Friday Saints of this Day March  04 Quarto Nonas Mártii.  

Saving American Children from painful deaths at the hands of murderers
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Day 24 40 Days for Life

 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

March 4 – Our Lady of Sorrows (Italy, 1603) – 15th apparition of Lourdes
 
They can leave truly knowing that Mary is ever at their side
Pope Francis
 
It is most fitting that on this day we invoke the Blessed Virgin Mary above all as Mother of mercy. The door we have opened is, in fact, a Door of Mercy. Those who cross its threshold are called to enter into the merciful love of the Father with complete trust and freedom from fear; they can leave this Basilica knowing – truly knowing – that Mary is ever at their side.

She is the Mother of mercy, because she bore in her womb the very Face of divine mercy, Jesus, Emmanuel, the Expectation of the nations, the “Prince of Peace” (Is 9:5). The Son of God, made incarnate for our salvation, has given us his Mother, who joins us on our pilgrimage through this life, so that we may never be left alone, especially at times of trouble and uncertainty.

Mary is the Mother of God, she is the Mother of God who forgives, who bestows forgiveness, and so we can rightly call her Mother of forgiveness… Following Jesus’ example and by his grace, she herself could forgive those who killed her innocent Son.  For us, Mary is an icon of how the Church must offer forgiveness to those who seek it.
 
Holy mass and opening of the Holy Door – Basilica of St Mary Major – Friday, January 1, 2016 - Mary Most Holy, the Holy Mother of God
www.vatican.va

 
The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

March 4 – Our Lady of Sorrows (Italy, 1603)
- 15th Apparition of Lourdes (France, 1858)
 
Her Heart was Pierced by Seven Swords
 To illustrate the sorrows of the Virgin Mother, painters represent her Heart pierced by seven swords, a symbol of the seven principal sorrows of the Mother of God, which is why she is crowned as Queen of Martyrs. Here is a list of the Seven Sorrows of Our Lady, whose evocation is dear to her true children:

1. Saint Simeon’s Prophecy (Luke 2:34-35)
2. The Flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13-21)
3. The Loss of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-51)
4. The Meeting of Mary and Jesus on the Way to Calvary (Luke 23:27-31)
5. The Crucifixion and Death of Jesus on the Cross (John 19:25-27)
6. After His Descent from the Cross, Mary Receives the Body of Her Dead Son
7. The Burial of Jesus.

 
March 3 – Our Lady of Help (Italy) – 14th apparition of Lourdes (France, 1858)
"You will be all right: Mary is here, she can see us"
The 68th unexplained healing in Lourdes was officially acknowledged by Bishop Delmas, the bishop of Angers, France, on Sunday, March 27, 2011. The beneficiary, Serge François, said:

"Following surgery in June 1997, my left leg was left semi- paralyzed ... I never asked Mary for help. I always prayed for the other invalids.  It happened in the afternoon of April 12, 2002. I was at the Saint Bernadette Church, across from the grotto, for the anointing the sick. At the end of the celebration, a young lady next to me started sobbing. I put my arms around her shoulders to comfort her, as I would have done to my own daughter.
"It's all right, Mary is here, she sees us," I told her.

At that time, an unusual shiver ran through my whole body... I turned and suddenly walked away. It was only at the top of Saint Joseph Hill that I realized the change. I usually would go up using the wrought iron fence as a handrail! I was stunned... I went to see the priest who accompanied us. And the Anjou Hospitality House filled out a declaration of healing at the Medical Findings Office three days later."
 
www.famillechretienne.fr

 
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.


Our Lord gives to souls of prayer a deep understanding of Himself.
He never deceives them. -- St. Peter Julian Eymard


  254 St. Lucius I a Roman elected Pope to succeed Pope St. Cornelius
  254 Item pássio sanctórum Archelái, Cyrílli et Phótii.
          St. Caius Palatinus and twenty-seven others who were cast into the sea.
4th v. St. Basil and Companions Martyred bishop with others
4th v. St. Adrian and twenty-three others
 475 Saint Gerasimus; lived in the Thebaid, then wilderness near the Jordan river where he built a monastery and became renowned for the virtue of his life; During 5 days no cooked food was eaten only small amount of dried bread, roots and water brought from the monastery; Saturdays and Sundays all monks went to monastery attend Divine Liturgy receive Holy Communion, then served cooked food and a little wine at the refectory; work completed during week given to the abbot. On Sunday, afternoon each monk departed once again for his solitary cell in the wilderness, taking only a little bread, roots, a vessel of water and palm branches to weave baskets; lion for a pet.
 680 St. Owen Benedictine monk  
 705 St. Basinus Benedictine bishop of Trier Germany  
 800 St. Appian Benedictine hermit and missionary  
 875 St. Adrian bishop martyred missionary possibly royal blood
1038 St. Felix of Rhuys Benedictine abbot hermit
1123 St. Peter of Pappacarbone Benedictine bishop leadership, care, and wisdom
1188 BD HUMBERT III OF SAVOY
1310 Blessed Romeo Italian Carmelite lay brother  (Romaeus) of Limoges, OC (AC)
1483 St. Casimir born of kings slept little, spending his nights in prayer
1590 BD CHRISTOPHER BALES, MARTYR received his education abroad at the English College in Rome and at the Douai College at Rheims
1877 St. Placide Viel Nun and mother general relief during Franco Prussian War
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1). 
Day 24 40 Days for Life
Dear Readers
 
Just yesterday, we focused on two 40 Days for Life vigil locations where abortion facilities have closed their doors and gone out of business – in Jacksonville, North Carolina and Augusta, Georgia.

In other cities, we have seen 40 Days for Life campaigns where the abortion staff packed everything up and moved to a new location.
Without fail … the peaceful prayer vigil followed them to the new spot.
That type of persistence has paid off ... as seen in this exciting development in Georgia.
 
Marietta, Georgia
From Marietta comes the very encouraging news that the abortion center where the 40 Days for Life vigil takes place has stopped doing abortions … and announced closure plans.
The daily prayers in front of this facility are being answered!
This abortion center was in another location previously. It closed there … then reopened in a different site. And faithful volunteers brought their prayer vigil to this new location.
Colleen, the 40 Days for Life coordinator, said the ending of abortions is a tribute “to all the hard work that pro-life folks have done … arriving daily at 5 am and not relenting.”
 
According to media reports, the owners never disclosed that the new location would be used for abortions. There were also accusations that they performed medical procedures they were not licensed to do.
Until very recently, the center had done between 6 and 10 abortions on a typical day – but not anymore.
 “We are celebrating that no babies are dying there now!” Colleen said.
 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
The sidewalk in front of an abortion center always sees a jumble of emotions … and that’s evident in a pair of stories from Pittsburgh.
 
Vigil participants couldn’t help but notice the young man who stood in a doorway near the abortion center … in tears. He was trying to remain composed and be strong … but it was just too difficult. He said his girlfriend was planning to abort his child, and he couldn’t stop her.
 “He was tormented with guilt,” said one of the volunteers, “thinking it was his fault because he recently lost his job. They have no food and will not be able to pay their bills.”
The prayer team tried to console him and offered to take him to an agency that could help him find work. One person even promised to assist with groceries and babysitting.
Volunteers asked him to keep in touch, but they haven’t heard back. They’re asking for continued prayer for this young man and his girlfriend.
This somber scene later brightened considerably when a couple left Planned Parenthood to show volunteers an ultrasound image.
The young woman seemed a bit surprised when the technician asked if she wanted to see the screen … but understood when she saw the picture.
It was twins!
Seeing that ultrasound image was all it took – they changed their minds about abortion!
Here’s today’s devotional from Carmen Pate of Alliance Ministries.
 
Day 24 intention
Pray that God will continue to bless the efforts that have gone into the 40 Days for Life campaign, as we trust Him for the results.
 
Scripture
Now these are Your servants and Your people, whom You have redeemed by Your great power, and by Your strong hand. O Lord, I pray, please let Your ear be attentive to the prayer of Your servant, and to the  prayer of Your servants who desire to fear Your name. — Nehemiah 1:10-11
 
Reflection from Carmen Pate
Nehemiah provides an awesome blueprint for volunteers in God’s service, particularly those responding to the devastation abortion has caused our nation.

Nehemiah grieved for God's reputation as he witnessed the condition of the city walls of Jerusalem. The walls were broken down which was seen by neighboring people as a sign of weakness on the part of Jerusalem's God. No wall meant no security for the city and its people.

We learn from his story that he covered every detail in prayer; inspired others to join the cause; organized others to help do the work; confronted opposition directly and turned to God when discouraged; and finally celebrated what was accomplished and gave God all the glory!

Like Nehemiah, we must acknowledge God’s sovereignty as we serve Him before a mocking world. We too need to be reminded that we are “fighting” for our families. We too must have an attitude of confession and repentance before a Holy God. We must pray for strength, refute slander, and not be diverted from our work.

Like Nehemiah, we will draw attention from the enemy when we are seeking to protect the well-being of God’s people. We too must stand firm and seek God's help to persevere until the task is done. We too will be victorious.
 
Prayer
Yours, O Lord, is the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the victory, and the majesty: for all that is in heaven and in the earth is Yours. We pray for your continued guidance and protection throughout the remainder of this 40 day campaign.

May we be steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in Your work, knowing that our labor will not be in vain. We pray in the name of Jesus, Amen.
 
Printable devotional
To download today’s devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share with friends:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day24.pdf

March 4 - 15th Apparition at Lourdes  Our Lady of Healing (I)
In the city that is regarded as the world’s largest crystal factory, in a tower that is the only remnant of the thirteenth-century Franciscan Friary known a Saint Savior’s, is enshrined a small oaken figure of the Blessed Virgin that is known locally as Our Lady of Waterford or as Our Lady of Healing.  The history of the statue begins with the Reverend Nicholas Fagan, an Irishman by birth, who took the habit of religion in the famous Cistercian Abbey of Farrara in Castile, Spain, in the latter part of Queen Elizabeth’s reign. After some years he was sent back to Ireland.
He managed to preserve his life and engage in apostolic labors, in spite of being exposed to many dangers. More than once he was beaten and wounded by his enemies.

Reverend Fagan was very intent on promoting devotion to the Blessed Virgin as a powerful means of restoring and strengthening the Catholic Faith in Ireland. For this purpose he brought with him from Seville an image of Our Blessed Lady, which he enshrined in the hospital of St John in the city of Waterford. Don Gaspard Jongelino relates in his work entitled, Propora di S. Bernardo, that “Large numbers of Catholics devoutly visited the image where Our Lord, through the intercession of His Blessed Mother, worked many and astounding miracles at the shrine.”
Joan Carroll Cruz, Miraculous Images of Our Lady, Tan Books, 1993, page 135. (www.tanbooks.com)
March 4 - Our Lady of Guard (Arragon, Spain) - 15th Apparition in Lourdes - Saint Casimir
  Prayer of Saint Casimir, Patron Saint of Lithuania, Poland and Russia
Prince Casimir chose a life of celibacy and asceticism. He died at the age of twenty-six from tuberculosis, on March 4, 1484. He was buried in the cathedral at Vilna (now Vilnius, Lithuania). When in 1604 his tomb was opened for translation to the church that Sigismund III built in his name, his body was found to be fresh and whole. He was holding this prayer to the Virgin in his hands:

Every day, O my soul, pay your respects to Mary, Make her feasts solemn and celebrate her brilliant virtues; Contemplate and admire her elevation;
Proclaim her blessedness both as Mother and Virgin; Honor her so that she delivers you from the weight of your sins;
Invoke her so as not to be driven by the torrent of passion; I do know if anybody can honor Our Lady worthily Yet he who keeps silent in her praises is senseless; Everyone should exalt and love her in a special way, And never cease to cherish and pray to her;
O Mary, the honor and glory of all women, You who God has raised above all creatures;
O Virgin of Mercy, hear the prayers of those who never stop praising you; Purify those who are guilty and make them worthy of heaven;
Hail, O holy Virgin, through whom the gates of heaven were opened to undeserving souls
You, who, the old serpent's snares never managed to seduce; You repair and console despairing souls Preserve us from the evils that will fall on the wicked; Obtain perpetual peace for me, And save me from the misfortune of the flames of Gehenna;
Obtain for me to be chaste and modest, gentle, kind, sober, pious, prudent, upright and the enemy of all falsehood;
Grant me meekness, love of harmony and purity; Make me strong and constant on the path of righteousness.
Saint Casimir (d. 1484)


254 St. Lucius I a Roman elected Pope to succeed Pope St. Cornelius on June 25, 253, and ruled only eighteen months.
Rom æ, via Appia, natális sancti Lúcii Primi, Papæ et Mártyris; qui, primo in persecutióne Valeriáni ob Christi fidem exsílio relegátus, et póstmodum divíno nutu ad Ecclésiam suam redíre permíssus, tandem, cum plúrimum advérsus Novatiános laborásset, cápitis obtruncatióne martyrium complévit.  Eum vero sanctus Cypriánus summis láudibus celebrávit.
At Rome, on the Appian Way, during the persecution of Valerian, the birthday of St. Lucius, pope and martyr, who was first exiled for the faith of Christ, but being permitted by divine Providence to return to his church, after labouring long against the Novatians, he suffered martyrdom by beheading.  His praises have been published by St. Cyprian.
254 ST LUCIUS I, Pope
ALMOST immediately after his accession the persecution which had been initiated by Decius was renewed under Gallus, and Pope Lucius I was banished to a place the name of which has not been recorded. But he had been but a short time in exile when he and his companions were recalled, to the great joy of his people who flocked in crowds to meet him. On this occasion St Cyprian wrote him a letter of congratulation. In it he assures the pope that he had not lost the palm of martyr­dom, although, like the three children in the fiery furnace, he had been preserved by God from death. The letter adds: “We do not cease in our sacrifices and prayers to God the Father and to Christ His Son, giving thanks and offering supplication that He who perfects all may consummate in you the glorious crown of your confession. He perhaps has only recalled you that your glory may not be hidden, for it is fitting that the victim who owes to his brethren an example of virtue and faith should be sacrificed in their presence.”

In another letter, which St Cyprian afterwards wrote to Pope St Stephen, he quotes St Lucius as having condemned the Novatian heretics for their refusal of absolution and communion to those who had fallen but were penitent.

According to Eusebius, St Lucius did not occupy the pontifical chair for more than eight months. Although in the Roman Martyrology on this day Lucius is described as “Martyr in the persecution of Valerian”, it is practically certain that he was no longer living when the persecution of Valerian began, and it is improbable that he suffered death as a martyr. The chronographer of 354 does not insert his name in the “depositio martyrum”, but in the “depositio episcoporum”, and the remnants of the catacomb inscription discovered by De Rossi supply no indica­tion of martyrdom. No credence can be given to the statement of the Liber Pontificalis that St Lucius, as he was being led to death, virtually nominated Stephen as his successor.

Certain relics of St Lucius are said to be treasured in Bologna, whilst a head, reputed to be that of this pope, was long venerated in the cathedral of Roeskilde, near Copenhagen—the burial-place of the Danish kings—and Pope Lucius is honoured as chief patron of that city; but most probably the relics in Sweden and in Bologna are the remains of one of the two other saints of the name of Lucius who are commemorated on this same day. The pope’s body was buried in the catacomb of St Callistus, but the remains after an early translation were transferred to the church of St Cecilia, where they now lie, by order of Clement VIII.
See Duchesne, Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, pp. xcvii and 153. St Cyprian (Hartel), Pt ii Pp. 695 and 748; De Rossi, Roma Sotterranea, vol. ii, 62—70; and cf. the Acta Sanctorum. March, vol. i, and Allard, Histoire des persecutions, vol. iii, pp. 27 seq.
He was exiled briefly during the persecution of Emperor Gallus, but was allowed to return to Rome. A letter of St. Cyprian praises him for condemning the Novatians for their refusal of the sacraments to those who had fallen but were penitent. He did not suffer martyrdom, as a erroneously stated in the Liber Pontificalis, but died probably on March 4 in Rome and was buried in St. Callistus' catacomb. The remains after an early translation were transferred to the church of St. Cecilia, where they now lie, by order of Clement VIII.
4th v. Nicomedíæ sancti Hadriáni Mártyris, cum áliis vigínti tribus, qui omnes, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, martyrium crurifrágio consummárunt.  Eórum relíquiæ, a Christiánis Byzántium delátæ, reverénti honóre sepúltæ fuérunt; inde póstea sancti Hadriáni corpus Romam translátum fuit sexto Idus Septémbris, quo die festívitas ejus potíssimum celebrátur.
At Nicomedia, in the reign of Emperor Diocletian, the martyr St. Adrian and twenty-three others, who endured martyrdom by having their limbs crushed. 

Their remains were taken to Byzantium by the Christians, and buried there with reverence and honour.  Afterwards the body of St. Adrian was transferred to Rome on the 8th of September, on which day his feast is observed.
4th v. St. Basil and Companion Martyred bishop with others
Apud Chersonésum pássio sanctórum Episcopórum Basilíi, Eugénii, Agathodóri, Elpídii, Æthérii, Capitónis, Ephræm, Néstoris et Arcádii.
In Chersonesus, the passion of the saintly bishops, Basil, Eugene, Agathodorus, Elpidius, Aetherius, Capito, Ephrem, Nestor, and Arcadius. 
Agathodorus, Elpidius, Ephraem, slftherius, Eugene, Arcadius, Capito, and Nestor.
These prelates served as bishops. Nestor and Arcadius were rnartyred on Cyprus. The others died in the Crimean area and elsewhere in southern Russia.
  Eódem die sancti Caji Palatíni, in mare demérsi, et aliórum vigínti septem.
On the same day, St. Caius Palatinus and twenty-seven others who were cast into the sea.
254 Item pássio sanctórum Archelái, Cyrílli et Phótii.
Caius, Palatinus und 27 Gefährten MM Nikomedia
Also, the passion of Saints Archelaus, Cyril and Photius.
475 Saint Gerasimus; lived in the Thebaid, then wilderness near the Jordan river where he built a monastery and became renowned for the virtue of his life; During 5 days no cooked food was eaten only small amount of dried bread, roots and water brought from the monastery; Saturdays and Sundays all monks went to monastery attend Divine Liturgy receive Holy Communion, then served cooked food and a little wine at the refectory; work completed during week given to the abbot. On Sunday, afternoon each monk departed once again for his solitary cell in the wilderness, taking only a little bread, roots, a vessel of water and palm branches to weave baskets.
   Born in the province of Lycia in the southern part of Asia Minor. His parents were wealthy, prosperous people. From a very early age St. Gerasimus developed a great love of God and, as he grew older, he found he had little in common with other young people of his own age, whw were only interested in having fun. He realized that the world and an attachment to it only brought many needless cares and sufferings, so he yearned to serve God and to be pleasing to Him.

    Thus it was that St. Gerasimus became a monk and departed for the desert of Egypt, to the region known as the Thebaid. He spent some time there, growing in Spiritual strength and wisdom, and then he again returned to his native province of Lycia. Later, towards the end of the reign of the holy Emperor Theodosius the Younger (who ruled from 408-450), he went to Palestine, where he settled in the wilderness near the Jordan river. There he built a monastery and became renowned for the virtue of his life.

     The monastery of St. Gerasimus was built approximately 25 miles from Jerusalem and about 100 vards from the Jordan River. At that time there were more than 70 desert dwellers there and St. Gerasimus established the following rule for these strugglers. Five days a week each monk was to keep silent in a solitary cell, doing simple handiwork such as weaving mats or baskets out of palm leaves. During these five days no cooked food was eaten; the only food was a small amount of dried bread, roots and water brought from the monastery. On Saturdays and Sundays all the monks went ,to the monastery to attend the Divine Liturgy and receive Holy Communion. Afterwards they were served cooked food and a little wine at the refectory. The work that had been completed during the week was given to the abbot. On Sunday, afternoon each monk departed once again for his solitary cell in the wilderness, taking only a little bread, roots, a vessel of water and palm branches to weave baskets. Each monk had only a single old robe, a mat on which to sleep and a small vessel for water. Whenever the monks left their cells, the doors were left open so that anyone could enter and take whatever he wished of the monks' few possessions. In this way they prevented any attachment to material possessions. During Great Lent St. Gerasimus ate nothing at all until the radiant day of Pascha. His bodily and spiritual strength was sustained solely by receiving the Holy Mysteries.

    Monks of his monastery were fond of recalling how a lion came to greatly love the saint and served him obediently and with great humility. One day, as St. Gerasimus was walking through the Jordan desert, he met a lion. The lion stretched out his paw and St. Cerasimus saw that it was infected and very swollen. The lion gazed pleadingly and meekly at the elder who sat down immediately to inspect the paw. He discovered that a thorn had lodged in the lion's paw and this was the cause of his suffering. The saint carefully removed the thorn, cleansed the wound of all the pus and then wrapped it with his handkerchief. From then on the lion faithfully followed the saint like a disciple. St. Gerasimus marveled at the lion's intelligence, meekness and willingness to eat bread and whatever else could be found for him. The lion was given an obedience in the monastery. The monks had a donkey which carried water from the Jordan River for the brethren. The lion was entrusted with the task of accompanying the donkey to the river and guarding it while it grazed on the riverbank.

     One day the lion fell asleep in the sun, leaving the donkey to graze peacefully. Just then an Arabian merchant happened to pass by with his caravan of camels and saw the donkey. Thinking the animal was a stray, he tied it to his line of camels and took it with him. The lion awoke and began to search for the donkey, but it was nowhere to be found. The beast returned to the monastery and went immediately to St. Gercsimus who, seeing his dejected expression, thought he had eaten the donkey and asked, "Where is the donkey?" The lion stood in silence, hanging his head in shame. The elder praised the lion for not running away after his evil deed and instructed him to do the work of the donkey from then on. The monks loaded a large barrel on the lion's hack, as they had done before with the donkey, and sent him to the river to fetch water. One day a soldier came to the monastery to pray, and seeing the lion carrying the water, took pity on him and gave the monks three gold pieces to buy another donkey. The lion once again resumed his former obedience of guarding the donkey.

      Some time later, the Arabian merchant once again passed by the Jordan on his way to sell wheat in Jerusalem. The donkey was still with him. That day, the lion happened to be near the river and as the caravan approached he recognized the donkey. Roaring loudly, he rushed towards him, frightening the merchant and his companions who fled in great terror. The lion grasped the donkey's reins in his teeth, as he had done previously, and led it together with the string of camels to the saint. When he saw the saint he roared joyously at having found the lost donkey. St. Getanimus smiled gently and told his monks that the lion had been blamed most unfairly. The lion was given the name 'Jordan' and he continued to be a most faithful 'disciple'. He was never absent from the monastery for more than five days at a time.

     St. Gerasimus departed to the Lord in the year 475 and was buried by his sorrowing brethren there in his monastery. The lion was not in the monastery at that time. When later he arrived, he began to search for the saint. ... Father Sabbatius tried to explain why it was that the elder could not be found. “Jordan, our elder has left us orphans; he has departed to the Lord." The lion was not to be comforted; he refused the food that was offered and continued searching for his St. Gerasimus, roaring in great confusion. Fr. Sabbatius and the other monks stroked Jordan gently on the back and pleaded, "The elder has gone to the Lord; he has left us!" No words or explanations could stop the sorrowful roaring of the lion. He kept searching, now in great distress. Finally Fr. Sabbatius said, "If you do not believe us, then come with us: we will show you the place where the elder rests." Jordan was led to the tomb near the church where St. Gerasimus was buried. Fr. Sabbatius explained to the lion, "We have buried our elder here." Fr. Sabbatius then fell to his knees and with a heavy heart began to weep. The Lion now realized what had happened. He gave one last mighty roar, struck his head on the ground and died on the elder's grave.

    The lion's love and devotion for St. Gerasimus is an example of the love and obedience the animals had for Adam before his fall into sin and his expulsion from Paradise. From this account we also learn how St. Gerasimus pleased the Lord, from his youth unto old age, until he was granted to be numbered among the saints with whom he now glorifies the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.

680 St. Owen Benedictine monk.
Once a steward in the household of St. Etheldreda, he entered a Benedictine monastery at Last
705 St. Basinus Benedictine bishop of Trier Germany.
He was abbot of St. Maximin Abbey in Trier until succeeding St. Numerian as bishop. Basinus was a patron of the English missionaries of the time, including St. Willibrord. Basinus retired to his former abbey, where he died.

800 St. Appian Benedictine hermit and missionary.
Appian was born in Liguria, in Italy. He entered the Benedictine monastery of St. Peter of Ciel d'Oro in Pavia, where he adopted the life of a hermit. Appian lived as a recluse on the shores of the Adriatic Sea, but his mere presence served to convert many in the area.

875 St. Adrian bishop martyred missionary possibly royal blood
Adrian was born in Pannonia, in modern Hungary, and was appointed bishop of the local diocese. He resigned to undertake a missionary project. After laboring among the Scots, he retired to a monastery in the area of Firth of Forth. He and his fellow religious were murdered by Danish Viking invaders. In some records, St. Adrian is identified with St. Odhern of Ireland, and in other accounts he is listed as a missionary to Ireland.
875? SS. ADRIAN AND HIS COMPANIONS, MARTYRS
IN the ninth century, during one of their numerous descents upon the coast of Scotland, the Danes massacred St Adrian and a number of his companions who, after having helped to evangelize Fifeshire, had retired into a monastery on the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth. The early history of these saints is uncertain. According to the Aberdeen Breviary, St Adrian was of royal descent and a native of Pannonia in Hungary, where he became a bishop. Fired by missionary zeal, he came to Scotland with Clodion, Gaius, Stolbrand, Monan and 6602 other com­panions—all of whom perished with him. As a missionary bishop he appears to have had no fixed see, but he has been credited with the bishopric and even the archbishopric of Saint Andrews. Some modern historians identify St Adrian with the Irish St Odhran, and are disposed to follow Boece, who states that all the martyrs were Angles and Scots. The Angles may well have been the followers of St Acca who, when driven from Northumberland, founded a bishopric among the Picts, whilst the Scots or Irish will have been Arian and his friends, who were probably obliged by Danish invasions to leave Ireland and so came to the Firth of Forth. Fordun gives the number of martyrs as 100; there certainly was a battle in 875 between the Scots and the Danes, in the course of which many of the Scots were killed. In the Aberdeen Breviary, printed in 1509, the martyrs had an office with nine lessons, and Wyntoun celebrates their death in a metrical chronicle:

And upon Haly Thurysday
Saint Adrian thai sloe in May

With mony of his cumpany
In that haly lIe thai ly.

St David I built a priory on the island and placed it under the Benedictines of Reading, but it afterwards passed to the canons regular of Saint Andrews. The Isle of May became a favourite place of pilgrimage, and as such it was visited several times by the Scottish King James IV.

See the Aberdeen Breviary, and KSS., pp. 266—268.
900 holy martyrs who were buried in the cemetery of St. Cecilia.
Romæ, via Appia, sanctórum Mártyrum nongentórum, qui pósiti sunt in cœmetério ad sanctam Cæcíliam.
At Rome, on the Appian Way, nine hundred holy martyrs who were buried in the cemetery of St. Cecilia.
1038 St. Felix of Rhuys Benedictine abbot hermit
Born in Brittany, France, he was a recluse on Quessant Island and then entered the Benedictines at Flery, Saint Benoit sur Loire. He restored Rhuys Abbey.

1123 St. Peter of Pappacarbone Benedictine bishop leadership, care, and wisdom
Born at Salerno, he entered the Benedictines and was a monk at Cava, in southern Italy Sent to Cluny in 1062, he spent six years there and then was named bishop of Policastro in 1079. This office was not to his temperament, and he resigned to return to Cava where he was appointed coadjutor abbot. His first effort at being abbot was troubled with difficulties as the monks found his rule too severe. He departed the house of Cava for a time, but then came back at the request of the monks, and distinguished himself with renewed leadership, care, and wisdom. Through him, Cava became the center of numerous and thriving Benedictine houses.

1123 ST PETER OF CAVA, BISHOP OF POLICASTRO
PETER PAPPACARBONE was a native of Salerno in Italy, a nephew of St Alferius, founder of the monastery of Cava, and entered upon the religious life at a very early age under St Leo, the second abbot. He distinguished himself at once by his piety, abstemiousness and love of solitude. At this time the fame of the abbey of Cluny had spread far and wide, and the young monk was so attracted by what he had heard that about 1062 he obtained permission to leave Cava and go to France. When the older monks at Cluny would have sent him to the school to be trained, their abbot, St Hugh, disagreed, saying that Peter might be young in years but that he was a full-grown man in devotion. The abbot’s opinion was abundantly justified, for Peter proved himself well among that household of holy men and he remained there for some six years. He was then recalled to Italy, having been released by St Hugh apparently at the request of the archdeacon of Rome, Hilde­brand (who was afterwards Pope St Gregory VII).

St Peter was appointed the first bishop of Policastro, but he found himself unfitted for the turmoil of the world and for the secular cares which devolved upon him. He obtained permission to resign and retired to Cava, where Abbot Leo, realizing that he himself was becoming too old to govern, nominated him as his successor and withdrew. The monks by their votes had confirmed the election of their new superior, but soon found the strict rule he had brought from Cluny extremely irksome: they began to murmur and rebel, and some of them carried their complaints to the aged Leo in his retirement. St Peter, far from resisting and equally far from relaxing the rule, quietly left and betook himself to another monastery. It was not long before the monks of Cava, urged by Abbot Leo, came to entreat St Peter to return, which he consented to do. Thereafter it was remarked that those who had the most vehemently opposed him were now foremost in welcoming the rule they had previously spurned.

Under the government of Abbot Peter the monastery flourished amazingly. Not only did numbers of aspirants to the religious life flock to him from all sides, but men and women in the world showered money and lands upon the community, which was enabled to minister far and wide to the sick and the poor. The abbey itself had to be enlarged to admit the new members, and a new church was built, to the dedication of which came Pope Urban II, who had been with St Peter at Cluny and had remained his close friend. The description of this occasion was preserved in the chronicles of Cava, where it is stated that Bd Urban talked freely with the abbot and monks, as though “forgetting that he was pope”. St Peter lived to a great age and died in 1123.

The abbey of Cava still exists, and in 1912 the monks gave proof of their devotion to the founders of their observance by reprinting from the unique ancient manuscript in their possession the Lives of Alferius, Peter and two other early abbots, purporting to be written by Hugh of Venosa, a younger contemporary of St Peter. It is to this biography, which may be found in the Acta Sanctorum (March, vol. i) as well as in Ughelli and Muratori, that we owe all our knowledge of St Peter of Cava.

1188 BD HUMBERT III OF SAVOY
HUMBERT III, Count of Savoy, was born in 1136 at Avigliana, and his parents, Amadeus III of Savoy and Matilda of Vienne, were at pains to give him a good and religious education. They entrusted his training to Bd Amadeus, Bishop of Lausanne, under whom the youth made great progress, especially in the life of prayer.
   Called to rule at his father’s death, he sacrificed a desire for solitude to the task imposed upon him, and though a mere boy when he took up the reins of government he showed himself fully equal to his position, finding it quite possible to reconcile the duty of a secular ruler with that of self-sanctification. When his wife died childless, the count sought in the monastery of Aulps the consolation he needed, and would fain have remained there, but his vassals came to entreat him not to abandon them and to take steps to ensure the succession in his family. Yielding to these representations he again took up the burden and contracted two, if not three, more marriages. By his second wife, Germana of Zahringen, he had a child, Agnes, who was betrothed to John Lackland, afterwards king of England, but both mother and daughter died before the marriage could take place.
   During this period Humbert had occasion to repel aggression by force of arms, and he then proved himself as capable in warfare as in peace. “Brave in contest, undaunted in reverse, just and moderate in victory, he was ever unflinching in his adherence to what he held to be just.” His reputation for wisdom and probity reached far beyond the limits of his own country, and won for him the confidence of his con­temporaries. We read, however, that on one occasion he came into violent conflict with St Anthelmus, Bishop of Belley. Happily the two holy men, though they had lost their tempers badly, arrived at a very edifying reconciliation.

The time came at last when Count Humbert felt that he was justified in retiring from the world to prepare himself for death. He accordingly withdrew to the Cistercian abbey of Hautecombe, where he gave himself up to the humblest and most austere practices of the religious life. According to some authorities, how­ever, he was not suffered to remain long in retirement the call of his people, who were again threatened with invasion from Germany, summoned him from the cloister to take command of the army. Though forewarned of his approaching death he marched with them as far as Chambéry, where he died in 1188. This account of the close of his troubled career is, it must be confessed, very doubtful. There is good reason to believe that Bd Humbert died peacefully in his Cistercian retreat, where also was buried nearly a century later Bd Boniface of Savoy, who had been archbishop of Canterbury. The cultus of Bd Humbert was approved in 1838.

There seems to be no early biography of Bd Humbert. The facts have to be gathered from the imperfect and often conflicting accounts of the chroniclers. Most of the story can be gleaned from the important work of Samuel Guichenon, Histoire généalogique de la royale Maison de Savoye, of which the first edition appeared in 1660. See also the convenient little volume of F. G. Allaria I1 b. Umberto III storia e leggende (1879). It is noteworthy that Guichenon strongly maintains that Humbert was married, not three, but four times, and that his fourth wife, when he retired to his Cistercian abbey, herself became a nun at Messines in Flanders.
1310 Blessed Romeo Italian Carmelite lay brother  (Romaeus) of Limoges, OC (AC)
Romeo was an Italian Carmelite lay brother and the companion of Saint Avertanus.
Having set out together from Limoges on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, both died at Lucca, apparently of the plague (Benedictines).

1483 St. Casimir born of kings slept little, spending his nights in prayer
Vilnæ, in Lithuánia, beáti Casimíri Confessóris, e Casimíro Rege progéniti; quem Leo Décimus, Románus Póntifex, in Sanctórum númerum rétulit.
At Vilnius in Lithuania, blessed Casimir, confessor, the son of King Casimir, whom Pope Leo X inscribed in the roll of the saints. 
b. 1458 
Miracles were reported at his tomb
Casimir in line (third among 13 children) to be a king himself, was filled with exceptional values and learning by a great teacher, John Dlugosz. Even his critics could not say that his conscientious objection indicated softness. Even as a teenager, Casimir lived a highly disciplined, even severe life, sleeping on the ground, spending a great part of the night in prayer and dedicating himself to lifelong celibacy.
 
When nobles in Hungary became dissatisfied with their king, they prevailed upon Casimir’s father, the king of Poland, to send his son to take over the country. Casimir obeyed his father, as many young men over the centuries have obeyed their government. The army he was supposed to lead was clearly outnumbered by the “enemy”; some of his troops were deserting because they were not paid. At the advice of his officers, Casimir decided to return home. His father was irked at the failure of his plans, and confined his 15-year-old son for three months. The lad made up his mind never again to become involved in the wars of his day, and no amount of persuasion could change his mind. He returned to prayer and study, maintaining his decision to remain celibate even under pressure to marry the emperor’s daughter. He reigned briefly as king of Poland during his father’s absence. He died of lung trouble at 23 while visiting Lithuania, of which he was also Grand Duke. He was buried in Vilnius, Lithuania.
Comment:  For many years Poland and Lithuania faded into the gray prison on the other side of the Iron Curtain. Despite repression, the Poles and Lithuanians remained firm in the faith which has become synonymous with their name. Their youthful patron reminds us: Peace is not won by war; sometimes a comfortable peace is not even won by virtue, but Christ’s peace can penetrate every government repression of religion.
St. Casimir Patron of Poland and Lithuania
Casimir grew up in a world where his life was not his own. As a prince of Poland, the second son of King Casimir IV and Elizabeth of Austria, his life was scheduled to cement his father's authority and increase Poland's power. Casimir realized from an early age that his life belonged to someone else, but to a much higher King than his father. Despite pressure, humiliation, and rejection, he stood by that loyalty through his whole life. Born the third of thirteen children in 1461, Casimir was committed to God from childhood. Some of that commitment was the result of a tutor, John Dlugosz, whose holiness encouraged Casimir on his own journey.

It may be hard for us to imagine royal luxury as a pressure. But for Casimir, the riches around him were temptations to forget his true loyalties. Rebelling against the rich, fashionable clothes he was expected to enjoy, he wore the plainest of clothes. Rejecting even ordinary comforts, he slept little, spending his nights in prayer. And when he did sleep, he lay on the floor not on a royal bed. Even though he was a prince, many of those around him must have laughed and joked at his choices. Yet, in the face of any pressure, Casimir was always friendly and calm.

Though his father must have wondered about him, he must have seen and admired Casimir's strength. He showed that he misunderstood this strength when he sent Casimir as head of an army to take over the throne of Hungary at the request of some nobles there. Casimir felt the whole expedition was wrong but was convinced to go out of obedience to his father. He could not help but feel at every step that it was disobedient to his other Father. So when soldiers started deserting, he was only too glad to listen to the advice of his officers and turn back home. His feelings were confirmed when he discovered that Pope Sixtus IV had opposed the move.

His father, however, was furious at being deterred from his plans and banished Casimir to a castle in Dobzki, hoping that imprisonment would change Casimir's mind. Casimir's commitment to what he believed was right only grew stronger in his exile and he refused to cooperate with his father's plans any more despite the pressure to give in. He even rejected a marriage alliance his father tried to form. He participated in his true King's plans wholeheartedly by praying, studying, and helping the poor.

He died at the age of 23 in 1484 from lung disease. He was buried with his favorite song, a Latin hymn to Mary called "Omni die dic Mariae" which we know as "Daily, Daily Sing to Mary." Because of his love for the song, it is known as the Hymn of St. Casimir though he didn't write it.

1484 ST CASIMIR OF POLAND
ST CASIMIR, to whom the Poles gave the title of “The Peace-maker”, was the third of the thirteen children of Casimir IV, King of Poland, and of Elizabeth of Austria, daughter of the Emperor Albert II. Casimir was the second son; he and his two brothers, Ladislaus and John, had as their tutor John Dlugosz, the historian, a canon of Cracow and a man of extraordinary learning and piety. All the princes were warmly attached to the holy man, but Casimir profited the most by his teaching and example. Devout from his infancy, the boy gave himself up to devotion and penance, and had a horror of anything approaching softness or self-indulgence. His bed was often the ground, and he was wont to spend a great part of the night in prayer and meditation, chiefly on the passion of our Saviour. His clothes were plain, and under them he wore a hair-shirt. Living always in the presence of God he was invariably serene and cheerful, and pleasant to all. The saint’s love of God showed itself in his love of the poor who are Christ’s members, and for the relief of these the young prince gave all he possessed, using in their behalf the influence he had with his father and with his brother Ladislaus when he became king of Bohemia. In honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary Casimir frequently recited the long Latin hymn “Omni die dic Mariae”, a copy of which was by his desire buried with him. This hymn, part of which is familiar to us through Bittleston’s version, “Daily, daily sing to Mary”, is not uncommonly called the Hymn of St Casimir, but it was certainly not composed by him; it is three centuries older than his time.

The nobles of Hungary, dissatisfied with their king, Matthias Corvinus, in 1471 begged the King of Poland to allow them to place his son Casimir on the throne. The saint, at that time not fifteen years old, was very unwilling to consent, but in obedience to his father he went to the frontier at the head of an army. There, hearing that Matthias had himself assembled a large body of troops, and withal finding that his own soldiers were deserting in large numbers because they could not get their pay, he decided upon the advice of his officers to return home. The knowledge that Pope Sixtus IV had sent an embassy to his father to deter him from the expedition made the young prince carry out his resolution with the firmer conviction that he was acting rightly. King Casimir, however, was greatly incensed at the failure of his ambitious projects and would not permit his son to return to Cracow, but relegated him to the castle of Dobzki. The young man obeyed and remained in confinement there for three months. Convinced of the injustice of the war upon which he had so nearly embarked, and determined to have no further part in these internecine conflicts which only facilitated the further progress into Europe of the Turks, St Casimir could never again be persuaded to take up arms, though urged to do so by his father and invited once more by the disaffected Hungarian magnates. He returned to his studies and his prayers, though for a time he was viceroy in Poland during an absence of his father. An attempt was made to induce him to marry a daughter of the Emperor Frederick III, but he refused to relax the celibacy he had imposed on himself.

St Casimir’s austerities did nothing to help the lung trouble from which he suffered, and he died at the age of twenty-three in 1484 and was buried at Vilna, where his relics still rest in the church of St Stanislaus. Miracles were reported at his tomb, and he was canonized in 1521.

A Latin life of St Casimir by Zachary Ferreri was printed at Cracow in 1521 and has been reproduced in the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. i, and there is also a biography by Prileszky in the Acts Sanctorum Hungariae (1743), vol. i, pp. 125—132. A popular account in German is that of Felix Iózefowicz, Der heilige Kasimir, commending the saint as a patron for young students. In the article devoted to St Casimir in the Catholic Encyclopedia, Prof. L. Abraham gives references to several works in Polish of more modern date. Casimir is sometimes referred to as king of Poland and Hungary, though he never occupied the throne of either country. The fact that he is accorded apparently only one line in the Cambridge History of Poland, vol. (1950) shows perhaps how little impression he made in secular affairs. The so-called Hymn of St Casimir forms one division of the great Mariale, a remarkable rhyming Latin lyric of the twelfth century, which has been attributed both to St Anselm and to St Bernard of Clairvaux. The true author is probably Bernard of Morlaix, or Cluny. Casimir’s love of these verses is a testimony at once to his good literary taste and to his devotion to the Mother of God. At a time when certain enthusiastic sympathizers with Polish aspirations were eager to claim the Omni die dic Manse as a sort of national anthem, a book was brought out which printed the text of the hymn along with translations in various modern languages in the metre of the original. When a second edition was in contemplation, Cardinal Wiseman was invited to contribute an English version of this hymn. His rendering was afterwards published separately, with a musical setting, but it is now little known.

Casimir is patron saint of Poland and Lithuania.
In His Footsteps:  Where do your loyalties lie? Is there a part of your life where you feel your loyalties divided and feel pressure to follow worldly commitment? Today choose the action that best serves Christ the King.
Prayer:  Saint Casimir, help us to remember that our true King is Jesus Christ and always serve him with joy and love. Help us to turn to our true Father for guidance and protection. Amen

March 4, 2007 St. Casimir (1458-1483)  
Casimir, born of kings and in line (third among 13 children) to be a king himself, was filled with exceptional values and learning by a great teacher, John Dlugosz. Even his critics could not say that his conscientious objection indicated softness. Even as a teenager, Casimir lived a highly disciplined, even severe life, sleeping on the ground, spending a great part of the night in prayer and dedicating himself to lifelong celibacy.
When nobles in Hungary became dissatisfied with their king, they prevailed upon Casimir’s father, the king of Poland, to send his son to take over the country. Casimir obeyed his father, as many young men over the centuries have obeyed their government. The army he was supposed to lead was clearly outnumbered by the “enemy”; some of his troops were deserting because they were not paid. At the advice of his officers, Casimir decided to return home. His father was irked at the failure of his plans, and confined his 15-year-old son for three months. The lad made up his mind never again to become involved in the wars of his day, and no amount of persuasion could change his mind. He returned to prayer and study, maintaining his decision to remain celibate even under pressure to marry the emperor’s daughter. He reigned briefly as king of Poland during his father’s absence. He died of lung trouble at 23 while visiting Lithuania, of which he was also Grand Duke. He was buried in Vilnius, Lithuania.
Comment:   For many years Poland and Lithuania faded into the gray prison on the other side of the Iron Curtain. Despite repression, the Poles and Lithuanians remained firm in the faith which has become synonymous with their name. Their youthful patron reminds us: Peace is not won by war; sometimes a comfortable peace is not even won by virtue, but Christ’s peace can penetrate every government repression of religion.
1590 BD CHRISTOPHER BALES, MARTYR received his education abroad at the English College in Rome and at the Douai College at Rheims
Coniscliffe in the diocese of Durham was the birthplace of Christopher Bayles, or Bales (who also took the name of Rivers). He received his education abroad at the English College in Rome and at the Douai College at Rheims, and was then ordained and sent on the English mission in 1588. After labouring for nearly two years, he was arrested and imprisoned. The misery of his confinement was aggravated by his bodily weakness, for he was consumptive, but nothing could overcome his courage and patience. He was cruelly racked in prison to force him to admit where he had said Mass and by whom he had been harboured, and on one occasion he was left hanging by the wrists for twenty-four hours.

Eventually he was brought to trial and found guilty of treason, for having been ordained priest beyond the seas and for coming to England to exercise his priestly office. When the judge asked him in the usual form whether he had anything to say in his defence, Bales answered that he wished to put one question “Was St Augustine, the monk sent by the Pope of Rome to preach the Catholic faith in England, guilty of treason in complying with that commission?“ The court replied in the negative. “Why, then”, asked the martyr, “do you arraign and condemn me for a traitor who do the same thing as he did, and to whom nothing can be objected but what might equally be objected against him?” They replied that the difference lay in the fact that, by English law, such action had now been made treason. Having been accordingly sentenced to death he was hanged, disembowelled and quartered in Fleet Street on March 4, 1590.

See MMP., p. 160, and J. H. Pollen, Acts of English Martyrs. The Penkevel Papers in the Westminster Archives and Fr Grene’s Collectanea at Stonyhurst furnish contemporary evidence, and cf John Gerard’s autobiography (ed. Caraman, 1951), pp. 8—9.
1877 St. Placide Viel Nun and mother general relief during Franco Prussian War
b.1815 in Normandy, France, she joined the Sisters of the Christian Schools in 1833 after meeting St. Marie Madeleine Postel, mother general of the congregation. In 1841 she was appointed assistant general of the sisters, a promotion which earned much resentment from other sisters. Nevertheless, after proving herself, she became mother general of the congregation in 1846 after Marie Madeleine’s passing. With much effort, in 1859 she won final approval of the institute from Pope Pius IX.
She was quite active in organizing relief during the Franco Prussian War.

1877 BD PLACIDA VIEL, VIRGIN

Victoria EULALIA Jacqueline VIEL, who was to become second superior general of the Sisters of the Christian Schools, was born in the Norman village of Val­Vacher in 1815, the eighth child of a farmer. The only schooling she had herself was seven years at a sort of dame’s school in the near-by town of Quettehou. She was serious and shy by disposition, leading the quiet ordered life of a farmer’s daughter and housekeeping for her brother until she was seventeen, when she went on a visit to her aunt, who was a member of St Mary Magdalen Postel’s community at Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte. Victoria was so impressed by what she saw there that she offered herself to the community and was accepted, receiving the name of Placida at her clothing.

Mother Mary Postel was then nearly eighty, and by the end of Sister Placida’s noviciate had decided that this young sister was the one most likely to succeed herself at the head of the community. Placida was therefore sent for a short period of intensive training to the normal-school in Argentan; on her return she was set to teach in the boarding-school, and the foundress quietly initiated her into the duties and responsibilities of administration, even to the extent of sending her to open new houses. In five years’ time Placida was made novice-mistress; but this was soon interrupted by her being sent to Paris to beg funds for the restoration of the abbey church at Saint-Sauveur and to do other important convent business.

On July 16, 1846 St Mary Magdalen Postel died, and at the ensuing general chapter of the Sisters of the Christian Schools Sister Placida was chosen in her place. Her aunt, Sister Mary, had expected to be the choice; and although the new superioress gave her a maximum of authority and responsibility, Sister Mary, who had already shown hostility to her niece, was the source of much worry and unpleasantness to Mother Placida for the next ten years. Indeed, she stayed at the mother-house as little as possible so long as her aunt lived, directing her society from the rough winding highways and byways of central and western France” which she traversed so often collecting funds and on other business of the rapidly-growing convents: notably the getting of official civil recognition, a long and weari­some business, which once took her on a mysterious secret visit to the Count de Chambord in Vienna.

Mother Placida directed the institute for thirty years, and it was a period of great expansion: orphanages, nursery-schools, workrooms and free elementary schools were opened, one of the largest and best-loved foundations being the orphanage of the Holy Heart of Mary in Paris, where by 1877 there were 500 children being looked after; and the foundress’s undertaking of the rebuilding of the great church at the mother-house was carried to a triumphant conclusion. Cardinal Guibert, Archbishop of Bordeaux, speaking of the state of France in the 1870s echoed what had been said of Bd Anne Javouhey, and remarked, “I know only one man capable of restoring order in France. He is at Saint-Sauveur-le­Vicomte, and his name is Mother Placida.” In reading of her life and achievements one gets an impression of great charm and good-humour, and of quietness and confidence in her determination that what St John Baptist de la Salle had done for boys should be spread wider yet among girls; thirty-six poor-schools were opened in Normandy—and Les ordonnances de Louis XIV was abolished as a reading-book for beginners, or for anyone else.

Bd Placida’s life was of the simplest from every point of view. We read of no great spiritual trials or mystical graces; but occurrences to all seeming miraculous were not wanting. These and other things she consistently attributed to the inter­cession in Heaven of Mother Postel, the preliminary steps towards whose beatifica­tion she took. Bd. Placida herself died on March 4, 1877, being only 62 years old; and she was beatified in 1951. During the time she was at the head of the Sisters of the Christian Schools their convents in France had risen from 37 to 105, and their religious from 150 to over 1000.

See, in French, D. Meunier, Une gerbe de merveilles (1931); L. Canuet, Bonne Mère Placide (1925) and the biography by P. de Crisenoy (1943); in English, Bd Placide Viel (1951), by S[ister] C[allista). Cf. also lives of St Mary M. Poste1 (July 16).



On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)



Day 24 40 Days for Life

 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world
It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
 
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).-
Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
The Pope said this today before reciting the midday Angelus with several thousand people gathered in the courtyard of the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, south of Rome.
Referring to the Gospel reading for today's Mass, the Holy Father reflected on the faith of Peter, which is shown to be "still immature and too much influenced by the 'mentality of this world.'”  He explained that when Christ spoke openly about how he was to "suffer much, be killed and rise again, Peter protests, saying: 'God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you.'"
"It is evident that the Master and the disciple follow two opposed ways of thinking," continued the Pontiff. "Peter, according to a human logic, is convinced that God would never allow his Son to end his mission dying on the cross.  "Jesus, on the contrary, knows that the Father, in his great love for men, sent him to give his life for them, and if this means the passion and the cross, it is right that such should happen."
Christ also knew that "the resurrection would be the last word," Benedict XVI added.
Serious illness
The Pope continued, "If to save us the Son of God had to suffer and die crucified, it certainly was not because of a cruel design of the heavenly Father.  "The cause of it is the gravity of the sickness of which he must cure us: an evil so serious and deadly that it will require all of his blood. 
"In fact, it is with his death and resurrection that Jesus defeated sin and death, reestablishing the lordship of God."

Popes mentioned in articles of todays Saints
254 St. Lucius I a Roman elected Pope to succeed Pope St. Cornelius
Pope St Gregory VII-- 1123 St. Peter of Pappacarbone Benedictine bishop leadership, care, and wisdom The abbot’s opinion was abundantly justified, for Peter proved himself well among that household of holy men and he remained there for some six years. He was then recalled to Italy, having been released by St Hugh apparently at the request of the archdeacon of Rome, Hilde­brand (who was afterwards Pope St Gregory VII).
Pope St Silvester; -- 803 St. Anselm of Nonantola Benedictine abbot duke
St. Anselm
also received from Pope Stephen III permission to remove to Nonantola the body of Pope St Silvester; and Langobard King Aistulf enriched the abbey with gifts and granted it many privileges it became very celebrated throughout all Italy.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints

492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
 Romæ natális sancti Felícis Papæ Tértii, qui sancti Gregórii Magni átavus fuit; qui étiam (ut ipse Gregórius refert), sanctæ Tharsíllæ nepti appárens, illam ad cæléstia regna vocávit.
       At Rome, the birthday of Pope St. Felix III, ancestor of St. Gregory the Great, who relates of him that he appeared to St. Tharsilla, his niece, and called her to the kingdom of heaven.

492 ST FELIX II (III), POPE  483 - 492
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
468  St. Hilary, Pope from 461-468 guardian of Church unity sent decree to Eastern bishops validating decisions of General Councils Nicaea Ephesus and Chalcedon. Hilary consolidated the Church in Sandi, Africa, and Gaul
731 Saint Pope Gregory II served St Sergius I next 4 popes as treasurer of the Church, then librarian, Held synods to correct abuses, stopped heresy, promoted discipline, morality in religious and clerical life

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Benedict VII -- 1011 St. Willigis Bishop missionaries to Scandinavia, founded churches chaplain to Emperor Otto II
On the death of Otto, Willigis became one of the most important and influential people in the empire.
Confirmed by Benedict VII in the right to coronate emperors, Willigis crowned Otto III and later influenced him in favor of abandoning Italy and concentrating his resources north of the Alps. Otto III died young in 1002. The succession was disputed but ended with Willigis crowning Saint Henry II and his wife Saint Cunegund at Paderborn. He then served his third monarch faithfully.



Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Ordained by Pope Vigilius in 546.  556 St. Maximian of Ravenna Bishop of Ravenna erected St. Vitalis Basilica, which was dedicated in the presence of Emperor Justinian and his wife, Theodora Maximianus of Ravenna B (RM) Born in Pola, Italy, 499; died February 22, 556; feast day formerly February 21. Maximianus was consecrated bishop of Ravenna in 546 by Pope Vigilius.

Pope Julius II died on this day in 1513.  During his reign as pope he laid the cornerstone for St. Peter's Basilica.  
He also commissioned Michelangelo Buonarotti to paint the frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chaper.



Pope Leo XIII.  1233 7 Founders of the Order of Servites On the Feast of the Assumption ; canonized in 1887 by Pope Leo XIII.

Clement VII in 1533 approved The cultus of Bd Verdiana who appears in the habit of a Vallombrosan nun, carrying a basket with two snakes in it. It seems certain she was associated with the Vallombrosan Order, but her connection with the Franciscan third order is by no means so clearly established.

Pope Callistus III allowed BD EUSTOCHIUM OF MESSINA, VIRGIN to found another convent to follow the first rule of St Francis under the Observants. 

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy, but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

"To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

731 Pope Gregory II, 89th Pope: educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian    (RM)

824 Pope St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.   Popes Html link here: 

731 Gregory II, 89th Pope educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian (RM)
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817
Pope Innocent III had experienced a similar vision. Without hesitation Innocent provided papal approval for the Order of the Most Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives (the Trinitarians), with John of Matha as superior.
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.