Sunday Saints of this Day March  13 Tértio Idus Mártii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Day 33 of 40 Days for Life


 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

  March 13 - Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1655)
  Joseph, the Faithful Cooperator
This is how Jesus Christ came to be born. His mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph; but before they came to live together she was found to be with child through the Holy Spirit. Her husband Joseph, being an upright man and wanting to spare her disgrace, decided to divorce her quietly.
He had made up his mind to do this when suddenly the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, 'Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because she has conceived what is in her by the Holy Spirit. She will give birth to a son and you must name him Jesus, because he is the one who is to save his people from their sins' (Matthew 1: 18-21).

     Beginning of Novena to Saint Joseph
A novena is a prayer that is said for nine consecutive days. The purpose is to obtain a special favor from heaven by imploring a particular saint, in this case -Saint Joseph - who is celebrated in the Catholic Church on March 19th.
O glorious Saint Joseph, faithful follower of Jesus Christ, to you do we raise our hearts and hands to implore your powerful intercession in obtaining from the benign Heart of Jesus all the helps and graces necessary for our spiritual and temporal welfare, particularly the grace of a happy death, and the special favor we now implore (..state your petition..).  O Guardian of the Word Incarnate, we have confidence that your prayers on our behalf will be graciously heard before the throne of God. Amen.
600 St. Leander of Seville bishop introduced the Nicene Creed at Mass
      succeeded in persuading many Arian bishops to change

 828 St. Nicephorus Patriarch of Constantinople martyr 
 840 St. Ansovinus Bishop sanctity and miracles confessor of the Frankish Emperor Louis the Pious

1208 Blessed Peter II of Cava "an enemy of all litigation" OSB Abbot
1236 Bl. Agnello of Pisa admitted into Order by St. Francis himself
Our Lady’s Rosary and Abundant Grace March 13 - Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1635)
The Rosary, though clearly Marian in character, is at heart a Christocentric prayer. In the sobriety of its elements, it has all the depth of the Gospel message in its entirety, of which it can be said to be a compendium.
It is an echo of the prayer of Mary, her perennial Magnificat for the work of the redemptive Incarnation which began in her virginal womb. With the Rosary, the Christian people sit at the school of Mary and are led to contemplate the beauty on the face of Christ and to experience the depths of his love.
Through the Rosary the faithful receive abundant grace, as though from the very hands of the Mother of the Redeemer.
Excerpt from Pope John Paul II, Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, October 16, 2002, #1.

March 13 – Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1635) 
 Who is always watching over us?
 Mary is an expert at intervening without disturbing the realization of God's plan, without diminishing the beneficent power of his light and the effectiveness his action. She does intervene, but her actions are so delicate in their subtleness and tenderness! They come in the form of a seemingly fortuitous coincidence, a sudden peace, a light, an encounter, something apparently insignificant but where the soul recognizes without a doubt the action, smile, perfume or sweet smell … in short, the presence of his Mother.

Like a discreet shadow in the night, Mary brings her sweetness without taking away suffering; she creates a soft shadow, without dispelling the darkness. This sweetness and twilight are produced by the certainty of her action and the widespread perception of her presence.

Knowing that the Mother is there watching over him at night makes the child’s heart rejoice; it renews his strength, and fortifies his hope ... A true intimacy is established between Mary and the soul, an intimacy that is revealed in the spiritual life of the saints when they are willing to confide in us.
 Venerable Father Mary Eugene of the Child Jesus
In Je veux voir Dieu, (I Want to see God)
 
Receive Lord, all my liberty, my memory, my understanding and my whole will. You have given me all that I have, all that I am, and I surrender all to your divine will, that you dispose of me. Give me only your love and your grace. With this I am rich enough, and I have no more to ask.  
-- St. Ignatius Loyola
 March 13 - Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1635)
 
Reciting Ave Marias through the Streets of Paris
 Peguy was not married in the Church, his wife and children were not baptized and he himself did not receive the sacraments or go to Mass. (…) His wife refused to be baptized or follow him in his religious conversion.
However, Peguy did not want to be saved alone.
“We must be saved together; we have to arrive together to the good Lord's house.”
He would walk through the streets of Paris reciting Ave Marias: “Behind the fleet of Paternosters, I see a second fleet, the innumerable fleet of Ave Marias... All these Ave Marias and all these prayers to the Virgin Mary are like white caravels humbly leaning to the side and grazing the surface of the water under the weight of the sails.”

Peguy asked to be baptized, one year after the death of his friend Lotte. Three weeks before, on August 19, 1914, he attended Mass. The day before his death, on September 4th, he laid some flowers at the foot of a statue of the Virgin, in a small chapel in Montmélian, France. The next day, he was hit by a bullet in the head, giving his life for his country.
Taken from La Médaille Miraculeuse, (The Miraculous Medal), #65
 
The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Joseph, the Faithful Cooperator March 13 - Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1655)
This is how Jesus Christ came to be born. His mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph; but before they came to live together she was found to be with child through the Holy Spirit. Her husband Joseph, being an upright man and wanting to spare her disgrace, decided to divorce her quietly. He had made up his mind to do this when suddenly the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, 'Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because she has conceived what is in her by the Holy Spirit.
She will give birth to a son and you must name him Jesus,
because he is the one who is to save his people from their sins' (Matthew 1: 18-21).

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary.

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

 250  The Holy Martyrs Africanus, Publius and Terence suffered in the third century at Petrium.
 287 St. Sabinus Martyr native of Egypt
       In Pérside sanctæ Christínæ, Vírginis et Mártyris.
       Apud Camerínum sancti Ansovíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
             At Camerino, St. Ansovinus, bishop and confessor.
 295 St. Urpasian Martyr Reputedly member of household of Emperor
       Diocletian at Nicomedia
 311
Alexander presbyter in Pidna Holy Martyr, close to Thessalonica
4th v.
Christina of Persia Martyr scourged to death for confessing faith
410 In Thebáide deposítio sanctæ Euphrásiæ Vírginis favored with
        miracles both before and after her death Virgin_Euphrasia.jpg >
 554  St. Ramirus and Companions Martyrs of Spain by Arian Visigoths
7th v. St. Kevoca she is a Scottish saint 
656 St. Mochoemoc Abbot founder of Liath Mochoemoc Monastery at Tipperary
      St. Theusetas Martyr, with many companions at Nicaea, Bithynia
      St. Macedonius Martyr with Modesta and Patricia
 600 St. Leander of Seville bishop introduced the Nicene Creed at Mass
      succeeded in persuading many Arian bishops to change

 732 St. Gerald of Mayo, Abbot believed to have founded the abbeys of Elytheria, or Tempul-Gerald in Connaught, as
       well as Teaghna-Saxon, and a convent that he put under the care of his sister Segretia (AC)
 828 St. Nicephorus Patriarch of Constantinople martyr 
 840 St. Ansovinus Bishop sanctity and miracles confessor of the Frankish Emperor Louis the Pious
 842 St. Heldrad Benedictine abbot spent large fortune in carrying out good works 
 857 St. Roderic priest at Cabra martyred during the persecution of Christians by the Moors
1208 Blessed Peter II of Cava "an enemy of all litigation" OSB Abbot
1236 Bl. Agnello of Pisa admitted into Order by St. Francis himself
Our Lady’s Rosary and Abundant Grace March 13 - Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1635)
The Rosary, though clearly Marian in character, is at heart a Christocentric prayer. In the sobriety of its elements, it has all the depth of the Gospel message in its entirety, of which it can be said to be a compendium.
It is an echo of the prayer of Mary, her perennial Magnificat for the work of the redemptive Incarnation which began in her virginal womb. With the Rosary, the Christian people sit at the school of Mary and are led to contemplate the beauty on the face of Christ and to experience the depths of his love.
Through the Rosary the faithful receive abundant grace, as though from the very hands of the Mother of the Redeemer.
Excerpt from Pope John Paul II, Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, October 16, 2002, #1.
Day 33 of 40 Days for Life
Dear Readers

Abortion workers, the media, politicians ... and even a few pastors (see below) will label pro-life people as self-righteous, judgmental Christians. But the reality is that we are a movement of sinners.

All of us are sinners ... and our movement is led by those who don't have a distant relationship with abortion.
Quite the opposite; there are many leaders who have had an abortion, paid for an abortion – or even done abortions.


The pro-life movement is a movement of repentance, and therefore, a movement of hope.

One active abortionist was recently quoted as saying,
“The Jesus that I was taught about would be holding the hands of women inside the clinic.”

These days, Jesus is often molded into whatever the individual (or the world) wants Him to be.
But we need to remember that He is exactly what we and our world need: mercy.

Mercy offers freedom and clarity in an often confused world; but mercy is not always a welcome message.
It wasn’t for Jesus, and won’t always be for us. 

Southfield, Michigan
Leaders in Southfield were thankful that members of a local church met at the 40 Days for Life vigil … taking time out of a Sunday afternoon to pray for an end to abortion.

They were wondering why more churches weren’t involved when a man who said he was a Christian pastor stopped by to suggest that they change their tone and stop being so judgmental.

 “How can signs that say ‘Pray to End Abortion’ and ‘Love One Another as I Have Loved You’
be viewed as judgmental?” one team member wondered.

This volunteer reflected on the previous day of prayer and peaceful vigil. “This abortion center was packed on Saturday. Patients were arriving by 7:30 am and the last ones were released after 5:00 pm.”

The need for a peaceful, prayerful, loving witness – such as 40 Days for Life – was never more obvious.


Bogota, Colombia
“When a woman comes out of the abortion center,” said one of the 40 Days for Life team members in Bogota, “sometimes she thinks will be judged by the volunteers standing on the sidewalk.”

She may assume that vigil participants are self-righteous Christians, that can't wait to tell her she's going to an unhappy place in the hereafter. “On the contrary, she is received with hope and love.”

And in the moments after the abortion, precisely when the woman feels that there is no hope, when she feels vulnerable, the volunteers are there to express the mercy of Jesus.

“The love and acceptance expressed by our volunteers might be the only message that woman hears in her whole life that there is healing after the abortion,” the team member said.
Here’s today’s devotional from Fr. Terry Gensemer, National Director of the Charismatic Episcopal Church for Life.

Day 33 intention 
May we absorb the truth that God is paying attention to us, and to each human life, personally and individually.

Scripture 
When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers, the moon and the stars, which You have ordained, what is man that You are mindful of him, and the son of man that You visit him? For You have made him a little lower than the angels, and You have crowned him with glory and honor. — Psalm 8:3-9

Reflection from Fr. Terry Gensemer 

 
How often we ignore the phrase, “stop and smell the roses” and instead submit to the all-too-urgent task at hand.
Is this tendency what keeps us, at least in part, from acknowledging that God’s care for His sacred creation is paramount in His own mind?
 
The Psalmist speaks of God’s handiwork: the heavens, the work of his “fingers,” and then points to God’s masterpiece – human life. He declares to us that God is mindful of us. God keeps His masterpiece in His thoughts.
 
God, the creator of the awe-inspiring heavens, is not distracted by the tasks before Him.
He is not pulled away, as we might be, by thoughts of something “more important.”
God is paying attention to and attending to His crowning glory, His masterpiece of creation, which cannot be duplicated or replaced, which surpasses the beauty of all other created things – the human being.
There is no way to adequately describe how God feels about us as human beings.
There are no words to fully portray His love, compassion or desire to be in communion with us.
Perhaps, the closest we can come, is to contemplate the thoughts of a mother as she gazes for the first time at her newborn child. God cares for Life.
 
We, as His followers, should take time to consider the life He has created and called upon us to love and protect.

Prayer 
Lord, you are the creator of all things. Guide my thoughts to consider your creation in all of its majesty, beauty and holiness. Guide my heart especially to your creation of precious human life.
 
Help me to comprehend how essential life is in your own heart.
Teach me to appreciate, love and protect all human life through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen.

Printable devotional 
To download today’s devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share with friends:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day33.pdf




250  The Holy Martyrs Africanus, Publius and Terence suffered in the third century at Petrium. Their memory is celebrated also on April 10.
Terentius und Gefährten  Orthodoxe Kirche: 10. April

Als Kaiser Decius (249-251) befahl, alle Bürger sollten den heidnischen Göttern opfern, ließ der Gouverneur Fortunatius in der römischen Provinz Afrika auf dem Marktplatz Foltergeräte aufstellen und befahl allen Bürgern, sich auf dem Platz zu sammeln und den heidnischen Göttern zu opfern. Terentius und weitere 40 Christen weigerten sich und wurden vor den Gouverneur gebracht. Als sie sich zu Christus bekannten, ließ der Gouverneur Terentius und seine engsten Begleiter Africanus, Maximus und Pompius gefangensetzen. Die anderen Christen - unter ihnen Xenon, Alexander und Theodor - ließ sie foltern und in den heidnischen Tempel bringen. Aber die Christen opferten nicht, sondern beteten und die Götterstatuen fielen um und zerbrachen. Daraufhin ließ Fortunatus die 36 Märtyrer köpfen. Terentius und seine Gefährten im Gefängnis sollten dem Hungertod preisgegeben werden. Als sie aber am Leben blieben, wurden Giftschlangen in ihr Gefängnis geworfen. Auch diese schadeten ihnen nicht und daraufhin wurden sie geköpft.

287 St. Sabinus Martyr native of Egypt
 Hermópoli, in Ægypto, sancti Sabíni Mártyris, qui multa passus, tandem, projéctus in flumen, martyrium consummávit.
       At Hermopolis in Egypt, the martyr St. Sabinus, who suffered many torments, and at last completed his martyrdom by being cast into a river.
he was put to death by being drowned in the Nile during the persecutions launched by Emperor Diocletian.
The Holy Martyr Sabinus suffered in Egypt in the year 287.
295 St. Urpasian Martyr Reputedly member of household of Emperor Diocletian at Nicomedia
he was arrested for being a Christian and burned alive.

In Pérside sanctæ Christínæ, Vírginis et Mártyris.
      In Persia, St. Christina, virgin and martyr.

 St. Theusetas Martyr, with many companions at Nicaea, Bithynia  (modern Turkey) unknown
 Nicǽæ, in Bithynia, sanctórum Mártyrum Theusétæ, ejúsque fílii Horris, Theodóræ, Nymphodóræ, Marci et Arábiæ; qui omnes pro Christo igni tráditi sunt.
       At Nicaea in Bithynia, the holy martyrs Theusetas and Horres, his son; Theodore, Nymphodora, Mark, and Arabia, who were all burned to death for Christ.
Ilorres, Theodora, Nymphodora, Mark, and Arabia put to death in an uncertain year at Nicaea, Bithynia (modern Turkey). In some earlier martyrologies, the list of these martyrs contains many more names. Theusitas, Horres, Theodora, Nymphora, Mark & Arabia MM (RM)
Earlier martyrologies include many more names with this group of martyrs at Nicaea in Bithynia. Horres was the young son of Theusitas (Benedictines).

311 The Holy Martyr Alexander was a presbyter in the city of Pidna, not far from Thessalonica.
The saint converted many pagans to Christianity by his preaching.
During the persecution against Christians under the emperor Maximian Galerius (305-311), St Alexander was subjected to fierce tortures, and then beheaded.
St. Macedonius Martyr with Modesta and Patricia & 19 companions at Nicomedia.
 Nicomediæ natális sanctórum Mártyrum Macedónii, Patríciæ uxóris, et Modéstæ fíliæ.
       At Nicomedia, the birthday of the holy martyrs Macedonius, Patricia, his wife, and his daughter Modesta.
They were husband, wife. and daughter. in some lists they were martyred with nineteen companions.

4th v. The Holy Martyr Christina of Persia was scourged to death for confessing her faith in Christ, during the fourth century.
410 In Thebáide deposítio sanctæ Euphrásiæ Vírginis favored with miracles both before and after her death
       In Thebais, the death of St. Euphrasia, virgin.
Virgin, b. in 380; d. after 410. She was the daughter of Antigonus, a senator of Constantinople, and a relation of Emperor Theodosius.

420 ST EUPHRASIA, OR EUPRAXIA, VIRGIN
THE Emperor Theodosius I had a kinsman Antigonus, who died within a year of the birth of his daughter Euphrasia, and the emperor took the widow and her child under his protection. When the little girl was five years old he arranged to betroth her to the son of a wealthy senator—in accordance with the custom of the time—the marriage being deferred until the maiden should have reached a suitable age. The widow herself began to be sought in marriage, and she withdrew from court and went with Euphrasia to Egypt, where she settled down near a convent of nuns. Euphrasia, then seven years of age, was greatly drawn to the nuns and begged to be allowed to stay with them. To humour her and thinking it was only a childish fancy, her mother left her there for a little, expecting her soon to weary of the life, but the child was persistent, although she was told that she would have to fast and to sleep on the ground and to learn the whole Psalter if she remained. The abbess then said to the mother, Leave the little girl with us, for the grace of God is working in her heart. Your piety and that of Antigonus have opened to her the most perfect way”.  The good woman wept for joy, and leading her child before the image of our Lord she said, “Lord Jesus Christ, receive this child. Thee alone doth she love and seek, and to thy service alone doth she commend herself.” Then turning to Euphrasia she exclaimed, “May God who laid the foundations of the mountains, keep you always steadfast in His holy fear”.

A few days later the child was clothed in the nun’s habit, and her mother asked if she were satisfied. “Oh, mother” cried the little novice, “it is my bridal robe, given me to do honour to Jesus my beloved.” Soon afterwards the mother went to rejoin her husband in a better world, and as the years went by Euphrasia grew up a beautiful girl in the seclusion of the convent.

In due time the emperor, presumably Arcadius, sent for her to come to Con­stantinople to marry the senator to whom he had betrothed her. She was now twelve years old and an heiress, but she wrote him a letter begging him to allow her to follow her vocation and requesting him to distribute her parents’ property to the poor as well as to enfranchise all her slaves. The emperor carried out her requests but Euphrasia was sorely tried by vain imaginations and temptations to know more of the world she had forsaken. The abbess, to whom she opened her heart, set her some hard and humbling tasks to divert her attention and to drive away the evil spirits from which she suffered in body as well as in soul. Once the abbess ordered her to remove a pile of stones from one place to another, and when the task was completed she continued to make her carry them backwards and forwards thirty times. In this and in whatever else she was bidden to do, Euphrasia complied cheerfully and promptly she cleaned out the cells of the other nuns, carried water for the kitchen, chopped the wood, baked the bread and cooked the food. The nun who performed these arduous duties was generally excused the night offices, but Euphrasia was never missing from her place in the choir, and yet at the age of twenty she was taller, better developed and more beautiful than any of the others.

Her meekness and humility were extraordinary. A maid in the kitchen once asked her why she sometimes went without food for the entire week, a thing no one but the abbess ever attempted. When the saint said she did it out of obedience, the woman called her a hypocrite, who sought to make herself conspicuous in the hope of being chosen superior. Far from resenting this unjust accusation, Euphrasia fell at her feet and besought her to pray for her.

As the saint lay on her death-bed, Julia, a beloved sister who shared her cell, besought Euphrasia to obtain for her the grace of being with her in Heaven as she had been her companion on earth, and three days after her friend’s demise, Julia was taken also. The aged abbess who had originally received Euphrasia remained for a month together very sad at the loss of her dear ones. She prayed earnestly that she might not have to linger on now that the others had gone to their reward. The following morning when the nuns entered her cell they found only her lifeless body, for her soul had fled in the night to join the other two. According to Russian usage St Euphrasia is named in the preparation of the Byzantine Mass.

The remarkable Greek life, which is the source of all we know concerning St Euphrasia, has been printed in the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii. There seems good reason to regard it as a more or less contemporary and, in its main features, a trustworthy narrative. Certainly the asceticism it reflects is the asceticism of that age. Within a few years of the date at which Euphrasia died, St Simeon Stylites set up his first pillar. Of Euphrasia, as of her abbess, it is stated that she stood upright in one spot for thirty days until she lost consciousness and fell down in a swoon. Etheria in her pilgrimage (c. 390) tells us much of the ebdomadarii who made it a point of honour and endurance to pass an entire week without food from Sunday to Saturday evening. Moreover, the whole atmosphere of the document recalls vividly the ascetic ideals set before us in the Life of St Melania the Younger, who was a contemporary. See also A. B.C. Dunbar, Dictionary of Saintly Women, vol. i, pp. 292—293.
Her father died shortly after her birth, and her mother, also Euphrasia, devoted her life thenceforth exclusively to the service of God. To carry out this ideal she abandoned the capital, and, with her seven-year-old daughter, repaired to Egypt, where she dwelt on one of her estates, near a convent, and adopted the nuns' austere mode of life. This example aroused in her daughter the desire to enter the convent, and her mother gave her into the care of the superior, that she might be trained in the ascetic life. After her mother's death she declined an offer of marriage made, by the Emperor Theodosius, on behalf of a senator's son, transferred to the emperor her entire fortune, to be used for charitable purposes, and took up, with a holy ardour, the rigorous practices of Christian perfection. She was about thirty when she died. Her feast is celebrated in the Greek Church on 25 July, and in the Latin Church on 13 March. She is mentioned by St. John Damascene, in his third "Oratio de imaginibus".

Euphrasia (Eupraxia)  Orthodoxe Kirche: 25. Juli  Katholische Kirche: 13. März 
Euphrasia, Tochter des Senators Antigonos und seiner Ehefrau Eupraxia, wurde um 380 in Konstantinopel geboren. Nach dem Tod ihres Vaters kam sie mit ihrer Mutter nach Ägypten, wo sie um 387 in ein Nonnenkloster in der Thebais eintrat. Ihr wurde die Gabe der Heilung verliehen. Sie starb dort friedlich in jungen Jahren nach 410 (evt. 413).

Euphrasia of Constantinople V (RM) (also known as Euphraxia)  Born in Constantinople, Byzantium; died c. 420. Saint Euphrasia's father, Antigonus, was a blood relative of Emperor Theodosius I. Her mother, Eupraxia, was no less illustrious for her birth and virtue. Because of his close ties with her parents and the fact that she was an only child, the emperor took an interest in Euphrasia and, when she was only five, found her a rich senator for her future husband. After her birth, her pious parents mutually consented and vowed themselves to perpetual continence. From that time they lived together as brother and sister in order to devote themselves to prayer, alms-giving, and penance.
Antigonus died within a year, and the holy widow withdrew with her daughter to her large estates in Egypt in order to avoid importunate suitors for marriage and the distraction of friends. Near her home in Tabenisi was a monastery of one hundred and thirty austere nuns, who fasted severely and regularly, wore and slept on sackcloth that they made themselves, and prayed almost without interruption. When sick, they bore their pains with patience and thanksgiving, esteeming them an effect of the divine mercy: nor did they seek relief from physicians, except in cases of absolute necessity. Delicate and excessive attention to health nourishes self-love and often destroys the health that it anxiously tries to preserve.

The example of these holy virgins, moved the devout mother to greater fervor in the exercise of faith and charity. She frequently visited these servants of God, and earnestly entreated them to accept a considerable annual revenue, with an obligation that they should always be bound to pray for the soul of her deceased husband. But the abbess refused the estate, saying: "We have renounced all the conveniences of the world, in order to purchase heaven. We are poor, and such we desire to remain." She could only be prevailed upon to accept a continuous supply of oil for the votive lamp and incense for the altar.

The seven-year-old Euphrasia asked her mother for permission to serve God in this convent. Eupraxia joyfully gave permission and soon after presented Euphrasia to the abbess, who, taking up an image of Christ, gave it into her hands. The tender virgin kissed it, saying: "By vow I consecrate myself to Christ." Then the mother led her before an image of our Redeemer, and lifting up her hands to heaven, said: "Lord Jesus Christ, receive this child under your special protection. She seeks and loves You alone and commends herself only to You." Then turning to her dear daughter, she said: "May God, who laid the foundations of the mountains, strengthen you always in his holy fear." And leaving her in the hands of the abbess, she left the monastery weeping.

At first the nuns supposed the youngster would soon tire of the austerities of religious life. None of the burdens, however, discouraged Euphrasia. Of course, she probably wondered at times whether she had missed some great pleasure by quitting the world, but her greatest joy was in serving God by serving others.

When Eupraxia later fell deathly ill, she gave her last instructions to her daughter: "Fear God, honor your sisters, and serve them with humility. Never think of what you have been, nor say to yourself that you are of royal extraction. Be humble and poor on earth, that you may be rich in heaven." The good mother then died.

When news of her death reached the ears of the emperor, Theodosius sent for the noble virgin to court, having promised her in marriage to a favorite young senator. But in her own hand the virgin wrote him: "Invincible emperor, having consecrated myself to Christ in perpetual chastity, I cannot be false to my engagement, and marry a mortal man, who will shortly be the food of worms. For the sake of my parents, be pleased to distribute their estates among the poor, the orphans, and the church. Set all my slaves at liberty, and discharge my vassals and servants, giving them whatever is their due. Order my father's stewards to acquit my farmers of all they owe since his death, that I may serve God without let or hindrance, and may stand before him without the solicitude of temporal affairs. Pray for me, you and your empress, that I may be made worthy to serve Christ."

The messengers returned with this letter to the emperor, who shed many tears in reading it. The senators who heard it burst also into tears, and said to his majesty; "She is the worthy daughter of Antigonus and Eupraxia, of your royal blood, and the holy offspring of a virtuous stock." The emperor punctually executed all she desired, a little before his death, in 395.

Saint Euphrasia was to her pious sisters a perfect pattern of humility, meekness, and charity. If she found herself assaulted by any temptation she immediately confessed it to the abbess, to drive away the devil by that humiliation, and to seek a remedy. The discreet superioress often enjoined her on such occasions, some humbling and painful penitential labor; as sometimes to carry great stones from one place to another; which employment she once under an obstinate assault, continued thirty days together with wonderful simplicity, till the devil being vanquished by her humble obedience and chastisement of her body, he left her in peace. Her diet was only herbs or pulse, which she took after sunset, at first every day, but afterwards only once in two or three, or sometimes seven days. But her abstinence received its chief merit from her humility; without which it would have been a fast of devils.

She cleaned out the chambers of the other nuns, carried water to the kitchen, and, out of obedience, cheerfully employed herself in the meanest drudgery; making painful labor a part of her penance. To mention one instance of her extraordinary meekness and humility: it is related, that one day a maid in the kitchen asked her why she fasted whole weeks, which no other attempted to do besides the abbess. Her answer was, that the abbess had enjoined her that penance. The other called her a hypocrite. Upon which Euphrasia fell at her feet, begging her to pardon and pray for her. In which action it is hard to say, whether we ought more to admire the patience with which she received so unjust a rebuke and slander or the humility with which she sincerely condemned herself; as if, by her hypocrisy and imperfections, she had been a scandal to others.
She was favored with miracles both before and after her death at the age of 30. Her name is still mentioned in the preparation of the Byzantine Mass (Benedictines, Bentley, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
7th v. St. Kevoca she is a Scottish saint.
Scottish saint, honored in Kyle, Scotland. but now believed to be St. Mochoemoc. Also called Quivox.
Kevoca (AC) (also known as Kennotha, Quivoca) 7th century. Saint Kevoca is the titular patron of a church at Kyle, Scotland. She is probably identical with Saint Mochoemoc (Benedictines).
554  St. Ramirus and Companions Martyrs of Spain by the Arian Visigoths 6th century.
Ramirus served as prior of St. Claudus Monastety in Leon, Spain. The community was set upon by the Visigoths who, as Arians, opposed orthodox Christianity. The abbot, St Vincent, was put to death, followed two days later by Ramirus and the entire community.
Ramirus and Companions MM (AC) Died c. 554 or c. 630. Two days after the martyrdom of his abbot, Saint Vincent, by the Arian Visigoths, Saint Ramirus, the prior of Saint Claudius Abbey in Léon, Spain, and all his monks were massacred while chanting the Nicene Creed in the choir of the abbey church (Benedictines).

600 St. Leander of Seville bishop; introduced the Nicene Creed at Mass, succeeded in persuading many Arian bishops to change
The next time you recite the Nicene Creed at Mass, think of today’s saint. For it was Leander of Seville who, as bishop, introduced the practice in the sixth century. He saw it as a way to help reinforce the faith of his people and as an antidote against the heresy of Arianism, which denied the divinity of Christ.
By the end of his life, Leander had helped Christianity flourish in Spain at a time of political and religious upheaval.

Leander’s own family was heavily influenced by Arianism, but he himself grew up to be a fervent Christian. He entered a monastery as a young man and spent three years in prayer and study. At the end of that tranquil period he was made a bishop. For the rest of his life he worked strenuously to fight against heresy. The death of the anti-Christian king in 586 helped Leander’s cause. He and the new king worked hand in hand to restore orthodoxy and a renewed sense of morality. Leander succeeded in persuading many Arian bishops to change their loyalties.  Leander died around 600. In Spain he is honored as a Doctor of the Church.
  596 St. Leander of Seville Bishop monk consubstantiality 3 Persons of the Trinity 1st introduce Nicene Creed at Mass
 Híspali, in Hispánia, natális sancti Leándri, ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopi, qui, sanctórum Isidóri Epíscopi ac Florentínæ Vírginis frater, sua prædicatióne et indústria gentem Visigothórum, adjuvánte Reccarédo, eórum Rege, ab Ariána impietáte ad cathólicam fidem convértit.
       At Seville in Spain, the birthday of St. Leander, bishop of that city, and of St. Florentina, virgin.  By his preaching and zeal the Visigoths, with the help of King Recared, were converted from the Arian heresy to the Catholic faith.
Leander was born at Cartagena, Spain, of Severianus and Theodora, illustrious for their virtue. St. Isidore and Fulgentius, both bishops were his brothers, and his sister, Florentina, is also numbered among the saints. He became a monk at Seville and then the bishop of the See.

He was instrumental in converting the two sons Hermenegild and Reccared of the Arian Visigothic King Leovigild. This action earned him the kings's wrath and exile to Constantinople, where he met and became close friends of the Papal Legate, the future Pope Gregory the Great. It was Leander who suggested that Gregory write the famous commentary on the Book of Job called the Moralia.

Once back home, under King Reccared, St. Leander began his life work of propagating Christian orthodoxy against the Arians in Spain. The third local Council of Toledo (over which he presided in 589) decreed the consubstantiality of the three Persons of the Trinity and brought about moral reforms.
Leander's unerring wisdom and unflagging dedication let the Visigoths and the Suevi back to the true Faith and obtained the gratitude of Gregory the Great.

The saintly bishop also composed an influential Rule for nuns and was the first to introduce the Nicene Creed at Mass. Worn out by his many activities in the cause of Christ, Leander died around 600 and was succeeded in the See of Seville by his brother Isidore. The Spanish Church honors Leander as the Doctor of the Faith.
596 ST LEANDER, BISHOP OF SEVILLE
IT was mainly through St Leander’s efforts that the Western Goths or Visigoths, who had ruled in Spain for a hundred years, were converted from the errors of Arianism. His father was Severian, Duke of Cartagena, at which place the saint was born, and his mother was the daughter of the Ostrogothic King Theodoric. His brothers were St Fulgentius, Bishop of Ecija, and St Isidore, who succeeded him in the see of Seville. He had a sister, St Florentina, and according to tradition a second sister who married King Leovigild. This, however, is not certain; if true it must have added enormously to his difficulties, for Leovigild was a deter­mined Arian.

Even as a boy, Leander was remarkable for his eloquence and fascinating personality; while still quite young he took the monastic habit at Seville, where he gave himself for three years to devotion and study. Upon the death of the bishop of Seville he was unanimously chosen to succeed him, but his change of condition made little, or no alteration in his mode of living. He immediately set to work to fight against the prevalent heresy of Arianism, and through his prayers and his eloquence caused many conversions, including that of Hermenegild, the eldest son of King Leovigild.

In 583 St Leander went to Constantinople on an embassy to the emperor, and there he became acquainted with St Gregory the Great, who had been sent there as legate by Pope Pelagius II. The two men formed a close and lasting friendship, and it was at the suggestion of Leander that Gregory wrote his Morals on the Book of Job.

Upon his return, he continued his fight for the true faith, but in 586 Leovigild caused his son St Hermenegild to be put to death for refusing to receive communion from the hands of an Arian bishop, and he banished several Catholic prelates, including St Leander and his brother St Fulgentius. Even in exile the bishop continued his fight, writing two works against Arianism and a third to meet the objections that had been raised against his arguments. Before long, however, Leovigild recalled the exiles, and when he found that he was on his death-bed he sent for St Leander and entrusted to him his son and successor Reccared to be instructed in the Catholic faith. Nevertheless, through fear of his people, St Gregory tells us, Leovigild himself died unreconciled to the Church. Reccared, under the guidance of St Leander, became an ardent and well-instructed Catholic. Leander spoke with so much wisdom on the controverted points to the Arian bishops that, by force of his reasoning rather than by his authority, he brought them over to the truth and thus converted the whole nation of the Visigoths. He was equally successful with the Suevi, a people of Spain whom Leovigild had perverted. No one rejoiced more than did St Gregory the Great at the wonderful blessings bestowed by Almighty God on the labours of the holy bishop, and he wrote him to an affectionate letter in which he congratulated him warmly and also sent him the pallium.

In 589 St Leander presided over the third Council of Toledo, at which a solemn declaration of the consubstantiality of the Three Persons of the Trinity was drawn up, and twenty-three canons were passed relating to discipline, for the holy prelate was no less zealous in the reformation of manners and morals than in restoring the purity of the faith. The following year another synod was held at Seville to com­plete, establish and seal the conversion of the nation to the true faith. St Leander was deeply sensible of the importance of prayer, and he laboured to encourage true devotion in all, but especially in those who were consecrated to God under a religious rule. His letter to his sister Florentina, usually called his Rule of a Monastic Life, turns chiefly on the contempt of this world and on prayer. A very important work of his was his reform of the Spanish liturgy. In this liturgy and in the third Council of Toledo, in conformity with the practice of the Eastern churches, the Nicene Creed was appointed to be said at Mass in repudiation of the Arian heresy. Other Western churches, and eventually Rome itself, adopted this practice later.

St Leander was tried by frequent illness, particularly by the gout, and St Gregory, who was afflicted with the same complaint, alludes to it in one of his letters. According to an old Spanish tradition, the famous picture of our Lady of Guadalupe was a present from the pope to his friend Leander. Of the bishop’s many writings none have come down to us except his Rule of a Monastic Life, and a homily in thanksgiving for the conversion of the Goths. He died in 596, and his relics are now in a chapel of Seville Cathedral. In Spain St Leander is honoured liturgically as a doctor of the Church.

See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii; Gams, Kirchengeschichte von Spanien, vol. ii, Pt 2, pp. 37 seq. and 66 seq. DTC., vol. ix, P. 95. There is also an excellent article on St Leander by Mrs Humphry Ward in DCB., vol. iii, pp. 637—640; and cf. F. H. B. Daniell’s article on Reccared, vol. iv, pp. 536—538.
656 St. Mochoemoc Abbot founder of Liath Mochoemoc Monastery at Tipperary
Ireland. He was the son of Bevan and Nessa and the brother or nephew of St. Ita. Listed as Machaemhog, Puicherius, or Vuicherius, he was trained by St. Ita, at Munster, Ireland, and received ordination by St. Comgall at Bangor. Mochoemoc founded Arderin Abbey and others before he died.

7th v. ST MOCHOEMOC, ABBOT
THE accounts we have of St Mochoemoc are overladen with fantastic legends. Perhaps all that we should be justified in asserting is that he was the nephew of St Ita, who had charge of him in his youth, that he entered the monastery of Bennchor (Bangor) in County Down, that he was afterwards commissioned by St Comgall to found a settlement at Arderin, that he eventually established a flourishing community at Liath-mor, where he became the teacher of St Dagan and St Cuan­ghas, and that he died at a very advanced age.

Tradition, however, declares him to have been the son of St Ita’s sister Nessa and of Beoan, whom Ita had so marvellously raised to life. The boy was so hand­some that he was named Coemgen (Pulcherius), but his aunt called him by the pet-form Mochoemog, and by that name he was always known. His father and mother came to St Ita and said, “Lady, the grace of God shines wonderfully in your little favourite, our son we are earthly, and he is so spiritual that he cannot live with us.” She at once replied, “Bring him hither and I will rear him myself.” So she watched over him until he was twenty and superintended his studies. Then she blessed him and sent him to St Comgall at Bangor, where he was ordained. Recognizing his sanctity the abbot said one day to him, “My son, it is necessary that you should become the spiritual father to others, and that you should erect a house for God’s service wherever He may decree.”

So Mochoemoc set out with other monks and settled first at Arderin on Slieve Bloom, but later he departed to the country of Eile. There the chieftain offered to give him a lonely wooded place, and this the saint willingly accepted. Now when Ita had parted from her nephew she had given him a little bell, saying, “Here is this silent bell for you: it will not sound till you have reached the place of your resurrection.” As soon as Mochoemoc had reached the land granted him, the bell tinkled, and the saint gave thanks to God because he knew it was to be the place of his resurrection. There also he found a great wild hog, which greeted the monks, and Mochoemoc exclaimed, “As the colour of that hog is liath—grey—so shall it be the name of this place for ever.” Here then at Liath he founded his principal church which was called Liath-mor or Liath-Mochoemoc, but the place is now known as Leamokevoge in County Tipperary. Round the holy man gathered a number of disciples, and St Mochoemoc built for them a great monastery in which they lived in peace. At last, when he had founded many monasteries, the saint was warned that his time was come, and having blessed his monks and Liath he went to his reward a very old man.

There was formerly venerated in Scotland, particularly in the district about Glasgow, a maiden St Kennoch whose history is wrapped in great obscurity. We are met first with the difficulty that while in the text of the Aberdeen Breviary the name is printed Kenoca, the form in the calendar of the same book, as well as in the Aberdeen Martyrology and in the Arbuthnott calendar, is Keuoca or Kevoca. On the other hand, “Kennocha” appears among the virgins and widows in the ancient Litany of Dunkeld. Forbes, in his Kalendars of Scottish Saints, suggests that an ancient Irish monk—no other than Mochoemoc of Leamokevoge—has here through some confusion been transformed into a woman. The Kevoge, in fact, which we find in Leamokevoge is simply the saint’s name, and it may obviously be identified with Kevoca. No certain conclusion is possible. The statement that St Kennoch lived in the time of King Malcolm 11 (1005—1034) rests apparently only on the authority of Adam King (1588), which is quite worthless in such a matter.

There is a Latin Life of St Mochoemoc and an Irish text which is the translation of it. The Latin was printed by Colgan, and also in the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii. It has been re-edited in VSH., vol. ii, pp. 164-183 see also LIS., vol. iii. For St Kennoch, see the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii, and KSS.

Mochoemoc of Leamokevoge, Abbot (AC)
(also known as Kennoch, Mo-Chaomhog, Mochaemhog, Pulcherius, Vulcanius) Born in Munster, Ireland; died c. 656. Mochoemoc was raised by his aunt, Saint Ita, and educated by Saint Comgall in the Bangor Abbey, County Down, where he also entered religious life. Comgall sent him to establish a house at Arderin. Later Mochoemoc founded and became abbot of the great monastery of Liath-Mochoemoc (Liath-mor, now Leamokevoge), in County Tipperary, around which a large town was raised, which still bears that name. The supposed Scottish Kevoca, titular of the church of Quivox, is really the Irishman Mochoemoc (Benedictines, Farmer, Husenbeth).

732 Gerald of Mayo, Abbot believed to have founded the abbeys of Elytheria, or Tempul-Gerald in Connaught, as well as Teaghna-Saxon, and a convent that he put under the care of his sister Segretia (AC)

732 ST GERALD OF MAYO, ABBOT
ST GERALD was an Englishman, a native of Northumbria, who became a monk at Lindisfarne. After the Council of Whitby which prohibited the Celtic observance of Easter in Northumbria, St Colman left England accompanied by all the Irish monks and thirty of the English novices. At Inishbofin, an island off the coast of Mayo, he founded a monastery for his community, but as he found that the English­men and the Irish could not agree, he built a second house on the mainland for the English monks. It is not certain whether Gerald was one of the original thirty or whether he followed later, for we know that English and other students long continued to frequent Colman’s school at Mayo of the Saxons, as it came to be called.

At first St Colman acted as abbot over the two monasteries, but Gerald afterwards succeeded him in the English house, which flourished exceedingly. He is sometimes spoken of as a bishop, notably in the litany of Irish saints from the Book of Leinster, but this is very doubtful, as even his so-called acts which attribute to him many marvellous miracles only allude to him as an abbot. It has been suggested that the title pontifex or president of the English which was bestowed upon him gave rise to the idea that he was a bishop, whereas it probably only meant that the abbot of Mayo had certain privileges as protector of his countrymen who were strangers in Ireland. St Gerald, who lived to old age, must have witnessed the introduction into his abbey of the Roman observance of Easter. He is also credited, though on doubtful authority, with the foundation of the abbeys of Elytheria or Tempul-Gerald in Connaught and of Teagh-na-Saxon, as well as of a nunnery which he is said to have placed under the care of his sister St Segretia.

The extravagant Latin Life of St Gerald printed by Colgan has been re-edited by Plummer, VSH., vol. ii, pp. 107—115. See also the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii, and LIS. vol. iii.
Born in Northumbria, England; died in Galway, Ireland, 732. Saint Gerald became a monk at Lindisfarne and probably followed Saint Colman to Innisbofin Island, Galway, Ireland, when the Celtic liturgical practices were forbidden in Northumbria. He became a monk, then abbot, of the abbey known as Mayo of the Saxons, which Colman founded for the English following a quarrel between the English and Irish monks. The abbey flourished and was so well known for the erudition of its monks that Blessed Alcuin corresponded with its abbot and monks. He lived to a great age and may have witnessed the introduction of Roman observances into his abbey. Gerald is sometimes said to have been consecrated bishop, but this is uncertain. He is believed to have founded the abbeys of Elytheria, or Tempul-Gerald in Connaught, as well as Teaghna-Saxon, and a convent that he put under the care of his sister Segretia.
He was buried at Mayo, where a church dedicated to God under his patronage remains to this day (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).
828 St. Nicephorus Patriarch of Constantinople relics incorrupt and fragrant known for his intellect and his eloquence opponent of the Iconoclasts martyr
 Constantinópoli Translátio sancti Nicéphori, Epíscopi ejúsdem urbis et Confessóris; cujus corpus e Proconnéso, Propóntidis ínsula, ubi ipse quarto Nonas Júnii ob sanctárum Imáginum cultum exsul obíerat, Constantinópolim relátum est, atque a sancto illíus civitátis Epíscopo Methódio honorífice in templo sanctórum Apostolórum sepúltum, hac ipsa recurrénte die, in qua olim idem Nicéphorus in exsílium fúerat deportátus.
       At Constantinople, the transferral of the body of St. Nicephorus, bishop of that city, and confessor.  The body was returned from the island of Propontis in the Proconnesus, where his death occurred on the 5th of June while in exile for his reverence of sacred images. 
He was buried with honour by Bishop Methodius in the Church of the Holy Apostles on this the anniversary day of his exile.

828 ST NICEPHORUS, Patriarch OF Constantinople
THE father of St Nicephorus was secretary and commissioner to the Emperor Constantine Copronymus, but when that tyrant declared himself a persecutor of the orthodox faith, his minister maintained the honour due to holy images with so much zeal that he was stripped of his dignities, scourged, tortured and banished. Young Nicephorus grew up with his father’s example before him to encourage him in boldly confessing his faith, while an excellent education developed his exceptional abilities. After Constantine VI and Irene had restored the use of sacred pictures and images, Nicephorus was introduced to their notice and by his sterling qualities obtained their favour. He distinguished himself by his opposition to the Icono­clasts and was secretary to the Second Council of Nicaea, as well as imperial commissioner. Although a brilliant speaker, a philosopher, a musician and in every respect fitted for statesmanship, he always had a great inclination for the religious life, and while still occupied with public affairs had built a monastery in a solitary spot near the Black Sea. After the death of St Tarasius, Patriarch of Constantinople, no one could be found more worthy to succeed him than Nice­phorus. As he was a layman at the time, his election was opposed by some as uncanonical, and it was only at the express request of the emperor that he could be induced to accept office. During the consecration, as a public testimony of his faith, he held in his hand a treatise he had written in defence of images, and at the conclusion he laid it up behind the altar as a pledge that he would ever defend the tradition of the Church.

The new patriarch ere long still further antagonized the hostile rigorists. At the request of the emperor, Nicephorus, with the consent of a small synod of bishops, pardoned and reinstated in office a priest called Joseph, who had been deposed and exiled for celebrating a marriage between the Emperor Constantine VI and Theodota during the lifetime of the lawful Empress Mary. No doubt he acted in this way to avoid worse evils, but the party which was headed by St Theodore Studites refused to have any dealings or even to be in communion with the patriarch and with those who supported what they called the “Adulterine Heresy”: they went so far as to appeal to the pope. St Leo III sent them an encouraging reply but, being imperfectly informed about the whole matter and having received no communications from Archbishop Nicephorus, he took no further action. After a time, however, a reconciliation was brought about between the patriarch and St Theodore (who meanwhile had been imprisoned and his monks dispersed). It was not until then that Nicephorus sent to the pope a letter announcing his appointment to the see of Constantinople, with an apology and a rather lame excuse for his delay in making the customary notification. At the same time, in view of attacks that had been made upon his orthodoxy, he added a lengthy confession of faith and promised that in future he would give due notice at Rome of any important questions that might arise.

St Nicephorus was a zealous administrator and applied himself with patient determination to improving morals and restoring discipline in the various monas­teries under his control as well as amongst the clergy generally, with the support of St Theodore: But Leo the Armenian became emperor in 813. He was an Icono­clast, although he did not at first express his opinions and evaded the confession of faith which Nicephorus tried to elicit before consecrating him. It was only when he felt his position assured that he allowed his views to become known. He attempted by crafty suggestions to win over Nicephorus to favour his design of destroying the images which had been replaced in the churches after their, use had been vindicated and sanctioned by the Second Council of Nicaea. The patriarch replied, “We cannot change the ancient traditions we respect the holy images, as we do the cross and the book of the gospels.” Leo, however, persisted in his antagonism, which he proceeded to propagate without at first showing his hand too clearly. He privately encouraged some soldiers to insult an image of Christ which was fixed to a great cross at the Bronze Gate of Constantinople, and then ordered the figure to be removed on the plea of preventing a second profanation. Shortly afterwards the emperor, having assembled in his palace certain Iconoclastic bishops, sent for the patriarch and his fellow dignitaries. They entreated Leo to leave the government of the Church to her pastors, one of them saying, “If this is an ecclesiastical affair, let it be discussed in the church, not in the palace.” The emperor in a rage drove them all from his presence.

Some little time later the heterodox bishops held a meeting and cited the patriarch to appear before them. To their summons he replied, “Who gave you this authority? If it was he who pilots the vessel of Old Rome, I am ready. If it was the Alexandrine successor of the Evangelist Mark, I am ready. If it was the patriarch of Antioch or he of Jerusalem, I make no opposition. But who are you.  In my diocese you have no jurisdiction.” He then read the canon which declared those men excommunicated who presume to exercise any act of jurisdiction in the diocese of another bishop. On their side they proceeded to pronounce against him a sentence of deposition. After several attempts had been made against his, life he was sent by the emperor into exile, and spent his fifteen remaining years at the monastery which he had built on the Bosphorus. Although Leo’s successor Michael the Stammerer would not bring back the sacred images which Leo had banished from the churches, he was no persecutor and would have restored the patriarch had he been willing to keep silence on the disputed question but Nicephorus would not purchase his liberty at the expense of his conscience, and he felt that silence would be tantamount to consent. In exile he could and did continue to defend his tenets in writings which have lasted to this day.

His chief works were an Apology for orthodox teaching regarding sacred images and another larger treatise in two parts, the first of which consisted of a defence of the Church against the charge of idolatry, and the second, known as the Antirrhetica, was a confutation of the writings on images of Constantine V. Besides several other treatises, mostly dealing with Iconoclasm, he left two historical works known as the Breviarium and the Chronographia, the one a short history from the reign of Maurice to that of Constantine and Irene, and the other a chronicle of events from the beginning of the world. In the collection of the councils may still be found the seventeen canons of Nicephorus, in the second of which he declares it to be unlawful to travel on Sunday without necessity.

In 846, by order of the Empress Theodora and in the patriarchate of St Methodius, the body of St Nicephorus was translated from the island of Prokenesis to Constantinople, where it was deposited in the church of the Apostles on March 13—the day appointed for the commemoration of the saint in the Roman Mar­tyrology.

The principal source for the life of St Nicephorus is a biography of the deacon Ignatius. It has been edited by De Boor in modern times, but is also found in the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii. There is a good account of this disturbed period in Hergenröther, Kirchen­geschichte, vol. i, and in the article “Nicephorus” in the Kirchenlexikon and summaries of the Iconoclast controversy in Baynes and Moss, Byzantium (1948), pp. 15—17, 105—108, by H. L. B. Moss and H. Gregoire. Cf. Hefele-Leclercq, Histoire des Conciles, vol. iii, pt 2 (1910), pp. 741 seq.
The son of the secretary of Emperor Constantine V, he was raised as an opponent of the Iconoclasts in the imperial capital and remembered always that his father had been tortured for opposing the Iconoclast emperor. Nicephorus became known for his intellect and his eloquence, and received the post of imperial commissioner. After founding a monastery near the Black Sea, he was chosen despite being a layman to succeed to the office of patriarch of Constantinople in 806, succeeding St. Tarasius. He was opposed for a time by St. Theodore Studites after Nicephorus forgave a priest who married Emperor Constantine VI to Theodota despite the fact the Constantine’s wife, Mary, still lived. The patriarch also challenged the Iconoclast policies of Emperor Leo V the Armenian and was deposed by a synod of Iconoclast bishops at the conniving of the emperor. Nearly assassinated on several occasions, Nicephorus was exiled to the monastery he had founded on the Black Sea, spending his remaining years there in prayer. He died on June 2 or March 13, 829. While patriarch, he brought various reforms to his large diocese and inspired the lay people.
He was also the author of anti Iconoclast writings and two historical works, a Chronographia and Brevianim.

Nicephorus of Constantinople BM (RM) Born in 758; died June 2, 828; feast day formerly June 2. It's no wonder that Nicephorus was a staunch opponent of iconoclasm; his father, the emperor's secretary, had been tortured and exiled for refusing to accept Emperor Constantine Copronymus's decrees banning sacred images. Nicephorus became imperial commissioner known for his eloquence, scholarship, and statesmanship. He built a monastery near the Black Sea.
Although he was still a layman and did not desire any preference, he was named patriarch of Constantinople in 806 to succeed Saint Tarasius. Nicephorus incurred the enmity of Saint Theodore Studites for giving absolution to the priest who had illicitly married Emperor Constantine VI and Theodota while Constantine's wife Mary was still alive. The two were later reconciled.
Nicephorus devoted himself to reforming his see, restoring monastic discipline, and reinvigorating the faith of his flock. The patriarch also brought Saint Methodius of Constantinople, who later became patriarch, from his monastery on Chios. He resisted the efforts of Emperor Leo the Armenian to reimpose iconoclasm, but was deposed by a synod of iconoclastic bishops assembled by the emperor. Several attempts were made on the life of Nicephorus and he was exiled to the monastery he had built on the Black Sea, where he spent the last 15 years of his life. 
Nicephorus wrote several treatises against iconoclasm and two historical works, Breviarum and Chronographia (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).
Saint Nicephorus was a dignitary at the court of the empress Irene (797-802), and then after receiving monastic tonsure, he became known for his piety. In the year 806 he was elevated to the patriarchal throne. The saint was a zealous defender of the holy Icons. When the Iconoclast emperor Leo the Armenian (813-820) came to rule, the saint in 815 was exiled to Prokonnis, where he died in the year 828.
In the year 846 the holy relics of Patriarch Nicephorus were opened, and were found incorrupt and fragrant. They transferred them from Prokonnis to Constantinople and placed them for one day in Hagia Sophia, and then transferred them to the Church of the Holy Apostles. The saint's hands are preserved in the Hilandar monastery on Mount Athos.
The saint left behind three writings against Iconoclasm. The main Feast of St Nicephorus is celebrated on June 2, but today we commemorate the finding and transfer of his holy relics.
Nikephor von Konstantinopel  Orthodoxe Kirche: 2. Juni und 13. März (Übertragung der Gebeine) Katholische Kirche: 5. April
Nikephor war Sekretär am Hof der Kaiserin Irene. Er nahm am 7. Konzil teil und zog sich danach in eine Einsiedelei zurück. 802 wurde er zum Verwalter eines großen Hospitals in Konstantinopel berufen und 806 auf Wunsch des Kaisers zum Patriarchen gewählt, obwohl er Laie war und in der kirchlichen Hierarchie auf Ablehnung stieß. Als der Bildersturm von Leo V. wieder entfacht wurde, vrbündete sich Nikephor mit seinem bisherigen Gegner Theodor Studites und wandte sich gegen den Kaiser. Er wurde deshalb 815 auf die Insel Prokonnis verbannt. Hier schrieb er 3 Schriften gegen den Bildersturm und hier starb er am 5.4.828. Am 13.3.846 wurden seine Gebeine in die Apostelkirche ein Konstantinopel übertragen.

840 St. Ansovinus Bishop sanctity and miracles a great builder confessor of the Frankish Emperor Louis the Pious
He was born in Camerino, Italy, and entered the religious life at a young age. After living as a hermit for many years, Ansovinus elected Camerino. Ansovinus' sanctity and miracles also brought him to the court of Emperor Louis the Pious where he served as confessor and spiritual counselor.

840 ST ANSOVINUS, BISHOP, OF CAMERINO
ST Ansovinus was born at Camerino in Umbria, but no details of his early life have been preserved. After his ordination to the priesthood he retired into a solitary spot at Castel-Raimondo, near Torcello, where he soon acquired a reputa­tion for sanctity and miracles. It was even believed that when he came to church he crossed the river on his cloak which he cast into the water, and that, when the rays of the sun dazzled him as he was offering the holy sacrifice, he hung the linen purificator in the air and it shaded his eyes. The Emperor Louis the Pious when in Italy chose him as his confessor, and ratified his election to the see of Camerino. The saint, however, had no wish to accept the dignity, and when he did consent it was with the proviso that he should not be expected to provide soldiers for the imperial army. Although such military service was usual’ in feudal and semi-feudal states, he considered it unsuitable and contrary to the law of’ the Church.

Ansovinus proved himself a wise and prudent pastor. Not only was he liberal to the poor, but in seasons of dearth he husbanded all the resources at his command with such sagacity that he was able to relieve the sufferings of the needy. Indeed, it was said that when he had entirely emptied a granary, it was supernaturally refilled. The saint had the gift of healing and was instrumental in curing many sick persons. He was in Rome when he was seized with a form of fever which he and those about him recognized as likely to prove fatal. In spite of the protests of his friends he insisted upon returning home to die amongst his own people. They carried the sick man out to his horse, and when the animal saw him that strange instinct which dumb creatures often possess impelled him to kneel down to enable his master to mount. Ansovinus reached Camerino and was able to give a last blessing and to receive the viaticum before he quietly expired.

A singular miracle with which he is credited is worth relating, if only to account for the attribute commonly connected with St. Ansovinus. He was on his way to Rome to be consecrated when he and his friends arrived at Narni, where they stayed for refreshment. They called for wine, and the innkeeper brought some. Ansovinus, detecting that it had been watered, remonstrated with the man, who answered rudely that they could take it or leave it—it was all they would get. The saint then asked for cups, but the innkeeper said that he only provided wine and that visitors were expected to bring their own drinking-cups. So St Ansovinus took off his cape and told the host to pour the wine into the hood. He did so, under protest, and the hood retained the wine, whilst the water with which it had been mixed ran away.

The life printed in the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii, which purports, to have been written by a certain Eginus not less than a century after the death of the saint, is a wordy and unconvincing document consisting mainly of miracles. But the cultus of St Ansovinus is recognized, and his name is entered in the Roman Martyrology. See also M. Santoni, Cultus di Sant’ Ansovino (1883).
Ansovinus of Camerino B (RM) Born in Camerino, Italy; Ansovinus was a hermit at Castel Raimondo near Torcello who was consecrated bishop of Camerino. He accepted the office on the condition that his see should be exempt from the service of recruiting soldiers, then imposed upon most bishops in their capacity as feudal lords (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). Saint Ansovinus is depicted as a bishop with a barn near him. He may also be shown with fruit and garden produce (Roeder). He is venerated in Camerino, is the patron of gardeners, and is invoked for good harvests (Roeder).
842 St. Heldrad Benedictine abbot spent large fortune in carrying out good works
also called Eldrad, who devised ways of rescuing travelers in the Alps. He was a noble from Provence, France, who set out on a pilgrimage to Rome. Entering the abbey of Novalese in the Italian Alps, he became abbot and ruled for thirty years. Heldrad built a hospice and added to the abbey's library.

842 ST HELORAD, ABBOT
T
HE father of St Heldrad was a feudal lord in Provence, whose castle was near Aix at a town called Lambesc, the exact situation of which appears to be uncertain. Heldrad, while still quite young, succeeded to a large fortune, a considerable proportion of which he expended in good works. Not far from the town, at a spot where several important roads met, a market was held which was a veritable Vanity Fair, with much fraud and blasphemy. Beside the market St Heldrad built a church and a hospice, where all guests, rich or poor, were received without payment. He also laid out a garden where vegetables could be grown by the people.
In spite of all he had done, he was not satisfied and resolved to give up everything for Christ’s sake and to seek the way of perfection. Part of his possessions he gave to the bishop for the upkeep of the works he had established, and the rest was devoted to 
the poor. Meanly clad in the guise of a pilgrim, he started forth, visiting first the holy places of western France and of Spain, but not finding anywhere the kind of life to which he felt called.

Then he began tramping through Italy. Quite casually he heard from other pilgrims of the Benedictine monks of Novalese who, in their monastery at the foot of the Alps, not only exercised hospitality day and night, but also, it is said, took charge of a hospice on the top of the pass of Mont Cenis. Leon Lallemand, in his Histoire de la Charité (vol. ii, p. 183), speaks of a refuge on Mont Cenis constructed by Charlemagne on the site of an ancient temple of Jupiter, and it is possible that this was in charge of the monks of Novalese. One would like to think that in the winter season the brethren used to set out to seek travellers who were lost in the snow, bringing them back to the hospice to tend them and aid them on their journey. But positive evidence of this is lacking. The short summer season only gave the monks time to gather wood for fuel and to lay in provisions for the winter. It was in the autumn that Heldrad presented himself at the door of the abbey.
The abbot Amblulf had had a premonition with regard to his coming and therefore received him with special cordiality.

Here at last Heldrad found the life of devotion and active charity which satisfied his aspirations. For a time the abbot tested him by entrusting him with the care of the monastery vineyards, but before long he gave him the habit. Raised to the priesthood, Heldrad no doubt took part in perilous mountain expeditions, perhaps even anticipating the work subsequently taken up by the canons of the Great St Bernard. What is more certain is that he was charged with the training of the young religious; he does not, however, seem to have been tied to the spot, for at one time we find hint at Cluny whither he had been summoned by Louis the Pious. After the death of Amblulf, Charlemagne’s son Hugh was appointed abbot, but he was so often absent that the abbey would greatly have suffered but for Heldrad, who acted as administrator with so much success that he was elected abbot upon the death of Hugh. In this capacity he did much for the monastery. Within the fortified enclosure he erected a tower, the upper part of which served as a signaling-station, whilst the lower part contained the treasures of the house and the famous library which was his special care. Not satisfied with succouring travellers on the Mont Cenis he established another hospice on the Lautaret Pass, now called the Monestier de Briançon. St Heldrad’s death took place about 842. He was held in such veneration that his relics were long carried in procession in the valley of Novalese at Rogationtide, and his cultus was approved in 1903.

Nearly all that can be learnt about St Heldrad will be found collected in the volume published by C. Cipolla, Monumenta Novalicensia Vetustiora (1898), including a fragmentary rhythmical life which may possibly be assigned to the ninth century and which is certainly not later than the tenth, and also a prose life which had previously been printed in the Acta Sanctorum (March, vol. ii) and elsewhere. This latter, according to Bethmann (MGH., Scriptores, vol. vii, p. 73 n.), may be assigned to the early eleventh century. A short poem addressed to Heldrad is printed among the Poetae Latini Aevi Carolini, ii, p. 549.
Heldrad of Novalese, OSB Abbot (AC) (also known as Eldrad) Born in Provence; cultus approved in 1904. Saint Heldrad spent his large fortune in carrying out good works and then set out on a pilgrimage to Rome. After hearing many good reports about the Benedictine abbey of Novalese at the foot of the Alps from other pilgrims, Heldrad joined the community and eventually became its abbot. He governed the monastery for 30 years.
The library was his special concern, but he was also a great builder: he had a hospice erected at the highest point of Mount Cenis pass (Benedictines).
Heldrad of Novalese, OSB Abbot (AC) (also known as Eldrad)
Born in Provence; died 842; cultus approved in 1904. Saint Heldrad spent his large fortune in carrying out good works and then set out on a pilgrimage to Rome. After hearing many good reports about the Benedictine abbey of Novalese at the foot of the Alps from other pilgrims, Heldrad joined the community and eventually became its abbot. He governed the monastery for 30 years.
The library was his special concern, but he was also a great builder: he had a hospice erected at the highest point of Mount Cenis pass (Benedictines).
857 St. Roderic priest at Cabra martyred during the persecution of Christians by the Moors
 Córdubæ in Hispánia, sanctórum Mártyrum Ruderíci Presbyteri, et Salomónis.
       At Cordova in Spain, the holy martyrs Ruderic, priest, and Solomon.

857 SS. RODERIC AND SOLOMON, MARTYRS
THE history of the two martyrs Roderic and Solomon has been preserved for us by their contemporary St Eulogius, who wrote, either from his own knowledge or from the testimony of eye-witnesses, the acts of all those who perished before him in the persecution in which, as narrated above (March 11), he himself laid down his life. It must be acknowledged that these acts give an unfavourable impression of the mentality of the general run of Christians in Moorish Spain at that epoch. Families were divided, apostasy was common, and the Moors themselves were scandalized at the unfaithfulness of Christians and cast their laxity in their teeth. No wonder then that Eulogius begins his book with the words, “In those days, by a just judgement of God, Spain was oppressed by the Moors”. The story of St Roderic may serve as an illustration.

The martyr was a priest of Cabra who had two brothers, one of whom had become a Mohammedan whilst the other was a bad Christian who had practically abandoned his faith. One night the two brothers fell into an altercation which became so heated that they came to blows, and Roderic rushed in to separate them. Thereupon they both turned on him and beat him until he fell senseless to the ground. The Mohammedan then had him placed upon a litter and carried through the streets, whilst he himself walked beside the stretcher proclaiming that Roderic had apostatized and wished to be publicly recognized as a Moham­medan before he died. The victim was too ill to speak, but he suffered great anguish of mind, and as soon as he had recovered the use of his limbs he made his escape.

Not long afterwards, the Mohammedan brother met him in the streets of Cor­dova and immediately haled him before the kadi on the charge of having returned to the Christian faith after having declared himself a Mohammedan. Roderic indignantly denied ever having forsaken the Christian religion, but the kadi refused to believe him and cast him into one of the vilest dungeons in the city. There he found another prisoner, named Solomon, who had been confined there on the same charge. The two encouraged each other during the long and weary imprisonment by which the kadi had expected to wear out their constancy. As they remained inflexible, they were separated, but when that also proved ineffectual they were condemned and decapitated. St Eulogius, who saw their dead bodies exposed beside the river, noticed that the guards threw into the stream the pebbles stained with the martyrs’ blood lest the people should pick them up to preserve them as relics.

Our primary authority is the Apologeticus of St Eulogius, from which the Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum (March. vol. ii) have extracted the relevant passages. See also Florez, España Sagrada, vol. xii, pp. 36 seq.

Roderic, also known as Ruderic, was a priest at Cabra, Spain during the persecution of Christians by the Moors.

He was beaten into unconsciousness by his two brothers, one a Mohammedan and the other a fallen-away Catholic, when he tried to stop an argument between them.

The Mohammedan brother then paraded him through the streets proclaiming that he wished to become a Mohammedan. He escaped but was denounced to the authorities by the same brother as an apostate from Mohammedanism and imprisoned through he denied he had ever given up his Christianity.
While in prison, he met a man named Solomon, also charged with apostasy, and after a long imprisonment, they were both beheaded.

Roderic and Solomon MM (RM) (also known as Rodriguez or Rudericus and Salomon) Roderic was a priest of Cabra near Córdova. One of his brothers had become an Islamic; the other was a lapsed Christian. One night his brothers got into a fight, and Roderic tried to separate them. They turned on him and beat him unconscious. The Islamic had him placed on a litter and carried through the streets, while announcing Roderic had apostatized and wished to be recognized as an Islamic before he died.
Roderic heard all this in anguish but was too injured to speak. He escaped as soon as he was able. He ran into his Islamic brother on the streets later, and the brother accused him to the kadi of having reverted to Christianity after having declared himself an Islamic--an offense punishable by death even though the Christians themselves were tolerated.
Roderick denied having ever embraced Islam, but the kadi did not believe him and had him imprisoned in the most notorious prison in the city.

There Roderic met another prisoner, Solomon, who had been incarcerated for the same reason. They comforted each other, while the kadi left them in prison for a long time, hoping to break them down. They were separated after it was ascertained that they would hold firm. Even alone, however, they remained stoic; they were condemned and beheaded.
Saint Eulogius witnessed the guards throw the bloodied pebbles into a stream so that the Christians could not collect them as relics (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, White).
In art, Saint Roderic is portrayed as a priest in Mass vestments holding a palm as an angel brings him a wreath of roses (Roeder). He is venerated in Cabra and Cordova (Roeder).
1208 Blessed Peter II of Cava "an enemy of all litigation" OSB Abbot (AC)
cultus confirmed in 1928. From 1195 until his death, Peter was the abbot of Cava Monastery near Salerno. He is described as "an enemy of all litigation" (Benedictines).

1236 Bl. Agnello of Pisa admitted into Order by St. Francis himself

1236 BD AGNELLO OF PISA
THE founder of the English Franciscan province, Bd. Agnello, was admitted into the order by St Francis himself on the occasion of his sojourn in Pisa. He was sent to the friary in Paris, of which he became the custos or guardian, and in 1224 St Francis appointed him to found an English province, although he was as yet only a deacon. Of the eight brothers selected to accompany him three were English­men, but only one was in priest’s orders, namely, Richard of Ingworth. True to the precepts of St Francis, they had no money, and the monks of Fécamp paid their passage over to Dover. They made Canterbury their first stopping-place, whence Richard of Ingworth, Richard of Devon and two of the Italians went on to London to see where they could settle. The rest were lodged at the Poor Priests’ House, sleeping in a building which was used as a school by day. While the scholars were there, the friars were penned up in a small room at the back, and only after the boys had gone home could they come out and make a fire.

It was the winter of 1224, and they must have suffered great discomfort, especially as their ordinary fare was bread and a little beer, which was so thick that it had to be diluted before they could swallow it. Nothing, however, damped their spirits, and their simple piety, cheerfulness and enthusiasm soon won them many friends. They were able to produce a commendatory letter from Pope Honorius III, so that the archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton, in announcing their arrival, said, “Some religious have come to me calling themselves Penitents of the Order of Assisi, but I call them of the Order of the Apostles”: By this name they were at first known in England, and when some of them were to be ordained acolytes at Canterbury four months after landing, the archdeacon, in bidding the candidates come forward, said, “Draw near, ye brothers of the Order of the Apostles”.

In the, meantime Richard of Ingworth and his party had been well received in London and had hired a dwelling on Cornhill. They were now ready to push on to Oxford, and Agnello came from Canterbury to take charge of the London settlement. Everywhere the friars were received with enthusiasm, and Matthew Paris himself attests that Bd Agnello was on familiar terms with King Henry III. Although the minister provincial was not himself a learned man, yet he established a teaching centre which afterwards greatly influenced the university. To that school, in which Grosseteste, afterwards bishop of Lincoln, was a lecturer, flocked numbers of eager youths who were trained as friars and who, before many years were over, helped to raise Oxford to a position hardly inferior to Paris as a centre of learning.

Agnello seems to have died at the age of forty-one, only eleven years after he landed at Dover, but his reputation for sanctity and prudence stood high amongst his fellows. It is stated that his zeal for poverty was so great that “he would never permit any ground to be enlarged or any house to be built except as inevitable necessity required”. In particular the story runs that he built the infirmary at Oxford “in such humble fashion that the height of the walls did not much exceed the height of a man”. During Mass and when saying the Divine Office he shed tears continually, “yet so that neither by any noise nor by groans nor by any contortion of the face could it be known that he wept”. He was stern in resisting relaxations in the rule, but his gentleness and tact led him to be chosen in 1233 to negotiate with the rebellious Earl Marshal. His health is said to have been under­mined by his efforts in this cause and by a last painful journey to Italy. On his return he was seized with dysentery at Oxford and died there, after crying out for three days, “Come, sweetest Jesus”. The cult of Bd Agnello was confirmed in 1892 his feast is observed in the archdiocese of Birmingham today and by the Friars Minor on the 11th.

The narrative of Thomas of Eccleston, De adventu Fratrum  Minorum, together with the Chronicle of Lanercost, and the De conformitate of Bartholomew of Pisa are the most reliable sources of information. See especially the translation of Thomas of Eccleston with its appendixes, by Father Cuthbert, and the text edited by A. G. Little. See also the last-named’s The Grey Friars in Oxford (1891); E. Hutton, The Franciscans in England (1933); and Father Gilbert, Bd Agnellus and the English Grey Friars (1937).
The founder of the English Franciscan province, Blessed Agnello, was admitted into the Order by St. Francis himself on the occasion of his sojourn in Pisa. He was sent to the Friary in Paris, of which he became the guardian, and in 1224, St. Francis appointed him to found an English province; at the time he was only a deacon. Eight others were selected to accompany him.
True to the precepts of St. Francis, they had no money, and the monks of Fecamp paid their passage over to Dover. They made Canterbury their first stopping place, while Richard of Ingworth, Richard of Devon and two of the Italians went on to London to see where they could settle.  It was the winter of 1224, and they must have suffered great discomfort, especially as their ordinary fare was bread and a little beer, which was so thick that it had to be diluted before they could swallow it. Nothing, however, dampened their spirits, and their simple piety, cheerfulness and enthusiasm soon won them many friends. They were able to produce a commendatory letter from Pope Honorius III, so that the Archbishop of Canterbury, Steven Langton, in announcing their arrival, said, "Some religious have come to me calling themselves penitents of the Order of Assisi, but I called them of the Order of the Apostles."
In the meantime, Richard of Ingworth and his party had been well received in London and hired a dwelling on Cornhill. They were now ready to push on to Oxford, and Agnello came from Canterbury to take charge of the London settlement. Everywhere the Friars were received with enthusiasm, and Matthew Paris himself attests that Blessed Agnello was on familiar terms with King Henry III. Agnello is thought to have died at the age of forty-one, only eleven years after he landed at Dover, but his reputation for sanctity and prudence stood high amongst his fellows.
It is stated that his zeal for poverty was so great that "he would never permit any ground to be enlarged or any house to be built except as inevitable necessity required."
He was stern in resisting relaxations in the Rule, but his gentleness and tact led him to be chosen in 1233 to negotiate with the rebellious Earl Marshal. His health is said to have been undermined by his efforts in this cause and by a last painful journey to Italy. Opon his return he was seized with dysentery at Oxford and died there, after crying out for three days, "Come, Sweetest Jesus."
The cult of Blessed Agnello was confirmed in 1892; his feast is observed in the Archdiocese of Birmingham today and by the Friars Minor on the eleventh.

Blessed Agnellus of Pisa, OFM (AC) Born in Pisa, Italy, in 1194; died at Oxford, England, 1236; cultus confirmed in 1892. Saint Francis of Assisi himself received Agnellus as a Friar Minor and sent him to Paris to open a new house. Francis later appointed him the first Franciscan provincial in England.
Agnellus landed in Dover in 1224 and founded houses at Canterbury and Oxford. He also spent time in London. He established a famous school at Oxford (Benedictines).

1236 St. Agnellus of Pisa
Franciscan founder and diplomat. He was born in Pisa, a member of the noble Agnelli clan. St. Francis of Assisi personally received Agnellus into his order and sent him to Paris to start a Franciscan mission there. Agnellus also attended the "Chapter of Mats" and was then sent by St. Francis to England. Agnellus was only a deacon at the time. He and nine other Franciscans landed in Dover on September 12, 1224. They obtained a house in Oxford and began the Franciscan English Province. He became a friend of King Henry Ill (r. 1216-1272), who admired the saint's purity and holiness, calling upon Agnellus to avert a civil war between the throne and the Earl Marshal. Agnellus worked to calm the situation, contracting a serious illness in the process. He died in Oxford on May 7, 1236, and the body remained incorrupt, venerated in Oxford until the reign of King Henry VIII (r. 1509-1547) and the dissolution of the English religious houses.
Pope Leo XIII declared Agnellus' beatification in 1882.


   Friday  Saints of this Day March  13 Tértio Idus Mártii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Day 33 of 40 Days for Life


 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'


March 06 2016 MIRACLES authorised the Congregation to promulgate the following decrees:
CAUSES OF SAINTS July 2015.
October 01, 2015 Vatican City, Pope Authorizes following Decrees
Sunday, November 23 2014 Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King.



Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  March 2016
Universal:    
That families in need may receive the necessary support and that children may grow up in healthy and peaceful environments.

Evangelization: That those Christians who, on account of their faith, are discriminated against or are being persecuted,
may remain strong and faithful to the Gospel, thanks to the incessant prayer of the Church


It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life

Give as if every pasture in the mountains of Ireland belonged to you. -- Saint Aidan
 
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.

True charity consists in putting up with all one's neighbor's faults,
never being surprised by his weakness, and being inspired by the least of his virtues. -- St Therese of Lisieux

It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Day 33 of 40 Days for Life


 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'


Jesus brings us many Blessings
Fourth Week of Lent

   
     Beginning of Novena to Saint Joseph
A novena is a prayer that is said for nine consecutive days. The purpose is to obtain a special favor from heaven by imploring a particular saint, in this case -Saint Joseph - who is celebrated in the Catholic Church on March 19th.
O glorious Saint Joseph, faithful follower of Jesus Christ, to you do we raise our hearts and hands to implore your powerful intercession in obtaining from the benign Heart of Jesus all the helps and graces necessary for our spiritual and temporal welfare, particularly the grace of a happy death, and the special favor we now implore (..state your petition..).  O Guardian of the Word Incarnate, we have confidence that your prayers on our behalf will be graciously heard before the throne of God. Amen.
600 St. Leander of Seville bishop introduced the Nicene Creed at Mass
      succeeded in persuading many Arian bishops to change
 828 St. Nicephorus Patriarch of Constantinople martyr 
 840 St. Ansovinus Bishop sanctity and miracles confessor of the Frankish Emperor Louis the Pious
1208 Blessed Peter II of Cava "an enemy of all litigation" OSB Abbot
1236 Bl. Agnello of Pisa admitted into Order by St. Francis himself

Our Lady’s Rosary and Abundant Grace March 13 - Our Lady of the Rose (Italy, 1635)
The Rosary, though clearly Marian in character, is at heart a Christocentric prayer.
In the sobriety of its elements, it has all the depth of the Gospel message in its entirety, of which it can be said to be a compendium.

It is an echo of the prayer of Mary, her perennial Magnificat for the work of the redemptive Incarnation which began in her virginal womb. With the Rosary, the Christian people sit at the school of Mary and are led to contemplate the beauty on the face of Christ and to experience the depths of his love.
Through the Rosary the faithful receive abundant grace, as though from the very hands of the Mother of the Redeemer.
Excerpt from Pope John Paul II, Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, October 16, 2002, #1


SCRIPTURE
My power is made perfect in weakness. -- 2 Corinthians 12:9

Sunday, March 13, 2016
Isaiah 43:16-21 ; Psalms 126:1-6 ; Philippians 3:8-14 ;  John 8:1-11 ;

Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.

Poor human reason, when it trusts in itself, substitutes the strangest absurdities for the highest divine concepts.
-- St. John Chrysostom



Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  March 2016
Universal:    
That families in need may receive the necessary support and that children may grow up in healthy and peaceful environments.

Evangelization: That those Christians who, on account of their faith, are discriminated against or are being persecuted,
may remain strong and faithful to the Gospel, thanks to the incessant prayer of the Church

The Virgin Mary of Nazareth
The First Moment of Christian Tradition Began in Mary's Heart (III)
Today her intercession has proved to be amazingly powerful...
 
When faith is strong it works wonders ( Mk 16:17 ).
 
Mary's heart is not a document, it's a source. "She stored up all these things in her heart"
(Lk 2:19 & 51), and that was the Word of God.
Excerpt from "Follow the Lamb" (Suivre l'Agneau)  Father Marie-Dominique Philippe Saint Paul Ed. 2005

THE HOLY NAME OF JESUS
250  The Holy Martyrs Africanus, Publius and Terence suffered in the third century at Petrium.
 287 St. Sabinus Martyr native of Egypt
       In Pérside sanctæ Christínæ, Vírginis et Mártyris.
       Apud Camerínum sancti Ansovíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
             At Camerino, St. Ansovinus, bishop and confessor.
 295 St. Urpasian Martyr Reputedly member of household of Emperor Diocletian at Nicomedia
 311
Alexander presbyter in Pidna Holy Martyr, close to Thessalonica
4th v.
Christina of Persia Martyr scourged to death for confessing faith
410 In Thebáide deposítio sanctæ Euphrásiæ Vírginis favored with
miracles both before and after her death
Virgin_Euphrasia.jpg >
 554  St. Ramirus and Companions Martyrs of Spain by Arian Visigoths
7th v. St. Kevoca she is a Scottish saint 
656 St. Mochoemoc Abbot founder of Liath Mochoemoc Monastery at Tipperary
      St. Theusetas Martyr, with many companions at Nicaea, Bithynia
      St. Macedonius Martyr with Modesta and Patricia
 600 St. Leander of Seville bishop introduced the Nicene Creed at Mass succeeded in persuading many Arian bishops to change
 732 St. Gerald of Mayo, Abbot believed to have founded the abbeys of Elytheria, or Tempul-Gerald in Connaught, as well as Teaghna-Saxon, and a convent that he put under the care of his sister Segretia (AC)
 828 St. Nicephorus Patriarch of Constantinople martyr 
 840 St. Ansovinus Bishop sanctity and miracles confessor of the Frankish Emperor Louis the Pious
 842 St. Heldrad Benedictine abbot spent large fortune in carrying out good works 
 857 St. Roderic priest at Cabra martyred during the persecution of Christians by the Moors
1208 Blessed Peter II of Cava "an enemy of all litigation" OSB Abbot
1236 Bl. Agnello of Pisa admitted into Order by St. Francis himself



On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)




 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
 
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
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