Tuesday   Saints of this Day May 03 Quinto Nonas Maji   

Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum,
atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs,
confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

May 3, 2010  Sts. Philip and James  
The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.


CAUSES OF SAINTS April   2014



 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life.

Inexplicably, he couldn’t lift the sack!
 
May 3 – Mary Queen of Poland – Act of consecration of Poland to Mary (1966) – Our Lady of the Three Ears of Wheat (Ammerschwihr, France)
 
The Shrine of Our Lady of Three Ears of Wheat is the only place of Marian apparitions in Alsace and one of the oldest places of apparitions recognized by the Church in the world.

On May 3, 1491, a market day in Niedermorschwihr (a village in Alsace, France), Thierry Schoere came to town and bought a supply of grain, but he found it impossible to lift the sack! He then asked forgiveness from Heaven because his self-respect had kept him from revealing a message from the Virgin Mary.  In fact, at about ten in the morning he had stopped to pray in memory of a man who had died in an accident at a place called "Habtal." Suddenly he saw a bright light surrounding the Virgin holding three ears of wheat on a single stem in her right hand, and in her left hand, a piece of ice.

The ice, she said, represented the misfortunes that would fall upon the region if the people did not convert. The ears of wheat announced the blessings that God was ready to send those who would turn to Him. Thierry Schoere was expected to make public this call to conversion. To convince him, he had to be confronted with a sack impossible to lift. Since then, many miracles have occurred. Today, teams of worshipers take turns in adoration every week, even staying overnight.

How I Discovered the Tomb of the Apostle Philip

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary  .

Nothing restrains anger, curbs pride, heals the wound of malice,
bridles self-indulgence, quenches the passions, checks avarice
and puts unclean thoughts to flight, as does the name of Jesus.
-- St. Bernard

62  Jakobus der Bruder des Herrn (griech. adelphos kyriou) Markus 15,40 nennt Maria, die Mutter Jakobus des Kleinen
Apostel Jakobus Alphäus (der Jüngere) Apostel Philippus Sts. Philip and James
 286 Saints Timothy {from village of Perapa --Egyptian Thebaid} and Maura ("Let no one defend me. I have one Defender, God, in Whom I trust.") suffered for the faith under governor Arian.
 326 THE FINDING OF THE HOLY CROSS
 328  Kreuzfindung Die Kaiserin und Mutter Konstantins Helena soll in Jerusalem das Kreuz Christi gefunden haben.
563 St. Scannal (AC) The celebrated missionary; Scannal was a disciple of Saint Columba (Benedictines).

  801 Rabi'a al-'Adawiyya Sufi One of the most famous Islamic mystics
920 St Peter the Wonderworker Bishop of Argos in the Peloponnesos ransomed captives healed the sick and theafflicted, and possessed the gift of insight relics exuding myrrh, and working miracles and healings
1010 St. Ansfrid Bishop and founder Count of Brabant friend of Emperor Otto III of the Holy Roman Empire
.

May 3 – Mary, Queen of Poland - Act of Consecration of Poland to Mary (1966) 
The Icon of the Madonna was allegedly painted by Saint Luke
 
The Black Madonna of Czestochowa is world famous. Each year more than 3 million pilgrims flock to the city of 250,000 in southern Poland where the 1991 World Youth Days took place. It is believed that the famous icon of the Madonna was painted by the Apostle Luke himself. The icon is located in the convent of the Pauline Fathers, on the hill of Jasna Góra (“the illuminated mountain”).

Tradition tells us that through Our Lady’s intercession an invading Swedish army was defeated in 1655 near the city. In recognition, King Jan Kazimierz proclaimed the Virgin Mary "Queen of Poland."

Today, the Black Madonna of Czestochowa and the Jasna Góra monastery are still symbols of freedom and independence to the Polish people. Pilgrimages to Czestochowa had a special meaning at the time of the partition of Poland between Russia and Prussia, but also under the Nazi occupation and the communist regime.
temoignagechretien.fr

 
May 3 – Mary, Queen of Poland - Act of consecration of Poland to the Virgin Mary (1966)
– Our Lady of the Three Ears of Grain (Ammerschwirr, France)
This respect kept the people from giving their daughters the name of Mary
 The Polish people often call the Blessed Virgin Mary “Mother of my heart” (serdeczna Matke), but their tender love for Our Lady never gives place to undue familiarity. The Mother of hearts never ceases for a moment, in the people's consciousness, to enjoy incredible prerogatives derived from her divine maternity. She is “our mother” only because she is first and foremost the “Mother of God,” Matka Boska.
For a long time in some provinces, this sense of respect kept people from naming their daughters Mary. (…)
Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony declined outright the title of Queen of Poland in the coronation rite, because in her view that “this title belongs to Mary, Queen of Heaven, alone.” This royal attribution must have been very exclusive indeed, to give pause to a princess of royal blood and to her spokespersons! And in truth, since time immemorial, the Polish people have recognized only one “Queen of Poland”: the Virgin Mary, and they jealously ensure that nobody usurps the title.
 Marie Winoska
The Marian Devotion in Poland, in Maria, études sur la Vierge Marie - Volume IV

 

Saints Philip and James, Apostles (Feast)
May 3 - Mary, Mother of Jasna Gora and Queen - Polish National Consecration to the Virgin Mary (1966)  Millennium Anniversary of the Baptism of Poland
In the mid-fifties, life in Poland was very difficult to say the least. The communist government had set up severe repression against the Catholic faith, the seminaries were empty, and Cardinal Wyszynski, a hero of the faith, was in prison.
It was in this lugubrious prison, at the bottom of a hole, that the Cardinal had a decisive inspiration: despite all the setbacks, Poland needed to actively prepare the great millennium anniversary of its baptism, by a “novena” or nine-year long prayer to the Blessed Virgin. By the cardinal’s request the image Our Lady of Czestochowa was sent out like a Pilgrim Virgin, to all the parishes and families in Poland, so as to revive the faith of the People of God. The Pilgrim Virgin of Poland worked wonders and 9 years later, the entire country gathered together on May 3, 1966 during the feast of Mary, Mother of Jasna Gora and Queen, while the Primate of Poland pronounced an act of total surrender to the Mother of God, during the celebration of the Millennium.
John Paul II reminded his countrymen of this great occasion on his first visit to Poland as pope: "I would like to confirm and renew in a very special way the act of consecration pronounced at Jasna Gora on May 3, 1966, at the time of the Polish Millennium. By this act the Polish bishops gave themselves up to you, Mother of God, to your ‘maternal abandon of love’ and wanted to serve the great cause of freedom of the Church."
(John Paul II, homily at Jasna Gora on June 4, 1979)
In 1966, the Polish government understood the Polish faith was invincible. And the seminaries were full once again...
See www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/homilies/1979

Consecration to Jesus through Mary (II) May 3 - Our Lady of Kiev
God endowed Mary with the privileges and prerogatives of:
1) The Divine Maternity, sharing with the Father the parenthood of Jesus, true God and true man,
 the redeeming Divine Word Incarnate;
2) Perpetual virginity for her intimate union and close cooperation with Jesus
as co-redemptrix sharing in His redemptive ministry and sacrifice;
3) Assumption body and soul into heaven, for her continued union and cooperation with Jesus.
Our Lady was appointed spiritual loving mother of all humans and the Church; merciful human advocate and intercessor with the Father; universal mediatrix and distributrix to the world of the divine grace, light, wisdom and power of the Holy Spirit; and providentially governing Queen of Heaven and earth.
In short, we consecrate ourselves to Jesus through Mary because, immaculate, humble, open, full of grace and in intimate union with her divine Son, she is the model for our human spirituality; and is also, in the heavenly continuation of that same union, our divinely appointed advocate and mediatrix who intercedes through the Son with the Father for petitions from the world, and distributes divine blessings to it.
In fond memory of John Stokes Jr. (1920-2007)
 May 3, 2010  Sts. Philip and James
James {
the Lesser }, Son of Alphaeus: We know nothing of this man but his name, and of course the fact that Jesus chose him to be one of the 12 pillars of the New Israel, his Church. He is not the James of Acts, son of Clopas, “brother” of Jesus and later bishop of Jerusalem and the traditional author of the Letter of James.

James, son of Alphaeus, is also known as James the Lesser to avoid confusing him with James the son of Zebedee, also an apostle and known as James the Greater.

Philip: Philip came from the same town as Peter and Andrew, Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus called him directly, whereupon he sought out Nathanael and told him of the “one about whom Moses wrote” (John 1:45).

Like the other apostles, Philip took a long time coming to realize who Jesus was. On one occasion, when Jesus saw the great multitude following him and wanted to give them food, he asked Philip where they should buy bread for the people to eat. St. John comments,
[Jesus] said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do” (John 6:6). Philip answered, “Two hundred days’ wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little [bit]” (John 6:7).

John’s story is not a put-down of Philip. It was simply necessary for these men who were to be the foundation stones of the Church to see the clear distinction between humanity’s total helplessness apart from God and the human ability to be a bearer of divine power by God’s gift.

On another occasion, we can almost hear the exasperation in Jesus’ voice. After Thomas had complained that they did not know where Jesus was going, Jesus said, “I am the way...If you know me, then you will also know my Father. From now on you do know him and have seen him” (John 14:6a, 7). Then Philip said, “Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us” (John 14:8). Enough! Jesus answered, "Have I been with you for so long a time and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:9a).

Possibly because Philip bore a Greek name or because he was thought to be close to Jesus, some Gentile proselytes came to him and asked him to introduce them to Jesus. Philip went to Andrew, and Andrew went to Jesus. Jesus’ reply in John’s Gospel is indirect; Jesus says that now his “hour” has come, that in a short time he will give his life for Jew and Gentile alike.

Comment As in the case of the other apostles, we see in James and Philip human men who became foundation stones of the Church, and we are reminded again that holiness and its consequent apostolate are entirely the gift of God, not a matter of human achieving. All power is God’s power, even the power of human freedom to accept his gifts. “You will be clothed with power from on high,” Jesus told Philip and the others. Their first commission had been to expel unclean spirits, heal diseases, announce the kingdom. They learned, gradually, that these externals were sacraments of an even greater miracle inside their persons—the divine power to love like God.
Quote: “He sent them...so that as sharers in his power they might make all peoples his disciples, sanctifying and governing them.... They were fully confirmed in this mission on the day of Pentecost (cf. Acts 2:1–26) in accordance with the Lord’s promise: ‘You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you shall be witnesses for me...even to the very ends of the earth’ (Acts 1:8). By everywhere preaching the gospel (cf. Mark 16:20), which was accepted by their hearers under the influence of the Holy Spirit, the apostles gathered together the universal Church, which the Lord established on the apostles and built upon blessed Peter, their chief, Christ Jesus himself remaining the supreme cornerstone...” (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 19).
62  Jakobus der Bruder des Herrn (griech. adelphos kyriou) Markus 15,40 nennt Maria, die Mutter Jakobus des Kleinen
      Apostel Jakobus Alphäus (der Jüngere)
      Apostel Philippus
       Sts. Philip and Jame
 105 Romæ, via Nomentána, pássio sanctórum Mártyrum Alexándri Papæ Primi, Evéntii et Theodúli Presbyterórum
       St. Sarah, and her two sons wife of Diocletian's governor Socrates who caused their martyredom {Coptic}
       Kiev Caves Icon of the Uspenie (Dormition) of the Most Holy Theotokos one of the most ancient icons in the Russian Orthodox Church glorified by numerous miracles
 286 SS. TIMOTHY AND MAURA, MARTYRS     
 286 Saints Timothy {from village of Perapa --Egyptian Thebaid} and Maura ("Let no one defend me. I have one Defender, God, in Whom I trust.") suffered for the faith under governor Arian
 300 Xenia von Kalamas Ihre Eltern erzogen sie im christlichen Glauben und sie führte ein klösterliches Leben auf dem Hof ihrer Eltern
 313  Constantinópoli sanctórum Mártyrum Alexándri mílitis, et Antonínæ Vírginis.
 
326 THE FINDING OF THE HOLY CROSS
 328  Kreuzfindung Die Kaiserin und Mutter Konstantins Helena soll in Jerusalem das Kreuz Christi gefunden haben.
 369 Nárniæ sancti Juvenáli, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
4th v. Aphrodísiæ, in Cária, sanctórum Mártyrum Diodóri et Rhodopiáni
        Hierosólymis Invéntio Sacrosánctæ Crucis Domínicæ, sub Constantíno Imperatóre.
        Commemoration of
One hundred martyrs Sts. Babnuda (Paphnute) the hermit, Theodore the worshipper.
       Apud montem Senárium, in Etrúria, natális sanctórum Sostenǽi et Ugucciónis Confessórum, e septem Fundatóribus Ordinis Servórum beátæ Maríæ Vírginis
 563  St. Scannal (AC) The celebrated missionary; Scannal was a disciple of Saint Columba (Benedictines).
6th v. St. Gluvias Monastic founder and brother of St. Cadoc of Llancarfan, Wales. Gluvias labored in Cornwall, England, where he may have started an abbey also called   Glywys.
 680 St. Adalsindis Abbess and sister of St. Waldalenus became abbess of a convent at Beze, France, the monastery founded by her brother.
 744 Saint Mamai martyr for Christ served as chief shepherd of the Georgian faithful from 731 to 744
       Sts. Michael and Arsenius the Georgians
8th v. St.  Ethelwin Second bishop of Lindsey, England. He accompanied St. Egbert to Ire­land, where he died
 770  St. Philip of Zell Benedictine hermit founded the monastery of Zell, so named because it had its start with his single “cell,” or room.
 
801 Rabi'a al-'Adawiyya Sufi One of the most famous Islamic mystics
 920 St Peter the Wonderworker Bishop of Argos in the Peloponnesos ransomed captives healed the sick and the afflicted, and possessed the gift of insight relics exuding myrrh, and working miracles and healings
1010 St. Ansfrid Bishop and founder Count of Brabant friend of Emperor Otto III of the Holy Roman Empire
1074 Saint Theodosius of the Caves Father of monasticism in Russia from youth led the ascetic life relics incorrupt miracles of food for the monk brethren
1100 The Sven Caves Icon of the Mother of God painted by St Alypius of the Caves (August 17) glorified by miracles
12th v. Blessed Ventura Spellucci, OSB Abbot (AC)

"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him" (Psalm 21:28)

62 Jakobus der Bruder des Herrn (griech. adelphos kyriou) Markus 15,40 nennt Maria, die Mutter Jakobus des Kleinen
Orthodoxe Kirche: 23. Oktober und 26.12. (Synaxis der Gottesmutter Maria) (Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 3. Mai) (Anglikanische Kirche: 1. Mai)

Markus 6, 3 und Petrus in Gal. 1, 19 nennen den Herrenbruder (griech. adelphos kyriou) Jakobus. Die westliche Kirche setzt ihn mit Jakobus Alphäus gleich, dies dürfte aber nach heutigen Forschungsergebnissen nicht zutreffen. Markus 15,40 nennt Maria, die Mutter Jakobus des Kleinen. Ob Jakobus der Sohn des Kleopas war, ist fraglich. Die orthodoxe Tradition sieht ihn als Sohn Josefs von Nazareth aus seiner ersten Ehe mit Solomonia und damit als Halbbruder Jesu. Er wird auch deutlich von Jakobus Zebedäus und Jakobus Alphäus unterschieden und er soll Josef, Maria und Jesus auf der Flucht nach Ägypten begleitet haben (deshalb auch 26.12. als Gedenktag).

Jakobus ist wohl erst durch die erfahrene Auferstehung Jesu (1. Kor. 15, 17) zum Glauben gekommen. Er wurde dann aber schnell zu einer tragenden Säule der Jerusalemer Gemeinde und nach Petrus ihr zweiter Leiter (Gal 1,19; 2,9; Apg 12,17; 15,13-29; 21,18-25). Von besonderer Bedeutung für die Heidenmission ist seine Stellungnahme auf dem Apostelkonzil (Apg. 15, 19 ff.). Da er selber die jüdischen Gesetze und Vorschriften streng einhielt, erhielt er in der judenchristlichen Gemeinde den Beinamen 'der Gerechte'. Er wurde um 62 auf Veranlassung des Hohepriesters gesteinigt und vermutlich mit einer Tuchwalkerstange erschlagen. Der Jakobusbrief ist von ihm oder einem seiner Schüler verfaßt worden. Auch soll Jakobus nach orthodoxer Tradition eine Liturgie entwickelt haben, die Grundlage der heute verwendeten Liturgien des Basilius und von Johannes Chrysostomus wurde.

Apostel Jakobus Alphäus (der Jüngere)
Orthodoxe Kirche: 9. Oktober Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 3. Mai (mit Philippus) Anglikanische Kirche: 1. Mai (mit Philippus)
Jakobus Minor Jakobus der Jüngere
Ikonenzentrum Saweljew   

 Jakobus, der Sohn des Alphäus wird im Neuen Testament nur in den Apostellisten genannt. Er war wohl nicht der Bruder des Matthäus (der in Mark. 2, 14 auch als Sohn des Alphäus angegeben wird). Er wird der Jüngere genannt, weil er später berufen wurde als Jakobus Zebedäus. In der westlichen Kirche wird er mit Jakobus dem Herrenbruder gleichgesetzt. Dadurch sind auch die meisten Überlieferungen vermischt.

Weiterhin wird in der kirchlichen Tradition Jakobus Alphäus mit Jakobus dem Kleinen, dem Sohn der Maria (Mark. 15, 40 u.a.) gleichgesetzt. Da Joh. 19,25 von Maria der Frau des Kleopas spricht, wurde Jakobus Alphäus zum Sohn des Kleopas und Verwandten Jesu (Matth. 13, 55). Diese Gleichsetzung, die erstmals von Hieronymus aufgestellt und vom Konzil von Trient für verblndlich erklärt wurde, ist wissenschaftlich kaum haltbar.

Nach orthodoxer Tradition missionierte Jakobus gemeinsam mit Andreas und erlitt in Ägypten den Märtyrertod am Kreuz. Nach einer anderen Legende (die aber wohl den Herrenbruder Jakobus meint) wurde er gesteinigt und schließlich mit einer Tuchwalkerstange erschlagen.

Der Festtag von Jakobus dem Jüngeren wurde um 570 auf den 1. Mai gelegt, weil an diesem Tag die Apostelkirche in Rom, die Reliquien von ihm und Philippus bewahrt, eingeweiht wurde. 1956 erfolgte dann die Verlegung auf den 3. Mai, da am 1. Mai das Fest von Josef dem Arbeiter eingeführt wurde.

St. James the Less, the author of the first Catholic Epistle, was the son of Alphaeus of Cleophas. His mother Mary was either a sister or a close relative of the Blessed Virgin, and for that reason, according to Jewish custom, he was sometimes called the brother of the Lord. The Apostle held a distinguished position in the early Christian community of Jerusalem. St. Paul tells us he was a witness of the Resurrection of Christ; he is also a "pillar" of the Church, whom St. Paul consulted about the Gospel.

According to tradition, he was the first Bishop of Jerusalem, and was at the Council of Jerusalem about the year 50. The historians Eusebius and Hegesippus relayed that St. James was martyred for the Faith by the Jews in the Spring of the year 62, although they greatly esteemed his person and had given him the surname of "James the Just."

Tradition has always recognized him as the author of the Epistle that bears his name. Internal evidence based on the language, style, and teaching of the Epistle reveals its author as a Jew familiar with the Old Testament, and a Christian thoroughly grounded in the teachings of the Gospel. External evidence from the early Fathers and Councils of the Church confirmed its authenticity and canonicity.

The date of its writing cannot be determined exactly. According to some scholars it was written about the year 49 A.D. Others, however, claim it was written after St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans (composed during the winter of 57-58 A.D.). It was probably written between the years 60 and 62 A.D.

St. James addresses himself to the "twelve tribes that are in the Dispersion," that is, to Christians outside Palestine; but nothing in the Epistle indicates that he is thinking only of Jewish Christians. St. James realizes full well the temptations and difficulties they encounter in the midst of paganism, and as a spiritual father, he endeavors to guide and direct them in the faith. Therefore, the burden of his discourse is an exhortation to practical Christian living.

Apostlecalled “the Younger” or “the Just,” named in the lists of the disciples given by Matthew, Mark, and Luke and mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles. He was the son of Alpheus and was known as “the Less” merely as a means of distin­guishing him from James the Greater who was older or taller. According to Mark, he stood with the woman Mary and Mary Magdalene at the Crucifixion; he is also called by implication the son of the woman Mary. Little else is known with certainty about him, unless one accepts the view that he is to be identified with St. James, the Brother of the Lord, with whom he is often confused. In liturgical art, he is depicted holding a book or a club. He shares the same feast day as St. Philip.
Apostel Philippus
Orthodoxe Kirche: 14. November Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 3. Mai Anglikanische Kirche 1. Mai
Philippus aus Bethsaida wird im Neuen Testament mehrfach erwähnt. Er scheint schon damals Kontakt zu griechischen Juden gehabt zu haben (vgl. Joh. 12, 21), er und Andreas tragen als einzige Apostel griechische Namen. Die Überlieferung zu seinem Wirken nach Pfingsten beruht möglicherweise auf einer Verwechslung mit dem Diakon Philippus. Nach der Überlieferung wirkte er zunächst in Galiläa, ging dann mit seiner Schwester Mariam, die ihn auf allen Reisen begleitete, nach Griechenland und missionierte hier in den jüdischen Gemeinden. Nachdem ein Attentatsversuch des Jerusalemer Hohenpriesters fehlschlug, setzte er Narkissos als Bischof von Athen ein und ging nach Parthien und nach Syrien, wo er in Hieropolis Heros als Bischof einsetzte. Er missionierte in vielen Landstrichen Kleinasiens und kam schließlich mit seiner Schwester und Bartholomäus in das phrygische Hierapolis. Hier ließ der Priester des heidnischen Schlangentempels die drei kreuzigen. Ein Erdbeben warf alle Anwesenden zu Boden und Philippus bat Gott um das Ende des Erdbebens und Rettung der Menschen. Die Heiden holten daraufhin die drei Christen vom Kreuz herunter und bekehrten sich. Philippus aber war bereits verstorben. Bartholomäus und Mariam beerdigten seinen Leichnam und gingen nach Armenien, um hier weiter zu missionieren. Reliquien von Philippus befanden sich zunächst in Hierapolis. Sie kamen dann nach Konstantinopel und in die 12-Apostel-Kirche in Rom sowie an zahlreiche weitere Orte. Sein Festtag wurde in der Westkirche auf den 1. Mai gelegt, da an diesem Tag die 12-Apostel-Kirche geweiht wurde. Mit der Einführung des Festes Josef der Arbeiter wurde das Fest 1956 auf den 3. Mai verlegt.

Philip was born in Bethsaida, Galilee. He may have been a disciple of John the Baptist and is mentioned as one of the Apostles in the lists of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and in Acts. Aside from the lists, he is mentioned only in John in the New Testament. He was called by Jesus Himself and brought Nathanael to Christ. Philip was present at the miracle of the loaves and fishes, when he engaged in a brief dialogue with the Lord, and was the Apostle approached by the Hellenistic Jews from Bethsaida to introduce them to Jesus. Just before the Passion, Jesus answered Philip's query to show them the Father, but no further mention of Philip is made in the New Testament beyond his listing among the Apostles awaiting the Holy Spirit in the Upper Room. According to tradition he preached in Greece and was crucified upside down at Hierapolis under Emperor
Domitian.
How I Discovered the Tomb of the Apostle Philip
Interview With Archaeologist Francesco D'Andria By Renzo Allegri ROME, MAY 2, 2012 (Zenit.org).-
 On May 3, the Church remembers St. Philip and St. James the Less, two apostles who formed part of the Twelve.

Last summer the news broke that the Apostle Philip’s tomb was found at Hierapolis, in Phrygia. “The value of this finding is undoubtedly of a very high level,” says Professor Francesco D’Andria, director of the archaeological mission that made the discovery. D’Andria teaches archaeology at the University of Salento-Lecce and is the director of the School of Specialization in Archaeology of that university. He has been working in Hierapolis for more than 30 years, looking for St. Philip’s tomb and, since the year 2000, he has been director of this mission.

We asked Professor D’Andria to speak to us about St. Philip and the exceptional finding that he and his team of researchers carried out. “Historical news on Saint Philip is scarce,” said D’Andria. “From the Gospels we know that he was a native of Bethsaida, on Lake Gennesaret; hence, he belonged to a family of fishermen.
John is the only evangelist who mentions him several times. In the first chapter of his Gospel, he recounts that Philip entered the group of the apostles from the beginning of Jesus’ public life, called directly by the Master. In the order of calling, he is the fifth after James, John, Andrew and Peter. In the sixth chapter, when he recounts the miracle of the multiplication of loaves, John says that, before doing this miracle, Jesus turned to Philip and asked him how all those people could be fed, and Philip answered that 200 denarii worth of bread would not be sufficient even to give a piece to each one.
And in Chapter 12, John says that after Jesus’ triumphal entrance in Jerusalem, some Greeks wished to speak with the Master and went to Philip.
And during the Last Supper, when Jesus spoke of the Father (“If you had known me, you would have known my Father also”), Philip said: “Lord, show us the Father, and we shall be satisfied.”
From the Acts of the Apostles we know that Philip was present with the others at the moment of Jesus’ Ascension and on the day of Pentecost, when the descent of the Holy Spirit took place. Written information ceases on that day. All the rest comes from Tradition.”


ZENIT: What does Tradition say in addition?
D’Andria: After Jesus’ death, the Apostles dispersed through the world to spread the Gospel message. And, according to Tradition and ancient documents written by the Holy Fathers, we know that Philip carried out his mission in Scizia, in Lydia, and in the last days of his life, in Hierapolis, in Phrygia.
   In a letter written to Pope Victor I, Polycrates, who toward the end of the second century was bishop of Ephesus, recalls the important personalities of his Church, among them the Apostles Philip and John. Of Philip, he said: “He was one of the twelve Apostles and died in Hierapolis, as did two of his daughters who grew old in virginity … Another daughter of his … was buried in Ephesus.”

“All scholars agree in considering that Polycrates’ information is absolutely reliable.
The Letter, which dates back to about 190 after Christ, 100 years after Philip’s death, is a fundamental document for relations between the Latin and the Greek Church.

It refers to the dispute about the date of the celebration of Easter. And in that letter, Polycrates, who was patriarch of the Greek Church, claims the nobility of the origins of the Church in Asia, stating that just as the trophies (mortal remains) of Peter and Paul are in Rome, the tombs of the Apostles Philip and John are in Asia. Moreover, from that letter we know that Philip spent the last years of his life in Hierapolis, with two of his three daughters, who undoubtedly helped him in his work of evangelization.
In his Ecclesiastical History, Eusebius of Caesarea says that Papias, who was bishop of Hierapolis at the beginning of the third century, knew Philip’s daughters and from them learned important details of the Apostle’s life, among them also the account of a tremendous miracle: the resurrection of a dead man.”


ZENIT: Is it known how and when the Apostle died?
D’Andria: Most of the ancient documents state that Philip died in Hierapolis, in the year 80 after Christ, when he was about 85. He died a martyr for his faith, crucified upside down like St. Peter. He was buried in Hierapolis. In the ancient necropolis of that city an inscription was found that alludes to a church dedicated to St. Philip. On an unspecified date, Philip’s body was taken to Constantinople to remove it from the danger of profanation by barbarians.
And in the sixth century, under Pope Pelagius I, it was taken to Rome and buried, next to the Apostle James, in a church built specifically for them. The Byzantine-style church, which was called “of Sts. James and Philip,” was transformed in 1500 into a magnificent Renaissance church, which is the present one called “Of the Holy Apostles.”


ZENIT: When did research begin on St. Philip’s tomb in Hierapolis?
D’Andria: In 1957, thanks to professor Paolo Verzone, who taught engineering at Turin’s Polytechnic and was very passionate about archaeological research. An agreement was stipulated between the Italian and Turkish Republics, which enabled our team of archaeologists to carry out searches in Hierapolis. Professor Verzone was the first director of that mission. He began immediately, of course, to look for the Apostle Philip’s tomb. He concentrated the excavations on a monument that was already visible in part and known as the church of St. Philip, and he discovered an extraordinary octagonal church, a genuine masterpiece of Byzantine architecture of the fifth century, with wonderful arches in travertine stone.
All this complex of constructions made with so much care and detail made one think that it was a great church of pilgrimage, a very important shrine, and Professor Verzone identified it as the Martyrion, namely the martyrial church of St. Philip. And therefore he thought that it was built on the saint’s tomb. Hence he had several excavations carried out in the area of the main altar, but he never found anything that made one think of a tomb.
I myself thought the tomb was in the area of the church, but in 2000, when I became director of the Italian archaeological mission of Hierapolis, by concession of the Ministry of Culture of Turkey, I changed my opinion.

ZENIT: Why? D’Andria: All excavations carried out over so many years had no result. I also carried out research through geo-physical explorations, that is, special explorations of the subsoil, and not obtaining anything, I was convinced we had to look elsewhere, still in the same area but in another direction.
ZENIT: And towards what did you direct your research?
D’Andria: My collaborators and I studied a series of satellite photos of the area carefully, and the observations of a group of brave topographers of the CNR-IBAM, directed by Giuseppe Scardozzi, and we understood that the Martyrion, the octagonal church was the center of a large and well-developed devotional complex. We identified a great processional street that took the pilgrims of the city to the octagonal church, the Martyrion at the top of the hill, the remains of a bridge that enabled pilgrims to go across a valley through which a torrent flowed; we say that at the foot of the hill there were stairs in travertine stone, with wide ascending steps that led to the summit.  At the bottom of the stairs we identified another octagonal building that could not be seen from the surface but only on satellite photos. We excavated around that building and realized it was a thermal complex.  This was an enlightening discovery that made us understand that the whole hill was part of a course of pilgrimage with several stages. Continuing our excavations, we found another flight of steps that led directly to the Martyrion, and on the Square, next to the Martyrion, there was a fountain where pilgrims did their ablutions with water, and near there a small plain, in front of the Martyrion, where there were vestiges of buildings. Professor Verzone had not dared to carry out an excavation in that area because it was an immense heap of stones. In 2010, we began to do some cleaning and elements of extreme importance came to light.

ZENIT: Of what sort?
D’Andria: A marble architrave of a ciborium with a monogram on which the name Theodosius could be read. I thought it was the name of the emperor and so that architrave made it possible to date the martyrial church between the fourth and fifth centuries. Then, little by little we found vestiges of an apse. Excavating and cleaning the floor, a great church came to light. Whereas the floor of the Martyrion was octagonal, this floor was that of a basilica, with three naves. A stupendous church with marble capitals refined decorations, crosses, friezes, plant branches, stylized palms in the niches and a central pavement with marble tesserae with colored geometrical motifs: all referable to the fifth century, namely, the age of the other church, the Martyrion. However, at the center of this wonderful construction what enthused and moved us was something disconcerting that left us breathless.

ZENIT: And it was?
D’Andria: A typical Roman tomb that went back to the first century after Christ. In a certain sense, its presence could be justified by the fact that in that area, before Christians built the proto-Byzantine shrine, there was a Roman necropolis. However, examining its position carefully, we realized that that Roman tomb was at the center of the church. Hence, in the fifth century the church had been built precisely around that pagan Roman tomb, to protect it, because, evidently, that tomb was extremely important. And immediately we thought that perhaps that could be the tomb where the body of St. Philip was placed after his death.

ZENIT: And did you find confirmations of this supposition?
D’Andria: Indeed. In the summer of 2011, we carried out extensive excavation in the area of this church with the coordination of Piera Caggia, research archaeologist of the IBAM-CNR, and extraordinary elements emerged that confirmed are suppositions fully. The tomb was included in a structure in which there is a platform that is reached by a marble staircase. Pilgrims, entering in the narthex, went up to the higher part of the tomb, where there was a place for prayer and they went down on the opposite side. And we saw that the marble surface of the steps was completely consumed by the steps of thousands upon thousands of people. Hence, the tomb received an extraordinary tribute of veneration.

On the façade of the tomb, near the entrance, there are nail holes which undoubtedly served to support an applied metallic locking device. Moreover, there are grooves in the pavement that make one think of an additional wooden door: all precautions that indicate that in that tomb there was an inestimable treasure, namely, the apostle’s body.  And on the façade, on the walls there are numerous graffiti with crosses, which in some way have consecrated the pagan tomb.
Excavating next to the tomb we found water baths for individual immersions, which undoubtedly served for healings. After venerating the tomb, sick pilgrims were submerged in the baths exactly as happens in Lourdes.  However, the main -- I would say mathematical -- confirmation which attests, without a shadow of a doubt, that that construction is really St. Philip’s tomb comes from a small object that is in the Museum of Richmond in the United States. An object in which there are images that up to now could not be fully deciphered, whereas now they have an obvious significance.

ZENIT: What object is it?
D’Andria: it is a bronze seal about 10 centimeters (four inches) in diameter, which served to authenticate St. Philip’s bread to be distributed to pilgrims. Icons have been found that represent St. Philip with a large loaf in his hand. And, to be distinguished from ordinary bread, this bread was marked with the seal so that pilgrims would know that it was a special bread, to be kept with devotion.

There are images on the seal. There is the figure of a saint with a pilgrims’ cloak and an inscription that says “Saint Philip.” On the border is a phrase in Greek, an ancient phrase of praise to God: Agios o Theos, agios ischyros, agios athanatos, eleison imas (Holy God, strong Holy One, immortal Holy One, have mercy on us). All the specialists of Byzantine history who know that seal have always said that it came from Hierapolis. However, what is most extraordinary is the fact that the figure of the saint is presented between two buildings: the one on the left is covered by a cupola, and it is understood that it represents the octagonal Martyrion; the one on the right of the saint, has a roof like the one of the church of three naves which we have now discovered. The two buildings are at the top of a stairway. It seems that it was an image of the complex then existing around St. Philip’s tomb. A photograph made in the sixth century. Moreover, in the image of the seal there is an emblematic element: a lamp hanging at the entrance, typical signs that served to indicate a saint’s sepulcher. Hence, already indicated in that seal is that the tomb was in the basilica church and not in the Martyrion.

ZENIT: You have made all these discoveries in recent times.
D’Andria: I would say very recent times. We did so between 2010 and 2011. Above all 2011 was the year of the greatest emotions for us: we discovered the second church and Philip’s tomb. We concluded a work begun 55 years ago. The news has gone around the world. And it has attracted scholars and the curious to Hierapolis. Among others, at the end of last August, hundreds of Chinese arrived, as well as numerous Koreans and journalists of several nationalities.

Last Nov. 24, I had the honor of presenting the discovery, at the Pontifical Archaeological Academy of Rome, to scholars and Vatican representatives. Also Bartholomew the patriarch of Constantinople, primate of the Orthodox Church, wished to receive me to know the details of the discovery, and on Nov. 14, feast of St. Philip in the Orthodox Church, he celebrated Mass precisely on the tomb found in Hierapolis. And I was present, 1,000 thousand years, the chants of the Greek liturgy resounded among the ruins of the church.

In the forthcoming months, we will take up the works again and I am certain that other important surprises await us.
 Sts. Philip and James  
James, Son of Alphaeus: We know nothing of this man but his name, and of course the fact that Jesus chose him to be one of the 12 pillars of the New Israel, his Church. He is not the James of Acts, son of Clopas, “brother” of Jesus and later bishop of Jerusalem and the traditional author of the Letter of James. James, son of Alphaeus, is also known as James the Lesser to avoid confusing him with James the son of Zebedee, also an apostle and known as James the Greater.

Philip: Philip came from the same town as Peter and Andrew, Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus called him directly, whereupon he sought out Nathanael and told him of the “one about whom Moses wrote” (John 1:45).

Like the other apostles, Philip took a long time coming to realize who Jesus was. On one occasion, when Jesus saw the great multitude following him and wanted to give them food, he asked Philip where they should buy bread for the people to eat. St. John comments, “[Jesus] said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do” (John 6:6). Philip answered, “Two hundred days’ wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little [bit]” (John 6:7).

John’s story is not a put-down of Philip. It was simply necessary for these men who were to be the foundation stones of the Church to see the clear distinction between humanity’s total helplessness apart from God and the human ability to be a bearer of divine power by God’s gift.

On another occasion, we can almost hear the exasperation in Jesus’ voice. After Thomas had complained that they did not know where Jesus was going, Jesus said, “I am the way...If you know me, then you will also know my Father. From now on you do know him and have seen him” (John 14:6a, 7). Then Philip said, “Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us” (John 14:8). Enough! Jesus answered, “Have I been with you for so long a time and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:9a).

Possibly because Philip bore a Greek name or because he was thought to be close to Jesus, some Gentile proselytes came to him and asked him to introduce them to Jesus. Philip went to Andrew, and Andrew went to Jesus. Jesus’ reply in John’s Gospel is indirect; Jesus says that now his “hour” has come, that in a short time he will give his life for Jew and Gentile alike.

Comment:    As in the case of the other apostles, we see in James and Philip human men who became foundation stones of the Church, and we are reminded again that holiness and its consequent apostolate are entirely the gift of God, not a matter of human achieving. All power is God’s power, even the power of human freedom to accept his gifts. “You will be clothed with power from on high,” Jesus told Philip and the others. Their first commission had been to expel unclean spirits, heal diseases, announce the kingdom. They learned, gradually, that these externals were sacraments of an even greater miracle inside their persons—the divine power to love like God.
Quote:    “He sent them...so that as sharers in his power they might make all peoples his disciples, sanctifying and governing them.... They were fully confirmed in this mission on the day of Pentecost (cf. Acts 2:1–26) in accordance with the Lord’s promise: ‘You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you shall be witnesses for me...even to the very ends of the earth’ (Acts 1:8). By everywhere preaching the gospel (cf. Mark 16:20), which was accepted by their hearers under the influence of the Holy Spirit, the apostles gathered together the universal Church, which the Lord established on the apostles and built upon blessed Peter, their chief, Christ Jesus himself remaining the supreme cornerstone...” (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 19).
105 Romæ, via Nomentána, pássio sanctórum Mártyrum Alexándri Papæ Primi, Evéntii et Theodúli Presbyterórum.  Ex his Alexánder, sub Hadriáno Príncipe et Aureliáno Júdice, post víncula, cárceres, equúleum, úngulas et ignes, punctis crebérrimis per tota membra confóssus ac perémptus est; Evéntius vero et Theodúlus, post longos cárceres, ígnibus examináti, ad últimum decolláti sunt.
    At Rome, on the Via Nomentana, the holy martyrs Pope Alexander and the priests Eventius and Theodulus.  Alexander was bound, imprisoned, racked, lacerated with hooks, burned, and had all his limbs pierced with pointed instruments, and finally met death, under Emperor Hadrian and the judge Aurelian. 
Eventius and Theodulus after a long imprisonment were exposed to flames and then beheaded.

Alexander (I.) von Rom Orthodoxe Kirche: 16. März Katholische Kirche: 3. Mai

113? SS. ALEXANDER, Eventius AND THEODULUS, MARTYRS
IN the Roman Martyrology the second announcement for this day, May 3, runs:
“At Rome, on the Via Nomentana, the passion of the holy martyrs Alexander the Pope, Eventius and Theodulus, priests; whereof Alexander, after suffering fetters, imprisonment, the rack and torture by hooks and the flame, was, under the Emperor Hadrian and the judge Aurelian, pierced with many sharp points in all his limbs, and slain, but Eventius and Theodulus, after long imprisonment, were tried by fire and at last beheaded “. Although the whole of this notice has practically speaking been repeated in successive martyrologies for more than 1200 years, it unfortunately reposes upon a so-called passio of the martyrs which is a mere work of fiction and historically worthless. The Alexander mentioned is assumed to have been the pope, but this is almost certainly an error, In the Hieronymianum the name Eventius stands first, and in a fragmentary inscription found in 1855 on the spot indicated as that of the burial in the Via Nomentana, another name must have come before Alexander’s; in neither is he styled episcopus. There were, no doubt, three martyrs interred on this spot, but we know nothing beyond their names. Of Pope Alexander I the Liber Pontificalis tells us very little. It attributes to him the insertion of the clause, Qui pridie quam pateretur” in the canon of the Mass, and the custom of using holy water in private houses, but if it indicates the seventh milestone along the Via Nomentana as the place of his interment, it has borrowed this from some recension of the quite unreliable passio.
The passio itself is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i. But consult also Duchesne, Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, p. xci; Quentin, Lea Martyrologes historiques, p. 58 and passim; Delehaye, CMH., pp. 227-228; and Marucchi, Il Cimitero e la Basilica di S. Alessandro alla Via Nomentana (1922).

Alexander wurde wohl 105 Bischof von Rom. Er hatte das Amt 10 Jahre inne und soll am 3. Mai 115 unter Kaiser Trajan enthauptet worden sein. Nach anderen Quellen soll er 119 mit den Priestern Eventius und Theodulus unter Kaiser Hadrian verbrannt worden sein. Möglicherweise handelt es sich um einen anderen Alexander. Als weiterer Märtyrer wird Quirinus genannt, der Patron von Neuss (Gedenktag 30.3. und in Köln 30.4. vgl. Quirinus-Münster). Von ihm wird berichtet, er sei der Kerkermeister Alexanders gewesen und von diesem bekehrt worden.
Alexander I PM, Eventius, & Theodulus MM (RM)
Died c. 113. Died c. 113-119. Tradition relates that, after a lengthy imprisonment, Pope Saint Alexander I and two priests, Eventius and Theodulus, were burned and then beheaded during Hadrian's persecution. During his imprisonment, Alexander is said to have brought Saint Quirinus and his daughter Saint Balbina to the faith. Today's saints were buried on the Via Nomentana near Rome. Their relics were later translated to the church of Saint Sabina, which now belongs to the Dominicans. Although called Pope Alexander in the Roman Martyrology, all sources agree that this is probably an erroneous listing (Benedictines, Coulson, Delaney, Husenbeth). In art, Pope Alexander wears a triple tiara and holds a triple cross and book. His name is in the halo
(Roeder).

286 SS. TIMOTHY AND MAURA, MARTYRS     

The cruel edicts of Diocletian against the Christians were enforced with great severity in Upper Egypt by Arrian, the prefect of the Thebaid. Amongst his victims were a young couple named Timothy and Maura, who were ardent students of the Holy Scriptures, Timothy being a lector of the church at Penapeis, near Antinoë. They had only been married twenty days when Timothy was taken before the governor and bidden to deliver up the sacred books that they might be publicly burned. Upon his refusal, red-hot iron instruments were thrust into his ears, his eyelids were cut off and other tortures applied to him. As he remained steadfast, Maura was sent for that she might break down his resolution by her entreaties. Far from obeying the governor’s orders, she declared herself willing to die with her husband. Alter her hair had been torn out, she and Timothy were nailed to a wall where they died, after lingering for nine days.
There was a considerable cultus of these martyrs in the East, though its introduction at Constantinople seems to have been relatively late. The Greek “acts” have been printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i (appendix), but see also the Synaxarium Constantinopolitanum, (ed. Delehaye), cc. 649—652.
313  Constantinópoli sanctórum Mártyrum Alexándri mílitis, et Antonínæ Vírginis.  Hæc, in persecutióne Maximiáni, sub Prǽside Festo, ad lupánar damnáta, et ab Alexándro, qui pro ipsa ibi remánserat, mutátis véstibus clam edúcta, cum eo póstmodum jussa est torquéri; et ambo simul in ignem, præcísis mánibus, pro Christo sunt injécti, atque ita, egrégio perácto certámine, coronántur.
    At Constantinople, the holy martyrs Alexander, soldier, and Antonina, virgin.  In the persecution of Maximian, under the governor Festus, Antonina, having been condemned to remain in a place of debauchery, was delivered by Alexander, who secretly exchanged garments with her, and took her place.  They were tortured together, both had their hands cut off, were cast into the fire, and received their crowns at the end of their heroic combat for the faith.
Orthodoxe Kirche: 10. Juni
Katholische Kirche: 3. Mai

Während der Christenverfolgung unter Maximian wurde 313 die Jungfrau Antonina verhaftet, vor den Gouverneur Festus gebracht und nach der Folter ins Gefängnis geworfen. Alexander, ein römischer Soldat, befreite sie (auf Anweisung eines Engels) und nahm ihren Platz im Gefängnis ein. Als er vor Festus gebracht und gefoltert wurde, trat Antonina zu ihm. Beiden wurden die Hände abgeschlagen und sie wurden verbrannt.
Martyr and soldier, who tried to shield a fellow Christian, St. Antonina. Antonina was a hunted victim during the persecutions conducted under the reign of Emperor Maximian. Alexander tried to change clothes with Antonina so that he could escape from the Roman officials. They were discovered, and both were condemned. They were tortured and burned to death.
 328 Kreuzfindung Die Kaiserin und Mutter Konstantins Helena soll in Jerusalem das Kreuz Christi gefunden haben.
Orthodoxe Kirche: 6. März Katholische Kirche: 3. Mai
Die Kaiserin und Mutter Konstantins Helena soll 328 in Jerusalem das Kreuz Christi gefunden haben. Die "Legenda aurea" beginnt die Geschichte des Kreuzes mit Seth, der aus dem Paradies einen Zweig vom Baum des Lebens erhält und diesen auf Adams Grab pflanzt. Aus diesem Zweig wuchs der Baum, aus dem das Kreuz Christi entstand. Helena soll drei Kreuze gefunden haben, das Kreuz Christi erkannte sie dadurch, daß eine Leiche, auf das "richtige" Kreuz gelegt, wieder lebendig wurde. Bruchstücke und Splitter des Kreuzes finden sich in zahlreichen Kirchen. Auch in Kloster Kirchberg befand sich bis 1865 ein Splitter des
Kreuzes.
Kiev Caves Icon of the Uspenie (Dormition) of the Most Holy Theotokos one of the most ancient icons in the Russian Orthodox Church glorified by numerous miracles
The Kiev Caves Icon of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos is one of the most ancient icons in the Russian Orthodox Church. The Mother of God entrusted it to four Byzantine architects, who in 1073 brought the icon to Sts Anthony and Theodosius of the Caves. The architects arrived at the monks' cave and asked, "Where do you want to build the church?" The saints answered, "Go, the Lord will point out the place."
"How is it that you, who are about to die, have still not designated the place?" the architects wondered. "And they gave us much gold."
Then the monks summoned all the brethren and they began to question the Greeks, saying, "Tell us the truth. Who sent you, and how did you end up here?"
The architects answered, "One day, when each of us was asleep in his own home, handsome youths came to us at sunrise, and said, 'The Queen summons you to Blachernae.' We all arrived at the same time and, questioning one another we learned that each of us had heard this command of the Queen, and that the youths had come to each of us. Finally, we beheld the Queen of Heaven with a multitude of warriors. We bowed down to Her, and She said,
'I want to build Myself a Church in Rus, at Kiev, and so I ask you to do this. Take enough gold for three years.'"
"We bowed down and asked, 'Lady Queen! You are sending us to a foreign land. To whom are we sent?' She answered,
'I send you to the monks Anthony and Theodosius.'"
"We wondered, 'Why then, Lady, do You give us gold for three years? Tell us that which concerns us, what we shall eat and what we shall drink, and tell us also what You know about it.'"
"The Queen replied,
'Anthony will merely give the blessing, then depart from this world to eternal repose. The other one, Theodosius, will follow him after two years. Therefore, take enough gold. Moreover, no one can do what I shall do to honor you. I shall give you what eye has not seen, what ear has not heard, and what has not entered into the heart of man (1 Cor.2:9). I, Myself, shall come to look upon the church and I shall dwell within it.'"
"She also gave us relics of the holy martyrs Menignus, Polyeuctus, Leontius, Acacius, Arethas, James, and Theodore, saying,
'Place these within the foundation.'
We took more than enough gold, and She said,
'Come out and see the resplendant church.'
We went out and saw a church in the air. Coming inside again, we bowed down and said, 'Lady Queen, what will be the name of the church?'"
"She answered,
'I wish to call it by My own name.'
We did not dare to ask what Her name was, but She said again,
 'It will be the church of the Mother of God.'
After giving us this icon, She said,
'This will be placed within.'
We bowed down to Her and went to our own homes, taking with us the icon we received from the hands of the Queen."

Having heard this account, all glorified God, and St Anthony said, "My children, we never left this place. Those handsome youths summoning you were holy angels, and the Queen in Blachernae was the Most Holy Theotokos. As for those who appeared to be us, and the gold they gave you, the Lord only knows how He deigned to do this with His servants. Blessed be your arrival! You are in good company: the venerable icon of the Lady." For three days St Anthony prayed that the Lord would show him the place for the church.

After the first night there was a dew throughout all the land, but it was dry on the holy spot. On the second morning throughout all the land it was dry, but on the holy spot it was wet with dew. On the third morning, they prayed and blessed the place, and measured the width and length of the church with a golden sash. (This sash had been brought long ago by the Varangian Shimon, who had a vision about the building of a church.) A bolt of lightning, falling from heaven by the prayer of St Anthony, indicated that this spot was pleasing to God. So the foundation of the church was laid.
The icon of the Mother of God was glorified by numerous miracles.

Two friends, John and Sergius, sealed their friendship before it. After many years John fell mortally ill. He gave part of his wealth to the the Caves monastery, and he gave Sergius the portion for his five-year-old son for safekeeping. He also entrusted his son Zachariah to his guardianship. When Zachariah turned fifteen, he asked for his inheritance, but Sergius persisted in saying that John had distributed everything to the poor. He even went into the Dormition church and swore before the wonderworking icon that he had taken nothing.

When he attempted to kiss the icon, he was not able to come near it. He went to the doors and suddenly shouted, "Sts Anthony and Theodosius! Let me not be struck down for my dishonesty. Entreat the Most Holy Theotokos to drive away the multitude of demons which torment me. Let the gold and silver be taken away. It is sealed up in my granary." Zachariah gave away all his inheritance to the Caves monastery, where he also himself was tonsured a monk. From that time, no one would take oaths before the wonderworking icon (March 24).

More than once the icon defended the land from enemy invasion. In 1677, when the Turks laid siege to Chigirin and danger threatened Kiev, they carried the icon around the city for almost the entire day of August 27. The Mother of God blessed Russian armies going to the Battle of Poltava (1709). In 1812 they carried the icon around Kiev again. The icon is commemorated twice during the year: May 3 and August 15 .
286 Saints Timothy {from village of Perapa --Egyptian Thebaid} and Maura ("Let no one defend me. I have one Defender, God, in  Whom I trust.") suffered for the faith under governor Arian
In Thebáide sanctórum Mártyrum Timóthei et Mauræ cónjugis, quos Ariánus Præféctus, post multa torménta, cruci jussit affígi; in qua, per novem dies cum vivi pependíssent ac se ipsos in fide roborássent, martyrium consummárunt.
    In Thebais, the holy martyrs Timothy and his wife Maura.  The Arian prefect caused them to be tortured, and then fastened to a cross, on which they remained alive for nine days, encouraging each other to persevere in the faith, until they completed their martyrdom.
Wonderworking icon of St Maura

Timotheus und Maura Orthodoxe Kirche: 3. Mai
Timotheus stammte aus der Thebais in Ägypten. Er war Sohn eines Priesters und wurde Lektor und war mit der Pflege der Gottesdienstbücher betraut. Kaiser Diokletian (284 - 305) hatte die Verbrennung aller christlichen Bücher angeordnet und Timotheus wurde verhaftet und schwer gefoltert, um die Bücher herauszugeben. Er blieb aber standhaft und daraufhin wurde seine junge Ehefrau Maura, mit der er seit 20 Tagen verheiratet war, ebenfalls gefoltert. Da beide weiterhin ihren christlichen Glauben bekannten, wurden sie 286 gekreuzigt. Ihre Verehrung begann kurze Zeit später in Konstantinopel, wo ihnen auch eine Kirche erbaut wurde.
Saints Timothy and Maura suffered for the faith during the persecution under the emperor Diocletian (284-305)
St Timothy came from the village of Perapa (Egyptian Thebaid), and was the son of a priest named Pikolpossos. He was made a reader among the church clergy, and also a keeper and copyist of divine service books. St Timothy was denounced as a keeper of Christian books, which the emperor ordered to be confiscated and burned. They brought St Timothy before the governor Arian, who demanded that he hand over the sacred books. They subjected the saint to horrible tortures for his refusal to obey the command. They shoved two red-hot iron rods into his ears, from which the sufferer lost his eyesight and became blind.
St Timothy bravely endured the pain and he gave thanks to God, for granting him to suffer for Him. The torturers hung the saint head downwards, putting a piece of wood in his mouth, and they tied a heavy stone to his neck. St Timothy's suffering was so extreme, that even those who tortured him implored the governor to ease up on the torture.

About this time they informed Arian that Timothy had a young wife named Maura, whom he had married only twenty days before. Arian ordered Maura to be brought, hoping that with her present, they could break St Timothy's will. St Timothy urged his wife not to fear the tortures, but to follow his path. St Maura answered, "I am prepared to die with you," and she boldly confessed herself a Christian. Arian commanded that the hair be torn from her head, and to cut the fingers off her hands.
St Maura underwent the torment with joy and even thanked the governor for the torture, which she endured so that her sins might be forgiven.

Then Arian gave orders to throw St Maura into a boiling cauldron, but she did not feel any pain, and she remained unharmed. Suspecting that the servants had filled the cauldron with cold water out of sympathy for the martyr, Arian went up and ordered the saint to splash him on the hand with water from the cauldron. When the martyr did this, Arian screamed with pain and drew back his scalded hand. Then, momentarily admitting the power of the miracle, Arian confessed God in Whom Maura believed as the True God, and he ordered her to be released. But the devil still held great power over the governor, and soon he again began to urge St Maura to offer sacrifice to the pagan gods. Having gotten nowhere, Arian was overcome all the more by a satanic rage and he came up with new tortures. Then the people began to murmur and demand a stop to the abuse of this innocent woman. But St Maura, turning to the people, said, "Let no one defend me. I have one Defender, God, in Whom I trust."
Finally, after torturing them for a long time, Arian ordered the martyrs to be crucified. For ten days they hung on crosses facing each other.

On the tenth day of martyrdom the saints offered up their souls to the Lord. This occurred in the year 286.
Later, a solemn celebration of the holy martyrs Timothy and Maura was instituted at Constantinople, and a church was built in their honor.
On the first Sunday of July, we commemorate the discovery of a wonderworking icon of St Maura in the town of Machairado on the island of Zakynthos.
300 Xenia von Kalamas Ihre Eltern erzogen sie im christlichen Glauben und sie führte ein klösterliches Leben auf dem Hof ihrer Eltern
Orthodoxe Kirche: 3. Mai
Xenia wurde Ende des 3. Jahrhunderts im Süden Griechenlands geboren. Ihre Eltern erzogen sie im christlichen Glauben und sie führte ein klösterliches Leben auf dem Hof ihrer Eltern. Der Eparch Dometian wollte sie heiraten, aber sie lehnte das Angebot ab, da er nicht Christ werden wollte. Dometian ließ sie daraufhin verhaften, foltern und hinrichten. Viele Wunder werden Xenia zugeschrieben und sie wird besonders bei Herzkrankheiten und pschysichen Erkrankungen um Hilfe angerufen.

326 THE FINDING OF THE HOLY CROSS
THE feast of the Inventio, that is to say the discovery, of the Holy Cross, which is kept on May 3 with the rite of a double of the second class, would seem to take precedence of the September feast, the “Exaltation”, which is only observed as a greater double. There is, however, a good deal of evidence which suggests that the September feast is the more primitive celebration, and that a certain confusion has arisen between the two incidents in the history of the Holy Cross which these festivals purport to commemorate. Strictly speaking, neither of them seems at first to have been directly connected with the discovery of the cross. The September feast took its rise from the solemn dedication in A.D. 335 of the churches which Constantine, encouraged by his mother, St Helen, had caused to be built on the site of the Holy Sepulchre. We cannot be sure that the dedication was carried out precisely on September 14. The month, however, was September, and seeing that in the time of the pilgrim Etheria, fifty years later, the annual commemoration of this inaugurating ceremony lasted for a week, there is clearly no reason to be particular to a day or two. In any case, Etheria herself tells us: “The dedication of these holy churches is therefore celebrated with the highest honour, and also because the cross of our Lord was found on this same day. And it was so ordained that, when the holy churches above mentioned were consecrated, that should also be the day when the cross of our Lord had been found, in order that the whole celebration should be made together, with all rejoicing, on the self-same day.” From this it would follow that the discovery of the cross was honoured at Jerusalem in September, and the pilgrim Theodosius, about A.D. 530, speaking expressly of the inventio crucis, bears witness to the same fact.
But at present we commemorate in September an entirely different event, to wit, the recovery in 629 by the Emperor Heraclius of the relics of the cross which some years before had been carried off from Jerusalem by Chosroes II, King of Persia. The Roman Martyrology and the lessons of the Breviary are explicit on the point. There is, however, reason to think that under the style “Exaltation of the Cross” we have reference to the physical act of the lifting of the sacred relic when it was exhibited for the veneration of the people, and it is also probable that this designation was used in connection with the feast before the time of Heraclius.

As for the actual finding, with which we are here concerned, there is a distressing absence of early information. The Pilgrim of Bordeaux, in 333, says nothing of the cross. Eusebius, the historian, from whom, as a contemporary, we should have expected to learn much, makes no reference to the discovery, though he seems to know about the three separate places of worship within the Holy Sepulchre precincts. Thus, in stating that Constantine “adorned a shrine sacred to the salutary emblem”, he may well be supposed to refer to that chapel, “Golgotha”, in which as Etheria tells us, the relics of the cross were preserved.
St Cyril, Bishop of Jerusalem, in his catechetical lectures which were delivered, about the year 346, on the very site where our Saviour was crucified, refers more than once to the wood of the cross. “It has been distributed”, he declares, “fragment by fragment, from this spot and has already nearly filled the world.” Furthermore, in his letter to Constantius, he expressly states that “the saving wood of the cross was found at Jerusalem in the time of Constantine”. In all this there is no mention of St Helen, who died in 330. The first, perhaps, to ascribe the discovery to her active intervention is St Ambrose, in his sermon De Obitu Theodosii, preached in 395; but about that date or a little later we find many others, John Chrysostom, Rufinus, Paulinus of Nola, and Cassiodorus, together with the church historians Socrates Sozomen and Theodoret—but notably not St Jerome, who lived on the spot—all repeating similar stories of the recovery of the cross in which St Helen plays a principal part.
Unfortunately, the details of these accounts are by no means always in agreement. St Ambrose and St John Chrysostom inform us that in the excavations which were undertaken at the instance of St Helen, three crosses were discovered. They add that to the one in the middle the “title” was still attached, and that in this way our Saviour’s cross was clearly identified.
On the other hand, Rufinus, who is followed in this by Socrates, reports that in accordance with a special inspiration St Helen directed that excavations should be made in a certain place, that three crosses were found and an inscription, but there was no way of deciding to which of the three the inscription belonged. The bishop of Jerusalem, Macarius, thereupon had a dying woman brought to the spot. She was made to touch the three crosses, and at the contact of the third she was healed, so that it was made plain to all that this was the cross of our Saviour. There are other divergences, at about the same date, regarding the miracle of healing by which the true cross was identified, the finding and disposal of the nails, etc. On the whole, it seems probable that the statements made more than sixty years after the event by writers bent mainly on edification were a good deal influenced by certain apocryphal documents which must already have been in circulation.

The most notable of these is the tractate De inventione crucis dominicae which is mentioned (c. 550) in the pseudo-Gelasian decree De recipiendis et non recipiendis libris as a writing to be regarded with mistrust. There can be no doubt that this little tractate was widely read. The compiler of the first redaction of the Liber Pontificalis (c. A.D. 532) must have had it in his hands, and he quotes from it in the account he gives of Pope Eusebius. It must also have been known to those who blunderingly revised the Hieronymianum at Auxerre early in the seventh century.*[* It is curious to find Mgr Duchesne stating in his Origines (Christian Worship, p. 275, n. 2 and cf. the Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, p. 378, n. 29) that “in the Epternach MS. there is no mention of this festival of the cross”. It occurs there on May 7, and also on the same day in St Willibrord’s Calendar. ]
Neglecting the anachronisms in which the narrative abounds, the story in brief runs thus. The Emperor Constantine, in conflict with hordes of barbarians on the Danube, was in grave danger of defeat. There appeared to him, however, a vision of a brilliant cross in the sky, with the legend “In this sign thou shalt conquer”. He was thereupon victorious, was instructed and baptized by Pope Eusebius in Rome, and out of gratitude despatched his mother, St Helen, to Jerusalem, to search for the relics of the holy cross. All the inhabitants professed ignorance of its whereabouts, but at last, by dint of threats she prevailed upon a learned Jew named Judas to reveal what he knew. They dug twenty fathoms deep and discovered three crosses. The identity of the true cross is determined by its raising a dead man to life. Judas is thereupon converted, and, as the bishop of Jerusalem happened just then to die, St Helen selects this new convert, who is henceforth called Cyriacus, or Quiriacus, to govern that see in his place. Pope Eusebius is summoned from Rome to Jerusalem to consecrate him bishop, and shortly after­wards, through the miraculous appearance of a brilliant light, the hiding-place of the holy nails is also revealed. St Helen, having made generous donations to the holy places and the poor of Jerusalem, happened to die not long afterwards, charging all faithful Christians as her last behest to hold festival every year on May 3 (quinto nonas Maii), the day on which the cross was found. Before the year 450, Sozomen (bk. ii, ch. 1) seems to have been acquainted with this story of the Jew who revealed the hiding place of the cross. He does not denounce it as a fabrication, but quietly passes it by as less probable.

Another apocryphal story which bears, though less directly, on the finding of the cross, is introduced, somewhat as a digression, into the document known as The Doctrine of Addai, of Syrian origin. What we are told here is that Protonike, the wife of the Emperor Claudius Caesar, less than ten years after our Lord’s ascension, went to the Holy Land, compelled the Jews to reveal where the crosses were hidden, and distinguished that of our Saviour by a miracle wrought upon her own daughter. It is contended that this legend has suggested the story of St Helen and the dis­covery of the cross in the time of Constantine. Mgr Duchesne believed that the Doctrine of Addai was earlier in date than the De inventione crucis dominicae, but there are strong arguments for the contrary opinion.  

  In view of all this very unsatisfactory evidence, the most probable suggestion, seems to be that the holy cross with the title was found during the excavations rendered necessary by the construction of Constantine’s basilica on Mount Calvary. Such a discovery, which may well have involved some period of doubt and inquiry while the authenticity of the find was being discussed, is likely to have given rise to multifarious conjectures and rumours which before long took written shape in the De inventione tractate. It is probable that St Helen’s share in the transaction actually amounted to no more than what we should gather from Etheria’s statement when she speaks of “the building which Constantine, under his mother’s auspices (sub praesentia matris suae) embellished with gold and mosaics and precious marbles”. The credit of a victory is often given to a sovereign, though it is his generals and troops who have done all the fighting. What is certain in the whole matter is that from the middle of the fourth century reputed relics of the true cross spread through the world. This we know not only from St Cyril’s reiterated statement, but also from dated inscriptions in Africa and elsewhere. Still more convincing is the evidence that before the end of the same century the stem of the cross and the title were both venerated in Jerusalem with intense devotion. Etheria’s account of the ceremony is the description of an eye-witness about the year 385; but only a dozen years or so later we have in the Life of St Porphyrius of Gaza another testimony to the veneration with which the relic was regarded by its custodians. And again, after nearly two centuries, the pilgrim, commonly, if incorrectly, known as Antoninus of Piacenza, tells us how “we adored (adoravimus) and kissed” the wood of the cross and handled its title. In a Motu Propria of John XXIII dated July 25, 1960, this feast was dropped from the Roman Calendar.
There is a considerable literature bearing upon the matters here discussed. For much of this the reader may conveniently be referred to the bibliographical references in Dom Leclercq’s article in DAC., vol. iii, cc. 3131—3139. See also the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i; Duchesne, Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, pp. cvii—cix and pp. 75, 167, 378; Kellner, Heortology (1908), pp. 333—341; J. Straubinger, Die Kreuzauffindungslegende (1926); A. Halusa, Das Kreuzesholz in Geschichte und Legende (1926); H. Thurston in The Month, May 1930, pp. 420—429. It is generally held that this feast of the Finding of the Cross on May 3 is not of Roman origin, since it is lacking in the Gregorian Sacramentary, but, so far as its prevalence in the West is concerned, must have arisen in Gaul. It occurs in the Félire of Oengus and in most MSS. of the Hieronymianum. In the Epternach MS., however, it is assigned, as noted above, to May 7. This seems to have reference to a feast celebrated in Jerusalem and among the Armenians, in memory of the luminous cross in the heavens which appeared on May 7, 351, as St Cyril describes in his letter to the Emperor Constantius. As for the date, May 3, it is impossible not to believe that it is closely connected with the mention of that precise day in the apocryphal tract, De inventione crucis dominicae. The earliest notice of a cross festival in the West seems to be the mention of a “dies sanctae crucis” in a lectionary of Silos, c. 650.
4th v. Aphrodísiæ, in Cária, sanctórum Mártyrum Diodóri et Rhodopiáni, qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni Imperatóris, a cívibus suis lapidáti sunt.
    At Aphrodisia in Caria, the holy martyrs Diodorus and Rodopian, who were stoned to death by their fellow citizens, in the persecution of Diocletian.
4th century

A martyr with Rhodopianus. They were executed for the faith in Caria, Asia Minor.

St. Sarah, and her two sons wife of Diocletian's governor Socrates who caused their martyredom
On this day, St. Sarah and her two sons, were martyred. She was from the city of Antioch, the wife of a man whose name was Socrates, one of the governors of Emperor Diocletian. This Governor had denied Christ to please Diocletian, pretending before his wife that he did that because of his fear from the Emperor.

Sarah had two sons, she could not baptize in Antioch, because of her fear from the Emperor and her husband. She took them and sailed to Alexandria to baptize them there. God willed to reveal the greatness of her faith as a lesson to the generations to come. God brought forth a great tempest and the ship was about to be wrecked and drown. Sarah was afraid that her sons would be drowned without being baptized. She prayed a long prayer, then she wounded her right breast, took some of her blood, anointed them making the sign of the cross upon the foreheads, and over the hearts. Then she dipped them in the sea three times saying: "In the Name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit."

After that, the winds died down, a great calm came on the sea, and the ship sailed toward Alexandria. When she arrived, took her sons, went to the church, and handed them to Pope Peter, the seal of the martyrs. He baptized them, together with the children of the city. When the Pope carried one of her sons to baptize him, the water froze. The Pope went on baptizing other children and came back to her sons, but the water froze again. The same thing occurred on the third attempt. The Pope was amazed and asked their mother about her story. She told him about all what happened to her at sea and what she did for her sons. He glorified God and said: "It is indeed one baptism."

When the woman returned to Antioch, her husband denounced what she had done. He related what happened to the Emperor accusing his wife with adultery. The Emperor brought her and reproached her saying: "Why did you go to Alexandria to commit adultery with the Christians?" The Saint answered him: "Christians do not commit adultery, and do not worship idols, and after this do what you wish, for you will not hear another word from me."

The Emperor asked her: "Tell me what did you do in Alexandria?" When she did not answer him, he ordered to tie her hands behind her, and to place her two sons on her belly, and to bum all three of them. She turned her face to the east and prayed. They burnt her, with her sons. She delivered up her pure soul along with her sons, and they all received the crown of martyrdom. Their prayers be with us.
Amen.
Hierosólymis Invéntio Sacrosánctæ Crucis Domínicæ, sub Constantíno Imperatóre.
    At Jerusalem, in the time of Emperor Constantine, the finding of the holy Cross of our Lord.

Commemoration of Sts. Babnuda (Paphnute) the hermit, Theodore the worshipper, and the One hundred martyrs.
This day also marks the commemoration of Sts. Babnuda (Paphnute) the hermit, Theodore the worshipper, and the One hundred martyrs, who were martyred in Persia. Their prayers be with us and Glory be to our God forever.
Amen.
369 Nárniæ sancti Juvenáli, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
    At Narni, St. Juvenal, bishop and confessor.
First bishop of Narni, Italy, consecrated by Pope Damasus. He was a physician from the East, and he is credited with saving Narni from a Ligurian and Sarmatian invasion. The barbarian invaders were supposedly slain in a wondrous but deadly downpour. Juvenal is patron of Narni, but his cult was confined to local calendars in 1969.
376 ST JUVENAL, BISHOP OF NARNI
THE chief patron of Narni and the titular of its cathedral is its first bishop, St Juvenal, whose oratory and original tomb are still venerated in the city. His history has been confused with that of other saintly prelates of the same name, and a connected biography compiled by the Bollandists, from fragmentary notices in print and manuscript, is quite obviously legendary in parts. According to this account, Juvenal, who was both a priest and a physician, came from the East to Narni, where he was hospitably entertained by a woman called Philadelphia. At the request of the Christian inhabitants, Pope Damasus made Narni into a separate diocese and consecrated St Juvenal to be its bishop.
    One day, as he was passing a brazen bull in front of a temple dedicated to Bacchus, a pagan priest struck him in the mouth with the hilt of his sword because the saint refused to sacrifice to the gods. The bishop held the weapon with his teeth, and the priest, in a violent effort to withdraw his blade, cut his own throat. This incident led to the immediate conversion of the heathen bystanders.
    In the fifth year of his pontificate, troops of Ligurians and Sarmatians who had captured Terni proceeded to invest Narni. St Juvenal climbed upon the city wall, where he chanted Psalm xxxiv and prayed aloud for the town. Scarcely had the people responded Amen, when a great thunderstorm broke out, with torrents of rain, in which 3000 of the assailants perished. Thus was Narni saved. The saint ruled his diocese for seven years, dying about 376. St Gregory the Great speaks of him more than once and styles him martyr, but he seems to have made the mistake of identifying him with a namesake who suffered death for the faith at Benevento.

The Bollandists have collected much archaeological material bearing on the cult of St Juvenal. See the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i; and also Lanzoni, Le Diocesi d’Italia, vol. i, pp. 402 seq.; the Römische Quartalschrift, 1905, pp. 42—49, and 1911, pp. 51—71. Cf. the Neues Archiv, 1919, pp. 526—555.
Apud montem Senárium, in Etrúria, natális sanctórum Sostenǽi et Ugucciónis Confessórum, e septem Fundatóribus Ordinis Servórum beátæ Maríæ Vírginis; qui, cælitus admóniti, eádem die et hora, salutatiónem Angélicam recitántes, e vita migrárunt.  Ipsórum autem ac Sociórum festum prídie Idus Februárii celebrátur.
    On Mount Senario in Etruria, Saints Sosteneo and Ugoccio, confessors, of the seven founders of the Order of Servites of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  Responding to a voice from heaven, they departed this life on the same day and at the same hour, while reciting the angelical salutation.  Their feast is observed with the rest of their companions on the 12th day of February.

563 Scannal (AC) The celebrated missionary Saint Scannal was a disciple of Saint Columba (Benedictines).
6th v. St. Gluvias Monastic founder and brother of St. Cadoc of Llancarfan, Wales. Gluvias labored in Cornwall, England, where he may have started an abbey. He is also called Glywys.
680 St. Adalsindis Abbess and sister of St. Waldalenus became abbess of a convent at Beze, France, the monastery founded by her brother.
8th v. St.  Ethelwin Second bishop of Lindsey, England. He accompanied St. Egbert to Ire­land, where he died.
744 Saint Mamai served as chief shepherd of the Georgian faithful from 731 to 744 martyr for Christ

The information we have about his life is scarce, but it is known that St. Mamai was abbot of Zedazeni Monastery and died a martyr for Christ.

Outstanding in his achievements and endowed with profound spiritual wisdom.
St. Mamai was enthroned as Catholicos of Georgia at a time when the catholicos and the Georgian king were frequently the first victims of invading armies.


Arsenius  and Michael_of_Ulompo_Georgia

Sts. Michael and Arsenius the Georgians The biographies of have unfortunately not been preserved.

It is known that they were contemporaries of Patriarch Sergius of Jerusalem (843–859). The following entry is recorded in the synodicon of Jerusalem’s Holy Cross Monastery: “Our Holy Fathers Michael and Arsenius, founders of Olympus.” The record indicates that Sts. Arsenius and Michael established Georgian monasticism on Mt. Olympus. (located in Bythinia of Asia Minor, southeast of Prousa, was an important monastic center from the 5th to the 14th centuries. The monasteries of Olympus came to include the monastic communities on the plain of Prousa. The number of monasteries in the region is numbered at around fifty, their apogee occurring between the 8th and 10th centuries, when Olympus occupied the first place in the list of holy mountains. Monasteries in the region included Atroa, Chenolakkos, Medikion, and Pelekete.)

According to Paul Ingorokva, a scholar of the Georgian Middle Ages, Arsenius was probably a disciple of St. Grigol of Khandzta. Ingorokva calls Arsenius “a handsome gentleman, a kind monk full of wisdom, the son of a great nobleman, and a relative of St. Ephraim, bishop of Atsquri.”

It is believed that at some point Arsenius moved from Khandzta Monastery to Palestine and labored there with a certain Macarius of Leteti. Afterward, St. Arsenius founded a Georgian monastery on Mt. Olympus in Asia Minor. Twenty years later, Venerable Ilarion the Georgian arrived on Mt. Olympus and found three Georgian monks who were almost certainly disciples of Michael and Arsenius
.
770  St. Philip of Zell Benedictine hermit founded the monastery of Zell, so named because it had its start with his single “cell,” or room.
An Anglo Saxon, he undertook a pilgrimage and then became a hermit in the area around Worms. Meeting King Pepin the Short of the Franks, he became a friend and advisor to the monarch. He also attracted various followers and founded the monastery of Zell, so named because it had its start with his single “cell,” or room.
8th v. ST PHILIP OF ZELL
DURING the reign of Charlemagne’s father, King Pepin, there was living in the Rhenish palatinate, not far from the present city of Worms, a hermit named Philip who had an extraordinary reputation for sanctity and miracles. An Englishman by birth, he had settled in the Nahegau after he had made a pilgrimage to Rome, where he was ordained priest. Amongst those who sought out the recluse was King Pepin himself who, according to the legend, often visited him and conversed familiarly with him about holy things. The historian of St Philip, who wrote a century after his death, states that through his intercourse with the hermit, Pepin “began to fear as well as to love God and to place all his hope in Him”. As is so often the case with solitaires, Philip exercised a great attraction over the wild creatures of the forest: birds perched on his shoulder and ate from his hands, whilst hares frisked about him and licked his feet. He was joined in his solitude by another priest, Horskolf by name, who served God with him in prayer and helped to cultivate the land. One evening, thieves stole the two oxen which the hermits kept to aid them in their labours. All night long the miscreants wandered about the woods, unable to find their way out, and in the morning they discovered that they were back again in front of the hermitage. In dismay they threw themselves at St Philip’s feet, begging forgiveness. The holy man reassured them, entertained them as guests and sped them on their way. Gradually disciples gathered round the two hermits and a church was built.
A story is told that Horskolf, on his return from a journey, found Philip dead and lying in his coffin. With tears the disciple besought his master to give him the usual blessing which, for some reason, had been omitted when they had last parted. In reply the corpse sat up and said, “Go forth in peace, and may God prosper you abundantly in all things. Take care of this place as long as you live. Safe and sound you shall go forth; safe and sound shall you return.” Then, having given the desired blessing, he sank back into death. Horskolf continued to reside in the hermitage until, at the age of 100, he passed away to rejoin his master. On the site of the cells was built a monastery, and then a collegiate church, in the midst of what became the parish of Zell, i.e. cell, named after St Philip’s hermitage.

The author of the life of St Philip which is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, is not known, but he was certainly not a contemporary, as has sometimes been stated. This text, with other materials, has been more critically edited by A. Hofmeister in the supple­mentary volume (Scriptores, vol. xxx, part 2, pp. 796—805) of Pertz, MGH. Some useful information concerning St Philip and his cultus was printed in various numbers of Der Katholik of Mainz; in 1887, 1896, 1898 and 1899.
920 St Peter the Wonderworker Bishop of Argos in the Peloponnesos ransomed captives healed the sick and the afflicted, and possessed the gift of insight relics exuding myrrh, and working miracles and healings
Lived during the ninth and early tenth centuries, and was raised by pious parents. St Peter's parents, and later his brothers Paul, Dionysius, Platon and St Peter himself, all became monks. St Peter zealously devoted himself to monastic labors, and he excelled all his fellows. This came to the attention of the Italian bishop Nicholas (who from 895 was Patriarch of Constantinople), who wanted to elevate him to the rank of bishop. St Peter declined, accounting himself unworthy of such honor.
Bishop Nicholas consecrated Paul, St Peter's brother, as Bishop of Corinth, and St Peter went to his brother and lived with him, taking upon himself the spiritual struggle of silence.

After a year emissaries came to Bishop Paul from the city of Argos, where the bishop had died, and they asked for St Peter as their bishop. After long and intense entreaties, St Peter finally gave his consent. As bishop, St Peter toiled zealously in guiding his flock. He was extraordinarily compassionate, concerning himself with those in need, especially orphans and widows.
The saint fed the hungry in years of crop failure. Through his prayers food  for the hungry never ran out.

Theodosius of the Caves

The saint also ransomed captives, healed the sick and the afflicted, and possessed the gift of insight.
The saint predicted the day of his death, and departed to the Lord at the age of seventy.
His relics were transferred from Argos to Nauplos in 1421, exuding myrrh, and working miracles and healings.
1074 Saint Theodosius of the Caves the Father of monasticism in Russia from youth led the ascetic life relics incorrupt miracles of food for the monk brethren
He was born at Vasilevo, not far from Kiev. From his youth he felt an irresistible attraction for the ascetic life, and led an ascetic lifestyle while still in his parental home. He disdained childish games and attractions, and constantly went to church. He asked his parents to let him study the holy books, and through his ability and rare zeal, he quickly learned to read the books, so that everyone was amazed at his intellect. When he was fourteen, he lost his father and remained under the supervision of his mother, a strict and domineering woman who loved her son very much.
Many times she chastised her son for his yearning for asceticism, but he remained firmly committed to his path.

At the age of twenty-four, he secretly left his parents' home and St Anthony at the Kiev Caves monastery blessed him to receive monastic tonsure with the name Theodosius. After four years his mother found him and with tearfully begged him to return home, but the saint persuaded her to remain in Kiev and to become a nun in the monastery of St Nicholas at the Askold cemetery.
St Theodosius toiled at the monastery more than others, and he often took upon himself some of the work of the other brethren.

He carried water, chopped wood, ground up the grain, and carried the flour to each monk. On cold nights he uncovered his body and let it serve as food for gnats and mosquitoes. His blood flowed, but the saint occupied himself with handicrafts, and sang Psalms. He came to church before anyone else and, standing in one place, he did not leave it until the end of services. He also listened to the readings with particular attention.
In 1054 St Theodosius was ordained a hieromonk, and in 1057 he was chosen igumen.

The fame of his deeds attracted a number of monks to the monastery, at which he built a new church and cells, and he introduced cenobitic rule of the Studion monastery, a copy of which he commissioned at Constantinople. As igumen, St Theodosius continued his arduous duties at the monastery. He usually ate only dry bread and cooked greens without oil, and spent his nights in prayer without sleep.
The brethren often noticed this, although the saint tried to conceal his efforts from others.

No one saw when St Theodosius dozed lightly, and usually he rested while sitting. During Great Lent the saint withdrew into a cave near the monastery, where he struggled unseen by anyone. His attire was a coarse hairshirt worn next to his body. He looked so much like a beggar that it was impossible to recognize in this old man the renowned igumen, deeply respected by all who knew him.

Once, St Theodosius was returning from visiting the Great Prince Izyaslav. The coachman, not recognizing him, said gruffly, "You, monk, are always on holiday, but I am constantly at work. Take my place, and let me ride in the carriage." The holy Elder meekly complied and drove the servant. Seeing how nobles along the way bowed to the monk driving the horses, the servant took fright, but the holy ascetic calmed him, and gave him a meal at the monastery. Trusting in God's help, the saint did not keep a large supply of food at the monastery, and therefore the brethren were in want of their daily bread.
Through his prayers, however, unknown benefactors appeared at the monastery and furnished the necessities for the brethren.

The Great Princes, especially Izyaslav, loved to listen to the spiritual discourses of St Theodosius. The saint was not afraid to denounce the mighty of this world. Those unjustly condemned always found a defender in him, and judges would review matters at the request of the igumen. He was particularly concerned for the destitute. He built a special courtyard for them at the monastery where anyone in need could receive food and drink. Sensing the approach of death, St Theodosius peacefully fell asleep in the Lord in the year 1074. He was buried in a cave which he dug, where he secluded himself during fasting periods.

The relics of the ascetic were found incorrupt in the year 1090, and St Theodosius was glorified as a saint in 1108. Of the written works of St Theodosius six discourses, two letters to Great Prince Izyaslav, and a prayer for all Christians have survived to our time.  The Life of St Theodosius was written by St Nestor the Chronicler (October 27), a disciple of the great Abba, only thirty years after his repose, and it was always one of the favorite readings of the Russian nation. St Theodosius is also commemorated on September 2 and 28.
1010 St. Ansfrid Bishop and founder Count of Brabant friend of Emperor Otto III of the Holy Roman Empire
Ansfrid was a courtier and friend of Emperor Otto III of the Holy Roman Empire. In 994, the emperor named him the bishop of Utrecht, although his appointment drew some local opposition. Ansfrid founded a monastery at Heiligensberg, Germany, and a convent at Thorn. He was stricken with blindness late in his life, a fate that brought about his retirement to this abbey. He is also listed as
Ansfridus.
1100 The Sven Caves Icon of the Mother of God painted by St Alypius of the Caves (August 17) glorified by miracles
On the icon the Mother of God is depicted sitting upon a throne, and with the Divine Infant on Her knees. St Theodosius is on the right side of the throne, and St Anthony of the Caves on the left.

Assuage_My_Sorrows_Icon_Most_Holy_Theotokos_and_Alypius.
Until the year 1288 it was in the Kiev Caves monastery, where it was glorified by miracles. In 1288 it was transferred to the Briansk-Svensk monastery, which is dedicated to the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos.

Prince Roman of Chernigov, then at Briansk, became blind. Hearing about the miracles worked by the icon of St Alypius, the prince sent a courier to the monastery requesting that the icon be sent to him at Briansk. They sent a priest with the icon along the River Desna. After the voyage the boat landed on the right bank of the River Svena. After lodging for the night they went to the boat to pray before the icon, but they did not find it there. They saw it on a hill on the opposite bank, resting in the branches of an oak tree. News of this reached Prince Roman, and they led him to the icon on foot.

The prince prayed fervently before the icon and vowed to build a monastery on that spot, donating all the land which could be seen from the hill. After the prayer the prince regained his sight. First he saw the footpath, then nearby objects, and finally all the surroundings.

After making a shrine for the icon, the prince had a Molieben served, and then they laid the foundations for a wooden church in honor of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos. The tree on which the icon rested was cut up and used as wood for other icons. The Feast day of the Sven Icon of the Mother of God was set for May 3. It is also commemorated on August 17 (the day of the repose of St Alypius the Iconographer).

The icon was glorified by healings of the blind and of the possessed, and has long been regarded as a protector from enemies.
12th v. Blessed Ventura Spellucci, OSB Abbot (AC)
Born at Spello (near Assisi), Italy, in the 12th century. After joining the Italian Cruciferi under the Benedictine Rule, Ventura built an abbey-hospice on his family estate, where he governed as abbot until his death (Benedictines).



 Tuesday   Saints of this Day May 03 Quinto Nonas Maji   
  Sixth Week in Easter
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
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Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
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Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005
 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.