persuaded the Antioch primate of the canonical legality of the autocephaly of the Gruzian-Georgian Orthodox Church, -- preserving its Apostolic Succession back to the holy Apostle Andrew the First-Called. From Antioch, at the invite of the Gruzian emperor Bagrat IV ((1027-1072), the Monk George set off to Gruzia. In Gruzia he spent five years: he taught the people by word and by deed, he assisted in the improvement of church life and he introduced his books of translation. Due to their highly erudite and literary quality, they were acknowledged by the Gruzian-Georgian Church as exemplary.

Having in mind the spiritual enlightening of the land, the Monk George selected 80 Gruzian youths and set off with them to Athos, in order to give them the fundamentals of an education. Along the way he visited Constantinople. Despite the agreement with his students to put off a meeting with the emperor, because he had taken sick and was aware of his own approaching end, the saint nonetheless hastened to present his students before the emperor Constantine X Lukas (1059-1067), and he received a grammota-decree for their education at the Athos school.

On the following day, 29 June 1065, Saint George peacefully expired to the Lord. The body of the monk was reverently conveyed to Athos, and it was glorified along the way by evident signs of God's mercy. It lay for a year in a coffin without burial in the church of All Saints. When the coffin was opened, the body of the saint was totally without decay: not one hair fell from his head or beard. The coffin of Saint George was put near the reliquary of Saint Euphymios on 24 May 1066, on the day commemorating the memory of the Monk Simeon Divnogorets. With the consent of the Katholikos-Patriarch of All Gruzia John IV (1110-1142), annually on this day celebrated the memory of Saint George, later it was moved to the day of his blessed repose, at present it is celebrated on 27 June. 1999 by translator Fr S Janos
1066 St. Arialdus Martyr of Milan remains recovered ten months later uncorrupt and sweet smelling
Also called Arialdo. A noble of the Milan region and born in Cutiacum, Italy, Arialdus studied at Laon and Paris, France, before becoming a canon. He preached against the abuses in the city and was excommunicated by Bishop Guido, but was reinstated by Pope Stephen IX. Bishop Guido, who was finally suspended, was guilty of simony and immorality. His allies slew Arialdus and threw his body into Lake Maggiore. The remains were recovered ten months later, uncorrupt and sweet smelling, and carried to Milan Cathedral. There the remains were on public display before being interred in the cathedral. In 1067, Pope Alexander II declared Arialdus a martyr.
Arialdus of Milan M (AC) cultus approved in 1904. Deacon Saint Arialdus distinguished himself for his zeal against the rampant simony of his time, chiefly in Milan. For this reason, he was first excommunicated and, after much persecution, killed by the party of the simonious archbishop of Milan (Benedictines)
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1095 Ladislaus I of Hungary, King He fought just and successful wars against Poles, Russians, and the Tartars (RM) renowned for his miracles even to this day
Varadíni, in Hungária, sancti Ladislái Regis, qui claríssimis miráculis usque ad diem hodiérnum corúscat.
    At Grosswardein in Hungary, the holy king Ladislaus, greatly renowned for his miracles even to this day.
Also known as Lancelot, Lalo, Laszlo: Born in Neustra, Hungary, July 29, 1040; died at Nitra, Bohemia, July 29, 1095; canonized in 1192 by Pope Celestine III. Laszlo of the house of Arpad, son of King Bela, was elected king of Hungary in 1077 by the nobles. He followed in the footsteps of Saint Stephen I of Hungary. Immediately he was faced with the claims of a relative and son of a former king, Solomon, to the throne, and defeated him on the battlefield in 1089. He developed the power of his young kingdom. He fought just and successful wars against Poles, Russians, and the Tartars.

Laszlo supported Pope Gregory VII in his investiture struggle against Emperor Henry IV, and Rupert of Swabia, Henry's rival. Laszlo married Adelaide, daughter of Duke Welf of Bavaria, one of Rupert's supporters. While Laszlo encouraged Christian missionaries and fostered Christianity within his dominions, he allowed religious freedom to the Jews and Islamics within his realm.
He was distinguished personally for the justness of his rule and the virtue of his life. In 1091, Laszlo marched to the aid of his sister, Helen, Queen of Croatia, against the murderers of her husband. When she died childless, he extended the boundaries of his kingdom by the annexation of Croatia and Dalmatia despite objections from the pope, the emperor in Constantinople, and Venice.

In 1092 at the Synod of Szabolcs, Laszlo promulgated a series of laws on religious and civil matters. He was chosen to lead the armies of the first crusade but before he could go he died. In a sentence, Laszlo was the ideal national hero. He is venerated for his zeal, piety, and moral life. In 1192, his relics were enshrined as those of a saint in the cathedral he had founded at Nagyvarad (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).
In art, Saint Ladislaus is portrayed as an armored king with a banner bearing a cross and a halberd. He may be shown (1) on a battlefield; (2) attacking a Tarter who is carrying off a lady; (3) between SS. Stephen of Hungary and Emeric; and (4) two angels with swords near him. He is the patron saint of Hungary (Roeder).


St Ladislaus of Hungary
IF Hungary owed the establishment of its monarchy and the organization of its church to St Stephen I, it was almost equally indebted to another sainted king of the same house of Arpad. For Ladislaus extended its borders, kept its enemies at bay, and made it politically a great state. But it is not for such activities that men are canonized (if, indeed, Ladislaus ever was formally canonized, which appears to be doubtful); and it is for his private life and work for Christianity that reverence is due to his memory.

After a childhood and youth whose background was political intrigue and dynastic violence, Ladislaus (Laszlo) came to the Hungarian throne in 1077; but his rights were contested by his kinsman Solomon, whom eventually he defeated in battle. The young prince was said to be the embodiment of the outward graces and inner virtues of the ideal knight of chivalry. Towering head and shoulders above the crowd, he had the strength and courage of a lion, combined with a courteous affability that endeared him to all. His piety, which was as fervent as it was well balanced, expressed itself in his zeal for the faith, in the punctilious fulfilment of his religious obligations, in the strictness of his morals, and in the austerity of his life.
Entirely devoid of personal ambition, he accepted the dignity thrust upon him from a sense of duty. In pursuance of a policy dictated alike by his religious and his patriotic instincts, Ladislaus allied himself closely with Pope Gregory VII and the other opponents of the German emperor, Henry IV.
He espoused the cause of Henry's rival, Rupert of Swabia, and married Adelaide, the daughter of Rupert's chief supporter, Duke Welf of Bavaria. Within the boundaries of Hungary itself he had to face repeated invasions from the Kumans and others, but he successfully repulsed them all and did his best to win barbarian tribes to Christianity and civilization; at the same time he allowed civil and religious liberty to the Jews and the Ishmaelites, i.e. Mohammedans.
It was at his solicitation that King Stephen I, his son Emeric, and the martyred bishop Gerard
were recognized by the Holy See as worthy of veneration as saints.
Ladislaus governed with a firm hand in both civil and ecclesiastical affairs, as was seen at the diet of Szabolcs and when, in 1091, his sister Helen, the widowed queen of Croatia, appealed to him for help against the murderers of her husband. He marched in, restored some sort of order, and established the see of Zagreb. When Helen died childless he annexed Croatia and Dalmatia, in the face of remonstrances from the emperor at Constantinople, the republic of Venice and the Holy See. Nevertheless Blessedd Urban II looked for his help in organizing the First Crusade, and it was Ladislaus who was chosen by the kings of France, Spain and England to be the commander-in-chief of that expedition. However he was not destined to march with the rest, for he died rather suddenly at Nitra in Bohemia in 1095. He was fifty-five years old.
The body of St Ladislaus was taken for burial to Nagy Varad (Oradea Mare in Transylvania)-to the city and the cathedral which he had founded. From the moment of his death he was honoured as a saint and a national hero, and his deeds have formed the theme of many popular Magyar ballads and tales. His relics were solemnly enshrined in 1192.

The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. vii, print a set of liturgical legendae, accompanied with the usual historical dissertation. A more reliable source is probably the life edited by S. L. Endlicher, in his Rerum Hungaricarum Monumenta Arpadiana (1849), pp. 235-244, and 324-348. See also Archiv f. ôster. Geschichte (1902), pp. 46-53, and an article, "St Laszlo", translated by E. Lindner in the Ungarische Revue for 1885. are several lives published in Magyar, of which that by J. Karacsonyi (1926) is said the best. See also Revue archéologique, 1925, pp. 315-327, and C. A. Macartney Medieval Hungarian Historians (1953).
1100 St. Laszlo Laszlo was the son of King Bela of Hungary
He was born at Neustra on July 29 and was elected King of Hungary by the nobles in 1077. He was at once faced with the claims of a relative and son of a former King, Solomon, to the throne, and defeated him on the battlefield in 1089. He supported Pope Gregory VII in his investiture struggle against Emperor Henry IV, and Rupert of Swabia, Henry's rival; Laszlo married Adelaide, daughter of Duke Welf of Bavaria, one of Rupert's supporters. Laszlo successfully repelled Cuman attempts to invade Hungary, encouraged Christian missionaries, and built many churches, but allowed religious freedom to the Jews and Mohammedans in his realms. In 1091, he marched to the aid of his sister Helen, Queen of Croatia, against the murderers of her husband, and when she died childless, annexed Croatia and Dalmatia despite objections from the Pope, the Emperor in Constantinople, and Venice. At the Synod of Szabolcs in 1092, he promulgated a series of laws on religious and civil matters. He was chosen to lead the armies of the First Crusade but before he could do so died at Nitra, Bohemia, on July 29 when he was fifty-five years old. He is one of the great national heroes of Hungary and made Hungary a great state, extending its borders and defending it successfully against invasion. He was venerated from the time of his death for his zeal, piety, and moral life, and was canonized in 1192 by Pope Celestine III. Laszlo is known in Polish as Ladislaus.
1143 Blessed Eppo of Mallersdorf, OSB 2nd Abbot (AC)
The monk Eppo became the second abbot of Mallersdorf in Bavaria (Germany) in 1122 (Benedictines).

1146 Saint Martin of Turov served as cook under the Turov bishops Simeon, Ignatius, Joachim (1144-1146), and George; Sts Boris and Gleb appeared to him, gave him a sip of water, and miraculous healing him of his illness
This last hierarch made St. Martin retire because of his age. But the old man did not want to leave the monastery (the bishops lived at the monastery of Sts Boris and Gleb), and so he accepted monasticism.
In his former work he had often overexerted himself and therefore often fell ill.
One time St. Martin lay motionless and in moaning with sickness. He fervently called on Sts Boris and Gleb for help, and on the third day the saints appeared to him, gave him a sip of water, and healed him of his illness. After this miraculous healing, St. Martin survived for another year.

1232 Blessed Benvenuto of Gubbio uncouth soldier; endowed with supernatural gifts of a high order: these spread his fame far and wide;  many miracles; received into Franciscan order by Saint Francis himself OFM (AC)
Cultus authorized by Pope Gregory IX. Benvenuto, an uncouth soldier, was received into the Franciscan order by Saint Francis himself.  At his own request the new friar was allowed to tend lepers, fulfilled with the utmost charity (Benedictines).
Blessed Benvenuto, a native of Gubbio, in Umbria, a soldier by profession and unlettered. Coming under Franciscan influence, he in 1222 took the Minorite habit. From the moment he entered the order, he modeled his life entirely upon that of St Francis. Set in charge of lepers at his own request, he treated them as though they had been our Lord Himself-tending their sores, washing them, and never shrinking from the most repulsive cases or the meanest offices. Always cheerful, always courteous, he waited upon them hand and foot; his sympathy was perhaps the greater because he suffered much from various infirmities which he bore with unfailing patience. A considerable part of the night he spent in prayer, and often at Mass he had a vision of a beautiful little Child, and would stretch out his arms as though to embrace it. His behavior was so exemplary that he was never known to merit a reproof of any sort.
Yet in the seclusion of a religious life he might well have lived and died unrecognized by the outside world, if he had not been endowed with supernatural gifts of a high order: these spread his fame far and wide. He died at Corneto, in Apulia, in 1232. Within four years of his death, the bishops of Venice and Amalfi approached the Holy See to seek sanction for his cultus, and cited many miracles in support; Pope Gregory IX granted it for their two dioceses.
No independent biography seems to be known, but see the Acta Sanctorum, June, vol. vii; Wadding, Annales O.M.; and Léon, Aureole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp, 427-429.
1250 St. Ferdinand of Aragon
Fifth bishop of Cajazzo, on Sicily. He was related to the royal family of Aragon, Spain, and to the rulers of the two Sicilies.
13th v. Ferdinand of the Angels fifth bishop of Cajazzo B (AC)
(also known as Ferdinand of Aragon) 13th century. Related to the royal family of Aragon, then the rulers of the Two Sicilies, Ferdinand became the fifth bishop of Cajazzo, in that kingdom. His relics are now venerated at Cornello, Sicily (Benedictines).

1611 Saint Serapion of Kozhe Lake brought to Moscow among Kazan Tatar captives in the year 1551; built two churches; one in honor of the Holy Theophany, and the other in honor of St Nicholas. Patriarch Job
They called him Murza (Tatar-prince) Turtas Gravirovich. He was baptized with the name Sergius and lived in the home of the Moscow boyar Zachariah Plescheev. Sergius accepted the Christian Faith so sincerely, that he decided to devote himself entirely to God.
In 1560, on a desolate island of Kozhe Lake, he encountered the hermit Niphon and stayed to live with him. At the fervent request of Sergius, Niphon tonsured him into monasticism with the name Serapion. In 1584, after the death of the monk Niphon, St Serapion set off for Moscow and asked Tsar Theodore Ioannovich (1584-1598) for a land deed for a monastery. After his return to the monastery, St Serapion and the brethren made a clearing in the forest and built two churches; one in honor of the Holy Theophany, and the other in honor of St Nicholas. Patriarch Job (+ 1607) provided St Serapion with antimensia for the altars. In 1608, when St Serapion had become old, he made his disciple Abramius the igumen in place of himself. St Serapion died in 1611 and was buried at a church of the Kozhe Lake monastery. In 1613 the monk Bogolep of Kozhe Lake wrote an account of the founding of the monastery and about its initial construction under St Serapion. He compiled also a Life of St Serapion.

1654 Johann Valentin Andreä Er schrieb mehrere kleine Schriften in lateinischer Sprache, in denen er die Mißstände in der Christenheit anprangerte und ein wahres Christentum forderte.
Evangelische Kirche: 27. Juni

Johann Valentin Andreä, ein Enkel Jakob Andreäs, wurde am 17.8.1586 in Herrenberg geboren. Er studierte in Tübingen Theologie, Philosophie, Mathematik und Historie. Nach einer Wanderzeit als Hofmeister adliger Söhne wurde er Geistlicher. Mit Johann Arndt forderte er die Übereinstimmung von Leben und Lehre und setzte sich für eine gründliche Unterweisung der Jugend ein. 1614 wurde er Diakon in Vaihingen/Enz und 1620 Dekan in Calw. Die Stadt wurde nach der Nördlinger Schlacht von kaiserlichen Truppen überfallen und geplündert. Andreä flüchtete mit der Bevölkerung in den Schwarzwald. Nach dem Rückzug der Truppen kehrten von 4.000 Einwohnern nur noch 1.500 zurück, von ihnen starb die Hälfte während der Pest, die in Calw ausgebrochen war. Andreä harrte bei seiner Gemeinde aus und sammelte in der Umgebung für die verarmte und hungernde Bevölkerung. 1639 wurde er als Hofprediger und Konsistorialrat in die württembergische Kirchenleitung berufen. Das Land war verwüstet, die Bevölkerung weitgehend verwildert. Knapp ein Drittel der Pfarrerschaft war noch am Leben, eine Theologenausbildung fand nicht mehr statt. Andreä stellte die Theologenausbildung im Tübinger Stift wieder her und baute das Schulwesen wieder auf. 1645 erließ er eine Anordnung zum allgemeinen Schulbesuch. Seine Versuche, eine allgemeine Kirchenzucht einzuführen, scheiterten an der lasziven Haltung des Herzogshofes. 1650 wurde Andreä zum Prälat in Bebenhausen berufen. Er starb am 27.6.1654 in Stuttgart.
Er schrieb mehrere kleine Schriften in lateinischer Sprache, in denen er die Mißstände in der Christenheit anprangerte und ein wahres Christentum forderte.
1794 B Madeleine Fontaine And Her Companions, Virgins  And Martyrs Sisters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul of the convent of Arras
THESE four martyrs were Sisters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul of the convent of Arras. They were the superioress, BD MADELEINE FONTAINE, aged 71; Bd FRANCES LANEL, aged 49; BD TERESA FANTOU, a Breton, aged 47; and BD JOAN GERARD, aged 42. Having, in accordance with the judgment of their ordinary, refused to take the oath tendered by the Convention to clergy and religious in 1793, they were arrested as suspects on February 14 in the following year. On the strength of certain documents "planted" in their convent, they were interrogated about their "counter-revolutionary activity"; and the notorious apostate priest Joseph Lebon ordered them to be sent to him at Cambrai, where they arrived on June 26. On the same day they were taken before the tribunal, where Sister Madeleine was condemned as "une pieuse contre-révolutionnaire", and the other three as her accomplices.
Without further delay the sisters went boldly to execution, singing Ave maris stella; and at the scaffold there was a remarkable happening. Sister Madeleine was the last to suffer, and as she approached the guillotine she turned to the crowd and shouted, "Listen, Christians! We are the last victims. The persecution is going to stop; the gallows will be destroyed; the altars of Jesus will rise again gloriously." The prophecy came true. In the face of violent criticism Lebon had to halt the succession of executions; and within six weeks his own head had fallen into the basket. These four Sisters of Charity were beatified in 1920, and their feast is kept on June 27.
See L. Misermont, Les bienheureuses Filles de La Charité d'Arras (1920), in the series "Les Saints"; and Baudot and Chaussin, Vies des saints  vi (1948), pp. 448-455.
1840 Bl. Thomas Toan Vietnamese native Martyr 
Martyr in Vietnam. A Vietnamese native, he worked as a catechist until his arrest by authorities. After overcoming the temptations of giving up the faith, he repented his weakness and stood firm. As a result, he was viciously flogged and then left to die from exposure, succumbing after twelve agonizing days.
1840 St. Joseph Hien Dominican martyr of Vietnam
He was beheaded by anti-Christian authorities and was canonized in 1988 by Pope John Paul II.
Blessed Joseph Heiu (Hien, Yeun) a native Dominican priest of Annam (Vietnam), who was beheaded at Nam-Dinh, OP
and Thomas Toan MM (AC) beatified in 1900. Joseph was a native Dominican priest of Annam (Vietnam), who was beheaded at Nam-Dinh. Beatified at the same time was the catechist Thomas Toan of Tonkin (b. 1767). He had shown signs of apostatizing, repented, and was thereafter cruelly scourged and exposed to the sun and insects without food or drink for 12 days until his death (Benedictines).
1918, Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II was found murdered in the patriarchal residence at Martqopi Monastery;  Bishop Kirion was a tireless researcher, with a broad range of scholarly interests. To his pen belong more than forty monographs on various themes relating to the history of the Georgian Church and Christian culture in Georgia. He compiled a short terminological dictionary of the ancient Georgian language and, with the linguist Grigol Qipshidze, a History of Georgian Philology.
The holy Hieromartyr Kirion II (known in the world as George Sadzaglishvili) was born in 1855 in the village of Nikozi in the Gori district. His father was a priest.  He enrolled at the parochial school in Ananuri, then at the theological school in Gori, and finally at Tbilisi Seminary.  In 1880 he graduated from the Kiev Theological Academy and was appointed assistant dean of the Odessa Theological Seminary. From 1883 to 1886 St. Kirion was active in the educational life of Gori, Telavi, Kutaisi, and Tbilisi. In 1886 he was appointed supervisor of the Georgian monasteries and dean of the schools of the Society for the Renewal of Christianity in the Caucasus. He directed the parochial schools, established libraries and rare book collections within them, and published articles on the history of the Georgian Church, folklore and literature under the pseudonyms Iverieli, Sadzagelov, and Liakhveli (the Liakhvi River flows through his native region of Shida [Inner] Kartli, the central part of eastern Georgia).

In 1886 God’s chosen, George, was tonsured a monk with the name Kirion, and he was enthroned as abbot of Kvabtakhevi Monastery. Kirion continued his scholarly pursuits and intensified his spiritual labors. He collected folklore and ethnographic materials and studied artifacts from ancient Georgian churches. He generously donated the reliquaries and rare manuscripts he found to the antiquities collections at the Church Museum of Tbilisi and the Society for the Propagation of Literacy among the Georgians.
In 1898 Kirion published a description of the historical monuments of Liakhvi Gorge. His publication is an important resource for scholars and historians, since most of the monuments he describes were toppled by Georgia’s ideological and national enemies in subsequent years. (Kirion would later join the Moscow Archaeological Society.)  In August of 1898 Archimandrite Kirion was consecrated bishop of Alaverdi.  St. Kirion began at once to rebuild Alaverdi Church, and he offered his own resources for this momentous task. At the same time, he began to study the ancient artifacts of Kakheti and Hereti in eastern Georgia. Among the manuscripts he turned over to the Church Museum of Tbilisi was a Holy Gospel from the year 1098, unknown to scholars until that time.

Bishop Kirion was a tireless researcher, with a broad range of scholarly interests. To his pen belong more than forty monographs on various themes relating to the history of the Georgian Church and Christian culture in Georgia. He compiled a short terminological dictionary of the ancient Georgian language and, with the linguist Grigol Qipshidze, a History of Georgian Philology.  Kirion fought the appropriation of Georgian churches by the Armenian Monophysites.
He sent a detailed memorandum to the Russian exarch in Georgia demanding that the confiscated Orthodox churches be returned.
In 1901 Kirion was installed as bishop of Gori. By that time it had become clear to the Georgian exarchate that the educated and progressive clergymen were endorsing the holy hierarch Kirion and contesting the abolition of the autocephaly of the Georgian Church. But the government found a way out of this “dangerous situation” by frequently reassigning St. Kirion to serve in different parts of the Russian Empire: in 1903 he was reassigned to Cherson, in 1904 to Orel, and in 1906 to Sokhumi. In Sokhumi St. Kirion exerted every effort to restore and revive the historical Georgian churches and monasteries, though he would soon be reassigned to the Kovno diocese.
In 1905, at the demand of Georgia’s intelligentsia (under the leadership of St. Ilia the Righteous), the regime formed an extraordinary commission to formally consider the question of the autocephaly of the Georgian Church. St. Kirion delivered two lectures to the commission: one on the reasons behind Georgia’s struggle for the restoration of an autocephalous Church, and the other on the role of nationality in the life of the Church.
The commission rejected the Georgian claims to autocephaly and subjected the leaders of the movement to harsh repression.
In 1907 St. Ilia the Righteous was killed, and the government forbade St. Kirion to travel to Georgia to pay his last respects.
St. Kirion managed only to send a letter of condolence to St. Ilia’s loved ones. In the months that followed, the regime tightened down even more severely on St. Kirion. In 1908 he was accused of conspiring in the murder of Exarch Nikon, deprived of the rank of bishop, and arrested. This treacherous deed roused the indignation not only of the Georgian people but of the faithful of Russia as well. Even the democratic forces in Europe founded a society for the protection of the rights of Bishop Kirion and gathered signatures to demand his release from prison. The bishop himself humbly carried the cross of his persecution and consoled his sympathizers with the words of the great Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli:
“‘Not a single rose is plucked from this world without thorns.’ We must bear our suffering with love, since suffering is the fruit of love and in suffering we will find our strength!”
By the year 1915 the regime had ceased to persecute St. Kirion. They restored him to the bishopric and elevated him as archbishop of Polotsk and Vitebsk in western Russia. He was not, however, permitted to return to his motherland.
In March of 1917 the Georgian Apostolic Orthodox Church declared its autocephaly restored. At the incessant demands of the Georgian people, St. Kirion finally returned to his motherland. One hundred and twenty cavalrymen met him in Aragvi Gorge (along the Georgian Military Highway) and reverently escorted him to the capital. In Tbilisi St. Kirion was met with great honor.

In September of 1917 the Holy Synod of the Georgian Orthodox Church enthroned Bishop Kirion as Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia. During the enthronement ceremony at Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, St. Kirion addressed the faithful: “My beloved motherland, the nation protected by the Most Holy Theotokos, purified in the furnace by tribulations and suffering, washed in its own tears: I turn to you, having been separated from you, having sought after you, having grieved over you, having sought for you and now having returned not as a prodigal son, but as your confidant and the conscience of your Church.
“I know that in your minds you are all inquiring, ‘What has he brought back with him? With what ointment will he heal his wounds? How will he comfort himself in his sadness?’ Consider my words: He came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give His life a ransom for many (Matt. 20:28). I, likewise, have come not as a hired servant, but as a faithful and obedient son!”

Soon after he was enthroned, St. Kirion sent an appeal to all the Orthodox patriarchs of the world in which he described in detail the history of the Georgian Church and requested an official recognition of her autocephaly.
On May 26, 1918, Georgia declared its independence. The next day Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II presided during a service of thanksgiving. The chief shepherd and his flock rejoiced at the restoration of the autocephaly of the Georgian Church and the independence of the Georgian state, though from the beginning they perceived the imminence of the Bolshevik danger. The socialist revolution, now showing its true face, posed an enormous threat to the young republic and her Church.

On June 27, 1918, Catholicos-Patriarch Kirion II was found murdered in the patriarchal residence at Martqopi Monastery. The investigation was a mere formality and the guilty were never found.  Rumors were even spread that St. Kirion had shot himself. When the Holy Synod of the Georgian Apostolic Orthodox Church convened on October 17, 2002, it canonized Holy Hieromartyr Kirion and numbered him among the saints.

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
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Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
 684 Pope St. Benedict II distinguished knowledge of the Scriptures and by his singing, and as a priest was remarkable for his humility, love of the poor, and generosity; Many of the churches of Rome were restored by him; and its clergy, its deaconries for the care of the poor, and its lay sacristans all benefited by his liberality

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew

Jesus Christ is the blessing for every man and woman ... The Church, in giving us Jesus, offers us the fullness of the Lord’s blessing. This is precisely the mission of the people of God: to spread to all peoples God’s blessing made flesh in Jesus Christ. And Mary, the first and most perfect disciple of Jesus, the first and most perfect believer, the model of the pilgrim Church, is the one who opens the way to the Church’s motherhood and constantly sustains her maternal mission to all mankind. Mary’s tactful maternal witness has accompanied the Church from the beginning. She, the Mother of God, is also the Mother of the Church, and through the Church, the mother of all men and women, and of every people. …

Let us look to Mary, let us contemplate the Holy Mother of God. I suggest that you all greet her together, just like those courageous people of Ephesus, who cried out before their pastors when they entered Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!” What a beautiful greeting for our Mother. There is a story – I do not know if it is true – that some among those people had clubs in their hands, perhaps to make the Bishops understand what would happen if they did not have the courage to proclaim Mary “Mother of God”! I invite all of you, without clubs, to stand up and to greet her three times with this greeting of the early Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!”  Pope Francis; Homily, Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Chinese Catholics Celebrate Pentecost, World Day of Prayer for Church in China
Sacraments of Initiation Administered During Course of Celebrations
Hail, Holy Mother of God -- Pope Francis
By Staff Reporter
Rome, May 27, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Many Chinese Catholic communities celebrated the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China last Sunday, reported Fides. Pope Benedict XVI instituted this day of prayer in 2007.

The May 24 prayer day coincides with the Marian feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians, and this year it coincided with the feast of Pentecost.  At the end of last Wednesday's General Audience in the Vatican, Pope Francis remembered the prayer day for the Asian nation.

In China on the prayer day, the sacraments of Christian initiation were administered to seven catechumans, 13 infants, and 38 adults in the He Bei province's parishes of Yan Jiao and of Bao Ding, as well as in the Zhe Jiang province's parish of Long Gang in the diocese of Wen Zhou.

The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians is celebrated at the Shrine of Our Lady of Sheshan in Shanghai and on the day, the parish of Chang Shu in the diocese of Su Zhou, along with many other communities, prayed: "Let us pray for the Church in China, that faces major challenges in the life of the Church and society. Let us pray so that the Holy Spirit guides us ... and may Our Lady Help of Christians protect us."  Four infants were also baptized during Mass in Chang Shu.

Also to celebrate, the parish of Yi Shan in the Diocese of Wen Zhou in the province of Zhe Jiang held a solemn Marian procession, so that, as observers noted, "the Church is one and united and a witness of love."

Moreover, religious and some lay people of the diocese of Nan Chong, located in the southern province of Sichuan, went on a pilgrimage not only to celebrate the special feasts of Sunday, but also to celebrate the Year of Consecrated Life. During it, those partaking exchanged their experiences of vocation, faith, mission and pastoral activity.

Pope Francis called for the Year of Consecrated Life at the end of his meeting with 120 superior generals of male institutes last November. The year started on the First Sunday of Advent, the weekend of Nov. 29, 2014, and ends on Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated Life. (D.C.L.)


  Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.
By Deborah Castellano Lubov VATICAN CITY, March 04, 2015 (Zenit.org) –

“Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.”
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is  very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding
.

 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

  Pope Francis: The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (Video)
He explained that it can also be found in day to day life By Staff

ROME, November 13, 2014 (Rome Reports) - To view the video click here.
     
At the end of its Constitution on the Church, the Second Vatican Council left us a very beautiful meditation on Mary Most Holy.
Let me (Pope Francis) just recall the words referring to the mystery we celebrate today: “The immaculate Virgin preserved free from all stain of original sin, was taken up body and soul into heavenly glory, when her earthly life was over, and exalted by the Lord as Queen over all things” (no. 59).
Then towards the end, there is: “The Mother of Jesus in the glory which she possesses in body and soul in heaven is the image and the beginning of the Church as it is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise, she shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come” (no. 68). Pope Francis
 
 
"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall