The cross stands in the midst of the church in the middle of the lenten season not merely to remind men of Christ's redemption and to keep before them the goal of their efforts,
but also to be venerated as that reality by which man must live to be saved.
"He who does not take up his cross and follow me is not worthy of me" (Mt.10:38).
For in the Cross of Christ Crucified lies both
"the power of God and the wisdom of God" for those being saved (1 Cor.1:24).
   Saturday  Saints of this Day March  11 Quinto Idus Mártii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Day 11 of 40 Days for Life

 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world.

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.
Eternal Father, strong to save, whose arm doth bind the restless wave, who bidst the mighty ocean deep
 its own appointed limits keep. Oh hear us when we cry to thee, for those in peril on the sea. Amen
-- U.S. Navy hymn


Abba Kyrillos the Sixth, the 116th Pope of Alexandria.
 Novena to Saint Joseph Day 3
A novena is a prayer that is said for nine consecutive days. The purpose is to obtain a special favor from heaven by imploring a particular saint, in this case -Saint Joseph - who is celebrated in the Catholic Church on March 19th.
O glorious Saint Joseph, faithful follower of Jesus Christ, to you do we raise our hearts and hands to implore your powerful intercession in obtaining from the benign Heart of Jesus all the helps and graces necessary for our spiritual and temporal welfare, particularly the grace of a happy death, and the special favor we now implore (..state your petition..).  O Guardian of the Word Incarnate, we have confidence that your prayers on our behalf will be graciously heard before the throne of God. Amen.
 258 Sts Victor, Nicephorus and Victorinus
At Antioch, the Commemoration of many holy martyrs, some of whom by order of Emperor Maximian were laid on red hot gridirons, not to be burned to death, but to continue their suffering a longer time; others were subjected to different horrible torments, and won the palm of martyrdom.
568 Saint Anastasia Patrician of Alexandria lived in Constantinople; Alexandria founded a small
      monastery not far from the city & a remote skete 28 yrs Lord revealed her day of death
 576 St. Constantine missionary to Scotland under St. Columba and then St. Kentigern

646 Saint Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem From his youth he was distinguished for his piety and his
      love for classical studies proficient in philosophy of monasticism.
1069 St. Aurea famed for her visions and miracles
1069 St. Amunia Mother of St. Aurea

1615 St. John Ogilvie joined the Jesuits entered Scotland tightening of the penal laws caused his arrest
       refused to apostasize hung there canonized 1976, becoming first Scottish saint since 1250
1770 St. Teresa Margaret Redi discalced Carmelite remarkable prayer life deeply penitential demeanor 
 

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

March 11 – Madonna Miracolosa (Italy, 1855) - Saint Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem
 
Hail Mother of mercy, Mother of God, Mother of forgiveness
 
 “Hail Mother of mercy, Mother of God, Mother of forgiveness,
Mother of hope, Mother of grace and Mother full of holy gladness.”
In these few words we find a summary of the faith of generations of men and women who, with their eyes fixed firmly on the icon of the Blessed Virgin, have sought her intercession and consolation…Let us, then, pass through the Holy Door of Mercy knowing that at our side is the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Holy Mother of God, who intercedes for us. Let us allow her to lead us to the rediscovery of the beauty of an encounter with her Son Jesus. Let us open wide the doors of our heart to the joy of forgiveness, conscious that we have been given new confidence and hope, and thus make our daily lives a humble instrument of God’s love.

And with the love and affection of children, let us cry out to Our Lady as did the faithful people of God in Ephesus during the historic Council: “Holy Mother of God!” I invite you to repeat together this acclamation three times, aloud and with all your heart and with all your love: “Holy Mother of God! Holy Mother of God! Holy Mother of God!”

The Pope opened the Holy Door of the Papal Basilica of Saint Mary Major, on Friday, January 1, Solemnity of Mary Mother of God, and World Day of Peace.
 
Pope Francis
Holy Mass and opening of the Holy Door- Basilica of St Mary Major. Homily, January 1, 2016
www.vatican.va


March 11 - Our Lady of the Forests (Great Britain, 1419) To Jesus through Mary, with Joseph

Hail Joseph, blessed with Divine Grace, the Savior rested in your arms and grew before your eyes.
Blessed are you among all men, and blessed is the fruit of your Virginal Spouse, Jesus.
Holy Joseph, foster Father of the Son of God, pray for us, watch over our family, health and work,
until our last day, and let us have recourse to you at the hour of our death.Amen.
As the foster Father of the Son of God, chaste Spouse of the Virgin Mary, and Patron of the universal Church, Joseph was placed alongside Mary like the seraph watching over the Tabernacle. Jesus said "yes" at the Incarnation, in the spirit of Psalm 39, and Mary said "yes" at the Incarnation on behalf of all humanity, but Joseph also said "yes" to be the head of the Holy Family. Joseph was great, righteous, had given his life to God, and he was waiting for the Messiah.
He gladly accepted to "take Mary home" as soon as he understood God's plan.

March 11 – Madonna Miracolosa (Italy, 1855)
 –
March 11 - Saint Sophronius of Jerusalem (d. 639) 
From You He Comes Forth Like a Bridegroom Leaving His Chamber
 Truly, you are blessed amongst women. For you have changed Eve's curse into a blessing;
and Adam, who hitherto lay under a curse, has been blessed because of you.
Truly, you are blessed amongst women. Through you the Father's blessing has shone forth on mankind,
setting them free of their ancient curse.
Truly, you are blessed amongst women, because through you your forbears have found salvation.
For you were to give birth to the Savior who was to win them salvation.
Truly, you are blessed amongst women, for without seed you have borne, as your fruit,
him who bestows blessings on the whole world and redeems it from that curse that made it sprout thorns.

(…) You, O Virgin, are like a clear and shining sky, in which God has set up his tent. From you he comes forth like a bridegroom leaving his chamber. Like a giant running his course, he will run the course of his life which will bring salvation for all who will ever live, and extending from the highest heavens to the end of them, it will fill all things with divine warmth and with life-giving brightness.  Saint Sophronius of Jerusalem
 
Why did God choose a holy Virgin?
 Concerning the Incarnation, I believe that God the Word, the only Son of the Father ... moved by compassion for our fallen nature, came from His free movement, by the will of God who generated Him with the divine approval of the Holy Spirit... came down towards our lowliness… and upon entering the womb of Mary, the holy and radiant Virgin, full of a divine wisdom, and free from any stain of the body, heart and spirit, he became incarnate, he who is incorporeal ... he became truly man, he who is still God ... He wanted to become man to purify similar with similar, to save the brother by the brother ...That is why a holy Virgin was chosen; she was purified in body and soul;
being chaste, pure and immaculate, she became the cooperatrix of the Incarnation of the Creator.
Saint Sophronius of Jerusalem
 
Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh,
was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
        Item sanctórum Mártyrum Gorgónii et Firmi
        Hierosólymis sancti Sophrónii Epíscopi.
 258 Sts Victor, Nicephorus and Victorinus
At Antioch, the Commemoration of many holy martyrs, some of whom by order of Emperor Maximian were laid on red hot gridirons, not to be burned to death, but to continue their suffering a longer time; others were subjected to different horrible torments, and won the palm of martyrdom.
 259 Candidus, Piperion & Companions suffered in Carthage or Alexandria 
 263 St. Heraclius and Zosimus African martyrs suffered in Carthage
 300 Sts. Trophimus & Thalus crucified at Laodicea, Syria
 568 Saint Anastasia Patrician of Alexandria lived in Constantinople; Alexandria founded a small monastery not far from the city & a remote skete 28 yrs Lord revealed her day of death
 576 St. Constantine missionary to Scotland under St. Columba and then St. Kentigern
 646 Saint Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem From his youth he was distinguished for his piety and his love for classical studies proficient in philosophy of monasticism 
 685 St. Vigilius Bishop and martyr successor to St. Palladius as bishop of Auxerre
712 ST Vindician Bishop of Cambrai Monasteries and new convents sprang up plentifully under his fostering care;
 725 St. Benedict Crispus Archbishop of Milan wrote the epitaph for Caedwalla 
 824 St. Aengus 824 ST OENGUS, ABBOT-BISHOP ST OENGUS (or Aengus) sometimes called “the Hagiographer”, is better known as “the Culdee” or “God’s Vassal a Celtic title which came to be applied to those who practised a particularly rigid observance, especially in the order of divine service, but which was attached specially to him as to one who made an important contribution to the devotional literature of the Church and who lived according to the strictest rule of religion.
 840 Sardis sancti Euthymii Epíscopi, qui, ob cultum sanctárum Imáginum, a Michaéle, Imperatóre Iconoclásta, in exsílium missus est;
 859 Córdubæ, in Hispánia, sancti Eulógii, Presbyteri et Mártyris; qui, in persecutióne Saracenórum
1020 St. Firmian Benedictine abbot of San Piceno in the Acona region of Italy
1069 St. Aurea famed for her visions and miracles
1069 St. Amunia Mother of St. Aurea 
        St. Peter the Spaniard shirt of mail as a penitential reminder
1100 ST AUREA, VIRGIN rewarded by vision of her 3 patron saints who assured her of God’s approval promised her a crown of glory the fame of her penances and miracles spread, her assistance and intercession were eagerly sought
1454 Saint Euthymius archbishop labored in constructing and restoring churches devoted himself to asceticism
1485 BD CHRISTOPHER MACASSOLI
1539 BD JOHN BAPTIST OF FABRIANO miracles were reported to have been worked at his tomb, and a considerable cultus followed confirmed in 1903.
1544 BD. JOHN LARKE, JERMYN GARDINER AND JOHN IRELAND, MARTYRS
JOHN LARKE sometimes erroneously described as Sir Thomas More’s chaplain, he was actually rector of Chelsea, the church which Sir Thomas habitually attended when in London, his town house being situated in that parish.
1615 St. John Ogilvie joined the Jesuits entered Scotland tightening of the penal laws caused his arrest refused to apostasize hung there canonized 1976, becoming first Scottish saint since 1250
1770 St. Teresa Margaret Redi discalced Carmelite nun remarkable prayer life and a deeply penitential demeanor


Day 11 of 40 Days for Life
Day 11 40 Days for Life
From anarchists to socialists, pro-abortion folks are getting angry ... and it starts with a place I visited this week -- San Francisco. Case in point: a rhetoric-filled rant on SocialistWorker.org.
The writers of this string of clichés and talking points (you’re an “anti-choice bigot” according to this piece) were giddy and gleeful that pro-abortion protesters tried to disrupt the 40 Days for Life kickoff rally in San Francisco.
This line pretty much sums it up: “Anti-choice protests like these have helped create a climate that puts women’s fundamental right to choose what she does with her body into question.”

The writers declared victory for the pro-abortion side, a victory attained by “outnumbering and demoralizing” the 40 Days for Life group: “The counter-protest successfully blocked the anti-choicers in sight and sound.”
 
Truth is not determined by numbers. But if it was, then attendance at nine years’ worth of 40 Days for Life campaigns in San Francisco versus the one day of counter-protests would be something to consider.


California is anything but demoralized -- as proven by the record 41 locations hosting 40 Days for Life vigils right now! Another Socialist Worker article referred to “an abortion rights emergency.” And that’s perhaps closer to the truth.

These protests aren’t happening because the pro-abortion side is winning; they’re happening because the pro-abortion side is losing … even in California, long considered a bastion of support for legal abortion.

Vigils at 41 abortion centers and Planned Parenthood facilities in California represent a whole lot of prayer. No wonder abortion proponents are worried!
 
San Francisco, California
Planned Parenthood in downtown San Francisco closed a few years back after many 40 Days for Life campaigns. “It was a miracle,” said Ron, the leader. And Ron didn’t stop. He moved to another Planned Parenthood abortion facility in one of America’s most pro-abortion cities. It’s not an easy location.
For 30 minutes, we were harassed by a lady who insulted us and filmed us as she accused us of being “gender supremacists.” This doesn’t shake Ron

Redding, California
The 40 Days for Life vigil participants in Redding have had to deal with the elements so far during this campaign – there was even a hailstorm on one of the abortion days! Then the abortion staff put up a sheet as a barrier between their clients and the prayer volunteers
 
I beseech you to walk worthy of the calling with which you were called, with all lowliness, and gentleness, with longsuffering, bearing with one another in love. — Ephesians 4:1b-2

Dear Heavenly Father, we are humbled that you have called us and appointed us to be ambassadors of Christ in a world that is not our home. We pray that your Holy Spirit will empower us to walk worthy of the calling. We pray that Your unconditional love will flow through us to those who desperately need Your saving grace.
See today's full devotional
For life, Shawn D. Carney President, 40 Days for Life



258 Sts Victor, Nicephorus and Victorinus and other disciples of St Quadratus: crushed in a large stone press. 
< SAINT VICTOR

                                                                                SAINT LEIONIDAS ^
Saint Claudius was a disciple of St Quadratus. His hands and feet were cut off.
258 Saint Diodorus disciple of St Quadratus. He was thrown into a fire, receiving the crown of martyrdom.
258 St Serapion was a disciple of St Quadratus, and was decapitated.
Sts Papias and Leonidas were disciples of St Quadratus. They were drowned in the sea.
Saint Leonidas was a disciple of St Quadratus. He was drowned in the sea.


Saint Chariessa  one of those martyred with St Quadratus 258. Many holy women including St Chariessa went voluntarily to suffer for Christ.
Saint Nunechia was one of those martyred with St Quadratus in 258. 
Saint Basilissa was one of those martyred with St Quadratus in 258.
Saint Nike was one of those martyred with St Quadratus in 258.
Saint Galla was a disciple of St Quadratus.
Saint Galina was one of those who suffered with the holy martyr Quadratus (Codratus) in 258.
Saint Theodora was one of those martyred with St Quadratus in 258.

258 The Holy Martyrs Quadratus of Nicomedia, Saturinus, Rufinus and others suffered during the persecutions of the emperor Decius (249-251) and his successor Valerian (253-259).   St Quadratus was descended from an illustrious family. Possessing considerable wealth, the saint did not spare his means in helping fellow Christians, languishing in prison for the faith.  When the envoy of the impious Decius, the proconsul Perennius, arrived in Nicomedia, St Quadratus voluntarily appeared before him, in order to strengthen the courage of the imprisoned brethren by his self-sacrificing decision. At first Perennius attempted to lure Quadratus from Christ, promising him rewards and honors.
Then, seeing the futility of his attempts, he cast the saint into prison and gave orders to lay him down on a bed of nails and to lay a large stone on him.

Setting out for Nicea, the proconsul commanded that all the imprisoned Christians be brought after him. In that number was St Quadratus. Upon arriving in the city, St Quadratus implored that they be led to the pagan temple. As soon as they untied his hands and feet, he began to overturn and destroy the idols. By order of the proconsul, they gave Quadratus over to torture.
Enduring terrible torments, the saint held firm in spirit and by his act encouraged the other martyrs, whose wounds were seared with burning candles.
< Quadratus_Anastasia_Michael_the_new
During the suffering of the martyrs, suddenly there shone a brilliant cloud, but the pagans found themselves in total darkness. In the ensuing silence was heard the singing of angels glorifying God. Many of those present confessed themselves Christians. Perennius ascribed the miracle to sorcery, and gave orders to take them to prison.

From Nicea the martyrs walked behind the proconsul to Apamea, then to Caesarea, Apollonia and the Hellespont, where they tortured them in all sorts of ways, hoping to make them deny Christ.

They tied St Quadratus into a sack filled with poisonous serpents, and threw it into a deep pit. On the following morning, everyone was astonished to see the martyr whole and unharmed. When they began to beat him mercilessly, two noblemen, Saturinus and Rufinus, were moved with pity for the martyr. This was observed, and Saturinus and Rufinus were beheaded.
Perennius subjected the martyr to even more fierce and refined tortures, but was not able to break his spirit. The saint lost his strength and was hardly able to move. For the last time the proconsul urged the martyr to abjure Christ. Marshalling his strength, the saint firmly replied,
"Since childhood I have acknowledged Christ as the one and only God, and I know no other."

The proconsul gave orders to light the fire, make the iron grate red-hot and throw the martyr on it. Having blessed himself with the Sign of the Cross, St Quadratus laid himself down upon the red-hot couch as upon a soft bed, emerging unharmed from the flames. In frustration, the proconsul gave orders to behead St Quadratus.
259 Candidus, Piperion & Comps suffered in Carthage or Alexandria  MM (RM)
 Alexandríæ pássio sanctórum Cándidi, Piperiónis et aliórum vigínti.
       At Alexandria, the passion of Saints Candidus, Piperion, and twenty others.

The particulars of these 22 African martyrs have been lost. It is believed that they suffered in Carthage or Alexandria either under Valerian or Gallienus (Benedictines).
263 St. Heraclius and Zosimus African martyrs suffered in Carthage.
 Carthágine sanctórum Mártyrum Heráclíi et Zósimi.
      At Carthage, the holy martyrs Heraclius and Zosimus.
Antiochíæ commemorátio plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum, quorum álii, Maximiáni Imperatóris mandáto, candéntibus cratículis superpósiti, non ad mortem sed a diutúrnum cruciátum assáti, álii áliis sævíssimis affécti supplíciis, ad palmam martyrii pervenérunt.
       At Antioch, the Commemoration of many holy martyrs, some of whom by order of Emperor Maximian were laid on red hot gridirons, not to be burned to death, but to continue their suffering a longer time; others were subjected to different horrible torments, and won the palm of martyrdom.

300 Sts. Trophimus & Thalus crucified at Laodicea, Syria
 Laodicéæ, in Syria, sanctórum Mártyrum Tróphimi et Thali, qui in persecutióne Diocletiáni, post multa sǽvaque torménta, corónas glóriæ sunt assecúti.
      At Laodicea in Syria, during the persecution of Diocletian, the holy martyrs Trophimus and Thalus, who obtained their crowns of glory after many severe torments.
Two martyrs put to death at Laodicea (modern Syria), under Emperor Diocletian .
Trophimus and Thalus MM (RM). Trophimus and Thalus were crucified at Laodicea, Syria, under Diocletian (Benedictines).
Item sanctórum Mártyrum Gorgónii et Firmi.       Also, Saints Gorgonius and Firmus.
In fínibus Ambianénsium sancti Firmíni Abbátis.       In the diocese of Amiens, St. Firmin, abbot.
  Hierosólymis sancti Sophrónii Epíscopi.       At Jerusalem, Bishop St. Sophronius.
568 Saint Anastasia Patrician of Alexandria lived in Constantinople, Alexandria founded a small monastery not far from the city & a remote skete 28 yrs Lord revealed her day of death.
Descended from an aristocratic family. She was an image of virtue, and she enjoyed the great esteem of the emperor Justinian (527-565). Widowed at a young age, Anastasia decided to leave the world and save her soul far from the bustle of the capital. She secretly left Constantinople and went to Alexandria. She founded a small monastery not far from the city, and devoted herself entirely to God.  Several years later, the emperor Justinian was widowed and decided to search for Anastasia and marry her. As soon as she learned of this, St Anastasia journeyed to a remote skete to ask Abba Daniel (March 18) for help.
In order to safeguard Anastasia, the Elder dressed her in a man's monastic garb and called her the eunuch Anastasius.

Having settled her in one of the very remote caves, the Elder gave her a Rule of prayer and ordered her never to leave the cave and to receive no one. Only one monk knew of this place. His obedience was to bring a small portion of bread and a pitcher of water to the cave once a week, leaving it at the entrance. The nun Anastasia dwelt in seclusion for twenty-eight years.
Everyone believed that it was the eunuch Anastasius who lived in the cave.

The Lord revealed to her the day of her death. Having learned of her approaching death, she wrote several words for Abba Daniel on a potsherd and placed it at the entrance to the cave. The Elder came quickly and brought everything necessary for her burial. He found the holy ascetic still alive, and he confessed and communed her with the Holy Mysteries. At Abba Daniel's request, St Anastasia blessed him and the monk accompanying him. With the words: "Lord, into Thy hands I commend my spirit," the saint died in peace (ca. 567-568).

When the grave was prepared, the Elder gave his disciple his outer garment and ordered him to dress the deceased "brother" in it. As he was putting on the rassa, the monk noticed that she was a woman, but he did not dare to say anything. However, when they returned to the monastery after they buried the nun, the disciple asked Abba Daniel whether he knew the "brother" was a woman, and the Elder related to the young monk the life of St Anastasia. Later, the abba's narrative was written down and received wide acclaim.
The relics of St Anastasia were transferred to Constantinople in the year 1200, and put not far from the church of Hagia Sophia.
576 St. Constantine king of Cornwall missionary to Scotland under St. Columba and then St. Kentigern
Constantine was  Unreliable tradition has him married to the daughter of the king of Brittany who on her death ceded his throne to his son and became a monk at St. Mochuda monastery at Rahan, Ireland. He performed menial tasks at the monastery, then studied for the priesthood and was ordained. He went as a missionary to Scotland under St. Columba and then St. Kentigern, preached in Galloway, and became Abbot of a monastery at Govan.  In old age, on his way to Kintyre, he was attacked by pirates who cut off his right arm, and he bled to death. He is regarded as Scotland's first martyr.

6th v. ST CONSTANTINE
ACCORDJNG to the lessons in the Aberdeen Breviary the early career of King Constantine of Cornwall gave no promise of the holiness to which he afterwards attained; but after the death of his wife, daughter of the king of Brittany, he was so grief-stricken that he resolved to mend his ways and gave up his kingdom to his son. Concealing his rank and identity, he found his way to Ireland, where he entered the monastery of St Mochuda at Rahan. There he served for seven years, performing the most menial offices and carrying sacks of corn to and from the mill; According to the legend, he was finally identified by a monk who happened to be in the granary one day and overheard him laughing over his work and saying to himself: “Is this indeed King Constantine of Cornwall who formerly wore a ‘helmet’ and breastplate and who now drudges at a handmill?”

He learnt letters, was raised to the priesthood, and was sent to Scotland, where he was associated first with St Columba and then with St Kentigern. He is said to have preached the faith in Galloway and then to have become abbot of a monastery at Govan. As an old man Constantine went on a mission into Kintyre, but was attacked by pirates, who cut off his right arm. Calling his followers he gave them his blessing; and slowly bled to death. Scotland regarded him as her first martyr, and his feast is still observed in the diocese of Argyll and the Isles.

Cornwall, Wales, and Ireland also had traditions of a Cornish king named Constantine who became a monk, but no confidence can be placed in their often contradictory details; nor is there any good reason to suppose that Constantine of Cornwall was identical with Gildas’s “tyrannical Whelp of the unclean Lioness of Domnonia”.

The principal source is the Aberdeen Breviary and Martyrology. The Bollandists (Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii) seem to have adopted in the main the conclusions of Colgan in his Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae. See KSS., pp. 311—314, and especially Canon Doble’s excellent summary, St Constantine (1930), no. 26 in his Cornish Saints series. The annals of Tigernach (so-called) enter under the date 588 “Conversio Constantini ad Dominum”; the Annals of Ulster however, record it in 587, and the Annales Cambriae give it under 589.

Constantine of Scotland M (AC) feast in Cornwall and Wales is March 9. King Constantine of Cornwall is reputed to have been married to the daughter of the king of Brittany and to have led a life full of vice and greed until he was led to conversion by Saint Petroc. Upon the death of his wife, he is said to have ceded his throne to his son in order to become a penitent monk at St. Mochuda Monastery at Rahan, Ireland. He performed menial tasks at the monastery, then studied for the priesthood and was ordained. Constantine became a missionary to the Picts in Scotland under Saint Columba and then Saint Kentigern, preached in Galloway, and founded and became abbot of a monastery at Govan near the River Clyde. In his old age, on his way to Kintyre, he was attacked by pirates who cut off his right arm, and he bled to death. He is regarded as Scotland's first martyr, although his story is often contradictory and unreliable. It is probable that the Scottish martyr is not the same person as the British king. There are two places in Cornwall called Constantine: one on the Helford River and the other near Padstow. The church on the first site was the larger and survived as a monastery until the 11th century.
He was also patron of the Devon churches of Milton Abbot and Dunsford (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Husenbeth).
646 Saint Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem From his youth he was distinguished for his piety and his love for classical studies proficient in philosophy of monasticism
Born in Damascus around 560. From his youth he was distinguished for his piety and his love for classical studies. He was especially proficient in philosophy, and so he was known as Sophronius the Wise.
The future hierarch, however, sought the true philosophy of monasticism, and conversations with the desert-dwellers.

638 ST SOPHRONIUS, PATRIARCH OF JERUSALEM
ST SOPHRONIUS was born in Damascus. Although threatened at one time with blindness through over-study, he eventually became so great an adept in Greek philosophy that he was surnamed “the Sophist”. Falling under the influence of the celebrated hermit John Moschus, he joined forces with him, and they travelled widely in Syria, in Asia Minor and in Egypt, where he appears to have taken a monk’s habit about the year 580. The two friends lived together for some years in the laura of St Sabas and at the monsatery of St Theodosius near Jerusalem. Ever eager to advance in the practice of asceticism they visited the monasteries and many famous solitaries in Egypt and then went on to Alexandria, where St John the Almsgiver, the patriarch, detained them for two years to assist him in reforming his diocese and opposing heresy. It was in that city that John Moschus wrote his Spiritual Meadow, which he dedicated to Sophronius. About 620 Moschus died in Rome, where they had gone on pilgrimage, and Sophronius eventually returned to Palestine, where his piety, learning and orthodoxy led to his being elected patriarch of Jerusalem.

No sooner was he established in his see than he assembled all the bishops of his patriarchate to condemn monothelite teaching, and composed a synodal letter to explain and state the Catholic doctrine on the subject contested. This letter, which was afterwards confirmed in the sixth general council, was sent by St Sophronius to Pope Honorius and to Sergius, Patriarch of Constantinople, who had persuaded Honorius to write evasively on this question as to one or two wills in Christ. It seems evident that Honorius never professed to pronounce upon the matter in dispute, but his silence was ill-timed, as it gave the appearance of con­niving at heresy. Sophronius, seeing that the emperor and many Eastern prelates were fighting against the truth, felt that it was his duty to defend it with greater zeal than ever. He took his suffragan Stephen, Bishop of Dor, to Mount Calvary, and there adjured him by Christ who was crucified on that spot, and by the account he would have to render at the last day, “to go to the Apostolic See, where are the foundations of holy doctrine, and not to cease to pray till those in authority there should examine and condemn the novelty”. Stephen obeyed and remained in Rome for ten years, until he saw the monothelite heresy condemned by Pope St Martin I at the Council of the Lateran in 649.

Sophronius soon had other troubles to contend with.  The Saracens had in­vaded Syria and Palestine, taking Damascus in 636 and Jerusalem in 638. During that time he had done all he could to help and strengthen his flock, sometimes at the peril of his life. He preached to them a most pathetic Christmas sermon when the Mohammedans were beleaguering the city and the faithful could not go out to keep the festival at Bethlehem according to custom. After the town fell, St Sophronius fled, and is thought to have died of grief soon afterwards, perhaps in Alexandria.

Besides the synodal letter, St Sophronius wrote biographies and homilies, as well as hymns and anacreontic odes of considerable merit. The Life of John the Almsgiver, which he compiled in collaboration with John Moschus, has not come down to us, and another large work, in which he cited 600 passages from the fathers in support of the doctrine of Christ’s twofold will, has likewise perished.

The identity of Sophronius “the Sophist” with Sophronius the patriarch of Jerusalem has been called in question: see S. Vailhé in the Revue de l’Orient chrétien, vols. vii and viii (1902—1903). We have no direct evidence that the patriarch was associated with John Moschus. It has, however, been generally assumed that “the Sophist” who travelled with Moschus is the man who was afterwards patriarch; so e.g. by the Bollandists (Acta Sanctorum March, vol. ii). Cf. Bardenhewer, Patrology (Eng. trans.), pp. 559—561 and 564—565; and DCB., vol. iv, pp. 719—725.

He arrived in Jerusalem at the monastery of St Theodosius, and there he became close with the hieromonk John Moschus, becoming his spiritual son and submitting himself to him in obedience. They visited several monasteries, writing down the lives and spiritual wisdom of the ascetics they met. From these notes emerged their renowned book, the LEIMONARION or SPIRITUAL MEADOW, which was highly esteemed at the Seventh Ecumenical Council.
To save themselves from the devastating incursions of the Persians, Sts John and Sophronius left Palestine and went to Antioch, and from there they went to Egypt. In Egypt, St Sophronius became seriously ill. During this time he decided to become a monk and was tonsured by St John Moschus.
After St Sophronius recovered his health, they both decided to remain in Alexandria. There they were received by the holy Patriarch John the Merciful (November 12), to whom they rendered great aid in the struggle against the Monophysite heresy. At Alexandria St Sophronius had an affliction of the eyes, and he turned with prayer and faith to the holy Unmercenaries Cyrus and John (January 31), and he received healing in a church named for them. In gratitude, St Sophronius then wrote the Lives of these holy Unmercenaries.
When the barbarians began to threaten Alexandria, Patriarch John, accompanied by Sts Sophronius and John Moschus, set out for Constantinople, but he died along the way. Sts John Moschus and Sophronius then set out for Rome with eighteen other monks. St John Moschus died at Rome. His body was taken to Jerusalem by St Sophronius and buried at the monastery of St Theodosius.
In the year 628, Patriarch Zacharias of Jerusalem (609-633) returned from his captivity in Persia. After his death, the patriarchal throne was occupied for two years by St Modestus (December 18). After the death of St Modestus, St Sophronius was chosen Patriarch.
St Sophronius toiled much for the welfare of the Jerusalem Church as its primate (634-644).  Toward the end of his life, St Sophronius and his flock lived through a two year siege of Jerusalem by the Moslems. Worn down by hunger, the Christians finally agreed to open the city gates, on the condition that the enemy spare the holy places. But this condition was not fulfilled, and St Sophronius died in grief over the desecration of the Christian holy places.
Written works by Patriarch Sophronius have come down to us in the area of dogmatics, and likewise his "Excursus on the Liturgy," the Life of St Mary of Egypt (April 1), and also about 950 troparia and stikheras from Pascha to the Ascension.  While still a hieromonk, St Sophronius reviewed and made corrections to the Rule of the monastery of St Sava the Sanctified (December 5).
The saint's three Odes Canons for the Holy Forty Day Great Fast are included in the the contemporary Lenten Triodion.
685 St. Vigilius Bishop and martyr successor to St. Palladius as bishop of Auxerre
France, in 661, he was murdered in the forest near Compiegne at the order of Warator, Frankish mayor of the palace, because of a disagreement. He was thus venerated as a martyr.

712 ST VINDICIAN, BISHOP OF CAMBRAI Monasteries and new convents sprang up plentifully under his fostering care;
BULLECOURT near Bapaume was the birthplace of St Vindician who, upon the death of St Aubert about 669, was elected to succeed him as bishop of Cambrai. We are told that he visited all the parishes in his diocese and converted many sinners. He translated the body of St Maxellendis, who had been murdered by Harduin, a nobleman whom she had refused to marry. A great sensation was caused on that occasion by the, sudden cure of blindness and conversion of the murderer. At Caudry, where the relics were deposited, Vindician settled an establishment of pious women to serve God and to watch over them. Monasteries sprang up plentifully under his fostering care, and we find him soon afterwards consecrating the chapels of two more new convents and assisting, when invited by St Amand, at the consecration of the church of the monastery of Elnone.
     Upon his return to his own diocese, St Vindician found that it had become, the scene of a terrible tragedy. St Leger (Leodegar), Bishop of Autun, had incurred the displeasure of the savage Ebroin, mayor of the palace, who had blinded him, mutilated his face and had him beheaded in the forest of Sarcy in Artois. The horror-stricken bishops held a consultation as to what should be done. Tradition says that they decided to send Vindician as their spokesman to King Thierry to make a solemn protest. It was an embassy fraught with danger, but he accepted it and succeeded in gaining access to the king.
     Vindician came straight to the point. It was the duty of a bishop, he said, to reprove those who have fallen from grace lest they perish in their sin and the bishop with them. He went on to call upon the king to listen to a solemn expostulation in regard of the murder of St Leger which had been perpetrated with his connivance. It was a crime so great that the assembled bishops hardly knew what atonement could be made for such an outrage. The king must humbly seek reconciliation with God, acknowledging his fault and saying with the patriarch Job, “I have not concealed my fault, but have confessed it in the presence of all the people”.
     King Thierry declared that he recognized his offence and would try to make amends. The monastery of Arras—since called Saint-Vaast——became the special recipient of his bounty as being near the place where St Leger had died. That monastery, which had been begun by St Aubert on the spot where St Vaast used to retire for prayer and contemplation, had become for St Vindician the object of his particular solicitude. Carrying out the intentions of his predecessor, he was anxious to establish at Arras a community of men eager for the sanctification of souls. With that end in view he spared neither pains nor expense, and has consequently always been considered the primary benefactor of the abbey. He attempted to obtain for Arras the body of St Leger, but after some contention it was given to Poitiers. We find the holy bishop concerned in one more consecration, when he dedicated the church of the abbey of Hamage. No special events mark the rest of his life. He continued to rule over his diocese, and in his old age would often retire to Mont-Saint-Eloi or to Saint-Vaast to renew his fervour. He had reached his eightieth year when he was seized with the fever which proved fatal. He was on a visit to Brussels, but his body at his own request was buried on Mont-Saint-Eloi.
There is no early biography of St Vindician, and it is to be feared that some of the details incorporated in the account of him furnished by the Bollandists (Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii) and by the Abbé Destombes (Vies des Saints des dioceses de Cambrai et Arras, vol. 1, pp. 320—335) are based upon a forgery. See the article of A. Poncelet, Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxvii, pp. 384—390. But there can be no question as to the important part played by this saint in the ecclesiastical history of the Low Countries in the seventh century: Van der Essen, Saints Mérovingiens, pp. 276—277.
725 St. Benedict Crispus Archbishop of Milan wrote the epitaph for Caedwalla
 Medioláni sancti Benedícti Epíscopi.       At Milan, St. Benedict, bishop.
Italy, listed in the Roman Martyrology. Benedict was involved in a lawsuit of some sort during his forty-five years as archbishop. He also wrote the epitaph for Caedwalla, the English king of Wessex, who was buried in St. Peter's in Rome.
725 ST BENEDICT, ARCHBISHOP OF MILAN
VERY little is known about St Benedict Crispus. After he became archbishop of Milan he had a great lawsuit at Rome, being what Ughelli describes as “a very earnest defender” of his episcopal rights but he lost his case. He has an interest for English people as he composed the epitaph for the tomb in St Peter’s of the young Anglo-Saxon prince Caedwalla (April 20). Benedict is named in the Roman Martyrology.
See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii.
824 ST OENGUS, ABBOT-BISHOP ST OENGUS (or Aengus) sometimes called “the Hagiographer”, is better known as “the Culdee” or “God’s Vassal a Celtic title which came to be applied to those who practised a particularly rigid observance, especially in the order of divine service, but which was attached specially to him as to one who made an important contribution to the devotional literature of the Church and who lived according to the strictest rule of religion.

He came of royal race in Ulster, and was born about the middle of the eighth century. In early youth he entered the famous monastery of Clonenagh in Leix, which, under its saintly abbot Maelaithgen, then enjoyed a great reputation for learning, for sanctity and for its numbers. Here he made rapid advance until he had reached a point at which it could be said of him that no one in his time could be found in Ireland to equal him in virtue and in sacred knowledge. To shun the world more entirely he retired to a cell at Dysartenos some seven miles from the monastery, where he hoped to continue unnoticed the austerities he practised. Besides making three hundred genuflexions, it was his custom to recite the whole Psalter daily, dividing it into three parts, one of which he recited in his cell, another under a spreading tree, and the third whilst he stood tied by the neck to a stake, with his body partially immersed in a tub of cold water. His fame soon attracted too many visitors, and he departed secretly from his hermitage.
At the church of Coolbanagher, Oengus had a vision of angels who seemed to surround a particular tomb, singing hymns of celestial sweetness. Inquiry from the local priest elicited the fact that the tomb was that of a poor old man who formerly lived at the place. “What good did he do?” asked Oengus. “I saw no particular good done by him”, replied the priest, “but that his customary practice was to recount and invoke the saints of the world, as far as he could remember them, both at his going to bed and his getting up, in accordance with the custom of the old devotees.”—“Indeed”, said Oengus, “he who would make a poetical composition in praise of the saints should doubtless have a high reward, when so much has been vouchsafed to the efforts of this holy devotee.” From this moment his metrical hymn in honour of the saints began to shape itself in Oengus’s mind, although he did not immediately put it into words, fearing that he was unworthy and that his verses might not be dignified enough for so lofty a subject.
Continuing his journey, he finally reached the great monastery of Tallaght near Dublin, and asked to be received as a serving-man——concealing his name and scholarship. He was accepted by the abbot, St Maelruain, and for seven years he was given the meanest and most laborious offices, but he was well satisfied because he found plenty of time to raise his heart and thoughts to Heaven. His identity, however, was discovered in a singular way. One day as he was working in the monastery barn a scholar, who did not know his lesson and was therefore playing truant, took shelter in the granary and asked to be allowed to stay. Oengus took the little fellow in his arms and lulled him to sleep. When he awoke he had learnt his lesson perfectly. That, at least, was what he told the abbot, who cross-questioned him after hearing him repeat his lesson with unprecedented fluency and intelligence. Whether Maelruain thought that a miracle had been performed, or whether he realized that the humble serving-man was a teacher of exceptional ability, he ran out to the barn and embraced St Oengus with tender affection, divining or eliciting that he was the missing Oengus of Dysartenos.
Blamed for the misplaced humility which had deprived the community of the benefit of his learning and experience, he fell on his knees and begged the abbot’s pardon. From that moment the two saints became the closest of friends, and St Oengus, freed from menial work, set about composing the metrical hymn known in the Irish language as the Félire and in Latin as the Festilogium, although it does not appear to have been circulated until after the death of St Maelruain in 787, for the name of that abbot is included and he is called the “Bright Sun of Ireland”.
   As he meant to imitate the practice of the old man who was buried at Coolbanagher, Oengus could hardly be expected, consistently with the recital of the whole Psalter and his other devotions, to do more than invoke the principal saints in this metrical hymn, the repetition of which he is said to have added to his daily exercises. He remained on for some years at Tallaght, but after the death of St Maelruain he turned his steps back to Clonenagh, where he had spent his youth. Here he appears to have been made abbot in succession to Maelaithgen, and to have been raised to episcopal dignity in accordance with the practice prevalent in Ireland at the time of making the superiors of religious houses bishops without a definite see.
As he felt his end approaching, he withdrew to Dysartbeagh and there finished his Félire and perhaps composed some of his other works now lost, but whether he built a monastery in that place or whether he had a hermitage whilst continuing to guide a religious community elsewhere is uncertain. The exact date of his death is contested, but it is not thought that he lived to a great age. As he is said to have died on a Friday we may choose between 819, 824, and 830, in each of which years March 11, which is certainly his day, fell on a Friday.
The Life of St Oengus printed by the Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum (March, vol. ii) is taken from Colgan. There seems to be no early biography in either Latin or Irish, and the saint is not commemorated liturgically in any Irish diocese. Some useful illustrative material has been collected by Whitley Stokes in the edition of the Félire which he edited for the Henry Bradshaw Society. See also Abp J. Healy, Ireland’s Ancient Schools and Scholars, pp. 404—413 J. O’Hanlon in the Irish Ecclesiastical Record for 1869, as also in his LIS. and L. Gougaud, Christianity in Celtic Lands (1932).
824 St. Aengus  "the Culdee," author Festlology of the Saints of Ireland, The Felire  he communed with angels
Called Dengus and "the Culdee," a hermit and author of the Festlology of the Saints of Ireland, The Felire. The term Culdee refers to Aengus' love of solitude: Ceile De was a name given to the hermits of the time.
Aengus, born in Clonengh, Ireland, became a solitary monk on the banks of the river Nore, where he communed with angels. In time he sought a more remote site near Maryborough, erecting a small hermitage there. Visitors drawn by his reputation for holiness drove Aengus to the monastery of Tallaght, near Dublin, then under the control of St. Maelruain. He tried to enter as a simple lay brother, not telling anyone who he was. Aengus, along with Maelruain (who had discovered the Culdee's real identity), wrote the Martyrology of Tallaght together in 790. Aengus completed his Felire in 805 in his Maryborough hermitage, having returned there when Maelruain died. Aengus passed away on March 11, 824, and was buried in Clonenagh.

840 Sardis sancti Euthymii Epíscopi, qui, ob cultum sanctárum Imáginum, a Michaéle, Imperatóre Iconoclásta, in exsílium missus est; ac demum, Theóphilo imperánte, búbulis nervis, inhumániter cæsus, martyrium consummávit.
At Sardis, St. Euthymius, bishop, who was sent into exile by the Iconoclast emperor Michael for the veneration of sacred images. 
Afterwards, in the reign of Theophilus, he was barbarously beaten with knotted clubs, which completed his martyrdom.
Euthymius von Sardes BM Sardes um 840
859 Córdubæ, in Hispánia, sancti Eulógii, Presbyteri et Mártyris; qui, in persecutióne Saracenórum, ob præcláram et intrépidam Christi confessiónem, verbéribus et álapis cæsus ac decollátus gládio, adjúngi ejúsdem urbis Martyribus méruit, quorum pro fide certámina scribéndo fúerat æmulátus.
       At Cordova in Spain, St. Eulogius, priest, who deserved to be associated with the martyrs of that city because, in writing of their trials for the faith, he had envied their happiness.  On account of his own fearless and intrepid confession of Christ, he was scourged and beaten with rods, and finally beheaded during the Saracen persecution.
Eulogius von Cordoba Pr M 859
859 ST EULOGIUS OF CORDOVA, MARTYR
“If you [moslems] could but conceive the reward which awaits those who persevere in the faith until the end, you would resign your dignities in exchange for it!”
ST EULOGIUS has been described as the principal glory of the Spanish church in the ninth century. The descendant of a stock which had owned land in Cordova since the Roman occupation, he was one of a family of four brothers and two sisters. Cordova was then in the hands of the Moors, who had made it their capital, and Christianity, although to a certain extent tolerated, was hampered by vexatious restrictions public worship was allowed on payment of a monthly tax, but Christians were forbidden under pain of death to make converts. At the same time many of them held high office under their conquerors, and the saint’s youngest brother Joseph was an important official in the court of Abdur Rahman II.
Eulogius received his early education from the priests of Saint Zoilus, and when he had learnt all they could teach him he placed himself under the illustrious writer and abbot Sperandeo. Here he had as fellow pupil Paul Alvarez, and they contracted a lifelong friendship, Alvarez afterwards becoming his biographer. Their studies completed, Eulogius was raised to the priesthood, whilst his friend married and took up a literary career. The two carried on a voluminous correspondence, but agreed to destroy their letters as being too effusive and lacking in polish.
   In his Life of St Eulogius, Alvarez gives a delightful description of his friend, whom he represents as pious, mortified, learned in all branches of knowledge, but especially in the Holy Scriptures, of an open countenance, so humble that he often deferred to the opinions of those whose judgement was greatly inferior to his own, and so kindly that he won the love of all who had dealings with him. Visiting hospitals and monasteries was his recreation, and he was in such high esteem that he was asked by the monks to draw up new rules for them. To do this he not only went to stay in Spanish houses, but also visited monasteries in Navarre and Pamplona, comparing their regulations and selecting what was best in each code.
In 850 the Moors started a sudden persecution of Christians in Cordova, either because certain Christians were indiscreet in inveighing openly against Mohammed, or else because they had attempted the conversion of some of the Moors. Matters were made worse for the faithful when an Andalusian bishop called Reccared, instead of defending the flock of Christ, opened the door of the fold to the fury of the wolves. Why he should have turned against his own clergy is not clear:  probably he was a “moderate” man and preferred peace and toleration to missionary zeal and persecution. Whatever the reason, it was he who was responsible for the arrest of the priests of Cordova and of their bishop. They were shut up in prison and Eulogius, who was of their number, occupied himself in reading the Bible to the rest and in encouraging them to remain faithful to God. From his dungeon he wrote his Exhortation to Martyrdom, addressed to two maidens, Flora and Mary.

“They threaten to sell you as slaves and dishonour you”, he said, but be assured that they cannot injure the purity of your souls, whatever infamy they may inflict upon you. Cowardly Christians will tell you in order to shake your constancy that the churches are silent, deserted and deprived of the sacrifice on account of your obstinacy that if you will but yield temporarily you will regain the free exercise of your religion. But be persuaded that, for you, the sacrifice most pleasing to God is contrition of heart, and that you can no longer draw back or
renounce the truth you have confessed.”

The girls were spared the threatened humiliation and were executed with the sword, declaring with their dying breath that as soon as they should find themselves in the presence of Jesus Christ they would ask for the release of their brethren. Six days after their death the prisoners were set free, and Eulogius immediately composed a metrical account of the passion of the martyrs in order to induce others to follow in their footsteps. His brother Joseph was deprived of his office at court and he himself was compelled to live from thenceforth with the traitor Reccared, but he continued to instruct and confirm the faithful both by his voice and by his pen.

In 852 several others suffered martyrdom, and that same year the Council of Cordova forbade anyone to provoke arrest of set purpose. As the persecution waxed hotter under Abdur Rahman’s son and successor the zeal of Eulogius only increased, and he kept numerous weak Christians from falling away, besides encouraging others to martyrdom.
In the three volumes which he entitled The Memorial of the Saints he described the sufferings and death of all who perished in that persecution. He also wrote an Apologia, directed against those who denied to these victims the character of true martyrs on the grounds that they had wrought no miracles, that they had sought death instead of awaiting it, that they had perished at one blow without previous torture, and that they had been killed, not by idolaters, but by men who acknowledged the one true God. In defending these he was also defending himself, because he had approved and encouraged their action.

After the death of the archbishop of Toledo, the clergy and people cast their eyes upon St Eulogius as the most prominent leader of the Church, but although he was canonically elected he did not live to be consecrated. For his activities he was a marked man and could not long escape the fate to which he had urged others. There was a young woman in Cordova called Leocritia who had been converted to Christianity by a relative and baptized, although her parents were Moslems. For a follower of Islam to become a Christian was punishable by death, and the girl’s parents discovering her change of faith beat her and treated her cruelly in order to induce her to apostatize. She made her sufferings known to St Eulogius, who with the help of his sister Anulona assisted her to escape and concealed her amongst faithful friends. Her place of hiding, however, was discovered, and she and all those concerned in her escape were brought before the kadi. Eulogius, undaunted, offered to show the judge the true road to heaven, and declared that the prophet Mohammed was an impostor. The kadi threatened to have him scourged to death. The martyr replied that it would be to no purpose as he would never change his religion. The kadi then gave orders that he should be taken before the king’s council.
   There one of the council led him aside and said, “Although ignorant people rush headlong to their death, a man of your learning and standing ought not to imitate their folly. Be guided by me. Say but one word—since necessity requires it: afterwards you may resume your own religion and we will promise that no inquiry shall be made.”
   Eulogius replied with a smile, “If you could but conceive the reward which awaits those who persevere in the faith until the end, you would resign your dignities in exchange for it!” He then began boldly to proclaim the gospel to them, but the council, to avoid listening, promptly sentenced him to death. As he was being led away, one of the servants struck him on the face for having spoken against Mohammed: he at once turned the other cheek and meekly received a second blow. He was led out of the city to the place of execution, and with great composure allowed himself to be decapitated. St Leocritia suffered four days later.

As stated above, for our knowledge of the history of St Eulogius we are almost entirely dependent upon the short Latin biography of his friend Alvarez or Alvarus. This has been printed in the Act Sanctorum, March, vol. ii, and also in Migne, PL., vol. cxv, cc. 705—720, and other collections. See further Gams, Kirchengeschichte von Spanien, vol. ii, pp. 299—338, and the article “Eulogius” in the Kirchenlexikon. Cf. Dozy, Histoire des Musulmans d’Espagne, vol. ii, pp. 1—174, and W. von Baudissin, Eulogius und Alvar (1872). There is a popular account tr. into English, J. Perez de Urbel, A Saint under Moslem Rule (1937).
1020 St. Firmian Benedictine abbot of San Piceno in the Acona region of Italy.
In fínibus Ambianénsium sancti Firmíni Abbátis
1069 St. Amunia Mother of St. Aurea.
She joined her daughter in the life of a hermitess after the death of her husband.

1069 St. Aurea famed for her visions and miracles
Aurea was a native of Villavelayo, Spain. During the Moorish occupation of Spain, she became a nun at a nearby Benedictine San Millan de la Cogolla abbey and lived as a solitary famed for her visions and miracles.
ST AUREA, VIRGIN (c. A.D. 1100)
         WHEN Spain lay under the Moorish yoke it became the custom for those Christians who desired to live the religious life to build their monasteries in desolate mountain fastnesses where their conquerors seldom troubled to molest them. One of these was San Millán de la Cogolla above the Upper Ebro in the diocese of Calahorra.
         It was primarily a Benedictine abbey for men but, as was not unusual at the time, there was a settlement for women a short distance away, and these women were under the direction of the abbot of La Cogolla. Down below, in the village of Villavelayo, lived a couple, Garcia Nunno, or Nunnio, and Amunia his wife, with their daughter Aurea. Constant study of the Holy Scriptures and meditation on the lives of St Agatha, St Eulalia and St Cecilia determined her to devote herself to God in the religious life, and she sought admittance to the convent of San Millán.
         Receiving the habit she lived a life of complete abnegation as a solitary. Aurea was rewarded by a vision of her three patron saints who assured her of God’s approval and promised her a crown of glory; the fame of her penances and miracles spread, and her assistance and intercession were eagerly sought. She became the victim of a painful disease, dying in her mother’s arms, in the presence of the monk who wrote her life, tier mother, who did not long survive her, was buried by her side.
        The evidence is not very satisfactory. Mabillon in the Annales says nothing of St Aurea
         but a summary account is in the Bollandist Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii.


Aurea of San Millán, OSB V (AC) (also known as Oria) Saint Aurea, a Spanish virgin, was a hermit attached to the Benedictine abbey of San Millán de la Cogolla in La Rioja, Spanish Navarre. Her spiritual direction was provided by Saint Dominic of Silos. Her mother, Saint Amunia, joined her before her death at the age of 27 (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
1100 ST AUREA, VIRGIN rewarded by a vision of her three patron saints who assured her of God’s approval and promised her a crown of glory the fame of her penances and miracles spread, and her assistance and intercession were eagerly sought
WHEN Spain lay under the Moorish yoke it became the custom for those Christians who desired to live the religious life to build their monasteries in desolate mountain fastnesses where their conquerors seldom troubled to molest them. One of these was San Millán de Ia Cogolla above the Upper Ebro in the diocese of Calahorra. It was primarily a Benedictine abbey for men but, as was not unusual at the time, there was a settlement for women a short distance away, and these women were under the direction of the abbot of La Cogolla. Down below, in the village of Villavelayo, lived a couple, Garcia Nunno, or Nunnio, and Amunia his wife, with their daughter Aurea. Constant study of the Holy Scriptures and meditation on the lives of St Agatha, St Eulalia and St Cecilia determined her to devote herself to God in the religious life, and she sought admittance to the convent of San Millán. Receiving the habit she lived a life of complete abnegation as a solitary. Aurea was rewarded by a vision of her three patron saints who assured her of God’s approval and promised her a crown of glory the fame of her penances and miracles spread, and her assistance and intercession were eagerly sought. She became the victim of a painful disease, dying in her mother’s arms, in the presence of the monk who wrote her life. Her mother, who did not long survive her, was buried by her side.
The evidence is not very satisfactory. Mabillon in the Annales says nothing of St Aurea but a summary account is in the Bollandist Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii.
1454 Saint Euthymius archbishop labored in constructing and restoring churches devoted himself to asceticism
in Baptism John, was born in answer to the fervent prayers of the presbyter Micah and his wife Anna. For many years they had been childless, and they vowed that if they had a son, they would dedicate him to God.
   The boy read priestly books and frequently attended church services, often helping his father in the small church of St Theodore. All this sanctified young John's soul. In the year 1411, he left his parental home for a monastery at the age of fifteen.
Twelve versts from Novgorod, in a wilderness spot named Vyazhisch, three monks, Euphrosynus, Ignatius and Galacteon, settled in the forests and the swamps. They were soon joined by the priest Pimen, who was tonsured with the name Pachomius. Here they lived in complete solitude at a wooden chapel they built in honor of St Nicholas. They lived in unceasing prayer and struggled with the severe conditions of nature in the northern regions.
The young John also came to these ascetics seeking salvation. The igumen Pachomius accepted him fondly and tonsured him into monasticism with the name Euthymius.
His tonsure at such a young age is an indication of the young ascetic's outstanding spiritual traits.
    During this time the See of Novgorod was occupied by Archbishop Simeon, a simple monk who became a hierarch. The virtuous life of St Euthymius became known to the archbishop. St Euthymius was summoned to Novgorod and after a long talk with Archbishop Simeon, he was appointed as the archbishop's steward.
At that time the Archbishops of Novgorod occupied a unique position. Independent of princely authority, they were elected directly by the assembly and they assumed a large role in secular matters. Moreover, they administered vast land-holdings. Under these conditions, an archbishop's steward had to combine administrative talent with the utmost non-covetousness and deep Christian humility. St Euthymius fervently entreated the archpastor to send him back to Vyazhisch, but then agreed to stay.
    St Euthymius evoked general astonishment and esteem, occupying such an important position, and being at the center of business life in a large city. As a monk he devoted himself to asceticism as fervently as he would have done in the deep forest.
Archbishop Simeon died in 1421. Under the new hierarch, Euthymius I, St Euthymius again withdrew to his monastery. Soon, however, the monks of a monastery on Lisich Hill chose the saint as their igumen. With the death of Archbishop Euthymius I in 1429, St Euthymius was then chosen as archbishop. On November 29, he entered into the temple of St Sophia. For four years the saint administered the Novgorod diocese, while putting off being installed as archbishop. Only on May 24, 1434 was he consecrated at Smolensk by Metropolitan Gerasimus.
St Euthymius wisely governed his diocese for twenty-nine years, zealous in fulfilling his archpastoral duty. St Euthymius labored in constructing and restoring churches, especially after the devastating fires of the years 1431 and 1442.

St. Peter the Spaniard shirt of mail as a penitential reminder
Penitent. According to tradition, Peter was a Spaniard who went on a pilgrimage to Rome and, being so moved, settled near Rome and spent the rest of his days as a hermit. He supposedly wore a shirt of mail as a penitential reminder.

1485 BD CHRISTOPHER MACASSOLI
THIS Bd Christopher of Milan must not be confused with a Dominican of the same name and place who is commemorated on March 1.
Christopher Macassoli entered the Franciscan Order at an early age. Love of poverty, great purity of heart and complete trust in God were his distinguishing characteristics. As a priest he converted many by his preaching and example. At Vigevano he helped to enlarge the friary in which he lived, and thousands of people flocked to receive his counsel and to ask his intercession with God. He died in 1485 and Pope Leo XIII in 1890 confirmed the local cultus which had been unbroken since his death. We are told that the little chapel of St Bernardino at Vigevano, where his remains repose in a tomb built into the wall, is covered with votive offerings made by the faithful in acknowledgment of miraculous answers to prayer.
See Mark of Lisbon, Croniche del Minori (Italian adaptation by B. Barezzi), vol. iv, pp. 251—252.
1539 BD JOHN BAPTIST OF FABRIANO miracles were reported to have been worked at his tomb, and a considerable cultus followed, which was confirmed in 1903.
THE life led by John Baptist Righi of Fabriano is much extolled in the, chronicles of the Order of Friars Minor. He was a priest, but though said to be a man of great natural ability he would never, out of humility, acquire more learning than was needful for ordination. The rigour of his fasts recalled the asceticism of the fathers of the desert. He often passed the entire week from Sunday to Sunday without taking food, and during the long Lent which he kept from the Epiphany until Easter day he never ate except on Sundays and Thursdays. After the termination of the night office, instead of retiring to his cell to rest, he used to remain praying in the church, and on one occasion was discovered there by the sacristan rapt in ecstasy, while diffusing around him a heavenly perfume which had attracted the intruder to the corner in which John Baptist had hidden himself. He was a little man and very frail, but he would not consent to protect himself from the cold by using any more clothing than his single patched habit. He wore himself out rendering services to others, for though he was most earnest in insisting that the rule should be observed with strict fidelity, he spared no pains to secure for his brethren, and especially for the sick, such alleviations as they really needed. After his death at the friary of Massaccio in 1539 miracles were reported to have been worked at his tomb, and a considerable cultus followed, which was confirmed in 1903.
See Ciro da Pesaro, Vita e culto del B. Giovanni Righi (1904) the author has made use of a short biography written shout sixty years after Father John’s death. Cf. also Mark of Lisbon, Croniche del Minori, vol. iii, pp. 602-603.
1544 BD. JOHN LARKE, JERMYN GARDINER AND JOHN IRELAND, MARTYRS
JOHN LARKE is sometimes erroneously described as having been Sir Thomas More’s chaplain, whereas he was actually rector of Chelsea, the church which Sir Thomas habitually attended when in London, his town house being situated in that parish.
We have no details concerning Larke’s parentage, birth or upbringing, but it is conjectured that he must have been an old man when he suffered martyrdom. In 1504 he had been appointed rector of St Ethelburga, Bishopsgate, the incumbency of which he continued to hold until shortly before his death.* [* A remarkable painting of Larke may be seen in this interesting church, one of the few in the City to be spared by the great fire of 1666.]
 In 1526 he became rector of Woodford in Essex, but he resigned the living four years later when he was nominated to Chelsea by Sir Thomas More, who as lord chancellor held the right of appointment from the abbey of Westminster. He seems to have had the greatest veneration for his patron, and Cresacre More in his life of Sir Thomas says that “his death so wrought on the mind of Dr Larke, his own parish priest, that he, following the example of his own sheep, afterwards suffered a most famous martyrdom in the same cause of supremacy”. The title of “doctor” appears to have been one of courtesy only. Though he never took the oath or sacrificed his principles to preserve his life and benefices, Larke does not appear to have been molested until 1544, when he was arrested and charged with treason, together with a secular priest named John Ireland, of whom little is known, and a young man called German or Jermyn Gardiner, a secretary and probably a relation of Stephen Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester. German was a zealous Catholic who, though sometimes spoken of as a priest, was almost certainly a layman.

The trial of Larke, Ireland and Gardiner took place at Westminster on February 15, 1544, and the record in the state papers contains the following statement:
The Jury say upon their oath that John Heywood, late of London, gentleman, John Ireland, late of Eltham in the county of Kent, clerk, John Larke, late of Chelsea in the county of Middlesex, clerk, and German Gardiner, late of Southwark in the county of Surrey, gentleman, not weighing the duties of their allegiance nor keeping God Almighty before their eyes, but seduced by the instigation of the devil, falsely, maliciously and traitorously [have acted] like false and wicked traitors against the most serene and Christian prince, our Lord Henry VIII, by the grace of God King of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and upon earth Supreme Head of the English and Irish Church—choosing, wishing and desiring and cunningly machinating, inventing, practising and attempting—together with many other false traitors unknown, in confederacy with them to deprive our said King Henry VIII of his royal dignity, title and name of “Supreme Head of the English and Irish Church” which has been united and annexed to his imperial crown by the laws and proclamations of this his realm of England.

The prisoners were all condemned and sentenced to death, but John Heywood, whose name figures first in the report of the trial, recanted after he had been placed on the hurdle, and received the king’s pardon. The rest remained steadfast and perished at Tyburn on March 7, 1544. The feast of John Larke in the diocese of Brentwood is assigned to this day.
See Camm, LEM., vol. i, pp. 541—547.
1615 St. John Ogilvie joined the Jesuits entered Scotland tightening of the penal laws caused his arrest refused to apostasize hung there; canonized 1976, becoming first Scottish saint since 1250 (c. 1579-1615)

John Ogilvie's noble Scottish family was partly Catholic and partly Presbyterian. His father raised him as a Calvinist, sending him to the continent to be educated. There John became interested in the popular debates going on between Catholic and Calvinist scholars. Confused by the arguments of Catholic scholars whom he sought out, he turned to Scripture. Two texts particularly struck him: "God wills all men to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth," and "Come to me all you who are weary and find life burdensome, and I will refresh you."
Slowly, John came to see that the Catholic Church could embrace all kinds of people. Among these, he noted, were many martyrs.
He decided to become Catholic and was received into the Church at Louvain, Belgium, in 1596 at the age of 17.

John continued his studies, first with the Benedictines, then as a student at the Jesuit College at Olmutz. He joined the Jesuits and for the next 10 years underwent their rigorous intellectual and spiritual training. Ordained a priest in France in 1610, he met two Jesuits who had just returned from Scotland after suffering arrest and imprisonment. They saw little hope for any successful work there in view of the tightening of the penal laws. But a fire had been lit within John. For the next two and a half years he pleaded to be missioned there.
Sent by his superiors, he secretly entered Scotland posing as a horse trader or a soldier returning from the wars in Europe. Unable to do significant work among the relatively few Catholics in Scotland, John made his way back to Paris to consult his superiors. Rebuked for having left his assignment in Scotland, he was sent back. He warmed to the task before him and had some success in making converts and in secretly serving Scottish Catholics. But he was soon betrayed, arrested and brought before the court. His trial dragged on until he had been without food for 26 hours. He was imprisoned and deprived of sleep. For eight days and nights he was dragged around, prodded with sharp sticks, his hair pulled out. Still, he refused to reveal the names of Catholics or to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the king in spiritual affairs. He underwent a second and third trial but held firm. At his final trial he assured his judges: "In all that concerns the king, I will be slavishly obedient; if any attack his temporal power, I will shed my last drop of blood for him. But in the things of spiritual jurisdiction which a king unjustly seizes I cannot and must not obey."
Condemned to death as a traitor, he was faithful to the end, even when on the scaffold he was offered his freedom and a fine living if he would deny his faith.
His courage in prison and in his martyrdom was reported throughout Scotland.
John Ogilvie was canonized in 1976, becoming the first Scottish saint since 1250.
Comment:    John came of age when neither Catholics nor Protestants were willing to tolerate one another. Turning to Scripture, he found words that enlarged his vision. Although he became a Catholic and died for his faith, he understood the meaning of “small-c catholic,” the wide range of believers who embrace Christianity.
Even now he undoubtedly rejoices in the ecumenical spirit fostered by the Second Vatican Council and joins us in our prayer for unity with all believers.

 March 11, 2010 St. John Ogilvie (c. 1579-1615) 
John Ogilvie's noble Scottish family was partly Catholic and partly Presbyterian. His father raised him as a Calvinist, sending him to the continent to be educated. There John became interested in the popular debates going on between Catholic and Calvinist scholars. Confused by the arguments of Catholic scholars whom he sought out, he turned to Scripture. Two texts particularly struck him: "God wills all men to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth," and "Come to me all you who are weary and find life burdensome, and I will refresh you."

Slowly, John came to see that the Catholic Church could embrace all kinds of people. Among these, he noted, were many martyrs. He decided to become Catholic and was received into the Church at Louvain, Belgium, in 1596 at the age of 17.

John continued his studies, first with the Benedictines, then as a student at the Jesuit College at Olmutz. He joined the Jesuits and for the next 10 years underwent their rigorous intelle ctual and spiritual training. Ordained a priest in France in 1610, he met two Jesuits who had just returned from Scotland after suffering arrest and imprisonment. They saw little hope for any successful work there in view of the tightening of the penal laws. But a fire had been lit within John. For the next two and a half years he pleaded to be missioned there.

Sent by his superiors, he secretly entered Scotland posing as a horse trader or a soldier returning from the wars in Europe. Unable to do significant work among the relatively few Catholics in Scotland, John made his way back to Paris to consult his superiors. Rebuked for having left his assignment in Scotland, he was sent back. He warmed to the task before him and had some success in making converts and in secretly serving Scottish Catholics. But he was soon betrayed, arrested and brought before the court. His trial dragged on until he had been without food for 26 hours. He was imprisoned and deprived of sleep. Fo r eight days and nights he was dragged around, prodded with sharp sticks, his hair pulled out. Still, he refused to reveal the names of Catholics or to acknowledge the jurisdiction of the king in spiritual affairs. He underwent a second and third trial but held firm. At his final trial he assured his judges: "In all that concerns the king, I will be slavishly obedient; if any attack his temporal power, I will shed my last drop of blood for him. But in the things of spiritual jurisdiction which a king unjustly seizes I cannot and must not obey."

Condemned to death as a traitor, he was faithful to the end, even when on the scaffold he was offered his freedom and a fine living if he would deny his faith. His courage in prison and in his martyrdom was reported throughout Scotland.
John Ogilvie was canonized in 1976, becoming the first Scottish saint since 1250.

Comment:  John came of age when neither Catholics nor Protestants were willing to tolerate one another. Turning to Scripture, he found words that enlarged his vision. Although he became a Catholic and died for his faith, he understood the meaning of “small-c catholic,” the wide range of believers who embrace Christianity. Even now he undoubtedly rejoices in the ecumenical spirit fostered by the Second Vatican Council and joins us in our prayer for unity with all believers.
1770 St. Teresa Margaret Redi discalced Carmelite nun remarkable prayer life and a deeply penitential demeanor; The devotion paid to her, especially in the city of Florence, has been attended with many miracles.
Anna Maria Redi was a native of Florence, Italy. She entered the Carmelites in 1765 and took the name Sister Teresa Margaret. She died at the age of twenty-three, but in the very brief time of her life in the cloister, she displayed a remarkable prayer life and a deeply penitential demeanor. She was canonized in 1934 by Pope Pius XI (r. 1922-1939).

1770 ST TERESA MARGARET REDI, VIRGIN
To the list of youthful saints who of late years have been honoured by the Church is now to be added the name of the Carmelite nun, Teresa-Margaret-of-the-Sacred Heart, canonized in 1934.
Anne Mary Redi, as she was called in the world, belonged to Arezzo, but the greater part of her life was spent at Florence and within convent walls. Born in 1747, she was sent to Florence at the age of ten to be educated by the nuns of the community of St Apollonia. She remained with them for seven years, giving a most admirable example of obedience, modesty, prayerfulness, diligence and all the virtues appropriate to a child. At school, reclaimed by her parents when her education was completed, she remained for a few months at home, but received what seemed to her a supernatural admonition from St Teresa of Avila that she was called to the Carmelites. She accordingly entered the convent of St Teresa at Florence in 1765. She would have wished to enter as a lay-sister, but this was not allowed, and after a most edifying noviceship she took her vows as a choir-nun.
There is not much to chronicle in the retired life Teresa Margaret led in a cloistered order, but those who had known her during the five years she was spared to them spoke in glowing terms of her extraordinary fidelity to her Christian vocation. We have the actual words used by her fellow Carmelites when summoned to give evidence in the episcopal process instituted not long after her death in view of her beatification. She was especially devout to the Sacred Heart and marvelously charitable, putting to profit every opportunity which a cloistered life could afford of sacrificing herself for the benefit of others. Her prayers, penances and a practice of poverty far more rigid than the rule required probably shortened her life. Moreover, she was much employed in tending the sick of the community, maintaining an unclouded brightness and equanimity even when she herself was far more fit to be a patient than a nurse. After her death at the age of twenty-three her body lay exposed for fifteen days without a sign of decomposition, and it has remained incorrupt until the present time. The devotion paid to her, especially in the city of Florence, has been attended with many miracles.
The summarium de virtutibus printed for the process of beatification may be found in the library of the British Museum. See also Fr Lorenzo, La b. Teresa Margherita (1930) and Fr Stanislas, Un angelo del Carmelo (1930), of which there is an adapted English version by Mgr J. F. Newcomb, St Theresa Margaret...(1934). She is honoured liturgically among the Carmelites on March 11, though March 7 was the day of her death.
Teresa Margaret Redi, OCD V (RM) (Baptized as Anna Maria Redi) Born in Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy, July 15, 1747; died March 7, 1770; canonized 1934. Teresa Margaret of the Sacred Heart of Jesus was born of a distinguished family, baptized Anna Maria, and raised by the Benedictine nuns of Santa Apollonia in Florence.
One day on entering her room, she distinctly heard herself addressed with the words: "I wish to have you among my daughters." She felt herself irresistibly drawn to the chapel, where the same voice said to her: "I am Teresa of Jesus, and I tell you that soon you will be in my convent."

Teresa Margaret returned to her parents' house for a few weeks, then, in the summer of 1764, was received on probation in the convent of the discalced Carmelites in Florence. The nuns were amazed at this novice, who set them an example of the perfect conventual life. Her motto was: "To suffer, to love, to be silent."

Under the spiritual sufferings of the path of purification she matured quickly to mystical union with God. On the evening of March 6, 1770, she was suddenly overcome by violent pains, and the very next day she peacefully and joyfully gave back her soul to God, whom she had always loved and for whom she had constantly yearned. She was 22 at the time of her death. The rumor that a saint had died rapidly spread through Florence, and her body had to be kept above ground for 15 days (Benedictines, Schamoni).



On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
Day 11 of 40 Days for Life
                      
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 01
492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet.  492 ST FELIX II (III), POPE  483 - 492
ACCORDING to the Roman Martyrology this Pope Felix was an ancestor (great-great-grandfather) of Pope St Gregory the Great it recalls Gregory’s statement that when his aunt, St Tharsilla, lay dying, Felix appeared in vision and summoned her to Heaven. The martyrology Calls him Felix III, through the long-standing but erroneous numeration of the antipope Felix as Pope St Felix II (see July 29).

549 St. Herculanus Bishop of Perugia, Italy marthred by Ostrogoths.        At Perugia, the transferral of the body of St. Herculanus, bishop and martyr, who was beheaded by order of Totila, king of the Goths.  Forty days after the decapitation, Pope St. Gregory relates that the head had been rejoined to the body as if it had never been touched by the sword:  beheaded by King Totila of the Ostrogoths. He is probably the same Herculanus sent to Perugia from Syria to evangelize the region.
 589 ?  St. David of Wales missionary priest monk dove lift him high above the people David is the patron saint of Wales and perhaps the most famous of British saints. Ironically, we have little reliable information about him. It is known that he became a priest, engaged in 589 ?  St. David of Wales David, cousin of Cadoc and pupil of Illtyd. David is the patron saint of Wales and perhaps the most famous of British saints. Many stories and legends sprang up about David and his Welsh monks. Their austerity was extreme. They worked in silence without the help of animals to till the soil. Their food was limited to bread, vegetables and water.
 713 St Swithbert (Suidbert) 1 of band 12 missionaries headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 evangelize Friesland. At Kaiserswerdt, Bishop St. Swidbert, who, in the time of Pope Sergius, preached the Gospel among the Frisians, Batavians, and other Germanic peoples.
ST SWITHBERT (Suidbert) was one of a band of twelve missionaries who, headed by St Willibrord, started in 690 to evangelize the pagans of Friesland. A Northumbrian by birth, and brought up as a monk near the Scottish border, Swithbert, like so many other Englishmen of his period, had crossed over to Ireland in search of higher perfection. Here he had come under the direction and influence of St Egbert, who, though long consumed with zeal for the conversion of Lower Germany, had been restrained by divine command when he prepared a ship and was on the point of embarking in person. His place had then been taken by his disciple and devoted friend St Wigbert, but the mission was a complete failure, and after labouring for two years Wigbert returned home. Egbert, however, refused to be discouraged and never slackened in his appeal for volunteers, until he succeeded in collecting and training this second mission which he despatched. By this time the conditions had become much more favourable. The missionaries landed at the mouth of the Rhine and, according to Alcuin, made their way as far as Utrecht, where they set to work to preach and to teach.


Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 02
6th century Martyrs of Campania Christians martyred by the Lombards in Italy.  ST GREGORY THE GREAT in one of his Dialogues has preserved for us the record of those martyrs under the Lombards whom we commemorate on this day, who were in fact contemporaries of his own. It was about the middle of the sixth century that the Lombards from Scandinavia and Pomerania, who had already descended upon Austria and Bavaria, penetrated yet further south into Italy, bringing ruin and desolation in their train.
Not content with material destruction, they attempted in many cases to pervert the Christian population, forcing their pagan rites upon them. In one place they endeavoured to induce forty peasants to eat meat offered to idols when they refused to a man, the invaders killed them all with the sword. In the case of another, party of prisoners, their captors sought to make them join in the worship of their favourite deity, a goat’s head, which they carried in procession and to which they bowed the knee, singing obscene songs in its honour. The greater part of the Christians—about 400 in number—chose rather to die than to flout God thus.

1127 Bl. Charles the Good martyred by black marketeers hording food.  Son of King Saint Canute of Denmark. Raised in the court of his maternal grandfather, Robert de Frison, Count of Flanders. Fought in the second Crusade. Succeeded Robert II as count of Flanders. Married into the family of the Duke of Clermont. His rule was a continuous defense of the poor against profiteers of his time, both clerical and lay. Called "the Good" by popular acclamation. Reformed laws to make them more fair, supported the poor, fed the hungry, walked barefoot to Mass each day. Martyred in the church of Saint Donatian at Bruges by Borchard, part of a conspiracy of the rich whom he had offended. He is venerated at Bruges.
Born:  1083 Died:  beheaded on 2 March 1127; relics at the Cathedral of Bruges  Beatified:  1883 by Pope Leo XIII (cultus confirmed)  Name Meaning:  strong; manly  Patronage:  counts, Crusaders
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1201 BD FULCO OF NEUILLY after a serious conversion he set about his priestly duties at Neuilly-sur-Marne with fervour and success; reputed to have a strange knowledge of men’s thoughts and worked innumerable cures upon those who had recourse to him in their infirmities.  All the chroniclers, however, are agreed that Fulco never flattered and was no respecter of persons. According to Roger Hoveden it was he who told King Richard Coeur-de-Lion that unless he married off his three disreputable daughters, he would certainly come to a bad end. When Richard exclaimed in a fury that the words proved his censor to be a hypocrite and an impostor, for he had no daughters, the holy man answered, “Yes, but indeed you have three daughters, and I will tell you their names. The first is called Pride, the second Avarice and the third Lust.” The fame of the French priest’s missionary labours attracted the notice of Pope Innocent III, and in the year 1198 he commissioned Fulco to preach the new Crusade, accounted the Fourth, throughout the northern part of France. His eloquence had already produced marvellous effects, and if we may credit his own statement, as reported by Coggeshall, 200,000 people in the course of three years had taken the cross at his hands. Fulco was himself to have joined in the expedi­tion, but before starting he fell ill and died on March 2, 1201. His tomb was still venerated at Neuilly-sur-Marne in the eighteenth century. The cultus formerly paid to him seems never to have been authoritatively confirmed.

1282 St. Agnes of Bohemia thaumaturgist or miracle worker. She was twenty-eight years old and a beautiful woman when, in 1235, the emperor sent an ambassador to Prague to escort her to Germany that the marriage might take place. Wenceslaus would listen to no remonstrances; but Agnes found means to delay her departure and wrote to Pope Gregory IX, entreating him to prevent the marriage because she had never con­sented to it and had long desired to be the spouse of Christ. Gregory, although for the moment he had made peace with Frederick, knew him well enough to be able to sympathize with the unwilling victim. He sent his legate to Prague to undertake her defence and to Agnes herself he wrote letters which she showed to her brother. Wenceslaus was greatly alarmed. On the one hand he feared to anger the emperor, but on the other he did not wish to alienate the pope or to force his sister to marry against her will. Eventually he decided to tell Frederick and to let him deal with the matter. The emperor on this occasion showed one of those flashes of magnanimity which have made his complex character so fascinating a study to historians. As soon as he had satisfied himself that the objection came, not from the King of Bohemia, but from Agnes herself, he released her, saying, “If she had left me for a mortal man, I should have made my vengeance felt; but I cannot take offence if she prefers the King of Heaven to myself.”
Now that she was free, Agnes set about consecrating herself and her possessions wholly to God. Her father had brought the Friars Minor to Prague, probably at her suggestion, and she built or completed a convent for them. With the help of her brother she endowed a great hospital for the poor and brought to it the Knights Hospitallers of the Cross and Star, whose church and monastery still remain in the same place, and the two also built a convent for Poor Clares. The citizens would fain have shared in the work, but the king and his sister preferred to complete it alone. Nevertheless it is said that the workmen, determined to do their part, would often slip away unperceived in the evening in order to avoid being paid. As soon as the convent was ready, St Clare sent five of her religious to start it, and on Whitsunday 1236 Bd Agnes herself received the veil. Her profession made a great impression: she was joined by a hundred girls of good family, and throughout Europe princesses and noble women followed her example and founded or entered convents of Poor Clares. Agnes showed the true spirit of St Francis, ever seeking the lowliest place and the most menial work, and it was with difficulty that she was induced, when nominated by Pope Gregory IX, to accept the dignity of abbess—at least for a time. After much entreaty she obtained for the Poor Ladies of Prague the concession obtained in 1238 by St Clare at San Damiano, namely, permission to resign all revenues and property held in common. The four letters from St Clare to Bd Agnes which have come down to us express her tender affection for her devoted disciple, to whom she also sent, in response to her request for a souvenir, a wooden cross, a flaxen veil and the earthen bowl out of which she drank. Agnes lived to the age of seventy-seven and died on March 2, 1282. Her cultus was confirmed by Pope Pius X; the Friars Minor now keep her feast on June 8, with Bd. Isabel of France and Baptista Varani. She was canonized in 1989 by Pope John Paul II.
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 03
803 St. Anselm of Nonantola Benedictine abbot duke.   WHEN the Langobard King Aistulf was reigning in Italy, he was greatly assisted in his military campaigns by his brother-in-law, Anselm, Duke of Friuli. The duke was not only a valiant soldier but also an ardent Christian, and founded first a monastery with a hospital at Fanano in the province of Modena and then a larger abbey twenty miles further south at Nonantola. Desirous of consecrating himself entirely to God, he then went to Rome, where he was clothed with the habit of St Benedict and appointed abbot over the new community. St. Anselm also received from Pope Stephen III permission to remove to Nonantola the body of Pope St Silvester; and Langobard King Aistulf enriched the abbey with gifts and granted it many privileges it became very celebrated throughout all Italy.
1075 ST GERVINUS, ABBOT.  Pilgrims used to throng the church, and the abbot sometimes spent nearly the whole day in hearing confessions. Nor was his zeal confined to his abbey, for he made excursions through Picardy, Normandy, Aquitaine and as far as Thuringia, preaching and hearing confessions. When Pope St Leo IX in 1050 came in person to Rheims to consecrate the church of St Remigius and to preside over a council, the abbot of Saint-Riquier accompanied him on his journey back to Rome.So great was the veneration in which he was held that he was called “the holy abbot” even during his lifetime. Although, for the last four years of his life, he suffered from a terrible form of leprosy, he continued to carry on all his customary duties as before, and he would often bless God for sending him the trial. On March 3, 1075, when he offered his last Mass in the little underground church of Notre-Dame de Ia Voute which he had built, he was so ill that he could scarcely finish, and had to be carried back to his cell as soon as it was over.
To his monks who stood round him in consternation he said, “Children, to-day our Blessed Lady has given me my discharge from this life”, and he insisted upon making a public confession of his sins. He then had himself taken back to the church and laid before the altar of St John Baptist, where he died. When his body was then washed, it was noticed that no trace of the leprosy remained.

1167 ST AELRED, ABBOT OF Rievaulx "He who loves thee, possesses thee and he possesses thee in proportion as he loves, because thou art love. This is that abundance with which thy beloved are inebriated, melting away from themselves, that they may pass into thee by loving thee.”
Of those last days, Aelred’s patience and trust in God, the love and grief of his monks, Walter Daniel has left us a most moving account. It must be admitted that Alban Butler is not at his best in his treatment of St Aelred, who is one of the most attractive of English saints, a great teacher of friendship, divine and human, and a man who, quite apart from his writings, must have exercised a great influence through the monasteries he founded from Rievaulx. He was himself, “One whom I might fitly call friendship’s child: for his whole occupation is to love and to be loved.”
(De spirituali amicitia).
 It seems that St Aelred was canonized in 1191 (Celestine III 1191-1198) his feast is kept on March 3 in the dioceses of Liverpool, Hexham and Middlesbrough, and by the Cistercians.

Besides the admirable study of St Aelred by Father Dalgairns (in Newman’s series of Lives of the English Saints), which may be truly described as one of the classics of hagiography, a very complete and up-to-date account of the saint is provided by F. M. Powicke’s Ailrad of Rievaulx and his Biographer Walter Daniel (1922). This writer shows that the life by Walter Daniel, a contemporary monk of Rievaulx, is the source from which both the two biographies previously known have been condensed. In 1950 Professor Powicke published Daniel’s biography in Latin and English, with notes and a long introduction. We also obtain a good many sidelights upon Aelred’s character from his own treatises and sermons. All these, with the exception of his book on the Hexham miracles, will be found printed in Migne, PL., vol. cxcv. There is a great devotional glow in many of his ascetical writings, notably in his Speculum charitatis. He was the author also of several short biographies— e.g. that of St Ninian—and of historical and theological tractates. There is a translation of De spirituali amicitia by Fr Hugh Talbot, called Christian Friendship. T. E. Harvey’s St Aelred of Rievaulx (1932) is an excellent short book by a Quaker. See also D. Knowles, The Monastic Order in England (1949), pp. 240—245, 257—266 and passim. Aelred’s name is variously spelt. In the DNB., for example, he appears as “Ethelred”, in Powicke and others as “Ailred”. See, further, the Acta Sanctorum for January 12 and the Dictionnaire de Spiritualité, vol. i, cc. 225--234.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 04
  254 St. Lucius I a Roman elected Pope to succeed Pope St. Cornelius
At Rome, on the Appian Way, during the persecution of Valerian, the birthday of St. Lucius, pope and martyr, who was first exiled for the faith of Christ, but being permitted by divine Providence to return to his church, after labouring long against the Novatians, he suffered martyrdom by beheading.  His praises have been published by St. Cyprian.
1123 St. Peter of Pappacarbone Benedictine bishop leadership, care, and wisdom.  PETER PAPPACARBONE was a native of Salerno in Italy, a nephew of St Alferius, founder of the monastery of Cava, and entered upon the religious life at a very early age under St Leo, the second abbot. He distinguished himself at once by his piety, abstemiousness and love of solitude. At this time the fame of the abbey of Cluny had spread far and wide, and the young monk was so attracted by what he had heard that about 1062 he obtained permission to leave Cava and go to France. When the older monks at Cluny would have sent him to the school to be trained, their abbot, St Hugh, disagreed, saying that Peter might be young in years but that he was a full-grown man in devotion. The abbot’s opinion was abundantly justified, for Peter proved himself well among that household of holy men and he remained there for some six years. He was then recalled to Italy, having been released by St Hugh apparently at the request of the archdeacon of Rome, Hilde­brand (who was afterwards Pope St Gregory VII).  Under the government of Abbot Peter the monastery flourished amazingly. Not only did numbers of aspirants to the religious life flock to him from all sides, but men and women in the world showered money and lands upon the community, which was enabled to minister far and wide to the sick and the poor. The abbey itself had to be enlarged to admit the new members, and a new church was built, to the dedication of which came Pope Urban II, who had been with St Peter at Cluny and had remained his close friend. The description of this occasion was preserved in the chronicles of Cava, where it is stated that Bd Urban talked freely with the abbot and monks, as though “forgetting that he was pope”. St Peter lived to a great age and died in 1123.
1188 BD HUMBERT III OF SAVOY.   Called to rule at his father’s death, he sacrificed a desire for solitude to the task imposed upon him, and though a mere boy when he took up the reins of government he showed himself fully equal to his position, finding it quite possible to reconcile the duty of a secular ruler with that of self-sanctification. When his wife died childless, the count sought in the monastery of Aulps the consolation he needed, and would fain have remained there, but his vassals came to entreat him not to abandon them and to take steps to ensure the succession in his family. Yielding to these representations he again took up the burden and contracted two, if not three, more marriages. By his second wife, Germana of Zahringen, he had a child, Agnes, who was betrothed to John Lackland, afterwards king of England, but both mother and daughter died before the marriage could take place. The time came at last when Count Humbert felt that he was justified in retiring from the world to prepare himself for death. He accordingly withdrew to the Cistercian abbey of Hautecombe, where he gave himself up to the humblest and most austere practices of the religious life. There is good reason to believe that Bd Humbert died peacefully in his Cistercian retreat, where also was buried nearly a century later Bd Boniface of Savoy, who had been archbishop of Canterbury. The cultus of Bd Humbert was approved in 1838 (Gregory XVI 1831-46)
1877 St. Placide Viel Nun and mother general relief during Franco Prussian War.   b.1815 in Normandy, France, she joined the Sisters of the Christian Schools in 1833 after meeting St. Marie Madeleine Postel, mother general of the congregation. In 1841 she was appointed assistant general of the sisters, a promotion which earned much resentment from other sisters. Nevertheless, after proving herself, she became mother general of the congregation in 1846 after Marie Madeleine’s passing. With much effort, in 1859 she won final approval of the institute from Pope Pius IX.
She was quite active in organizing relief during the Franco Prussian War.
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Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 05
423 Eusebius of Cremona build hostel for poor pilgrims, Abbot (AC).  ST EUSEBIUS of Cremona paid a visit as a young man to Rome and during his stay made the acquaintance of St Jerome. There sprang up between the two an intimacy which proved lifelong, and when Jerome proposed to journey to the Holy Land Eusebius determined to accompany him. Arrived at Antioch, they were joined by the widow St Paula and her daughter. St Eustochium, who accompanied them in their pilgrimages to the Holy Places and Egypt, before they all settled at Bethlehem. In view of the large number of poor pilgrims who flocked to Bethlehem, St Jerome proposed to build a hostel for them; and it was apparently to collect funds for that purpose that he sent Eusebius and Paulinian first to Dalmnatia and then to Italy, where they seem to have sold the property St Eusebius owned at Cremona as well as that of St Paula in Rome.   Later on, we find St Jerome accusing Rufinus of hiring a monk to get possession of a letter from St Epiphanius to John of Jerusalem—the monk having undertaken to make a Latin translation of it for Eusebius who, though an excellent Latin scholar, knew no Greek. The details of these protracted controversies are obscure and not very edifying. It seems that Eusebius was largely responsible for having eventually induced Pope St Anastasius to condemn the writings of Origen.
610 St. Virgilius of Arles Archbishop many miracle worker.  A native of Gascony, France, he studied on the island of Lerins, off the French coast near Cannes, eventually serving as abbot of the monastery there. He Iater was abbot of St. Symphorien in Autun and archbishop of Arles, also serving as apostolic vicar to King Childebert II (r. 575-595). He probably consecrated St. Augustine as archbishop of Canterbury and was responsible for founding churches in Arles. Virgilius was also rebuked by St. Gregory I the Great (r. 590-604) for permitting the forced conversion of Jews.
1734 St. John Joseph of the Cross very ascetic prophesy miracles humility religious discipline.  It had been the wish of St John Joseph to remain a deacon in imitation of the Seraphic Father St Francis, but his superiors decided that he should be raised to the priesthood, and on Michaelmas day 1677 he celebrated his first Mass. A month later, when at an unusually early age he was entrusted to hear confessions, it was found that the young priest, who from his purity of heart had grown up ignorant of evil, was endowed with an extraordinary insight and wisdom in the tribunal of penance.
About this time he formed the plan of building in the wood near the convent some little hermitages, like those of the early Franciscans, where he and his brethren could spend periods of retirement in even stricter austerity than was possible in the house. He easily obtained the permission of his superiors, and these hermitages became the means of great spiritual advancement.
Besides miracles and the gift of prophecy John Joseph was endowed with other supernatural gifts, such as ecstasies, levitation and heavenly visions moreover, during a great part of his life he could read the thoughts of those who came to consult him as clearly as though they had been writtten words.  He was canonized in 1839 (Gregory XVI 1831-46).

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 06
  203 Sts. Perpetua and Felicity she "couldn't call herself any other name but Christian".    Saints Perpetua and Felicity, who, on the day following this, received from the Lord the glorious crown of martyrdom.
With the lives of so many early martyrs shrouded in legend, we are fortunate to have the record of the courage of Perpetua and Felicity from the hand of Perpetua herself, her teacher Saturus, and others who knew them. This account, known as "The Martyrdom of Perpetua and Felicity," was so popular in the early centuries that it was read during liturgies.
203 SS. PERPETUA, FELICITY AND THEIR COMPANIONS, MARTYRS
THE record of the passion of St Perpetua, St Felicity and their companions is one of the greatest hagiological treasures that have come down to us.

In the fourth century these acts were publicly read in the churches of Africa, and were in fact so highly esteemed that St Augustine found it necessary to issue a protest against their being placed on a level with the Holy Scriptures. In them we have a human document of singularly vivid interest preserved for us in the actual words of two of the martyrs themselves.

335 St. Basil Bishop of Bologna, Italy Pope who was ordained by Pope St. Sylvester.
At Bologna, St. Basil, bishop, who was ordained by Pope 
who was ordained by Pope St. Sylvester, , and who governed the church entrusted to his care with great holiness, both by word and example.   Basil served his diocese until his death.

776 Chrodegang of Metz B (AC) many of the poor depended entirely upon his charity Chrodegang himself safely brought the pope over the Alps.  St CHRODEGANG was born near Liege, and was probably educated at the abbey of St. Trond. We are told that he spoke his own tongue and Latin with equal fluency; in appearance he was singularly prepossessing, and his kindness and gracious manners endeared him to all. Charles Martel recognized his exceptional qualities, and chose him as his secretary and referendary. After the death of Charles, Chrodegang, though still a layman, was in 742 invested with the bishopric of Metz; he combined in such an eminent degree sanctity with sagacity that nothing but good could result from such an appointment, and everywhere the holy man used his influence for the furtherance of justice and for the public weal. His biographers extol his almost boundless charity and his special solicitude for widows and orphans. As ambassador from Pepin, mayor of the palace, to Pope Stephen III, Chrodegang was concerned closely with Pepin’s coronation as king in 754, his defeat of the Lombards in Italy, and the handing over of the exarchate of Ravenna and other territory to the Holy See.
1137 St. Ollegarius Augustinian bishop miracles.  In 1123 Ollegarius went to Rome to attend the first Council of the Lateran, where he asked Pope Callistus II and the assembly to enact that the privileges which were being offered to those who would take part in the crusades in Palestine should be extended to those who would fight the Moslems in Spain. His petition was granted, and he returned home as apostolic delegate charged to preach a crusade against Moors. Success crowned his efforts, and Count Raymond succeeded in obtaining sufficient reinforcements to inflict severe losses on the Moors and to drive them from some of their strongholds. Ollegarius also did much to encourage and extend in his diocese the newly formed Order of Knights Templars. His metro­politan city of Tarragona had been almost entirely destroyed by the Moors, and he set to work to rebuild and restore it. Ollegarius also made the care of the sick poor, and in particular the mentally afflicted, the, object of his special solicitude. Al­though he was closely bound to the ruling family, he did not hesitate to denounce Count Raymond III when the count sought to reimpose an unjust tribute which his father, Raymond Berengarius, had remitted. At a synod in 1137 the archbishop, who was old and in failing health, was suddenly taken ill. He was carried from the council-chamber to his bed, from which he never rose again.

1235 Cyril of Constantinople Carmelite priest teacher of true sanctity.  The unsatisfactory character of this notice is revealed at once by the fact that while the Emperors Philip of Swabia and Otto IV must unquestionably be here referred to, Otto was not the colleague but the opponent and successor of Philip. Moreover Otto IV died in 1218, while Brocard, the predecessor of Cyril in the office of prior general of the Carmelites, was still living at that date. It would serve no good purpose to enter into any detail regarding the fanciful biography which at a later period was invented for St Cyril and which still holds its place in the lessons of the Carmelite Breviary. According to this; Cyril was a gifted priest of Constantinople who had rendered marvellous services to the Church in controversy with the Greek Orthodox over the question of the Filioque, and who had been sent by the Emperor Manuel Comnenus on an embassy to Pope Alexander III. In point of fact we know no more about St Cyril than the circumstance that about the year 1232 he succeeded and secondly that, owing in part to a most extravagant confusion of his name with that of St Cyril of Alexandria and St Cyril of Jerusalem, there were attributed to him long after his death a supposed treatise on the procession of the Holy Ghost, a dissertation upon the development cf the Carmelite Order, and a much-controverted Oracle or Prognostic, “solemnly transmitted from Heaven by angelic hands to St Cyril of Constantinople, the Carmelite”.

1447 St. Colette distributed her inheritance to poor holiness spiritual wisdom Superior of all Poor Clare convents sanctity, ecstacies visions of the Passion, prophesied.  At Ghent in Flanders, St. Collette, virgin, who at first professed the rule of the Third Order of St. Francis, and afterwards, by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, restored the pristine discipline to a great number of monasteries of Nuns of the Second Order.   Because she was graced with heavenly virtues, and performed innumerable miracles, she was inscribed on the roll of saints by Pope Pius VII.

1728 Blessed Rose Venerini organize schools in many parts of Italy a number of miracles were attributed to her.  Bd Rose had the gift of ready and persuasive speech, and a real ability to teach and to teach others to teach, and was not daunted by any difficulty when the service of God was in question. Her reputation spread, and in 1692 she was invited by Cardinal Barbarigo to advise and help in the training of teachers and organizing of schools in his diocese of Montefiascone. Here she was the mentor and friend of Lucy Filippini, who became foundress of an institute of maestre pie and was canonized in 1930. Rose organized a number of schools in various places, sometimes in the face of opposition that resorted to force in unbelievable fashion—the teachers were shot at with bows and their house fired. Her patience and trust overcame all obstacles, and in 1713 she made a foundation in Rome that received the praise of Pope Clement XI himself.
It was in Rome that she died, on May 7, 1728; her reputation of holiness was confirmed by miracles, and in 1952 she was beatified. It was not till some time after her death that Bd Rose’s lay school-teachers were organized as a religious congregation: they are found in America as well as in Italy, for the Venerini Sisters have worked among Italian immigrants since early in the twentieth century.
           There is a short account of Bd Rose in the decree of beatification, printed in the Acta
         Apostolicae Sedis
, voi. xliv (1952), pp. 405—409.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 07
Floréntiæ, in Etrúria, sanctæ Terésiæ Margarítæ Redi, Vírginis.  At Florence in Etruria, St. Teresa Margaret Redi, virgin, a member of the Order of Discalced Carmelites, of such admirable purity and simplicity that Pope Pius XI solemnly enrolled her on the scroll of holy virgins.
843 St. Ardo Benedictine abbot from Languedoc accompanied St. Benedict originally baptized Smaragdus. He became a Benedictine, took the name Ardo, and served under St. Benedict of Aniane. Ardo directed the monastery school at Aniane and accompanied St. Benedict on his journeys. In 814, Ardo became St. Benedict's successor when the abbot was named superior of the Aachen monastery in Germany. Ardo wrote the biography of St. Benedict of Aniane.
Although the Bollandists reject the claims of Ardo to be included in the register of saints, Mabillon seeks to prove that he must have been the subject of a definite cultus, because he has his own office in the Aniane Breviary and his relics were publicly venerated. See his Acta Sanctorum O.S.B., vol. iv, pt i, p. 550 where we learn also that Ardo’s head was preserved in a casket of silver-gilt, and his body in a wooden chest “wonderfully carved”.

Born at Rocca Secca in the Kingdom of Naples, 1225 or 1227; died at Fossa NuovaPope Leo XIII declared him the heavenly patron of all Catholic schools.

1274 St. Thomas Aquinas Philosopher, theologian, doctor of the Church (Angelicus Doctor), patron of Catholic universities, colleges, and schools.  1274 ST THOMAS AQUINAS, DOCTOR OF THE Church
THE family of the counts of Aquino was of noble lineage, tracing its descent back for several centuries to the Lombards. St Thomas’s father was a knight, Landulf, and his mother Theodora was of Norman descent. There seems something more northern than southern about Thomas’s physique, his imposing stature, massive build and fresh complexion.  

He was ill when he was bidden by Pope Gregory X to attend the general council at Lyons for the reunion of the Greek and Latin churches and to bring with him his treatise “Against the Errors of the Greeks”. He became so much worse on the journey that he was taken to the Cistercian abbey of Fossa Nuova near Terracina, where he was lodged in the abbot’s room and waited on by the monks. In com­pliance with their entreaties he began to expound to them the Canticle of Canticles, but he did not live to finish his exposition. It soon became evident to all that he was dying. After he had made his last confession to Father Reginald of Priverno and received viaticum from the abbot he gave utterance to the famous words, “I am receiving thee, Price of my soul’s redemption all my studies, my vigils and my labours have been for love of thee. I have taught much and written much of the most sacred body of Jesus Christ I have taught and written in the faith of Jesus Christ and of the holy Roman Church, to whose judgement I offer and submit everything.” Two days later his soul passed to God, in the early hours of March 7, 1274, being only about fifty years of age. That same day St Albert, who was then in Cologne, burst into tears in the presence of the community, and exclaimed, “Brother Thomas Aquinas, my son in Christ, the light of the Church, is dead. God has revealed it to me.”

St Thomas was canonized in 1323 ( Pope Urban V 1310; died at Avignon, 19 Dec., 1370 )

 Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 08
 871 Humphrey of Pruem source of strength comfort to people during Norman invasion. Bishop Humphrey of Thérouanne, who would have preferred to remain a monk of the Benedictine abbey of Pruem in the Ardennes, was persuaded by Pope Nicholas I who thought differently. At the same time he ruled the abbey of Saint Bertin. He was a source of strength and comfort to the people during the Norman invasion.
He had the feast of the Assumption of Our Lady kept with special splendor in his diocese (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
1223 St. Vincent Kadlubek Cistercian bishop 1 of earliest Polish chroniclers, also called Vincent of Cracow Born in Carnow, Poland, circa 1150, he studied in France and Italy before receiving appointment as provost of the cathedral of Sandomir (modern Poland). In 1208 he was appointed bishop of Cracow and worked to promote the reforms then being decreed by Pope Innocent III (r. 1198-1216) and to improve the monastic and religious conditions of the diocese. Resigning in 1128, he entered the Cistercians at Jedrzejow Abbey, where he established himself as one of Poland's first chroniclers through his authorship of the Chronicles of the Kings and Princes of Poland. His cult was confirmed in 1764, and he is venerated in Poland as a saint.
1550 St. John of God impulsive love embraced anyone in need. At Granada in Spain, St. John of God, founder of the Order of Brothers Hospitallers, famed for his mercy to the poor, and his contempt of self.  Pope Leo XIII appointed him as heavenly patron of the sick and of all hospitals.  John of God is the patron of the sick, of hospitals, and of nurses, printers, and booksellers.  
From the time he was eight to the day he died, John followed every impulse of his heart. The challenge for him was to rush to follow the promptings of the Holy Spirit gave him, not his own human temptations. But unlike many who act impulsively, when John made a decision, no matter how quickly, he stuck with it, no matter what the hardship.  

1550 ST JOHN OF GOD, FOUNDER OF THE BROTHERS HOSPITALLERS
THIS St John was born in Portugal and spent part of his youth in the service of the bailiff of the count of Oroprusa in Castile. In 1522 he enlisted in a company of soldiers raised by the count, and served in the wars between the French and the Spaniards and afterwards in Hungary against the Turks.

From contact with licentious companions in the army, he gradually lost the practice of religion and fell into grievous excesses. The troop having been disbanded, he went to Andalusia, where he entered the service of a woman near Seville as a shepherd.
     At the age of about forty, stung with remorse for his past misconduct, he resolved to amend his life, and began to consider how he could best dedicate the rest of his life to God’s service.
Compassion for the distressed led him to leave his situation in the hope that by crossing to Africa he might succour the Christian slaves there and perhaps win the crown of martyrdom.
At Gibraltar he met a Portuguese gentleman who had been condemned to banishment. This exile and his wife and children were bound for Ceuta in Barbary, and John was so full of pity for them that he attached himself to the family and served them without wages. At Ceuta the man fell ill, and John hired himself out as a day labourer to earn a little money for their benefit. However, he sustained a great shock owing to the apostasy of one of his companions, and as his confessor assured him that his going in quest of martyrdom was an illusion, he resolved to return to Spain.  
St John of God was canonized in 1690, and in 1886 Pope Leo XIII, as the Roman Martyrology records, “declared him the heavenly patron of all hospitals and sick folk”, with St Camillus of Lellis, to whom Pope Pius XI in 1930 added nurses of both sexes. Because of his early venture in hawking books and pictures he is also sometimes specially honoured by book and print sellers.  After hearing Blessed John of Ávila preach on Saint Sebastian's Day (January 20), he was so touched that he cried aloud and beat his breast, begging for mercy. He ran about the streets behaving like a lunatic, and the townspeople threw sticks and stones at him. He returned to his shop, gave away his stock, and began wandering the streets in distraction.
Some people took him to Blessed John of Ávila, who advised him and offered his support. John was calm for a while but fell into wild behavior again and was taken to an insane asylum, where the customary brutal treatments were applied to bring him to sanity. John of Ávila heard of his fate and visited him, telling him that he had practiced his penance long enough and that he should address himself to doing something more useful for himself and his neighbor. John was calmed by this, remained in the hospital, and attended the sick until 1539. While there he determined to spend the rest of his life working for the poor.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 09
 400 St. Gregory of Nyssa mystic among the three great Cappadocians.   At Nyssa, the death of St. Gregory, the son of Saints Basil and Emmelia, and the brother of Saints Basil the Great, bishop, and Peter, bishop of Sebaste, and Macrina, virgin.  His life and his great learning brought him fame.  He was driven from his own city for having defended the Catholic faith during the reign of the Arian emperor Valens.
Born at Caesarea, Cappadocia, c. 330-335; died c. 395-400. 
1440 St. Frances of Rome renowned for her noble family, holy life, and the gift of miracles.
THE gentle saint who was known first to her fellow-citizens and then to the Church at large as Santa Francesca Romana, St Frances the Roman, possessed to an extraordinary degree the power of attracting the love and admiration of those who came in contact with her. Nor has her charm ended with her death, for she is still honoured by countless souls who seek her intercession and pray before her tomb in Santa Maria Nuova. On her feast day and within its octave, crowds flock to visit Tor de’ Specchi and the Casa degli Esercizi Pu (the successor of the old Palazzo Ponziano), the rooms of which are annually thrown open to the public and every memorial and relic of the saint exhibited.
She was born in the Trastevere district of Rome in 1384, at the beginning of the Great Schism of the West, which was to cause het much grief as well as adversely to affect the fortunes of her family. She did not live to see harmony completely restored. Her parents, Paul Busso and Jacobella dei Roffredeschi, were of noble birth and ample means, and the child was brought up in the midst of luxury but in a pious household. Frances was a precocious little girl, and when she was eleven she asked her parents to allow her to become a nun, only to be met by a point-blank refusal. She died as she finished her vespers. Her last words were: "The Angel has finished his task; he calls me to follow him." The cause for her canonization was introduced almost immediately, but it was not much advanced until the accession of Clement VIII, who had a great devotion to the saint, but he and his successor died before this was accomplished. Paul V (Borghese) decreed her canonisation.  Her husband and children are entombed beneath the pavement of the Ponziani family chapel (now the sacristy) of the Church of Saint Cecilia. The walls have scenes from her life. Her skeletal remains, clad in the habit of the Oblates of the Congregation of Mount Olivet, which she founded, lie exposed in a glass casket in the church with her name, coupled with its original designation of Santa Maria Nuovo. Once every hundred years it is opened to reclothe her body in a fresh habit. This is her father Paolo di Bussi's church.
1463 St. Catherine of Bologna  experience visions of Christ and Satan, incorrupt healing miracles.   At Bologna, St. Catherine, virgin, of the Second Order of St. Francis, illustrious for the holiness of her life.  Her body is greatly honoured in that city.  Already some years earlier the little community governed by Lucy Mascaroni had embraced the strict Rule of St Clare and had removed to a more suitable building, but it was felt by St Catherine and the more austere sisters that the full regularity of the convent could not be obtained until it should become enclosed. The inhabitants of Ferrara, however, long resisted this innovation, and it was mainly through the prayers and efforts of St Catherine that enclosure was conceded, and finally sanctioned by Pope Nicholas V. Catherine was then appointed superioress of a new convent of strict observance at Bologna, and although she shrank from the office and would have preferred to remain in Ferrara, she received a divine intimation that she was to go and made no further protest. She and the religious who accompanied her were received at Bologna by two cardinals, by the senate and magistrates, and by the entire population, and there they established the convent of Corpus Christi. Despite the strictness of the enclosure, the fame of the sanctity and healing powers of St Catherine, as well as her gifts of prophecy, attracted so many would-be postulants that room could not be found for them all.
1857 Dominic Savio; Bosco wrote Dominic's biography  cheerfulness, friendliness, careful observation, & good advice. THE year 1950 saw the canonization of a twelve-year-old girl, Mary Goretti, as a martyr and the beatification of a fifteen-year-old boy, Dominic Savio, as a confessor.  The Church has raised several child martyrs to her altars, but the case of Dominic Savio seems to be unique. He was canonized in 1954.  He was born at Riva in Piedmont in 1842, the son .of a peasant, and grew up with the desire to be a priest. When St John Bosco began to make provision for training youths as clergy to help him in his work for neglected boys at Turin, Dominic’s parish-priest recommended him. An interview took place, at which Don Bosco was most deeply impressed by the evidence of grace in the boy’s soul, and in October 1854, when he was twelve, Dominic became a student at the Oratory of St Francis de Sales in Turin.
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 10

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today March 11
 646 Saint Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem From his youth he was distinguished for his piety and his love for classical studies proficient in philosophy of monasticism. Born in Damascus around 560. From his youth he was distinguished for his piety and his love for classical studies. He was especially proficient in philosophy, and so he was known as Sophronius the Wise.
The future hierarch, however, sought the true philosophy of monasticism, and conversations with the desert-dwellers. No sooner was he established in his see than he assembled all the bishops of his patriarchate to condemn monothelite teaching, and composed a synodal letter to explain and state the Catholic doctrine on the subject contested. This letter, which was afterwards confirmed in the sixth general council, was sent by St Sophronius to Pope Honorius and to Sergius, Patriarch of Constantinople, who had persuaded Honorius to write evasively on this question as to one or two wills in Christ. It seems evident that Honorius never professed to pronounce upon the matter in dispute, but his silence was ill-timed, as it gave the appearance of con­niving at heresy. Sophronius, seeing that the emperor and many Eastern prelates were fighting against the truth, felt that it was his duty to defend it with greater zeal than ever. He took his suffragan Stephen, Bishop of Dor, to Mount Calvary, and there adjured him by Christ who was crucified on that spot, and by the account he would have to render at the last day, “to go to the Apostolic See, where are the foundations of holy doctrine, and not to cease to pray till those in authority there should examine and condemn the novelty”. Stephen obeyed and remained in Rome for ten years, until he saw the monothelite heresy condemned by Pope St Martin I at the Council of the Lateran in 649.
THIS Bd Christopher of Milan must not be confused with a Dominican of the same name and place who is commemorated on March 1.
1485 BD CHRISTOPHER MACASSOLI.   Christopher Macassoli entered the Franciscan Order at an early age. Love of poverty, great purity of heart and complete trust in God were his distinguishing characteristics. As a priest he converted many by his preaching and example. At Vigevano he helped to enlarge the friary in which he lived, and thousands of people flocked to receive his counsel and to ask his intercession with God. He died in 1485 and Pope Leo XIII in 1890 confirmed the local cultus which had been unbroken since his death. We are told that the little chapel of St Bernardino at Vigevano, where his remains repose in a tomb built into the wall, is covered with votive offerings made by the faithful in acknowledgment of miraculous answers to prayer.
1770 St. Teresa Margaret Redi discalced Carmelite nun remarkable prayer life and a deeply penitential demeanor.  The devotion paid to her, especially in the city of Florence, has been attended with many miracles.
Anna Maria Redi was a native of Florence, Italy. She entered the Carmelites in 1765 and took the name Sister Teresa Margaret. She died at the age of twenty-three, but in the very brief time of her life in the cloister, she displayed a remarkable prayer life and a deeply penitential demeanor. She was canonized in 1934 by Pope Pius XI (r. 1922-1939).




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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared