Wednesday  Saints of this Day March  01 Kaléndis Mártii.  
      
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

We pray for the strength to love those who do not love us.

Beside each believer stands an angel as protector and shepherd leading him to life.
-- St. Basil, Adversus Eunomium III


Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR MARCH
Support for Persecuted Christians.
That persecuted Christians may be supported
by the prayers and material help of the whole Church.



 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

March 1 – Our Lady of Machaby (Italy, 1800) – 12th apparition of Lourdes (France, 1858)
 
The spot chosen by Our Lady
The Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows is located in Machaby, in the Aosta Valley, Italy. It is one of the most important shrines in the region. According to tradition, a wooden statue of the Madonna was originally found there. The shepherds who noticed it lying by a bush immediately carried it to the oratory of the hamlet upstream, but the next day the statue was found again near the same bush. So the locals decided to build a shrine on that spot.

The shrine dates back to 1503, but has been enlarged since. The walls inside are lined with ex-votos, mostly crutches. The feast of Our Lady of the Snows is celebrated every year on August 5th.
 
Sanctuaire Notre Dame des Neiges


492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
 977 St. Rudesind  Benedictine abbot bishop performing miracles 
1367 Bd Roger Le Fort, Archbishop Of Bourges tomb a place of pilgrimage many miracles worked.
1484 Bd Christopher Of Milan the apostle of Liguria great success in evangelizing that part of Italy, Dominican  endowed with the gift of prophecy
1796 Bd Peter Rene Roque, Martyr ordained 1782 professor of theology in his native town Vannes refused the Constitutional Oath On being sentenced to death, Father Roque fell on his knees and gave fervent thanks to God guillotined on March 1, 1796
Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque


How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

March 1 – Our Lady of Machaby (Italy, 1800) - 12th Apparition of Lourdes (France, 1858) 
"Use that one instead"
On Monday, March 1st, Bernadette's father accompanied her to the Grotto for the first time. There were 2,600 people already there waiting. They would experience a profound sense of joy for the next 45 minutes during the heavenly apparition whose beauty was reflected in Bernadette's face.
On that day, the Lady gave Bernadette and the entire crowd this unforgettable lesson: to love your own rosary—no matter how humble it may seem—and to carry it on you at all times. As the visionary was using someone else's rosary, the Lady asked her: "What happened to your rosary?" Bernadette took it out of her pocket and showed it to the Lady. The Virgin smiled and said: "Use that one instead."
 Cf Yvonne Estienne, in Lourdes et La Salette
and dieu-sauve.chez-alice.fr


Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
March 1st - Our Lady of Della Croce (Italy, 1873) - 12th apparition in Lourdes
Hail, Holy Queen
Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our Life, our Sweetness, and our Hope.
To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve.
To thee do we send up our sighs mourning and weeping in this valley of tears.
Turn then, most gracious Advocate, thine eyes of Mercy toward us, and after this our exile show us the
Blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary. Pray for us O Holy Mother of God
That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. Amen.
In Latin: Salve, Regina
Salve, Regina, mater misericordiae; vita, dulcedo et spes nostra, salve.
Ad te clamamus exsules filii Hevae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et flentes in hac lacrimarum valle.
Eia ergo, advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte.
Et Iesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis post hoc exsilium ostende.
O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix.
Ut digni efficamur promissionibus Christi. Amen.
This hymn is said to be a favorite of our Lady herself by testimony of those who have reportedly seen her in visions. One account concerning this claim relates a vision St Dominic had. He was entering a corridor of the monastery to resume his midnight prayer vigil when he chanced to raise his eyes and see three beautiful ladies approach him. He knelt before the principle lady and she blessed him. Even though St Dominic recognized her, he begged her to tell him her name. The Lady replied: "I am she whom you invoke every evening: and when you say, 'Turn then, most gracious Advocate, thine eyes of Mercy toward us,' I prostrate myself before my Son, entreating Him to protect this Order."
See http://www.preces-latinae.org/thesaurus/BVM/SalveRegina.html

Popes General Prayer Intention in the Month of March Lovingly Helped
Special Prayer Intention of Missions
Institutes of Consecrated Life in Mission Countries Rediscover the Missionary Dimension
and Generously Proclaim Christ to the Ends of the Earth

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

  290 St. Hermes and Adrian Martyrs with 24 companions
       St. Eudocia, martyr in the persecution of Trajan
 300 St. Lupercus Martyred bishop near Lourdes  
       St. Antonina, martyr.  For deriding the gods of the heathen, in the persecution of Diocletian, she
 492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
       St. Monan martyred  monk at St. Andrew's under St. Adrian
 549 St. Herculanus Bishop of Perugia, Italy marthred by Ostrogoths
 550  St Albinus, (Aubin), Bishop Of Angers many miracles attributed during life but more particularly after his death
 589 ?  St. David of Wales missionary priest monk dove lift him high above the people
 713 St Swithbert (Suidbert) 1 of band 12 missionaries headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 evangelize Friesland
 900 St. Leo Luke Basilian monastery Abbot of Corleone  
 977 St. Rudesind  Benedictine abbot bishop performing miracles 
1367 Bd Roger Le Fort, Archbishop Of Bourges after death tomb a place of pilgrimage many miracles worked.
1375 Bd Bonavita A Blacksmith by trade and a Franciscan tertiary
 Apud Cenómanos, in Gállia, sancti Siviárdi Abbátis.       At Le Mans in France, St. Siviard, abbot.
1484  Bd Christopher Of Milan the apostle of Liguria great success in evangelizing that part of Italy, Dominican  endowed with the gift of prophecy
1796 Bd Peter Rene Roque, Martyr ordained 1782 professor of theology in his native town Vannes refused the Constitutional Oath On being sentenced to death, Father Roque fell on his knees and gave fervent thanks to God guillotined on March 1, 1796
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1). 
March 1st - Our Lady of Della Croce (Italy, 1873) Our Lady’s Messenger (II)

(The evangelist) says: "The angel Gabriel was sent by God". His name is not without meaning to the message with which he is charged. Indeed, which angel would have been better to announce the coming of the Christ - who is God’s virtue - than the one who has the honor to be called the Force of God? Because what is force, if it is not virtue? (...)
If he is called the Force of God it is either because he has been chosen to announce the coming of this force itself, or because he was meant to reassure a naturally timid, simple and modest virgin that would have perhaps been disturbed by the news of the miracle about to be achieved in her womb. Indeed, he says to her,
"Rejoice, you who enjoy God’s favor! The Lord is with you.”
It is also possible to imagine that he came to give force and courage to the Virgin’s fiancé, this man of a humble and timorous conscience, although our evangelist does not specify this. Indeed, Gabriel says to him:
"Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife."
Therefore the choice of Gabriel for the messenger is totally relevant for the mission that he was meant to fulfill, or indeed it may be that he was called Gabriel because of the mission that he was meant to fulfill.
Saint Bernard Sermon on the Missus Est
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)

Day 1 40 Days for Life
Begins in more than 340 locations across the United States and 29 other countries! Find the closest vigil location at https://40daysforlife.com/browse-campaigns/ … and step forward in faith to pray and fast for an end to abortion.
And since it's Day 1 ... it's important to put first things first. We cannot do this without God.
That's why "First things first" is the title of this week's edition of the 40 Days for Life podcast and it stresses the importance of prayer in our hurry-up, activity driven culture:
https://40daysforlife.com/2017/02/28/podcast-61/

As Mother Teresa said, "I am not a social worker. I do this for Jesus."
When we pray at an abortion facility we are representing the peace, mercy and joy of Christ in the darkest corners of our culture. If He comes first, then everything else will follow in its proper order.

McAllen, Texas
"McAllen's kickoff rally was one of the most fun 40 Days for Life events I've ever been a part of." That was the excited reaction of Steve Karlen, the 40 Days for Life North American campaign director ...
 
Schenectady, New York
Schenectady's 40 Days for Life campaign got off to an encouraging start as the local team launched its ninth vigil. The local Catholic bishop led prayer at the campaign's kickoff event ... [more]
Blow the trumpet in Zion! Proclaim a fast, call an assembly. Gather the people, notify the congregation. Assemble the elders; gather the children and the infants at the breast … Let the priests, the ministers of the Lord, weep and say, "Spare, O Lord, your people." —Joel 2:15-17

Lord, we ask for the strength, courage, wisdom, determination and stamina to carry out this mission according to Your will. Guide us, we pray, as we go forth and proclaim Your truth.


Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum ducentórum sexagínta, quos jussit primo Cláudius, pro Christi nómine damnátos, extra portam Saláriam arénam fódere, deínde in amphitheátro sagíttis mílitum intérfici.
At Rome, 2 hundred and 60 holy martyrs condemned for the name of Christ.  Claudius ordered them to dig sand beyond the Salarian Gate, then to have soldiers in the amphitheatre shoot them with arrows.

 Item natális sanctórum Mártyrum Leónis, Donáti, Abundántii, Nicéphori et aliórum novem.
       Also, the birthday of the holy martyrs Leo, Donatus, Abundantius, Nicephorus, and nine others.

 Heliópoli, apud Líbanum, sanctæ Eudóciæ Mártyris, quæ, in persecutióne Trajáni, a Theódoto Epíscopo baptizáta et ad certámen muníta, ibídem, Vincéntii Præsidis jussu percússa gládio, martyrii corónam accépit.
       At Heliopolis, St. Eudocia, martyr in the persecution of Trajan.  She was baptized by Bishop Theodotus, and being fortified for the combat, was put to the sword at the command of Vincent the governor, and thus received the crown of martyrdom.

290 St. Hermes and Adrian Martyrs with 24 companions.
 Massíliæ, in Gállia, sanctórum Mártyrum Hermétis et Hadriáni.
       At Marseilles in France, the holy martyrs Hermes and Adrian.
probably the Massylitan martyrs praised by St. Augustine. They suffered in Massylis, or Marula, in Numidia.
300 St. Lupercus Martyred bishop near Lourdes.
venerated at Tarbes, near Lourdes, France. He was French or possibly Spanish and is also listed as Luperculus.

 Eódem die sanctæ Antonínæ Mártyris, quæ in persecutióne Diocletiáni, cum Gentílium deos irrisísset, ídeo, post vários cruciátus, in vase quodam inclúsa, in palúdem urbis Ceæ demérsa est.
       On the same day, St. Antonina, martyr.  For deriding the gods of the heathen, in the persecution of Diocletian, she was, after various torments, shut up in a cask and drowned in a marsh near the city of Cea.

492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
 Romæ natális sancti Felícis Papæ Tértii, qui sancti Gregórii Magni átavus fuit; qui étiam (ut ipse Gregórius refert), sanctæ Tharsíllæ nepti appárens, illam ad cæléstia regna vocávit.
       At Rome, the birthday of Pope St. Felix III, ancestor of St. Gregory the Great, who relates of him that he appeared to St. Tharsilla, his niece, and called her to the kingdom of heaven.

492 ST FELIX II (III), POPE  483 - 492
ACCORDING to the Roman Martyrology this Pope Felix was an ancestor (great-great-grandfather) of Pope St Gregory the Great it recalls Gregory’s statement that when his aunt, St Tharsilla, lay dying, Felix appeared in vision and summoned her to Heaven. The martyrology Calls him Felix III, through the long-standing but erroneous numeration of the antipope Felix as Pope St Felix II (see July 29).

Little Certain is known about him personally, but he was a straightforward, Courageous Roman of the type of Leo I, and he has his place in general church history in connection with the monophysite troubles. In 482 the Emperor Zero published a document called the Henotikon, which had been devised by the patriarch of Constantinople, Acacius, to placate the dissenting monophysites by ignoring the decisions of the Council of Chalcedon. Two years later St Felix held a synod at the Lateran and excommunicated Acacius and his supporters for a betrayal of the Catholic faith. St Felix thus appears in the common role of the Roman pontiffs as an upholder of an oecumenical council against the secular power, while much of the East meekly accepted the emperor’s “line”. But the resulting

“Acacian schism” unhappily lasted for thirty-five years, and helped to pave the way for the eventual separation of the Byzantine church.

In the west, Felix helped iii the restoration of the African church after its long persecution by the Arian Vandals. He died in 492 after a pontificate of nearly nine years, and his feast is kept in Rome.
St. Felix II has the extraordinary distinction of being not only a pope and saint himself, but the great-grandfather of another pope and saint, Gregory the Great. Felix had been married, but his wife had died before he became a priest. He was a member of an old Roman family of senatorial rank.

No sooner was he elected pope than Felix faced the vexing problem posed by Emperor Zeno's ill-considered attempt to unify the East by compromise. One of the evils which result from politicians meddling in church matters is the tendency to make a deal. And that is just what Zeno did. Alarmed by the hold that the Monophysites had on Egypt and Syria, Zeno issued his famous Henoticon (act of union) and ordered all to subscribe to it. This Henoticon was a creed drawn up by Acacius, the hitherto orthodox patriarch of Constantinople, and Peter, the Monophysite patriarch of Alexandria. It was orthodox in what it said, but implicitly it condoned the Monophysite heresy by omitting the decision of the Council of Chalcedon and the letter of Pope Leo to Flavian. Like so many compromises it pleased few. The more ardent Monophysites refused to follow their leader, Peter, and Pope Felix denounced it. With true spiritual independence, he warned the Emperor not to interfere in theological matters and "to allow the Catholic Church to govern itself by its own laws."

Pope Felix sent legates to Constantinople to summon Acacius to Rome, but to his dismay the Pope discovered that his legates had approved the election of the Monophysite Peter as patriarch of Alexandria and had communicated with heretics--in short, had sold him out. Felix held a synod at Rome in 484 at which he excommunicated the untrustworthy legates. He also excommunicated Acacius, but the patriarch remained stubborn. Thus started the Acacian schism in which Constantinople was officially separated from the Roman Church over the Henoticon. Even after Acacius died, the schism dragged on until the next century.

In the last years of this pontificate Theodoric led his Ostrogoths into Italy to defeat Odovakar and take over the rule of Italy--all in the name of Emperor Zeno. Though an Arian, Theodoric treated the Church well. It was different in Africa, where in the early years of his reign Felix heard anguished cries for help from the hapless Catholics. Hunneric, the Arian Vandal, ruthlessly harried the poor African Catholics. Pope Felix got Emperor Zeno to bring his influence to bear on the fierce Vandal, but this accomplished little. After Hunneric died, the persecution slackened, and the Pope then helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet. He followed the usual papal policy of mildness towards weak brethren who had given way in the storm.
Pope St. Felix died March 1, 492. He is buried in St. Paul's on the Ostian Way.

See Duchesne's edition of the Liber pontificalis, vol. i, pp. 252-253; DCB., vol. ii, pp. 482-485, s.v. Felix III; and works of general ecclesiastical history.

549 St. Herculanus Bishop of Perugia, Italy marthred by Ostrogoths
 Perúsiæ Translátio sancti Herculáni, Epíscopi et Mártyris, qui jussu Tótilæ, Gothórum Regis, decollátus est.  Ipsíus autem corpus ita cápiti unítum atque sanum, quadragésimo post abscissiónem die (ut scribit sanctus Gregórius Papa), repértum est, ac si nulla ferri incísio illud tetigísset.
       At Perugia, the transferral of the body of St. Herculanus, bishop and martyr, who was beheaded by order of Totila, king of the Goths.  Forty days after the decapitation, Pope St. Gregory relates that the head had been rejoined to the body as if it had never been touched by the sword.
beheaded by King Totila of the Ostrogoths. He is probably the same Herculanus sent to Perugia from Syria to evangelize the region.
550  St Albinus, Or Aubin, Bishop Of Angers many miracles attributed during his life but more particularly after his death
Andégavi, in Gállia, sancti Albíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris, viri præclaríssimæ virtútis et sanctitátis.
      At Angers in France, St. Albinus, bishop and confessor, a man of most eminent virtue and piety.

THE great popularity of St Aubin appears to be due, not so much to his career, which presents no remarkable features, as to the many miracles attributed to him not only during his life but more particularly after his death.
His cultus spread over France, Italy, Spain, Germany and even to distant Poland, and he became the titular patron of an immense number of French parishes. Born in the diocese of Vannes in Brittany, the saint belonged to a family said to have originally come from England or Ireland. While still young he entered the monastery of Tincillac, about which little is known, and there he led a life of great devotion. At the age of about thirty-five he was elected abbot, and, under his rule, the house flourished exceedingly and became a garden of virtues. Consequently, when the see of Angers fell vacant in 529 the clergy and citizens of Angers turned their eyes to Aubin. Greatly against his will, but much to the joy of the bishop of Rennes, St Melanius, he was appointed bishop of Angers and proved himself a capable and enlightened pastor.

St Aubin preached daily, and whilst always generous. to the sick and needy he was specially concerned with helping poor widows who were struggling to bring up large families. The ransoming of slaves was another good work very dear to his heart, and he spent large sums of money in buying back prisoners who had been carried off in the numerous raids of the barbarians. Tradition says that one of these captives was ransomed, not from the pirates, but from King Childebert himself. This was a lovely girl called Etheria upon whom the monarch had cast eyes. He caused her to be carried off from her home and imprisoned in a fortress. As soon as this came to the ears of the bishop, he went to the castle to demand her release, and such was the respect he inspired that the guards delivered her up at once. The legend adds that one soldier tried to detain the maiden and used threats and violence, but St Aubin breathed upon him and he fell down dead. The king made no further attempt to recapture the girl, but was undignified enough to demand a ransom which, we are told, was paid by the saint. Whether or not there is any truth in the story, it is certain that King Childebert had a great veneration for the bishop, but in other quarters he was very unpopular because of the energy with which he enforced the decrees of the Councils of Orleans in 538 and 541 against incestuous marriages.
St Aubin was credited with very many miracles. Besides numerous cases of the healing of the sick and the restoration of sight to the blind, we read of a youth called Alabald who was raised from the dead by his intercession. Once, after he had pleaded in vain with a judge to release some criminals, a great stone fell during the night from the prison wall and thus enabled the prisoners to regain their liberty. They immediately came to seek the saint and assured him that they would in future lead reformed lives.

The principal source for the life of St AIbinus is a short biography by Venantius Fortuna­tus, the most critical text of which is to be found in MGH., Auctores antiquissimi, vol. iv, "opera pedestria", pp. 27-33. His name is entered in the "Hieronymianum", and St Gregory of Tours refers to the cultus paid to him. See Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, pp. 347-349, 353-354; DHG., vol. v. cc. 254-255 ; and the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. i.

Born to a noble family of Brittany. Pious child. Monk from his mid-20's into his 60's at Timcillac, which later renamed itself Saint Aubin's in honor of him. Abbot for 25 years, beginning in 504. Bishop of Angers c.529. His episcopacy was known for his charity to the poor, widows and orphans, for his ransoming of slaves from their owners, his personal holiness, and the miracles he worked.
Custom of the day permitted consanguinity marriage. Albinus decried this as incest, and fought against it, making enemies in many powerful families who practiced it. Called councils at Orleans in 538 and 541, which condemned this and other morals offenses.
  Legend says that when he visited Etheria, a woman imprisoned by King Childebert for bad debts, the woman threw herself at Albinus' feet, and pled for help. A guard made a move to strike her, but Albinus breathed in the man's face, and he fell dead. Etheria was soon released.
  Another time Albinus passed a prison tower in Angers, and heard the cries and moans of badly treated prisoners. He pled with the local magistrate for their release, but was refused. He returned to the tower and prayed in front of it; after several hours, a landslide brought down part of the tower, the prisoners escaped, followed Albinus to the church of Saint Maurichies, reformed their ways, and became model citizens and Christians.
   The abbey of Saint Aubin in Angers was erected in his memory. Born:  469 at Vannes, Brittany, France Died:  1 March 549 of natural causes; relics at the Cathedral of Saint Germanus in Paris Canonized:  Pre-Congregation

589 ?  St. David of Wales missionary priest monk dove lift him high above the people
David is the patron saint of Wales and perhaps the most famous of British saints. Ironically, we have little reliable information about him. It is known that he became a priest, engaged in 589 ?  St. David of Wales David, cousin of Cadoc and pupil of Illtyd.
David is the patron saint of Wales and perhaps the most famous of British saints.
Many stories and legends sprang up about David and his Welsh monks. Their austerity was extreme. They worked in silence without the help of animals to till the soil. Their food was limited to bread, vegetables and water.


In about the year 550, David attended a synod where his eloquence impressed his fellow monks to such a degree that he was elected primate of the region. The episcopal see was moved to Mynyw, where he had his monastery (now called St. David's). He ruled his diocese until he had reached a very old age. His last words to his monks and subjects were: "Be joyful, brothers and sisters. Keep your faith, and do the little things that you have seen and heard with me."

St. David is pictured standing on a mound with a dove on his shoulder. The legend is that once while he was preaching a dove descended to his shoulder and the earth rose to lift him high above the people so that he could be heard. Over 50 churches in South Wales were dedicated to him in pre-Reformation days.

Comment:  Were we restricted to hard manual labor and a diet of bread, vegetables and water, most of us would find little reason to rejoice. Yet joy is what David urged on his brothers as he lay dying. Perhaps he could say that to them—and to us—because he lived in and nurtured a constant awareness of God’s nearness. For, as someone once said, “Joy is the infallible sign of God’s presence.” May his intercession bless us with the same awareness!work and founded many monasteries, including his principal abbey in southwestern Wales. Many stories and legends sprang up about David and his Welsh monks. Their austerity was extreme. They worked in silence without the help of animals to till the soil. Their food was limited to bread, vegetables and water.

In about the year 550, David attended a synod where his eloquence impressed his fellow monks to such a degree that he was elected primate of the region. The episcopal see was moved to Mynyw, where he had his monastery (now called St. David's). He ruled his diocese until he had reached a very old age. His last words to his monks and subjects were: "Be joyful, brothers and sisters. Keep your faith, and do the little things that you have seen and heard with me."

St. David is pictured standing on a mound with a dove on his shoulder. The legend is that once while he was preaching a dove descended to his shoulder and the earth rose to lift him high above the people so that he could be heard. Over 50 churches in South Wales were dedicated to him in pre-Reformation days.

Comment:  Were we restricted to hard manual labor and a diet of bread, vegetables and water, most of us would find little reason to rejoice. Yet joy is what David urged on his brothers as he lay dying. Perhaps he could say that to them—and to us—because he lived in and nurtured a constant awareness of God’s nearness. For, as someone once said, “Joy is the infallible sign of God’s presence.” May his intercession bless us with the same awareness!

St. David According to tradition was the son of King Sant of South Wales and St. Non. He was ordained a priest and later studied under St. Paulinus. He was involved in missionary work and founded a number of monasteries. The monastery he founded at Menevia in Southwestern Wales was noted for extreme asceticism. David and his monks drank neither wine nor beer - only water - while putting in a full day of heavy manual labor and intense study.
Around the year 550, David attended a synod at Brevi in Cardiganshire. His contributions at the synod are said to have been the major cause for his election as primate of the Cambrian Church. He was reportedly consecrated archbishop by the patriarch of Jerusalem while on a visit to the Holy Land. He also is said to have invoked a council that ended the last vestiges of Pelagianism. David died at his monastery in Menevia around the year 589, and his cult was approved in 1120 by Pope Callistus II. He is revered as the patron of Wales. Undoubtedly, St. David was endowed with substantial qualities of spiritual leadership. What is more, many monasteries flourished as a result of his leadership and good example. His staunch adherence to monastic piety bespeaks a fine example for modern Christians seeking order and form in their prayer life.

David of Wales B (AC) also known as Dewi 5th or 6th century. There is no certainty about the date though we know that St. David was a real personage, son of King Sant, a prince of Cardigan in far western Wales. All the information we have about him is based on the unreliable 11th century biography written by Rhygyfarch, the son of Bishop Sulien of St. David's. Rhygyfarch's main purpose was to uphold the claim of the Welsh bishopric to be independent of Canterbury, so little reliance can be placed on the document.
David, who may have been born at Henfynw in Cardigan, lived during the golden age of Celtic Christianity when saints were plentiful, many of them of noble rank--kings, princes, and chieftain--who lived the monastic life, built oratories and churches, and preached the Gospel.

Saint Cadoc founded the great monastery of Llancarfan. Saint Illtyd turned from the life of a soldier to that of a mystic and established the abbey of Llantwit, where tradition links his name to that of Sir Galahad. But greatest among them was David, cousin of Cadoc and pupil of Illtyd, who was educated in the White House of Carmarathen and who founded the monastery of Menevia in the place that now bears his name.

According to his biography, David became a priest, studied under Saint Paulinus, the disciple of Saint Germanus of Auxerre, on an unidentified island for several years. He then engaged in missionary activities, founded 12 monasteries from Croyland to Pembrokeshire, the last of which, at Mynyw (Menevia) in southwestern Wales, was known for the extreme asceticism of its rule, which was based on that of the Egyptian monks.

Here in this lovely and lonely outpost he gathered his followers. The Rule was strict, with but one daily meal, frequent fasts, and hours of unbroken silence. Their days were filled with hard manual labor and no plough was permitted in the work of the fields. "Every man his own ox," said St. David. Nor did David exempt himself from the same rigorous discipline: he drank nothing but water and so came to be known as David the Waterman; and long after vespers, when the last of his monks had retired to bed, he prayed on alone through the night.

We are told that he was of a lovable and happy disposition, and an attractive and persuasive preacher. It was perhaps his mother, the saintly Non, who had nurtured him carefully in the Christian faith, that he owed so many of his own fine qualities. It was not surprising, therefore, that when the time came for the appointment of a new archbishop of Wales the choice fell upon him.

At Brevi, in Cardiganshire, a great synod had been convened about 550, attended by a thousand members, but David, who kept aloof from temporal concerns, remained in his retreat at Menevia. The synod, however, insisted on sending for him. So great was the crowd and so intense the excitement that the voice of the aged and retiring archbishop Saint Dubricius could hardly be heard when he named David as his successor. David, who at first refused, came forward reluctantly, but when he spoke his voice was like a silver trumpet, and all could hear and were deeply moved; and in that hour of his succession a white dove was seen to settle upon his shoulders as if it were a sign of God's grace and blessing.

Without any facts to support the event, it is said that David was consecrated archbishop by the patriarch of Jerusalem while on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. But he loved Menevia and could not bring himself to leave it for Caerleon, the seat of the archbishopric, which he transferred to his own monastery by the wild headlands of the western sea, and which to this day is known by his name and remains a place of pilgrimage.

Again according to unsubstantiated legend, David convened a council, called the Synod of Victory, because it marked the final demise of Pelagianism, ratified the edicts of Brevi, and drew up regulations for the British Church.

"He opened," we are told, "many fountains in dry places, and across the centuries his words spoken in the hour of death still reach us: "Brothers and sisters, be joyful and keep your faith."

He died at Menevia and his cultus was reputedly approved by Pope Callistus II about 1120. Even his birth and death dates are uncertain, ranging from c. 454 to 520 for the former and from 560 to 601 for the latter (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Gill, Wade- Evans).

In art, St. David is a Celtic bishop with long hair and a beard, and a dove perched on his shoulder. He may be shown preaching on a hill, or holding his cathedral. He is the patron saint of Wales and especially venerated in Pembrokeshire (Roeder). No one seems to have a satisfactory explanation regarding the association of leeks with St. David's Day as in Shakespeare's Henry V, IV, 1 (Attwater).

589 ST DAVID, OR DEWI, BISHOP IN MYNYW, PATRON OF WALES      
IT is certainly unfortunate that we have no early history of St David (as we anglicize his name Dewi), the patron of Wales and perhaps the most celebrated of British saints. All the accounts preserved to us are based on the biography written about 1090 by Rhygyfarch (Ricemarch), son of Bishop Sulien of Saint Davids. Rhygyfarch was a learned man and his claim to have drawn on old written sources is probably justified; but he was concerned to uphold the fabulous primacy of the see of Saint Davids and he appears incapable of distinguishing historical facts from the wildest fables.

According to the legend David was the son of Sant, of princely family in Ceredigion, and of St Non (March 3), grand-daughter of Brychan of Brecknock ; and he was born perhaps about the year 520. "The place where holy David was educated ", says Rhygyfarch, "was called Vetus Rubus [Henfynyw in Cardigan] and he grew up full of grace and lovely to behold. And there it was that holy David learnt the alphabet, the psalms, the lessons for the whole year and the divine office; and there his fellow disciples saw a dove with a golden beak playing at his lips and teaching him to sing the praise of God." Ordained priest in due course, he afterwards retired to study for several years under the Welsh St Paulinus, who lived on an island, which has not been identified. He is said to have restored sight to his master, who had become blind through much weeping. Upon emerging from the monastery, David seems to have embarked upon a period of great activity, the details of which, however, are at least for the most part pure invention. To quote again from his biographer: "He founded twelve monasteries to the glory of God: first, upon arriving at Glastonbury, he built a church there; then he came to Bath, and there, causing deadly water to become healing by a blessing, he endowed it with perpetual heat, rendering it fit for people to bathe in; afterwards he came to Croyland and to Repton; then to Colfan and Glascwm, and he had with him a two-headed altar; after that he founded the monastery of Leominster. Afterwards, in the region of Gwent, in a place that is called Raglan, he built a church; then he founded a monastery in a place which is called Llangyfelach in the region of Gower." Finally, and here we are on surer ground, he settled in the extreme southwest corner of Wales, at Mynyw (Menevia), with a number of disciples and founded the principal of his many abbeys.

The community lived a life of extreme austerity. Hard manual labour was obligatory for all, and they were allowed no cattle to relieve them in tilling the ground. They might never speak without necessity, and they never ceased praying mentally, even when at work. Their food was bread, with vegetables and salt, and they drank only water, sometimes mingled with a little milk. For this reason ancient tradition begun upon an honourable respect", but no adequate explanation of the usage is forthcoming. There is no mention of leeks in St David's life. Pope Callistus II is said to have approved the cult of St David about the year 1120 and to have granted an indulgence to those who should visit his shrine-" two visits to Menevia being reckoned equal to one visit to Rome" -but this is doubtful. There can, however, be no question that he was a highly popular saint in his own country. More than fifty pre-Reformation churches in South Wales are known to have been dedicated in his honour. Moreover, even in England, Archbishop Arundel in 1398 ordered his feast to be kept in every church throughout the province of Canterbury. His feast is now observed in Wales and in the dioceses of Westminster and Portsmouth.

The earliest surviving mention of St David's name occurs in the Catalogue of Saints of Ireland (c. 730?) and in the Martyrology of Oengus (c. 800), but no details are added. The text of Rhygyfarch's Life has been accurately edited by A. W. Wade-Evans in Y Cymmrodor, vol. xxiv, and the same scholar has published a translation in English, abundantly annotated, together with some other relevant documents, in the Life of St David (1923); the Latin text is printed also in his Vitae Sanctorum Britanniae (1944). The adaptation of Rhygyfarch by Giraldus Cambrensis may be found in vol. iii of his works in the Rolls Series. See also LBS., vol. ii, pp. 285-32; J. E. Lloyd, History of Wales (1939), vol. i, pp. 152-159; S. M. Harris, St David in the Liturgy (1940); J. Barrett Davies in Blackfriars, vol. xxix (1948), pp. 121-126. For David's influence on the Irish church, see J. Ryan, Irish Monasticism (1931), pp. 113-114, 160-164 and passim; and on the alleged canonization, Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xlix (1931), pp. 211-213. An extremely full bibliography of all materials relating to St David has been published by Wyndham Morgan in connection with the Cardiff Public Library. See also the very beautiful volume printed at the Gregynog.Press in 1927, Ernest Rhys, The Life of St David; and Diana Latham, The Story of St David (1952).

St. Monan martyred  monk at St. Andrew's under St. Adrian
Monan worked as a missionary in the Firth of Forth area in Scotland until he and a large number of Christians were murdered by marauding Danes.

713 St Swithbert (Suidbert) was 1 of a band of 12 missionaries who, headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 evangelize Friesland
 Apud civitátem Werdam sancti Suitbérti Epíscopi, qui, témpore sancti Sérgii Papæ Primi, apud Frísones, Bátavos et álios Germániæ pópulos Evangélium prædicávit.
       At Kaiserswerdt, Bishop St. Swidbert, who, in the time of Pope Sergius, preached the Gospel among the Frisians, Batavians, and other Germanic peoples.

713 ST SWITHBERT, BISHOP

ST SWITHBERT (Suidbert) was one of a band of twelve missionaries who, headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 to evangelize the pagans of Friesland. A Northumbrian by birth, and brought up as a monk near the Scottish border, Swithbert, like so many other Englishmen of his period, had crossed over to Ireland in search of higher perfection. Here he had come under the direction and influence of St Egbert, who, though long consumed with zeal for the conversion of Lower Germany, had been restrained by divine command when he prepared a ship and was on the point of embarking in person. His place had then been taken by his disciple and devoted friend St Wigbert, but the mission was a complete failure, and after labouring for two years Wigbert returned home. Egbert, however, refused to be discouraged and never slackened in his appeal for volunteers, until he succeeded in collecting and training this second mission which he despatched. By this time the conditions had become much more favourable. The missionaries landed at the mouth of the Rhine and, according to Alcuin, made their way as far as Utrecht, where they set to work to preach and to teach.

Swithbert laboured mainly in Hither Friesland, which comprised the southern part of Holland, the northern portion of Brabant and the provinces of Guelderland and Cleves. His efforts were successful and multitudes were converted to the faith by his eloquence and zeal. His fellow labourers pressed him to obtain consecration that he might the better preside over his converts, and he returned to England for that purpose and also probably to collect more workers. There in 693 he was consecrated regionary bishop by St Wilfrid who, banished from his own see of York, was preaching the faith in Mercia.
Bede tells us that this took place at the time when the see of Canterbury was still vacant after the death of St Theo­dore, and doubtless St Swithbert was well known to St Wilfrid, who hailed from his own country of Northumbria. The newly appointed bishop then returned to his flock, but did not long remain with them-possibly because Pepin of Herstal was not satisfied at his election, but more likely simply to extend the missionary field.
After settling the churches he had founded, he left them in the care of St Willibrord and his companions and penetrated further into the country, up the right bank of the Rhine, where he converted to the faith a considerable number of the Boructuari, who inhabited the district between the Ems and the Lippe. A few years later, however, the Saxons invaded the country, which they devastated and occupied, and the saint, finding his work undone, withdrew into Frankish territory where he resolved to retire from the world and prepare his soul for death. Pepin, at the request of his wife Plectrudis, bestowed upon him a small island in the Rhine where he built a monastery which flourished for many years. Round this monastery grew up the town of Kaiserswerth, six miles north of Dusseldorf, but it is now united to the mainland, a channel of the Rhine having changed its course.

St Swithbert died in his abbey about the year 713, and has ever since been held in great veneration in Holland and the other places where he laboured. He is joint patron of St Peter's, Kaiserswerth, where his relics, which were found in 1626 in a silver shrine, are still preserved and honoured. Many miracles were ascribed to him and he is appealed to as a patron against angina. He is sometimes spoken of as St Swithbert the Elder, to distinguish him from St Swithbert the Younger, Bishop of Werden, with whom he was formerly often confused.
One very interesting memorial of St Swithbert which still survives is a manuscript of Livy now preserved in Vienna. This codex of fifth-century date seems to have belonged to him, for it bears his name and
he is described in it as bishop of Dorostat, now Wijk-bij-Duurstede on the Rhine.

The principal source for the life of St Swithbert is Bede's Ecclesiastical History (bk v, chs. 1)-11) with Plummer's notes, but see also Alcuin, De Sanctis Ebor. (v, 1073, in Jaffe's edition). The life by Marcellinus, printed in Surius, is a shameless fabrication. A panegyric and hymn by Radbod, Bishop of Utrecht, may be consulted in Migne, PL., vol. cxxxii, cc. 547-559. Cf. also the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. i, and Bouterwek, Der Apostel des Bergischen Landes; BHL., 7939-7942; Van der Essen, Étude sur les saints mérovingiens, pp. 428.seq.; and W. Levison, England and the Continent .. (1946), pp. 57-58

900 St. Leo Luke Basilian monastery Abbot of Corleone.
on Sicily. He spent eight decades as a monk.

977 St. Rudesind  Benedictine abbot bishop performing miracles
listed also as Rosendo. Born in Galicia, Spain, in 907 to a noble family, he was appointed bishop of Mondonedo at the age of eighteen and against his personal wishes. Soon after, he was given the duty of replacing the dissolute bishop of Compostela, his cousin Sisnand.
He distinguished himselfwith his military skills by leading armies in the field against invading Norsemen and Moors. When Sisnand escaped from imprisonment, he drove Rudesind from his office as bishop under threat of murder. Rudesind retired to the monastery of St. John Caveiro which he had built, and founded the abbey of Celanova at Villar, where he lived as a monk. He built several other monastic communities, installing in each strict observance of the Benedictine rule. Elected abbot of Celanova to succeed the first abbot, Franquila, he became a leading figure of his time, receiving visits from Church leaders throughout Portugal who sought his spiritual advice. A relative of St. Senorina, Rudesind earned a reputation for performing miracles. He died at Celanova and was canonized in 1195

977 St Rudesind, Or Rosendo, Bishop Of Dumium     
St Rudesind, or San Rosendo as he is called by his Spanish fellow countrymen, came of a noble Galician family. According to his biographer, Brother Stephen of Celanova, his mother was praying in St Saviour's church on Mount Cordoba when the birth of this son was divinely foretold to her. Rudesind grew up a serious and saintly youth, and when the see of Dumium (now Mondofledo) fell vacant, the people demanded that he should be appointed. In vain did he plead that he was only eighteen and quite unsuitable: they insisted, and eventually he had to accept consecration. As a bishop he was a great contrast to his cousin Sisnand, Bishop of Compostela, who neglected his duties and spent all his time in sports and dissipation. This caused such scandal that King Sancho put him in prison, and requested Rudesind to take over the diocese, which he did very reluctantly. On one occasion, when King Sancho was away, the Northmen descended upon Galicia, whilst at the same time the Moors invaded Portugal. Bishop Rudesind gathered together an army and, with the battle-cry, "Some put their trust in chariots and some in horses, but we will call on the name of the Lord", he led his men first against the Northmen whom he drove back to their ships, and then against the Moors whom he forced to retire into their own territories.
But at the death of King Sancho in 967 Sisnand broke out of prison and on Christmas night attacked Rudesind, whom he threatened with death unless he Vacated the see. The holy man made no resistance and retired into the monastery of St John of Caveiro which he had founded, and here he remained until he was instructed in a vision to build another abbey in a place that would be shown him. To his joy he found the place of his dream at Villar-a valley owned by his forefathers-"full of springs and streams and suitable for flowers, grain and herbs, as well as for fruit trees". Here he began to build and in eight years he completed the monastery, which he called Celanova. Over it he placed a saintly monk named Franquila, under whose obedience he chose to serve. With the help of this abbot he continued to build more monasteries as well as to enforce in those already founded a stricter observance of the Rule of St Benedict. After the death of Franquila, he was elected abbot, and so great was his influence that bishops and abbots came to him for advice and instruction and other religious houses placed themselves under his jurisdiction.
Many miracles are related by his biographer Stephen as having been wrought through St Rudesind-demoniacs and epileptics were healed, the blind cured, stolen property restored and captives liberated; and he prefaces his catalogue with a simple little personal experience of his own. "When I was at a tender age", he says, "my parents delivered me over to study letters. In order to escape from the toil of study and also from canings (which are the common lot of boys) I used to hide in the woods. As I could not be made amenable, even when I was securely tied up, my master, moved by a divine inspiration, went to the tomb of St Rudesind, lit a candle and prayed that if I were destined by the Just Judge for the order of the clergy, He would constrain me by the bonds of His virtue and would open my heart to learn. After this I became more docile, as I have often heard him say, and not so very long afterwards I received the religious habit in that very monastery." St Rudesind was canonized in 1195.

It is not certain whether the life attributed to the monk Stephen was really written by him, and in any case he lived nearly two centuries after the saint he commemorates. By far the greater part of the documents printed in the Bollandist Acta Sanctorum are taken up with the miracles after Rudesind's death. Much obscurity envelops his connection with the two sees, Dumium and Compostela, and whether he did not retire to Celanova before he was called away to take his cousin's place. See A. Lopez y Carballeira, San Rosendo (1909); and Gams, Kirchengeschichte Spaniens, vol. ii, pt 2, pp. 405-406. In Antony de Yepes, Coronica General de la Orden de San Benito, vol. v, pp. 14-16, is printed a Spanish translation of the bulls of beatification and canonization of San Rosendo. Ano Cristiano, by Justo Perez de Urbel (5 vols., 1933-1935) is useful for this and other Spanish saints, but it makes no claim to be a critical work.

1367 Bd Roger Le Fort, Archbishop Of Bourges immediately after death tomb a place of pilgrimage many miracles worked.
Roger Le For finds recognition in the Bollandist Acta Sanctorum on this day, though his cult has never been formally approved. He is said to have owed his elevation to the bishopric of Orleans to a jest. On the day of the election he had been criticizing the unseemly eagerness of the canons in pushing their claims without any thought of the responsibilities and difficulties involved in such a dignity. In mock earnest he said to one of those who were entering the chapter-house, " I hope the electors will think of me on the present occasion, for I too should like to be a bishop!" The canon, taking the words seriously, informed the rest, and the whole gathering acclaimed the name of the new candidate. The presiding prelate then rose and said, " Brethren, Heaven and earth are witnesses that you have made choice of Messire Roger for your bishop. Concurring as I do with your judgement, I declare that he upon whom your votes have fallen is the preordained pontiff of this city, for he is a man of eminent sanctity and wisdom. Assuredly this is the decision of the Holy Spirit, whom we cannot resist without guilt." Thereupon Roger was unanimously elected. It was in vain that he protested that he had only spoken in jest and that he had neither the desire nor the ability to undertake such a charge: the voice of the people came to ratify the choice of the clergy, and he was compelled to submit. On his entry into Orleans at his consecration an ancient custom was revived and all the prisoners in the city prison were released.
Roger was afterwards translated to Limoges, and in 1343 he became archbishop of Bourges. He is perhaps best remembered in connection with the feast of the Conception of our Lady, which he established in his diocese and which he did much to popularize. When he died, at the age of ninety, it was found that he had left all his possessions to enable poor boys to receive a good education. The archbishop's unsullied reputation and piety had caused him to be greatly venerated during his life, and immediately after his death his tomb became a place of pilgrimage where many miracles were said to be worked.
See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. i, and Cochard, Saints de l'É glise d'Orléans, pp. 487-495.
1375 BD BONAVITA A BLACKSMITH by trade and a Franciscan tertiary
Bd Bonavita lived and died in the little town of Lugo, fourteen miles west of Ravenna. It is recorded of him that whether walking or sitting, at work or at leisure, indoors or out of doors, he was liable to become so rapt in contemplation as to be oblivious to all that was round about him. He had the true Franciscan spirit, and when one bitter winter's day he found a poor wretch half frozen outside the church he stripped and gave the man his own clothes. The little urchins of the town pursued the nearly naked blacksmith with abuse and stones, but he reached home unhurt and unperturbed. Upon another beggar he bestowed his newly-mended shoes, and he made it his regular practice not only to feed the hungry, but to visit the prison and to help bury the dead.
A disastrous fire broke out which destroyed many of the houses in Lugo, but although nearly the whole population turned out in the hope of arresting its progress, Bonavita appears not even to have noticed it. When his attention was at last aroused he proceeded to the spot where the conflagration was raging, and as soon as he made the sign of the cross the fire was totally extinguished. We are told that through the same holy sign he also wrought many other wonders, but it must be admitted that the evidence for these marvels is not very satisfactory. The cult of this good tertiary seems never to have been formally approved.

See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. i, where the details given are derived mainly from Wadding, Annales, s.a, 1375.

1484  Bd Christopher Of Milan the apostle of Liguria great success in evangelizing that part of Italy, Dominican  endowed with the gift of prophecy
Bd Christopher who is called the apostle of Liguria because of his great success in evangelizing that part of Italy, received the Dominican habit at Milan, early in the fifteenth century. Soon after his ordination he began to be known as a great preacher, and his fame afterwards spread far and wide. His biographers record that his sermons, which brought about conversions and improvement of morals wherever he went, were always based on the Bible, the theology of St Thomas and the writings of the fathers, and that he denounced those preachers who, in their attempts to be popular and up-to-date, aired new-fangled notions and scorned to preach on the gospel for the day. Like a true missionary he wandered fearlessly and untiringly over dangerous passes and difficult country in his labours for souls. At Taggia, where he was particularly successful, the grateful inhabitants built Father Christopher a church and a monastery of which he became prior. He was endowed with the gift of prophecy. One day, as he was watching the people of Castellano dancing in the square, he exclaimed, ."You are now dancing merrily, but your ruin is nigh and your joy will be changed into sorrow" -a forecast which was fulfilled a few years later when the plague carried off most of the inhabitants. He also foresaw the destruction of Trioria by the French, and he warned the population of Taggia that they would flee from their city though not pursued, and that their river would leave its banks and destroy their gardens-prophecies which came true in every particular. When his last illness came upon him, he was preaching the Lent at Pigna. He had himself carried to his beloved Taggia and there breathed his last. His cult was confirmed in 1875.
See L. Brétaudeau, Un Martyr de la Revolution á Vanne, (1908) M. Misermont, Le bx P. R. Rogue (1937), and the decrees in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xxi (1929), pp. 564—567, and vol. xxvi (1934), pp. 304-308 and 292—296, which include a biographical summary.

1796 Bd Peter Rene Roque, Martyr ordained 1782 professor of theology in his native town Vannes refused the Constitutional Oath On being sentenced to death, Father Roque fell on his knees and gave fervent thanks to God guillotined on March 1, 1796
This
devoted Breton priest was born at Vannes in 1758. After his studies in the seminary of that city he was ordained in 1782, and for a while became chaplain to the Dames de la Retraite; but four years later he made his way to Paris to join the Lazarists, or Congregation of the Mission of St Vincent de Paul.
Even before his noviceship was completed he was sent to act as professor of theology in his native town, and there when the Revolution broke out he showed the utmost heroism in devoting himself to every form of apostolic work.
He refused to take the Constitutional Oath which was tendered him and for some time lived disguised and in hiding. In the end, having been betrayed by some miscreant, he was arrested by the revolutionaries; but even confinement in gaol did not put an end to his activities, for he found means to write in defence of religion and to render numberless services, both bodily and spiritual, to his fellow-prisoners. On being sentenced to death, Father Roque fell on his knees and gave fervent thanks to God. He was guillotined on March 1, 1796, and as soon as peace was restored to the Church an episcopal process was begun with a view to his beatification. This came about in 1934, and in the same year his remains were enshrined in Vannes cathedral.

See L. Brétaudeau, Un Martyr de la Revolution à Vannes (1908); M. Misermont, Le bx P. R. Rogue (1937), and the decrees in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xxi (1929), pp. 564-567, and vol. xxvi (1934), pp. 304-308 and 292-296, which include a biographical summary.


Mary's Divine Motherhood
   Wednesday  Saints of this Day March  01 Kaléndis Mártii.  
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  February 2017
Comfort for the Afflicted
That all those who are afflicted, especially the poor, refugees,
and marginalized, may find welcome and comfort in our communities.
ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 01
492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet.  492 ST FELIX II (III), POPE  483 - 492
ACCORDING to the Roman Martyrology this Pope Felix was an ancestor (great-great-grandfather) of Pope St Gregory the Great it recalls Gregory’s statement that when his aunt, St Tharsilla, lay dying, Felix appeared in vision and summoned her to Heaven. The martyrology Calls him Felix III, through the long-standing but erroneous numeration of the antipope Felix as Pope St Felix II (see July 29).

549 St. Herculanus Bishop of Perugia, Italy marthred by Ostrogoths.        At Perugia, the transferral of the body of St. Herculanus, bishop and martyr, who was beheaded by order of Totila, king of the Goths.  Forty days after the decapitation, Pope St. Gregory relates that the head had been rejoined to the body as if it had never been touched by the sword:  beheaded by King Totila of the Ostrogoths. He is probably the same Herculanus sent to Perugia from Syria to evangelize the region.
 589 ?  St. David of Wales missionary priest monk dove lift him high above the people David is the patron saint of Wales and perhaps the most famous of British saints. Ironically, we have little reliable information about him. It is known that he became a priest, engaged in 589 ?  St. David of Wales David, cousin of Cadoc and pupil of Illtyd. David is the patron saint of Wales and perhaps the most famous of British saints. Many stories and legends sprang up about David and his Welsh monks. Their austerity was extreme. They worked in silence without the help of animals to till the soil. Their food was limited to bread, vegetables and water.
 713 St Swithbert (Suidbert) 1 of band 12 missionaries headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 evangelize Friesland. At Kaiserswerdt, Bishop St. Swidbert, who, in the time of Pope Sergius, preached the Gospel among the Frisians, Batavians, and other Germanic peoples.
ST SWITHBERT (Suidbert) was one of a band of twelve missionaries who, headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 to evangelize the pagans of Friesland. A Northumbrian by birth, and brought up as a monk near the Scottish border, Swithbert, like so many other Englishmen of his period, had crossed over to Ireland in search of higher perfection. Here he had come under the direction and influence of St Egbert, who, though long consumed with zeal for the conversion of Lower Germany, had been restrained by divine command when he prepared a ship and was on the point of embarking in person. His place had then been taken by his disciple and devoted friend St Wigbert, but the mission was a complete failure, and after labouring for two years Wigbert returned home. Egbert, however, refused to be discouraged and never slackened in his appeal for volunteers, until he succeeded in collecting and training this second mission which he despatched. By this time the conditions had become much more favourable. The missionaries landed at the mouth of the Rhine and, according to Alcuin, made their way as far as Utrecht, where they set to work to preach and to teach.


Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 02




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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.