Wednesday   Saints of this Day May 04   Quarto Nonas Maii.  
CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.




 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life.

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

All you need to do is to love the Rosary
 
May 4 – Our Lady of Help (Italy, 1521) – Approval of the apparitions of Our Lady of Le Laus by Bishop Di Falco in 2008 – Pius XII established the feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (1944)
 
In Europe, I have often heard discussions for or against reciting the Rosary. Some say: "It's a form of contemplation." Others counter: "No, it’s a form of praise; we must think about what we are saying." - "That’s impossible! Try repeating fifty times Hail Mary... without losing your train of thought!”

In the desert, I understood that the Rosary is a form of prayer that is done under the impulse of the Holy Spirit. Whether you meditate it or not, whether you are distracted and empty, it doesn’t matter. All you need to do is to love the Rosary and not let a single day pass without reciting it. Then you will truly be a person of prayer!

The Rosary is like the echo of waves breaking along the shore: Hail Mary… Hail Mary... We abandon our train of complicated thought about prayer and recognize our smallness, our weakness, our poverty ...
Usually, the Rosary is a prayer that denotes spiritual maturity. If some don’t want to recite the Rosary because they find it boring, don’t insist! But if you meet a child or an elderly person who tells you that they love the Rosary without knowing why, then rejoice, because in those hearts it is the Holy Spirit who is praying.

 
 

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

May 4 – Pius XII establishes the feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (1944)  
 
Who will help me cleanse my soul?
 
Takashi Nagai died on May 1, 1951, at the age of 43 in Nagasaki, Japan. He was a Japanese radiologist, a convert to Catholicism and a courageous survivor of the Nagasaki atomic bombing which killed 38,000 in this small town on August 9, 1945. He himself died of the consequences of irradiation from the bomb. He was also an author.
The following lines were written by him on the Immaculate Virgin Mary:

"We had a white towel, but it has yellowed with age. No matter how much we wash it, we cannot restore its original luster. Every time someone from the hospital comes for my treatments, they always ask the same question: ‘Don’t you have a cleaner towel?’ This made me think that my soul has been imbued with original sin since my birth, and although it was purified at baptism, it has turned rather grey with time.
And I wondered: ‘Who will help me cleanse my soul?’

I found the answer in the bottom of my heart. The Virgin Mary, the Immaculate, who does not have original sin, will intercede for me. So now I often turn to her: Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.” 
Takashi Nagai, In Une lumière dans Nagasaki, Nouvelle Cité, 2006

 
 133 Cyriacus of Ancona revealed where the Cross was hidden to Empress Saint Helena BM (RM)

 300 Saint Pelagia of Tarsus in Cilicia (southeastern Asia Minor) saw the face of Bishop Linus in a dream miraclous baptism burnt body filled city with myrrh wild beasts protected her bones.
Pelagia_of_Tarsus
304 Florian of Austria princeps officiorum in the Roman army in Noricum (Austria) Many miracles are attributed RM
387 Saint Monica, mother of St Augustine of Hippo (June 15)
716 Ethelred of Bardney  abdicated to become a monk at Bardney OSB King (AC)
875 Hilarion der Wundertäter Ein Engel wies ihn an, nach Grusinien zurückzukehren und sich von seinem Vater Abschied zu nehmen
1028 Hilsindis In her widowhood she was the abbess-founder of the convent of Thorn on the Marne  River , OSB Abbess

1300 Saint Nicephorus teacher of St Gregory Palamas (November 14) convert from Catholic ascetic on Mount Athos
1485 Blessed Michael Gedroye famous for his gifts of prophecy and miracles: his cell adjoining church of the Augustinian canons regular at Cracow OSA (AC)
1535-1681 THE MARTYRS OF ENGLAND AND WALES
1945 Archpriest Vasily Martysz missionary service in the land of St Herman., America and martyred in Poland
1951 Blessed Mezlényi, martyr of the Hungarian communist regime

May 4 – Marian Apparitions of Our Lady of Laus
approved by Bishop Di Falco (France, 2008)
 
As pilgrims celebrated the 150th anniversary of the Marian Shrine at Lourdes, the Church officially recognized a new pilgrimage site in France.  On May 4, 2008, Bishop Jean-Michel di Falco of the Diocese of Gap, officially recognized the apparitions of the Virgin Mary to Benoite Rencurel at the Shrine of Laus in the area of Hautes-Alpes, France.

Rencurel, a poor shepherdess, was born in 1647. The Virgin Mary started appearing to her in 1664 and continued visiting her throughout the rest of her life. Rencurel died in 1718.
During the apparitions, the Blessed Mother asked for a church and a house for priests to be built, with the intention of drawing people to greater conversion, especially through the sacrament of penance. The holy site now draws 120,000 pilgrims annually. Numerous physical healings have also been associated with the site, especially when oil from a lamp is applied on the wounds according to the instructions the Virgin Mary gave to Rencurel.

Bishop di Falco, in his homily at the Mass broadcast throughout the country by France-2 Television, said, "344 year ago, Our Lady chose to address a simple shepherdess to open the way of penitence and conversion, to invite pilgrims to reconcile themselves with the world and with God."
"Benoite, an uncultured country girl, received her mission from Our Lady: For 54 years, she guided pilgrims, and called for conversion and mercy. To the poor and the small, God reveals himself.
And Benoite, a laywoman, was the messenger of God.
How can we not see in her the very example of the responsible layman?"


Mary's Divine Motherhood

Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).  Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

When you begin to study, look up to Him and think: 'O Lord, how worthless this knowledge would be,
if it were not for the enlightening of my mind for Your service, or for making me more useful to my fellow men.'
-- St Elizabeth Ann Seton

The Woman I Love (I)
May 4 - Our Lady the Helper (Normandy, France)
             I think one of the major defects in world religions has been the absence of the feminine. The absence becomes more striking in a study of Christian sects where so little attention is paid to the Mother of Christ.

It would be strange to visit a friend's home and yet never hear him speak of his mother. (...)
True, in the course of History, there have been exaggerations in devotion to Mary, but it was not the Church that made her important; it was Christ Himself.
The Church has never adored Mary, because only God may be adored.
But she, of all creatures, was closest to God. Without her as the key, it is difficult to discover the treasures in the vault of Faith. God Who made the sun also made the moon. The moon does not take away from the brilliance of the sun. The moon would be only a burned-out cinder floating in the immensity of space, were it not for the sun. All its light is reflected from that glowing furnace. In like manner, Mary reflects her Divine Son, without whom she is nothing. On dark nights we are thankful for the moon; when we see it shining, we know there must be a sun. So, in this dark night of the world, when men turned their backs on Him who is the Light of the World, we look to Mary to guide our feet while we await the sunrise.

Fulton Sheen, Treasure in Clay - The Autobiography of Fulton J. Sheen,
Image Books 1982. (Society for the Propagation of the Faith)
Saints Philip and James, Apostles (Feast)
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
Service to the holy Virgin Martyr Pelagia of Tarsus says she was "deemed worthy of most strange and divine visions."
 945 Archpriest Vasily Martysz and martyred in Poland
  Archpriest Vasily Martysz The holy New Martyr was born on February 20, 1874 in Tertyn, in the Hrubieszow region of southeastern Poland.  Missionary service in the land of St Herman, America.   Because of the long distances and severe climate, Fr Vasily's priestly work was extremely difficult and required many sacrifices. Often he would leave home for several weeks, in order to celebrate the services, to confess, baptize, marry the living, and to bury the dead, while traveling in a specially constructed kayak. Taught in the parish school and worked in two church homes for the poor.
    After serving nearly twelve years in America, Fr Martysz left the New World and returned to Europe in 1912. 
Fr Vasily served as chief of Orthodox chaplains for the next 25 years. Within the Ministry of the Interior, he had his own cabinet, and was directly responsible to the Minister himself. He celebrated the Divine Liturgy in Ukrainian internment camps in  their language. for over 5,000 prisoners, while visiting this camp. 
   The Polish Secretary of the Army, Lucjan Zeligowski sent a congratulatory letter to Father Vasily on the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his ordination, December 7, 1925, stating "The virtues of this remarkably talented, conscientious and diligent servant, completely devoted to the Polish nation, expressed in his receiving a high distinction, the Order of Polonia Restituta, which is conferred upon him for his efforts in securing the Autocephaly of the Orthodox Church in Poland."nd all the families of the nations shall worship before him" (Psalm 21:28)

 133 Cyriacus of Ancona revealed where the Cross was hidden to Empress Saint Helena BM (RM)
3rd v. Curcodomus of Auxerre sent by the pope to attend Saint Peregrinus, first bishop of Auxerre Deacon (RM)
 250 Porphyrius of Camerino preached in Umbria, Italy, chiefly at Camerino M (RM)
 300 Saint Pelagia of Tarsus in Cilicia (southeastern Asia Minor) saw the face of Bishop Linus in a dream miraclous

         baptism burnt body filled city with myrrh wild beasts protected her bones

Pelagia_of_Tarsus
 300 Florian und die Märtyrer von Lorch wurden auch in Lauriacum 40 Christen verhaftet
 303 Saint Erasmus Bishop of Formium, Italy--Angel "Erasmus! No one vanquishes enemies if he is asleep. Go to your own city, and you shall vanquish your enemies." many miracles and conversions

Nicomedíæ natális sanctæ Antóniæ Mártyris, quæ, nímium torta et váriis afflícta cruciátibus, áltero bráchio tribus suspénsa diébus, et in cárcere biénnio deténta, ad últimum a Priscilliáno Prǽside, in confessióne Dómini, flammis exústa est.
    At Nicomedia, the birthday of St. Antonia, martyr, who was cruelly tortured, subjected to various torments, suspended by one arm for three days, kept two years in prison, and finally delivered to the flames for the confession of Christ by the governor Priscillian.

 304 Saint Albian bishop of Aneium the Aseian district martyred for faith with his student disciple
 304 Florian of Austria princeps officiorum in the Roman army in Noricum (Austria) Many miracles are attributed M (RM)
 310 Saint Sylvanus from
Gaza city soldier priest bishop of Gaza martyred in copper mines with 40 converts in 311
 387 Saint Monica, mother of St Augustine of Hippo (June 15)
 395 Nepotian of Altino priest  esteemed by Saint Jerome, who dedicated to him a treatise on the sacerdotal life (AC)
 
409 Venerius of Milan ordained deacon by Saint Ambrose promoted to see of Milan following death of Saint Simplician loyal supporter of Saint John Chrysostom
The Staro Rus (Old Russian) Icon of the Mother of God

6th v. Antony du Rocher disciple of Saint Benedict and a companion of Saint Maurus during his mission to France Abbot
 716 Ethelred of Bardney  abdicated to become a monk at Bardney OSB King (AC)
 720 Sacerdos of Limoges monk, then abbot-founder of Calabre (Calviat) Abbey bishop of Limoges OSB B (RM)
 826 Paulinus of Sinigaglia bishop and now patron of Sinigaglia, Italy B (AC)
Saint  Paulinus of Cologne M (RM) relics are enshrined at Cologne, Germany (Benedictines).
875 Hilarion der Wundertäter Ein Engel wies ihn an, nach Grusinien zurückzukehren und sich von seinem Vater Abschied zu nehmen
1028 Hilsindis In her widowhood she was the abbess-founder of the convent of Thorn on the Marne  River , OSB Abbess
1038 Godehard of Hildesheim monk at Nieder-Altaich in 990  successfully accomplished reforms formed 9 abbots for  various houses over 9 years
1052 + Cunegund a Benedictine nun of Niedermunster convent in Regensburg (Benedictines)., OSB V
13th v. Blessed Catherine of Parc-aux-Dames convert from Judaism OSB Cist.
1300 Saint Nicephorus teacher of St Gregory Palamas (November 14) convert from Catholic ascetic on Mount Athos
1343 Blessed Gregory Celli monk  received by the Franciscans of Monte Carnerio, near Rieti, OSA
14th v. The Alfanov Brothers Sts Nikita, Cyril, Nicephorus, Clement, Isaac a miracle took place at their relics
1485 Blessed Michael Gedroye famous for his gifts of prophecy and miracles: his cell adjoining church of the Augustinian canons regular at Cracow OSA (AC)
1535-1681 THE MARTYRS OF ENGLAND AND WALES
1535 John Houghton  parish priest 1/40 Martyrs of England and Wales O Cart. M (RM)
1535 Richard Reynolds, Priest priest 1/40 Martyrs of England and Wales
1535 Augustine Webster one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales O. Cart. M (RM)
1535-40 18 Carthusian monks martyred in England for their allegiance to the Holy See Blessed Martyrs (AC)
1535 und 1681 600 katholischen Märtyrern Englands
1535 Robert Lawrence, Priest  1/40 Martyrs of England and Wales prior of the charterhouse of Beauvale, Nottinghamshire,M (RM)
1945 Archpriest Vasily Martysz missionary service in the land of St Herman., America and martyred in Poland
1951 Blessed Mezlényi, martyr of the Hungarian communist regime


133 Cyriacus of Ancona revealed where the Cross was hidden to Empress Saint Helena BM (RM)
Hierosólymis sancti Cyríaci Epíscopi, qui, cum loca sancta visitáret, ibídem, sub Juliáno Apóstata, cæsus est.
    At Jerusalem, in the reign of Julian the Apostate, St. Cyriacus, bishop, who was murdered while visiting the holy places.
(also known as Quiriacus, Judas Quiriacus)

133? ST CYRIACUS, OR JUDAS QUIRIACUS, Bishop
THE principal patron of Ancona, St Judas Cyriacus, may possibly have been a local bishop who died or was killed during a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. On the other hand, he has been conjecturally identified with Judas, bishop of Jerusalem, who was slain during a riot in 133. The local tradition of Ancona, however, connects its patron with Judas Quiriacus, a legendary Jew who is supposed to have revealed to the Empress Helen the place in which the Holy Cross lay hidden, and after being baptized and made bishop of Jerusalem, to have suffered martyrdom under Julian the Apostate. A fantastic account of his dialogue with the Emperor Julian, and of the torments endured by him and his mother Anna, is furnished in the so-called “acts” of his martyrdom. Ancona is said to owe to the Empress Galla Placidia the relics of its patron, but the saint’s head was brought over from Jerusalem by Henry, Count of Champagne, who built a church in the town of Provins to contain it.

The text of the De inventione crucis dominicae, the second part of which is concerned with the martyrdom of Judas Cyriacus, has been printed both in Latin and in Greek in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i. See also E. Pigoulewsky in the Revue de I’ Orient chrétien, 1929, pp. 305—356. The legend of Judas Cyriacus has already been referred to above, under the Finding of the Cross on May 3.
Saint Cyriacus, patron of Ancona, Italy, is variously and unreliably conjectured to have been the legendary Jew named Judas Quiriacus, who revealed where the Cross was hidden to Empress Saint Helena. Later he was baptized, consecrated as bishop of Jerusalem, and martyred during the persecutions of Julian the Apostate. Otherwise, he is said to have been the bishop of Ancona who died or was killed during a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, or he is styled as Bishop Judas of Jerusalem, who was killed during a riot there in 133. In other words, we don't really know who he was, but we have a 12th- century illumination of his martyrdom (Benedictines, Coulson, Delaney).
250 Porphyrius of Camerino preached in Umbria, Italy, chiefly at Camerino M (RM)
Cameríni sancti Porphyrii Presbyteri et Mártyris, qui, sub Décio Imperatóre et Antíocho Prǽside, cum plúrimos (in quibus fuit Venántius) ad Christi fidem convertísset, cápite amputátus est.
    At Camerinum, St. Porphyry, priest and martyr.  Because he converted many to the faith (among them Venantius), he was beheaded during the reign of Emperor Decius and the governor Antiochus.
Porphyrius preached in Umbria, Italy, chiefly at Camerino, and to have been beheaded under Decius. He belongs to the apocryphal legend of Saint Venantius (Benedictines). Porphyrius is depicted in art dressed in a doctor's cap and gown, holding a book, with Saint John the Baptist. He might also be portrayed as a priest with Saint Venantius (Roeder).
3rd v. Curcodomus of Auxerre sent by the pope to attend Saint Peregrinus, first bishop of Auxerre Deacon (RM)
Antisiodóri sancti Curcódomi Diáconi.    At Auxerre, St. Curcodomus, deacon.
Curcodomus, a Roman deacon, was sent by the pope to attend Saint Peregrinus, first bishop of Auxerre, on his mission in Gaul (Benedictines).
Saint Curcodomus of Auxerre; Third century deacon in Rome, Italy. Missionary to Auxerre, Gaul (modern France), sent by Pope Sixtus II to assist the area’s first bishop, Saint Peregrinus of Auxerre.
300 Saint Pelagia of Tarsus in Cilicia (southeastern Asia Minor) saw the face of Bishop Linus in a dream; miraclous baptism; burnt body filled city with myrrh; wild beasts protected her bones
Tarsi, in Cilícia, sanctæ Pelágiæ, Vírginis et Mártyris, quæ, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, in bovem æneum candéntem inclúsa, martyrium complévit.
    At Tarsus, St. Pelagia, virgin, who endured martyrdom under Diocletian by being shut up inside an ox made of brass that had been heated to redness.

304? ST PELAGIA OF TARSUS, VIRGIN AND MARTYR
THE story of St Pelagia of Tarsus is one of those Greek romances which appear to have been originally fabricated to supply edifying fiction for the Christian public. She is described as the beautiful daughter of pagan parents who sought to betroth her to the son of the Emperor Diocletian. She did not wish to marry and obtained permission to go away on a visit to her former nurse. She seized the occasion to seek instruction from a bishop called Clino, who baptized her and gave her holy communion. When on her return it transpired that she was a Christian her fiancé committed suicide and her mother denounced her to the emperor. So lovely was the maiden that Diocletian, instead of punishing her, would fain have married her, but she rejected his addresses and refused to abandon her faith. She was therefore roasted to death in a red-hot brazen bull. Her remains were cast forth, but lions guarded them until they were rescued by the bishop, who buried them with honour on a mountain near the city.
There are many Pelagias, upon one of whom—Pelagia of Antioch—St John Chrysostom pronounced a panegyric. The stories of the others are almost entirely legendary, and are confused one with another. No data are preserved, in this case of Tarsus, upon which any reasonable presumption of a historic foundation can be based. The attempt, however, to reduce all these hagiographic fables to a recrudescence of the worship of Aphrodite is quite unreasonable.

The theories of H. Usener in his Legenden der Heiligen Pelagia (1897) and other folk-lorists need to be controlled by such comments as Fr Delehaye has published in his Légendes Hagiographiques (1927), pp. 186—195. There is, moreover, nothing suggestive of Aphrodite in these particular “acts”, printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, as the fabulous history of Pelagia of Tarsus.

Pelagia von Tarsus Orthodoxe und Katholische Kirche: 4. Mai
Pelagia von TarsusPelagia lebte im 3. Jahrhundert in Tarsus in Kleinasien. Ihre vornehmen heidnischen Eltern wollten sie mit einem (Adoptiv-)sohn von Kaiser Diokletian verheiraten. Pelagia aber, die heimlich Christin geworden war, ließ sich taufen und schlug die Heirat aus. Ihr Verlobter, der sie nicht der Folter überantworten wollte, nahm sich daraufhin das Leben. Aber ihre eigene Mutter verriet Pelagia an Diokletian und dieser bot ihr an, einen anderen Sohn zu heiraten oder zu sterben. Pelagia schlug auch diese Heirat aus und wurde in einem glühenden Ofen verbrannt. Ihre Legende beruht wohl auf der Lebensgeschichte der Pelagia von Antiochia.

She lived in the third century, during the reign of Diocletian (284-305), and was the daughter of illustrious pagans. When she heard about Jesus Christ from her Christian friends, she believed in Him and desired to preserve her virginity, dedicating her whole life to the Lord.
Emperor Diocletian's heir (a boy he adopted), saw the maiden Pelagia, was captivated by her beauty and wanted her to be his wife. The holy virgin told the youth that she was betrothed to Christ the Immortal Bridegroom, and had renounced earthly marriage.  Pelagia's reply greatly angered the young man, but he decided to leave her in peace for awhile, hoping that she would change her mind. At the same time, Pelagia convinced her mother to let her visit the nurse who had raised her in childhood. She secretly hoped to find Bishop Linus of Tarsus, who had fled to a mountain during a persecution against Christians, and to be baptized by him. She had seen the face of Bishop Linus in a dream, which made a profound impression upon her. The holy bishop told her to be baptized.
St Pelagia traveled in a chariot to visit her nurse, dressed in rich clothes and accompanied by a whole retinue of servants, as her mother wished.  Along the way St Pelagia, by the grace of God, met Bishop Linus. Pelagia immediately recognized the bishop who had appeared to her in the dream. She fell at his feet, requesting Baptism.
At the bishop's prayer a spring of water flowed from the ground.
Bishop Linus made the Sign of the Cross over St Pelagia, and during the Mystery of Baptism, angels appeared and covered the chosen one of God with a bright mantle. After giving the pious virgin Holy Communion, Bishop Linus offered a prayer of thanksgiving to the Lord with her, and then sent her to continue her journey. She then exchanged her expensive clothing for a simple white garment, and distributed her possessions to the poor. Returning to her servants, St Pelagia told them about Christ, and many of them were converted and believed.

She tried to convert her own mother to Christ, but the obdurate woman sent a message to Diocletian's son that Pelagia was a Christian and did not wish to be his wife. The youth realized that Pelagia was lost to him, and he fell upon his sword in his despair. Pelagia's mother feared the emperor's wrath, so she tied her daughter up and led her to Diocletian's court as a Christian who was also responsible for the death of the heir to the throne. The emperor was captivated by the unusual beauty of the virgin and tried to turn her from her faith in Christ, promising her every earthly blessing if she would become his wife.  The holy virgin refused the emperor's offer with contempt and said,
 "You are insane, Emperor, saying such things to me. I will not do your bidding, and I loathe your vile marriage, since I have Christ, the King of Heaven, as my Bridegroom. I do not desire your worldly crowns which last only a short while. The Lord in His heavenly Kingdom has prepared three imperishable crowns for me. The first is for faith, since I have believed in the true God with all my heart; the second is for purity, because I have dedicated my virginity to Him; the third is for martyrdom, since I want to accept every suffering for Him and offer up my soul because of my love for Him."
Diocletian sentenced Pelagia to be burned in a red-hot bronze bull. Not permitting the executioners to touch her body, the holy martyr signed herself with the Sign of the Cross, and went into the brazen bull and her flesh melted like myrrh, filling the whole city with fragrance. St Pelagia's bones remained unharmed and were removed by the pagans to a place outside the city. Four lions then came out of the wilderness and sat around the bones letting neither bird nor wild beast get at them. The lions protected the relics of the saint until Bishop Linus came to that place. He gathered them up and buried them with honor. Later, a church was built over her holy relics.

The Service to the holy Virgin Martyr Pelagia of Tarsus says that she was "deemed worthy of most strange and divine visions." She is also commemorated on October 7. During the reign of Emperor Constantine (306-337), when the persecutions against Christians had stopped, a church was built at St Pelagia's burial place.

Pelagia of Tarsus VM (RM); feast day formerly October 8. During the persecutions of the Emperor Diocletian, Pelagia, the daughter of pagan parents in Tarsus, Cilicia, is said to have caught the eye of Diocletian's son. She, however, had no desire to marry. On the pretext of visiting her old nurse, she sought help and counsel from a Christian bishop.  Under his inspiration, Saint Pelagia became a Christian herself, and the bishop baptized her. At this point not only did the emperor's son turn against Pelagia; so did her own mother. Both reported her to the emperor, no doubt hoping that her faith would weaken under the threat of torture. Diocletian himself is said to have personally interviewed her--the legend alleges that he was as attracted to her beauty as was his son--but completely failed to change Pelagia's mind.
A singular torture was now prepared for the beautiful girl. A hollow bull was made out of bronze. Pelagia was put inside it and roasted to death. The bishop is said to have buried her relics.
Another version of the story has Diocletian's son committing suicide after Pelagia's rejection. When she repulsed Diocletian's advances, he decided to kill her. Today's saint is only one of several Pelagias and Marinas (the stories get very mixed up and the two names are the same in Greek and Latin). The idea that these, perhaps, fictitious stories are a christianized version of those of Aphrodite or Venus has been examined and firmly rejected by the eminent hagiographer Hippolyte Delehaye (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Coulson).  The scene of Pelagia's martyrdom shows her burned in a brazen bull (Roeder).
300 Florian und die Märtyrer von Lorch wurden auch in Lauriacum 40 Christen verhaftet

304 ST FLORIAN, MARTYR
THE Saint Florian commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on this day was an officer of the Roman army, who occupied a high administrative post in Noricum, now part of Austria, and who suffered death for the faith in the days of Diocletian. His legendary “acts” state that he gave himself up at Lorch to the soldiers of Aquilinus, the governor, when they were rounding up the Christians, and that after making a bold confession he was twice scourged, half-flayed alive and finally thrown into the river Enns with a stone round his neck. His body, recovered and buried by a pious woman, was eventually removed to the Augustinian abbey of St Florian, near Linz. It is said to have been at a later date translated to Rome, and Pope Lucius III, in 1138, gave some of the saint’s relics to King Casimir of Poland and to the Bishop of Cracow. Since that time St Florian has been regarded as a patron of Poland as well as of Linz and of Upper Austria. In these translations there may have been some confusion with other reputed saints of the same name, but there has been great popular devotion to St Florian in many parts of central Europe, and the tradition as to his martyrdom not far from the spot where the Enns flows into the Danube is ancient and reliable. Many miracles of healing are attributed to his intercession and he is invoked as a powerful protector in danger from lire or water.

In contrast to so many reputed Diocletian martyrs there is solid ground for the belief that Florian suffered at Lauriacum (Lurch). His “acts”, first printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, have been critically edited by Bruno Krusch in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. iii, pp. 68—71. They date from the end of the eighth century, but are admitted to have an historical foundation. There is also under May 4 a clear mention of his name and the manner of his martyrdom in the Hieronymianum. There has been much discussion of the case in the Neues Archiv and other learned German periodicals. For references, see the Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche, vol. iv (1932), cc. 42—43. Consult further J. Zeiller, Les Origines chrétiennes dans las Provinces Danubiennes (1919).
Orthodoxe Kirche: 4. Mai - Florian Katholische Kirche: 4. Mai - Florian und die Märtyrer von Lorch
Florian wurde in der zweiten Hälfte des 3. Jahrhunderts bei Wien geboren. Er wurde getauft und christlich erzogen. Er diente im römischen Heer und wurde dann Leiter der Kanzlei des Statthalters in Lauriacum (Lorch), der Hauptstadt der römischen Provinz Noricum ripense. Während der Christenverfolgung unter Diokletian (284-305) wurden auch in Lauriacum 40 Christen verhaftet. Florian wollte sie im Kerker besuchen und wurde ebenfalls verhaftet. Als er sich weigerte, den heidnischen Göttern zu opfern, wurde er gefoltert und mit einem Mühlstein um den Hals in der Enns ertränkt. Die Witwe Valeria bestattete seinen Leichnam auf ihrem Gut. Im 8. Jahrhundert wurde die Kirche St. Florian über dem Grabplatz errichtet. Die Gebeine der anderen Märtyrer, die auch den Tod fanden, ruhen in der Lorcher Basilika.

303 Saint Erasmus Bishop of Formium, Italy--Angel "Erasmus! No one vanquishes enemies if he is asleep. Go to your own city, and you shall vanquish your enemies." many miracles and conversions
Zealously served the Lord from his youth.  In his mature years he was consecrated as Bishop of Formium, Italy. During the persecution against Christians under the emperors Diocletian (284-305) and Maximian Hercules (284-305), St Erasmus left his diocese and went to Mount Libanus, where he hid for seven years. Once, however, an angel appeared to him and said, "Erasmus! No one vanquishes enemies if he is asleep. Go to your own city, and you shall vanquish your enemies." Heeding the voice of the angel, St Erasmus left his seclusion.

The first ones who asked him about his faith were soldiers who met him along the way. St Erasmus confessed himself a Christian. They brought him to trial at Antioch before the emperor Diocletian. The saint fearlessly confessed his faith in Christ and denounced the emperor for his impiety.

St Erasmus was subjected to fearsome tortures, but remained unbending. After the tortures the saint was bound in iron chains and thrown into prison, where an angel appeared in miraculous form, saying, "Follow after me, I will lead you to Italy. There you shall bring many people to salvation." St Erasmus preached boldly to the people about Christ and raised up the son of an illustrious citizen of Lycia.

After this miracle at Lycia 10,000 men were baptized. The emperor of the Western half of the Roman Empire, Maximian Hercules, gave orders to seize the saint and bring him to trial. St Erasmus also confessed his faith before this emperor. They beat him and threatened him with crucifixion if he did not renounce Christ. They forced him to go to a temple of the idol, but along the saint's route all the idols fell and were destroyed, and from the temple there came fire which fell upon many of the pagans.

After being set free, St Erasmus baptized many pagans, and later went to the city of Sirmium, where he was seized and subjected to torture. They seated him in a red-hot oven, but he remained alive and unharmed. This miracle amazed so many people that the emperor, fearing civil unrest, retired into his own chambers. The angel freed St Erasmus from his fetters and took him to the city of Formium, i.e. to his own diocese, where the saint baptized many more people. The saint died there in 303. Christians buried the relics of the holy hieromartyr with
honor.
304 Saint Albian bishop of Aneium in the Aseian district martyred for the faith  with him his student disciple
Suffered for Christ about the year 304 in a persecution against Christians under the emperor Diocletian and his co-ruler Maximian. St Albian was ordered to offer sacrifice to idols under the threat of death, but he confessed his faith in Christ and refused to serve idols. They tortured him with red-hot irons and beat him mercilessly, but he remained unyielding.  They tortured his disciple with him, and he also remained faithful to the Lord Jesus Christ. Both holy martyrs were sentenced to death and thrown into a red-hot oven, in which they died, receiving the crowns of martyrdom
.
304 Florian of Austria princeps officiorum in the Roman army in Noricum (Austria) Many miracles are attributed M (RM)
Lauréaci, in Nórico Ripénsi, sancti Floriáni Mártyris, qui, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, Aquilíni Prǽsidis jussu, in flumen Anísum, ligáto ad collum saxo, præcipitátus est.
    At Lorch in Austria, under Emperor Diocletian and the governor Aquilinus, the martyr St. Florian, who was thrown into the River Enns, with a stone tied about his neck.
The Martyrdom of St. Florian Albrecht Altdorfer Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence. Image courtesy of Carol Gerten Fine Arts
This site also has Altdorfer's The Departure of Saint Florian

Born at Ems; died 304. Florian was an officer (princeps officiorum) in the Roman army, who held a high administrative post in Noricum (now in Austria). He had secretly been converted to Christianity. When the governor of Lorch, Aquilinus, on instructions from Diocletian ordered his soldiers to hunt down Christians, Florian decided he no longer wished to conceal his faith. He gave himself up at Lorch to the governor's soldiers.

After professing his faith, he was scourged twice, then his skin was slowly peeled from his body. Finally, instead of being executed by the sword and thus given a soldier's death, Saint Florian was thrown into the River Enns (Anisus), near Lorch, with a stone around his neck.
His body was recovered and buried by a devout woman. It was removed to the Augustinian Abbey of Saint Florian, near Linz. It is held that his relics were later translated to Rome, and Pope Lucius III, in 1138, gave some of the saint's relics to King Casimir of Poland and to the bishop of Cracow. Many miracles are attributed to him, including the extinguishing of a huge fire with a pitcher of water (Benedictines, Bentley, Coulson, Delaney, Tabor, White).
Saint Florian is portrayed in art as a young man, sometimes in armor, sometimes unarmed, pouring water from a tub on a burning church. At times the picture may show him with a palm in his hand and a burning torch under his feet;  as a bearded warrior with a lance and tub;  as a classical warrior leaning on a millstone, pouring water on a fire; as a boy with a millstone; setting out on a journey with a hat and staff (Altdorfer); beaten;  being thrown into the river with a millstone around his neck; lying dead on a millstone guarded by an eagle; or with a sword (Roeder). The Sunserv site has Francesco del Cossa's painting.

Florian is one of the eight patron saints of Austria and the patron of Upper Austria and of Linz. He also holds patronage of Poland, brewers, coopers, chimney-sweeps, and soap-boilers (Roeder, Tabor). He is invoked against bad harvests, battles, fire, flood, and storm (Roeder). He is also the patron of those in danger from water and flood, and of drowning
(White).
310 Saint Sylvanus from city of Gaza a soldier priest bishop of Gaza martyred in copper mines with 40 converts there in 311
In metállo Phennénsi Palæstínæ natális beáti Silváni, Gazæ Epíscopi, qui, in Diocletiáni Imperatóris persecutióne, Galérii Maximiáni Cǽsaris mandáto, cum plúrimis suis Cléricis, martyrio coronátus est.
    At the metal mines of Phennes in Palestine, the birthday of blessed Silvanus, bishop of Gaza, who was crowned with martyrdom with many of his clerics by the command of Caesar Galerius Maximian, in the persecution of Diocletian.
Saint Sylvanus came from the vicinity of the city of Gaza. In the world Sylvanus was a soldier. Wishing to serve the Heavenly King, he became a priest, and was ordained bishop of Gaza. Saint Sylvanus converted many pagans to faith in Christ. During the time of the persecution against Christians under the emperor Diocletian he was taken for trial to the city of Caesarea, he underwent torture and bravely endured it, and was then sentenced to harsh labour in the copper mines. At this work the holy bishop reached the edge of exhaustion, but always cheerful of spirit, he incessantly preached Christ to all those around him. This occurrence angered the pagans, who beheaded him. Such death there also accepted together with him 40 holy martyrs, who through the words of the bishop believed in Christ. Their death followed in the year 311.

Silvanus and Companions MM (RM). Silvanus led a group of 41 from Egypt and Palestine, whose martyrdom is recounted by Eusebius. Silvanus, bishop of Gaza, was sentenced to the mines in Palestine but was too old for heavy work, so he was beheaded together with the others (
Benedictines).
387 Saint Monica, mother of St Augustine of Hippo (June 15)
Apud Ostia Tiberína sanctæ Mónicæ, beáti Augustíni matris, cujus ille præcláram vitam, in libro nono Confessiónum, testatam relíquit.
    At Ostia, the birthday of St. Monica, mother of blessed Augustine.  He has left us in the ninth book of his Confessions a beautiful sketch of her life.
{In der katholischen Kirche wurde ihr Fest bis 1969 am 4. Mai gefeiert.}
387 ST MONICA, WIDOW
THE Church is doubly indebted to St Monica, the ideal of wifely forbearance and holy widowhood, whom we commemorate upon this day, for she not only gave bodily life to the great teacher Augustine, but she was also God’s principal instrument in bringing about his spiritual birth by grace. She was born in North Africa—probably at Tagaste, sixty miles from Carthage—of Christian parents, in the year 332. Her early training was entrusted to a faithful retainer who treated her young charges wisely, if somewhat strictly. Amongst the regulations she inculcated was that of never drinking between meals. “It is water you want now”, she would say, “but when you become mistresses of the cellar you will want wine—not water—and the habit will remain with you.”
But when Monica grew old enough to be charged with the duty of drawing wine for the household, she disregarded the excellent maxim, and from taking occasional secret sips in the cellar, she soon came to drinking whole cupfuls with relish. One day, however, a slave who had watched her and with whom she was having an altercation, called her a wine-bibber. The shaft struck home: Monica was overwhelmed with shame and never again gave way to the temptation. Indeed, from the day of her baptism, which took place soon afterwards, she seems to have lived a life exemplary in every particular.
As soon as she had reached a marriageable age, her parents gave .her as wife to a citizen of Tagaste, Patricius by name, a pagan not without generous qualities, but violent-tempered and dissolute. Monica had much to put up with from him, but she bore all with the patience of a strong, well-disciplined character. He, on his part, though inclined to criticize her piety and liberality to the poor, always regarded her with respect and never laid a hand upon her, even in his worst fits of rage. When other matrons came to complain of their husbands and to show the marks of blows they had received, she did not hesitate to tell them that they very often brought this treatment upon themselves by their tongues. In the long run, Monica’s prayers and example resulted in winning over to Christianity not only her husband, but also her cantankerous mother-in-law, whose presence as a permanent inmate of the house had added considerably to the younger woman’s difficulties.
Patricius died a holy death in 371, the year after his baptism. Of their children, at least three survived,  two sons and a daughter, and it was in the elder son, Augustine, that the parents’ ambitions centred, for he was brilliantly clever, and they were resolved to give him the best possible education. Nevertheless, his waywardness, his love of pleasure and his fits of idleness caused his mother great anxiety. He had been admitted a catechumen in early youth and once, when he was thought to be dying, arrangements were made for his baptism, but his sudden recovery caused it to be deferred indefinitely. At the date of his father’s death he was seventeen and a student in Carthage, devoting himself especially to rhetoric. Two years later Monica was cut to the heart at the news that Augustine was leading a wicked life, and had as well embraced the Manichean heresy. For a time after his return to Tagaste she went so far as to refuse to let him live in her house or eat at her table that she might not have to listen to his blasphemies. But she relented as the result of a consoling vision which was vouchsafed to her. She seemed to be standing on a wooden beam bemoaning her son’s downfall when she was accosted by a radiant being who questioned her as to the cause of her grief. He then bade her dry her eyes and added, “Your son is with you”. Casting her eyes towards the spot he indicated, she beheld Augustine standing on the, beam beside her. Afterwards, when she told the dream to Augustine he flippantly remarked that they might easily be together if Monica would give up her faith, but she promptly replied, “He did not say that I was with you: he said that you were with me”.
Her ready retort made a great impression upon her son, who in later days regarded it as an inspiration. This happened about the end of 377, almost nine years before Augustine’s conversion. During all that time Monica never ceased her efforts on his behalf. She stormed heaven by her prayers and tears: she fasted: she watched: she importuned the clergy to argue with him, even though they assured her that it was useless in his actual state of mind. “The heart of the young man is at present too stubborn, but God’s time will come”, was the reply of a wise bishop who had formerly been a Manichean himself. Then, as she persisted, he said in words which have become famous: “Go now, I beg of you: it is not possible that the son of so many tears should perish”. This reply and the assurance she had received in the vision gave her the encouragement she was sorely needing, for there was as yet in her elder son no indication of any change of heart.
Augustine was twenty-nine years old when he resolved to go to Rome to teach rhetoric. Monica, though opposed to the plan because she feared it would delay his conversion, was determined to accompany him if he persisted in going, and followed him to the port of embarkation. Augustine, on the other hand, had made

She was born in 322 in Tagaste, North Africa. Her parents were Christians, but little is known of her early life. Most of our information about her comes from Book IX of her son's CONFESSIONS.

St Monica was married to a pagan official named Patritius, who had a short temper and lived an immoral life. At first, her mother-in-law did not like her, but Monica won her over by her gentle disposition. Unlike many women of that time, she was never beaten by her husband. She said that Patritius never raised his hand against her because she always held her tongue, setting a guard over her mouth in his presence. (Ps. 38/39:1).

St Monica and Patritius had three children: St Augustine, Navigius and Perpetua. It was a source of great sorrow to her that Patritius would not permit them to be baptized. She worried about Augustine, who lived with a young woman in Carthage and had an illegitimate son with her. Her constant prayers and tears for her son had the effect of converting her husband to Christ before his death. Augustine, however, continued on the path that led away from Christ.

While in Carthage, Augustine fell under the influence of the heretical Manichean sect. His mother was horrified and tried to turn him away from his error. She had a dream in which she was told to be patient and gentle with her son. Augustine, however, paid little attention to her arguments, and remained in his delusion for nine years. St Monica must have felt disheartened and disappointed, but she never gave up on him. She even tried to enlist the help of a bishop who had once been a Manichean himself, but he would not dispute with Augustine. He said he couldn't reason with the young man, because he was still attracted by the novelty of the heresy. He did reassure her saying, "Go on your way, and God bless you, for it is not possible that the son of these tears should be lost."

St Monica went to Rome with Augustine when he lectured there in 383. Later, he received an appointment to Milan, where he met St Ambrose (December 7) and was greatly impressed by his preaching. Bishop Ambrose came to have a high regard for St Monica, and often congratulated Augustine on having such a virtuous mother.

One day Augustine was reading the New Testament in a garden, and came to Romans 13:12-14. There and then Augustine decided to "cast off the works of darkness," and to "put on the Lord Jesus Christ." He was baptized on the eve of Pascha in 387.

After his baptism, Augustine and his mother planned to return to Africa. They stopped to rest in Ostia, where St Monica fell asleep in the Lord at the age of sixty-five. She was buried at Ostia, and her holy relics were transferred to the crypt of a church in the sixth century. Nine centuries later, St Monica's relics were translated to Rome.
In the West, St Monica is considered the patron saint of wives and mothers whose husbands or sons have gone astray.
Monnica (Monika) Orthodoxe Kirche: 15. Juni  Katholische, Anglikanische und Evangelische Kirche: 27. August
Monika wurde 332 in Tagaste (Nordafrika) geboren. Sie wurde christlich erzogen, dann aber mit einem heidnische Ehemann verheiratet. Obwohl ihr Mann sie schlug und Liebschaften unterhielt, blieb Monika zu ihm sanft und freundlich. Sie gebar drei Kinder, von denen Augustinus der Älteste war. Monika litt sehr darunter, daß Augustinus ein ausschweifendes Leben führte, mit seiner Geliebten ein Kind hatte und sich den Manichäern zuwandte. Augustinus versuchte, vor ihren stummen Mahnungen zu fliehen und reiste heimlich nach Mailand. Monika gab ihn nicht auf, sondern sobald sie seinen Aufenthaltsort erfuhr, reiste sie ihm hinterher und konnte in Mailand seine Bekehrung und seine Taufe miterleben. Auf der gemeinsamen Rückreise nach Afrika starb sie in Ostia, wohl im Oktober 387.
Ein Bischof, dem sie ihr Leid über das unchristliche Leben ihres Sohnes klagte, erwiderte ihr: Ein Kind so vieler Tränen und Gebete kann nicht verloren gehen. So wurde Monika zur Patronin der Mütter und
Müttervereine
395 Nepotian of Altino priest  esteemed by Saint Jerome, who dedicated to him a treatise on the sacerdotal life (AC)
Saint Heliodorus, bishop of Altino, ordained his nephew Nepotian as priest after he abandoned his high position as an officer in the imperial bodyguard. Nepotian was much esteemed by Saint Jerome, who dedicated to him a treatise on the sacerdotal life. It seems, however, that he has never been the object of a public cultus
(Benedictines).
409 Venerius of Milan ordained a deacon by Saint Ambrose promoted to the see of Milan following the death of Saint Simplician loyal supporter of, Saint John Chrysostom B (RM)
Medioláni sancti Venérii Epíscopi, cujus virtútes sanctus Joánnes Chrysóstomus, in epístola ad eum scripta, testátas relíquit.
    At Milan, St. Venerius, a bishop whose virtues are attested to by St. John Chrysostom in the epistle which he had written to him.
409 ST VENERIUS, BISHOP OF MILAN
THE second bishop of Milan after St Ambrose was St Venerius, who was one of his deacons and who succeeded St Simplician in 400. Very little is known about him, but his cultus received a great impetus when St Charles Borromeo elevated his relics in 1579 and translated them to the cathedral. The saint enjoyed the friendship of St Paulinus of Nola, of St Delphinus of Bordeaux and of St Chromatius of Aquileia, and was a warm sympathizer with St John Chrysostom in his sufferings. When the bishops of Africa, assembled at Carthage in 401, appealed for the support of Pope Anastasius, they also addressed a similar appeal to Bishop Venerius. The Christian poet Ennodius celebrated his praises and describes him as a man of singular eloquence.

All these testimonies are gathered up in the account furnished in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i.

Venerius is one of the breed of fast-track bishops. He was ordained a deacon by Saint Ambrose. About 400 AD, Venerius was promoted to the see of Milan following the death of Saint Simplician. Venerius is best remembered as a loyal supporter of, Saint John Chrysostom (Benedictines, Coulson).
6th v. Antony du Rocher disciple of Saint Benedict and a companion of Saint Maurus during his mission to France, OSB Abbot (AC)
 Saint Antony was said to have been a disciple of Saint Benedict and a companion of Saint Maurus during his mission to France.
He was the founder and abbot of Saint-Julian at Tours.
His surname comes from his ending his days as a recluse on a spot called le Rocher.
Only Francophiles still accept the story of Saint Maurus's French mission as factual
(Benedictines).
716 Ethelred of Bardney  abdicated to become a monk at Bardney OSB King (AC)
Ethelred, king of Mercia, abdicated to become a monk at Bardney, where he was later elected abbot (Benedictines).
Saint Ethelred is depicted as a Benedictine abbot with royal regalia at his feet. He is venerated at Leominster
(Roeder).
720 Sacerdos of Limoges monk, then abbot-founder of Calabre (Calviat) Abbey bishop of Limoges OSB B (RM)
In território Petragoricénsi sancti Sacerdótis, Epíscopi Lemovicénsis.
    In the province of Perigord, St. Sacerdos, bishop of Limoges.
(also known as Sardot, Sadroc, Sardou, Serdon, Serdot)
Born near Sarlat, Périgord, France, 670; Sacerdos became a monk, then abbot-founder of Calabre (Calviat) Abbey.
He was appointed bishop of Limoges and shepherded his flock until shortly before his death
(Benedictines).
826 Paulinus of Sinigaglia bishop and now patron of Sinigaglia, Italy B (AC)
Colóniæ Agrippínæ sancti Paulíni Mártyris.    At Cologne, the martyr St. Paulinus.
All that is known is that Paulinus was bishop and now patron of Sinigaglia, Italy (Benedictines).
875 Hilarion der Wundertäter Ein Engel wies ihn an, nach Grusinien zurückzukehren und sich von seinem Vater Abschied zu nehmen
Orthodoxe Kirche: 4. Mai und 19. November
Hilarion wurde 816 in Grusinien geboren. Schon als Kind wollte er Mönch werden und mit 12 Jahren trat er in ein Kloster ein, das sein Vater ausgewählt hatte. Mit 16 Jahren wurde er Einsiedler. Er verbrachte 10 Jahre in seiner Einsiedelei und wurde in Grusinien sehr bekannt. Er wurde zum Priester geweiht und ihm wurde das Bischofsamt angetragen. Hilarion unternahm aber eine Pilgerfahrt in das Heilige Land. Er lebte dann 17 Jahre am Jordan in einer Höhle, die schon der Prophet Elia und Johannes der Täufer bewohnt haben sollten. Ein Engel wies ihn an, nach Grusinien zurückzukehren und sich von seinem Vater Abschied zu nehmen. Hilarion wandelte dann sein Elternhaus in ein Kloster um, in das auch seine Mutter und seine Schwester eintraten. Nach dem Tod seiner Mutter ging Hilarion nach Konstantinopel und dann auf den Olymp in Kleinasien, wo er um 864 ein Kloster gründete. Hier verbrachte er fünf Jahre und mehrere Heilungswunder werden aus dieser Zeit berichtet. Hilarion unternahm dann eine weitere Pilgerreise, die ihn nach Konstantinopel, Rom und Thessaloniki führte. Hier lebte er drei Jahre und hier starb er am 19.11.875. 40 Tage nach seiner Bestattung ereigneten sich erste Wunder am Grab. Kaiser Basilius (866-886) ließ daraufhin 882 den Leichnam nach Konstantinopel überführen. Seine Gebeine wurden in der neu erbauten Apostelkirche beigesetzt.
Die grusinische Kirche erhob Hilarion im 9. Jahrhundert zum Heiligen und legte seinen Festtag auf den 19.11.
1028 Hilsindis In her widowhood she was the abbess-founder of the convent of Thorn on the Marne River , OSB Abbess (AC)
Hilsindis was born into the family of the dukes of Lorraine (France).
In her widowhood she was the abbess-founder of the convent of Thorn on the Marne River
(Benedictines).
1038 Godehard of Hildesheim monk at Nieder-Altaich in 990  successfully accomplished reforms  formed 9 abbots for various houses over 9 years  OSB B (RM)
Hildeshémii, in Saxónia, sancti Godehárdi, Epíscopi et Confessóris, qui ab Innocéntio Papa Secúndo in Sanctórum censum relátus est.
    At Hildesheim in Saxony, St. Gothard, bishop and confessor, who was ranked among the saints by Innocent II.
 
(also known as Gothard, Gotthard)
1038 ST GODEHARD, or GOTHARD, BISHOP OF HILDESHEIM)
THE birthplace of St Godehard was the Bavarian village of Reichersdorf, where his father was an employee in the service of the canons, who at that period occupied what had formerly been the Benedictine abbey of Nieder-Altaich. The boy was educated by the canons and showed so much promise that he attracted the notice of the bishops of Passau and Regensburg and the favour of Archbishop Frederick of Salzburg. The last named not only took him to Rome, but also made him provost of the canons at the age of nineteen. When, mainly through the efforts of the three prelates, the Benedictine rule was restored in Nieder-Altaich in 990, Godehard, by this time a priest, received the monastic habit together with several other canons. He rose to be abbot, his installation being honoured by the presence of St Henry, then duke of Bavaria—afterwards emperor—who always held him in the utmost esteem. A girdle worked for him by the Empress Cunegund was long venerated as a relic. The excellent order kept by Godehard at Nieder-Altaich prompted St Henry to send him to reform the monasteries of Tegernsee, in the diocese of Freising, Hersfeld, in Thuringia, and
Kremsmünster in the diocese of Passau. This difficult task he accomplished satisfactorily whilst retaining the direction of NiederAltaich, which was ruled by a deputy during his long absences. In the course of twenty-five years he formed nine abbots for various houses.
Then came the call to a very different life. St Bernwald, bishop of Hildesheim, died in ion, and the Emperor Henry immediately decided to nominate Godehard to be his successor. In vain did the abbot plead his age and lack of suitable qualifications; he was obliged to comply with the wishes of the monarch, supported by the local clergy. Although he was sixty years of age he threw himself into the work of his diocese with the zest and energy of a young man. He built and restored churches: he did much to foster education, especially in the cathedral school; he established such strict order in his chapter that it resembled a monastery; and, on a swampy piece of land which he reclaimed on the outskirts of Hildesheim, he built a hospice where the sick and poor were tenderly cared for. He had a great love for God. When he was fifteen, they decided to dedicate themselves to St Augustine for the really necessitous, but he looked with less favour on able-bodied professional tramps; he called them “peripatetic’s”, and would not allow them to stay for more than two or three days in the hospice. The holy bishop died in 1038 and was canonized in 1131. It is generally agreed that the celebrated Pass of St Gothard takes its name from a chapel built upon its summit by the dukes of Bavaria and dedicated in honour of the great prelate of Hildesheim.

We have a full and trustworthy account of St Gothard written by his devoted disciple, Wolfher. There are, in fact, two lives by the same author, the one compiled before Gothard’s death, the other revised and completed some thirty years later. Both are printed in Pertz, MGH., Scriptores, vol. xi, pp. 167—218. There are also some letters by and to him which have survived and which have been printed in MGH., Epistolae Selectae, vol. iii, pp. 59-70 and 105—110. St Gothard figures prominently in the third volume of Hauck’s Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands. There are also modern biographies by F. K. Sulzbeck (1863) and 0. J. Blecher (1931). See further the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, and E. Tomek, Studien z. Reform d. deutsch. Kloster, vol. i (1910), pp. 23 seq.
Born at Reichersdorf, Bavaria, Germany, c. 960; died at Hildesheim, May, 4, 1038; canonized by Innocent II in 1131. Godehard was educated by the canons of Nieder-Altaich Abbey, who employed his father. Archbishop Frederick of Salzburg took him to Rome and made him a provost when he was 19. Godehard was ordained, and became a monk at Nieder-Altaich in 990 when the Rule of Saint Benedict was reintroduced there with the help of the prelates of Salzburg, Passau, and Regensburg.

When, in 996, Godehard became abbot, Duke Henry of Bavaria attended his installation. Under his direction the house kept such a good religious discipline that the emperor, Saint Henry II, entrusted him with the reform of several other monasteries, including those of Tegernsee (Freising), Hersfeld (Thuringia), and Kremsmünster (Passau). He successfully accomplished the reforms while retaining the direction of Nieder-Altaich through a deputy during his long absences. In the course of 23 years, Godehard formed nine abbots for various houses.

After Saint Bernward died in 1022, Godehard was made bishop of Hildesheim at the nomination of Emperor Henry. He carried his reforming activities into the diocese with the vigor of a young man, although he was over 60. He showed particular care for the cathedral school but not neglecting the enforcement of clerical discipline nor his pastoral duties.

Because the relief of the poor was always one of his greatest concerns, he founded a large home for the poor at Saint Moritz near Hildesheim. Godehard had a great love of the truly needy, but he looked less favorably on able-bodied professional tramps; he called them "peripatetics," and would allow them to stay for only two or three days in the hospice.

The pass and railway tunnel from Switzerland into Italy takes its name from the Saint Godehard, in whose honor the neighboring hospice for travellers and its chapel were dedicated. The girdle made for him by the Empress Saint Cunegund is venerated as a relic (Attwater, Benedictines, Coulson, Delaney, Husenbeth, Walsh).

In art, Saint Godehard hangs his cloak on a sunbeam. Pictures of him may include him holding Hildesheim Cathedral; raising two shrouded corpses from the grave; or with a dragon at his feet (Roeder). He is venerated in Switzerland and is invoked against gallstones (Roeder). Many places in Germany have him as patron and several bear his name
(Husenbeth).
1052 + Cunegund a Benedictine nun of Niedermunster convent in Regensburg (Benedictines)., OSB V (AC)
13th v. Blessed Catherine of Parc-aux-Dames convert from Judaism OSB Cist. V (PC)
13th v. BD Catherine OF PARC-AUX-DAMES, VIRGIN became famous for her visions and miracles
BD CATHERINE of Parc-aux-Dames was the daughter of Jewish parents, resident in the city of Louvain. Amongst the constant visitors to their house was the duke of Brabant’s chaplain, Master Rayner, with whom his host used to have long discussions on religious subjects.
   From the time she was five years old, little Rachel— as she was then called—was an attentive listener to these talks and one day the priest, noticing her eager expression, said to her, “Rachel, would you like to become a Christian?” “Yes—if you would tell me how!” was the prompt reply. From that time Master Rayner began to give her instruction in the faith as occasion offered. Rachel’s parents, however, became uneasy at the change which was taking place in their child, and when she was in her seventh year decided to send her away beyond the Rhine, to remove her from Christian influences.
   Rachel was greatly distressed at the prospect, but one night she had a vision of our Lady, who gave her a staff and bade her escape. The girl arose at once, slipped out of the house and made her way to the priest, by whom she was taken to the Cistercian nuns in the abbey of Parc-aux-Dames, a mile and a half from Louvain. There she was baptized and clothed with the habit of the order, assuming the name of Catherine. Her parents appealed to the bishop of Louvain, to the duke of Brabant and even to Pope Honorius, that their daughter might be restored to them—at any rate till she was twelve years old. The bishop and the duke favoured the claim, but it was successfully opposed by Engelbert, archbishop of Cologne, and William, abbot of Clairvaux. Catherine accordingly remained at Parc-aux-Dames until her death, and became famous for her visions and miracles.

See the account in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, which is mainly compiled from such Cistercian sources as Caesarius of Heisterbach and Henriquez. But the Dominican Thomas de Cantimprd also vouches for the truth of the story, from his personal knowledge of Catherine.
Born in Louvain, France to Jewish parents, her given name was Rachel. The duke of Brabant's chaplain was a frequent visitor to her home, and the little Rachel was an eager listener when he would defend the Catholic faith against the attacks of her Jewish father. At the age of 12, Rachel secretly left home, received baptism, and joined the Cistercians at Parc- aux-Dames, near Louvain, where she took the name Catherine and where she lived until her death (Benedictines).
1300 Saint Nicephorus teacher of St Gregory Palamas (November 14) convert from Catholic ascetic on Mount Athos
He grew up as a Roman Catholic, but he journeyed to the Byzantine Empire and became Orthodox. St Nicephorus lived as an ascetic on Mount Athos, and died before the year 1300.
His treatise "On Watchfulness and the Guarding of the Heart" is found in the fourth volume of the English PHILOKALIA.

The Staro Rus (Old Russian) Icon of the Mother of God was so named because for a long time it was in Staro Rus, where it had been brought
by the Greeks from Olviopolis during the very first period of Christianity in Russia.

The icon was in Staro Rus until the seventeenth century.
In 1655 during a plague it was revealed to a certain inhabitant of the city of Tikhvin that the pestilence would cease if the wonderworking Staro Rus Icon were transferred there, and the Tikhvin Icon sent to Staro Rus.

After the transfer of the icons the plague ceased, but the people of Tikhvin did not return the icon and only in the eighteenth century did they give permission to make a copy of the Staro Rus Icon, which on May 4, 1768 was sent to Stara Russa.

A feast was established in honor of this event. On September 17, 1888
the original was also returned to Staro Rus and a second Feast day established.

1343 Blessed Gregory Celli monk  received by the Franciscans of Monte Carnerio, near Rieti, OSA (AC)
(also known as Gregory of Verucchio) Born in Verucchio, diocese of Rimini, Italy; died 1343; cultus confirmed in 1769.
1343 BD GREGORY OF VERUCCHIO
THE father of Bd Gregory dei Celli of Verucchio died before his son was four years old, and the child was brought up by a mother whose one object was to train him and St Monica: Gregory received the habit of the Hermits of St Augustine, whilst his mother spent their fortune in founding as well as endowing a house for the order at Verucchio.
     For ten years Gregory lived in the monastery, leading an exemplary life and converting many sinners who had been led away into heresy. But after his mother’s death, the brethren, instigated by jealousy at his success, or perhaps by resentment at his strictness, ungratefully drove him out of the house which had been built from the proceeds of his patrimony. Homeless and destitute, he made his way to the Franciscans of Monte Carnerio, near Reati, by whom he was so kindly received that he settled down permanently amongst them.
   He lived to extreme old age, dying, it is alleged, at the age of 118. It is averred that the mule which was bearing his coffin to the burial ground at Reati suddenly broke away and as though driven by an unseen force, carried its load back to Verucchio, where its arrival was announced by the spontaneous ringing of all the church bells.
By local custom Bd Gregory is invoked as a patron when rain is needed.
The account of this beatus printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, depends mainly upon a document, attested by a notary public of the Celli family, which was for­warded to the Bollandists by Father H. Torelli, the historiographer of the Hermits of St Augustine. It must be confessed that there are suspicious features about this notarial instrument, but there can be no doubt that the cultus of Bd Gregory, alleged to have been signalized by many miraculous cures, was formally confirmed by Pope Clement XIV in 1769.
Gregory's mother founded a monastery for the Augustinians in Verucchio, where Gregory later became a monk. After a time he was dismissed for some unjust reason, but was charitably received by the Franciscans of Monte Carnerio, near Rieti, where he died (Benedictines). In art, Gregory is an Augustinian hermit with an iron ring around his body. He is venerated at Urbino and invoked in times of drought (Roeder).
14th v. The Alfanov Brothers Sts Nikita, Cyril, Nicephorus, Clement, Isaac a miracle took place at their relics
They lived during the fourteenth century at Novgorod. They led a righteous life and founded the Sokolnitsky monastery. As the chronicles relate, "A wooden church dedicated to St Nicholas was built on the Sokol hill and a monastery was founded" in 1389.
The righteous Alfanov (Sokolnitskyie) brothers were kinsmen according to the chronicler James Anphalov [or Alfanov], who fled to the Dvina to avoid pursuit because of his dealings with Moscow.
The righteous ones were subjected to misfortune because they were related to James, and they purified themselves through their innocent suffering. In the Tale of the brothers, a miracle took place at their relics.
Their memory is celebrated on May 4 and June 17. As the result of a fire which destroyed the Sokolnitsky monastery, their holy relics were transferred to the Antoniev monastery on May 4,
1775.
1485 Blessed Michael Gedroye famous for his gifts of prophecy and miracles: his cell adjoining church of the Augustinian canons regular at Cracow OSA (AC)
(also known as Michael Giedroyc)
1485 BD MICHAEL GIEDROYC was endowed with the gifts of prophecy and miracles
THE history of Bd Michael Giedroyc is the story of his infirmities and his austerities. Born at Giedroyc Castle, near Vilna in Lithuania, the only son of noble parents, it soon became evident that he could never bear arms, being a dwarf and very delicate. Moreover, an accident at a very early age deprived him of the use of one of his feet.
   His father and mother therefore destined him for the Church, and his natural piety pointed in the same direction. His studies being frequently interrupted by ill-health and the lack of good teachers, the boy occupied himself in making sacred vessels for the church when he was not engaged in prayer. Weakly as he was, he had begun almost from childhood to practise mortification, speaking seldom, fasting strictly four days in the week and living as far as possible in retirement.
   He joined the canons regular of St Augustine in the monastery of our Lady of Metro at Cracow, but was permitted at his request to take up his abode in a cell adjoining the church, There, in a space so restricted that he could scarcely lie down, he spent the rest of his life, only leaving his cell to go to church, and on very rare occasions to converse with holy men. He never ate meat, living on vegetables, or else on bread and salt. His austerities were extreme and were never relaxed during illness or in his old age. Moreover, he suffered much physical and mental torment from evil spirits. On the other hand, God gave him great consolations: once, it is said, our Lord spoke to him from the crucifix, and he was endowed with the gifts of prophecy and miracles.

An account of this beatus, based on materials which do not seem to be altogether reliable, is given in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i. The canons of our Lady of Metro were members of a penitential order of which a brief description may be found in Hélyot, Ordres religieux, vol. ii (1849), pp. 562—567.
Born near Vilna, Lithuania; Of noble lineage, Michael was a cripple and a dwarf. He took up his abode in a cell adjoining the church of the Augustinian canons regular at Cracow, Poland, and there he lived his entire life. He was famous for his gifts of prophecy and miracles (Attwater2, Benedictines).
1535 John Houghton  parish priest 1/40 Martyrs of England and Wales O Cart. M (RM)
Born in Essex, England, in 1487; died at Tyburn on May 4, 1535; beatified in 1886; canonized by Pius VI in 1970 as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. Saint John served as a parish priest for four years after his graduation from Cambridge. Then he joined the Carthusians, where he was named prior of Beauvale Charterhouse in Northampton and, just a few months later, prior of London Charterhouse.
In 1534, he and his procurator, Blessed Humphrey Middlemore, were arrested for refusing to accept the Act of Succession, which proclaimed the legitimacy of Anne Boleyn's children by Henry VIII. They were soon released when the accepted the act with the proviso "as far as the law of God allows."
The following year Father Houghton was again arrested when he, Saint Robert Lawrence, and Saint Augustine Webster went to Thomas Cromwell to seek an exemption from taking the oath required in the Act of Supremacy. He, as the first of hundreds to refuse to apostatize in favor of the crowned heads of England, gave a magnificent example to his monks and the whole of Britain of fidelity to the Catholic faith.
As the sentence of drawing and quartering was read to Father Houghton, he said, "And what wilt thou do with my heart, O Christ?" The three were dragged through the streets of London, treated savagely, and then hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. After his death, John Houghton's body was chopped into pieces and hung in various parts of London (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).
John Houghton is depicted as a Carthusian with a rope around his neck, holding up his heart (Roeder).
1535-1681 THE MARTYRS OF ENGLAND AND WALES
IN addition to local feasts of individuals and groups there is to-day observed throughout England and Wales a collective festival, with proper Mass, of all the beatified among our martyrs from the Carthusians and others of 1535 to (at present) Bd William Howard in 1680 and Bd Oliver Plunket in 1681.
Already, while the persecution was at its height, Pope Gregory XIII informally approved certain recognitions of martyrdom, such as the public display of pictures of the victims in the church of the English College at Rome; These pictures are mentioned several times in these pages. They were a series of frescoes or wall-paintings of English saints and martyrs, made at the expense of George Gilbert, a friend of Bd Edmund Campion, and painted by Circiniani; Pope Gregory XIII gave permission for the inclusion of the English martyrs of between 1535 and 1583. The pictures were destroyed at the end of the eighteenth century, but a book of engravings of them (made in 1584) was preserved, and the equivalent beatification of certain martyrs was made on the strength of this evidence of ancient approved cultus. And in 1642 Pope Urban VIII began a formal inquiry, which came to nothing because of the Civil War. Not till over three hundred years later, in 1874, was an ordinary process begun, when Cardinal Manning, Archbishop of Westminster, sent a list of 360 names to Rome, with the evidence. In December 1886 the Holy See announced that 44 of these names had been referred back (dilati); but of the remainder, 54 (9 more were added later) were recognized as having been equivalently beatified by the actions of Pope Gregory XIII in 1583 mentioned above, which cultus Pope Leo XIII now confirmed. Of the remaining 253 one, Archbishop Plunket, was separately beatified in 1920. The evidence concerning the rest was exhaustively examined in Rome, and on December 15, 1929, the centenary year of Catholic Emancipation, 136 more were solemnly beatified. There are therefore now, apart from the dilati, 126 undecided cases from the list submitted in 1874. But in 1889 a second and separate list of presumptive martyrs was drawn up, whose process continues; these number 242, and are known as the praetermissi. It includes the last confessor to die in prison, Father Matthew Atkinson, Franciscan, who died in Hurst Castle in 1729 after thirty years’ imprisonment.
The 200 martyrs beatified to date (of whom, of course, two have since been canonized, Fisher and More) are made up as follows: 2 bishops, 84 secular priests, 7 more secular priests who became regulars (6 Jesuits, one Benedictine), 16 Benedictine monks, 18 Carthusians (including 6 lay-brothers), one Bridgettine, 3 Franciscans, one Austin friar, one Minim friar, 19 Jesuits (2 lay-brothers), 44 laymen and 4 laywomen. Of these persons some twenty were Welsh and the remainder mostly English. They are all referred to individually herein, either separately or as members-of groups, e.g. the London Martyrs of 1588. 
The best general books are Bishop Challoner’s Memoirs of Missionary Priests (1741), edition by Fr. J. H. Pollen, s.j., 1924; Lives of the English Martyrs, first series from 1535 to 1538, in 2 volumes, edited by Dom Bede Camm (1904—5); second series 1583—1603 unfin­ished: vol. i, edited by Canon E. H. Burton and Fr Pollen (1914); T. P. Ellis, The Catholic Martyrs of Wales (1933). Fr Pollen’s Acts of English Martyrs (1891) is a valuable collection of contemporary documents.
1535 und 1681 600 katholischen Märtyrern Englands
Katholische Kirche: Märtyrer Englands - 4. Mai Anglikanische Kirche: Englische Heilige und Märtyrer der Reformationszeit - 4. Mai
Die anglikanische Kirche gedenkt an diesem Tag in ökumenischer Weite aller Märtyrer und Heiligen der Reformationszeit (14. bis 17. Jahrhundert).
Von den über 600 katholischen Märtyrern, die zwischen 1535 und 1681 starben, wurden bisher 168 selig und 33 heilig gesprochen. Über 380 Verfahren sind noch anhängig. Die katholische Kirche feiert seit dem Jahr 2000 alle Märtyrer Englands am 4. Mai, um so auch die Nähe zu dem anglikanischen Gedenktag zu betonen. Der Tag der 40 Märtyrer von England und Wales (1970 heiliggesprochen) wurde bis 1999 am 25. Oktober begangen. Aller Märtyrer wird auch jeweils an ihrem Todestag gedacht.
1535 Richard Reynolds, Priest priest 1/40 Martyrs of England and Wales
M (RM) Born in Devon, England, c. 1490; died at Tyburn on May 4, 1535; beatified in 1886; canonized by Pius VI in 1970 as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.
Richard studied at Cambridge, was elected a fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1510, and took the degree of B.D. and was appointed university preachers in 1513. That same year, he professed himself as a Bridgettine monk at Syon Abbey, Isleworth, and became known for his sanctity and erudition. He was imprisoned when he refused to subscribe to the Act of Supremacy issued by Henry VIII and was one of the first martyrs hanged at Tyburn, after being forced to witness the butchering of four other martyrs (Benedictines, Delaney).
1535 Robert Lawrence, Priest  1/40 Martyrs of England and Wales prior of the charterhouse of Beauvale, Nottinghamshire,M (RM)
Died at Tyburn on May 4, 1535; beatified in 1886; canonized by Pius VI in 1970 as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. Saint Robert was prior of the charterhouse of Beauvale, Nottinghamshire, England. He was on a visit to the London charterhouse, as was Saint Augustine Webster, when they accompanied its prior, Saint John Houghton, to see Thomas Cromwell, who had them seized and imprisoned in the Tower of London. When they refused to sign the Act of Supremacy, which placed Henry VIII as head of the Church of England, they were savagely treated and hanged (Benedictines, Delaney).
1535 Augustine Webster one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales O. Cart. M (RM)
Died May 4, 1535; canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970 as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. After studying at Cambridge, Father Augustine became a Carthusian and then in 1531 prior of the charterhouse at Axholme, England. While on a visit to the London charterhouse, he accompanied Saint John Houghton and Saint Robert Lawrence to a meeting with Thomas Cromwell, who had the three arrested and imprisoned in the Tower. When they refused to accept the Act of Supremacy of Henry VIII, they were dragged through the streets of London, savagely treated, and executed at Tyburn outside London (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).
1535-40 18 Carthusian monks martyred in England for their allegiance to the Holy See Blessed Martyrs (AC)
beatified in 1886. This entry includes 18 Carthusian monks martyred in England for their allegiance to the Holy See under Henry VIII (Benedictines).
Märtyrer von England, Schottland und Wales
Alexander Blake
Alexander Crow
Anthony Page
Arthur Bell
Charles Meehan
Christopher Robinson      
Christopher Wharton
Edmund Duke
Edmund Sykes
Edward Bamber
Edward Burden
Edward Osbaldeston
Edward Thwing
Francis Ingleby
George Beesley
George Douglas
George Errington
George Haydock
George Nichols
Henry Heath
Henry Webley
Hugh Taylor
Humphrey Pritchard      
John Adams
John Bretton
John Fingley
John Hambley
John Hogg
John Lowe
John Norton
John Sandys
John Sugar
John Talbot
John Thules
John Woodcock
Joseph Lambton
Marmaduke Bowes
Matthew Flathers
Montford Scott
Nicholas Garlick
Nicholas Horner
Nicholas Postgate      
Nicholas Woodfen
Peter Snow
Ralph Grimston
Richard Flower
Richard Hill
Richard Holiday
Richard Sergeant
Richard Simpson
Richard Yaxley
Robert Bickerdike
Robert Dibdale
Robert Drury
Robert Grissold
Robert Hardesty
Robert Ludlam
Robert Middleton
Robert Nutter
Robert Sutton
Robert Thorpe
Roger Cadwallador      
Roger Filcock
Roger Wrenno
Stephen Rowsham
Thomas Atkinson
Thomas Belson
Thomas Bullaker
Thomas Hunt
Thomas Palaster
Thomas Pilcher
Thomas Pormont
Thomas Sprott
Thomas Watkinson
Thomas Whitaker
Thurstan Hunt
William Carter
William Davies
William Gibson
William Knight
William Lampley
William Pike
William Southerne
William Spenser
William Thomson
1945 Archpriest Vasily Martysz missionary service in the land of St Herman., America and martyred in Poland
The holy New Martyr Archpriest Vasily Martysz was born on February 20, 1874 in Tertyn, in the Hrubieszow region of southeastern Poland. His father Alexander was a judge in Molczyce near Pinsk. After his retirement, he was ordained a priest and became rector of a local parish.  Because of the long distances and severe climate, Fr Vasily's priestly work was extremely difficult and required many sacrifices. Often he would leave home for several weeks, in order to celebrate the services, to confess, baptize, marry the living, and to bury the dead, while traveling in a specially constructed kayak. Taught in the parish school and worked in two church homes for the poor. After serving nearly twelve years in America, Fr Martysz left the New World and returned to Europe in 1912.  Fr Vasily served as chief of Orthodox chaplains for the next twenty-five years. Within the Ministry of the Interior, he had his own cabinet, and was directly responsible to the Minister himself. He celebrated the Divine Liturgy their language in the Ukrainian internment camps for over 5,000 prisoners, while visiting this camp.  The Polish Secretary of the Army, Lucjan Zeligowski sent a congratulatory letter to Father Vasily on the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his ordination, December 7, 1925, stating "The virtues of this remarkably talented, conscientious and diligent servant, completely devoted to the Polish nation, expressed in his receiving a high distinction, the Order of Polonia Restituta, which is conferred upon him for his efforts in securing the Autocephaly of the Orthodox Church in Poland."
EDUCATION
In 1884, at the age of ten, Vasily made a brief trip to New York with his father. His beautiful singing during a church service attracted the attention of Bishop Vladimir. The hierarch prophesied that young Vasily would become a priest, and promised that he would invite him to his diocese in America once he was ordained. After returning to his country, he remembered the bishop's words, and decided to follow in his father's footsteps and become a priest. He began his theological education at the seminary in Chelm, where the rector was Bishop Tikhon (Belavin), the future Patriarch of Moscow.

Immediately after graduating in July 1899, Vasily married Olga Nowik, and was ordained a deacon. On December 10, 1900 he was ordained a priest. That same month he left Breman for America. The young couple expected to be assigned to a parish in New York, but instead he was appointed to a parish in Alaska. Together with the newly-appointed Bishop Tikhon, he began his missionary service in the land of St Herman. AMERICA
Orthodoxy had arrived in Alaska with the coming of the monastic mission from Valaam in 1794. At the start of the twentieth century, climatic and social conditions in this vast territory remained difficult. In his pastoral work, Fr Vasily met Russian settlers and indigenous inhabitants of the region, Eskimos and Aleuts. He also encountered gold rush pioneers quite often..
Fr Vasily's first parish was extensive. He was headquartered on Afognak, but he was also responsible for the people on Spruce and Woody Islands near Kodiak. There were several small wooden chapels scattered on these islands. In 1901, as a result of his efforts, the church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Virgin was built at Afognak (Although the village was completely destroyed in the earthquake and tidal wave of 1964, the church building survives to this day).

Because of the long distances and severe climate, Fr Vasily's priestly work was extremely difficult and required many sacrifices. Often he would leave home for several weeks, in order to celebrate the services, to confess, baptize, marry the living, and to bury the dead, while traveling in a specially constructed kayak.  Even when he was at home, Fr Vasily had very little time to devote to his dear family. Besides celebrating the services in church and serving the needs of his parishioners, he taught in the parish school and worked in two church homes for the poor. His family bore the arduous conditions, especially the climate, with difficulty. His wife Olga, who had given birth to two daughters, stayed home. The older daughter, Vera, was born at Afognak in 1902. Their second daughter was born two years later, after they had moved to Kodiak.

During his missionary service in Alaska, Fr Vasily kept a diary. It has survived to this day as one of the few records of his personal life. Fragments have been translated from Russian and published in Polish.
Because of the severe Alaskan climate, which especially affected Matushka Olga, and out of concern for the education of their children, the Martysz family transferred to the continental United States in 1906. As a farewell statement from Alaska that year, Fr Vasily wrote an article for the Russian Orthodox American Messenger, "The Voice from Alaska," in which he appealed to Orthodox faithful across the USA to support the building of Orthodox churches in Alaska.
The family settled in Osceola Mills in central Pennsylvania.

Their first son, Vasily, was born that same year, and their youngest child Helen was born in 1908, soon after they moved to Old Forge, PA. Fr Vasily's work took him to Waterbury, CT, to West Troy, NY, and finally to Canada. He was assigned to Edmonton and then to Vostok, where he became Dean of the provinces of Alberta and Manitoba. In 1910, he celebrated his tenth anniversary in the priesthood. His prolific and loving pastoral activity endeared him to his flock. Church authorities considered him a very effective, devoted and talented priest, while the faithful loved him sincerely, valuing his modesty and kindness.

Despite their comfortable lifestyle and the relatively large Orthodox community they served in western Canada, the couple longed for their homeland. They feared the loss of their ancestral identity and requested permission to return to Poland. After serving nearly twelve years in America, Fr Martysz left the New World and returned to Europe in 1912.

RETURN
Initially, Fr Vasily and his family lived with relatives in Sosnowiec, where he eventually became rector of the parish and instructor in Religious Education at the local girls' high school. The peaceful life they enjoyed there lasted barely one year, since the outbreak of the First World war disrupted the lives of thousands. Clergy were considered civil servants who were ordered to evacuate their homes, and move to safety inside Russia. At this critical time, Bishop Vladimir, their Archpastor and friend from Alaska, offered the Martysz family refuge in a small apartment within the St Andronicus Monastery in Moscow. From here, Fr Vasily commuted daily to the distant parish at Valdai, where he taught religious education classes. When the Bolsheviks seized power, he lost this job and was forced to earn a living unloading railroad cars. His own life was endangered because Red Army soldiers often treated clergy with distinct brutality.
In 1919, at the end of the war, Polish refugees were granted permission to return to their former residences.

Fr Vasily and his family took this opportunity to return to Sosnowiec. They moved back into their former apartment, which had survived the devastation of the war. They did not remain long, however, for that September Fr Vasily was assigned to a position in the newly organized Polish Army, in charge of Orthodox Affairs in the Religious Ministry of the War Department. The whole family relocated to Warsaw. Fr Vasily started the wearisome but important work of forming an Orthodox military chaplaincy. In 1921, he was promoted to the rank of colonel, and assumed responsibility as the head of the Orthodox military chaplaincy. At this time, the church elevated him to the rank of Archpriest.
Fr Vasily served as chief of Orthodox chaplains for the next twenty-five years.
Within the Ministry of the Interior, he had his own cabinet, and was directly responsible to the Minister himself.

AUTOCEPHALY
Fr Vasily was also a chief advisor and close colleague of Metropolitan George (Jaroszewski) of Warsaw and all Poland. He participated in preparing all the meetings of the Holy Synod, and assisted Metropolitan George in his effort to obtain autocephaly for the Polish Orthodox Church. He accompanied the Metropolitan on the tragic day of February 8, 1923, when he was assassinated. The assassin had also planned to kill Fr Vasily as well, but he was captured before he could succeed. Fr Vasily remained under police protection for some time, but attended to all the details of the Metropolitan's funeral, in which the First Regiment of the Szwolezers Regiment participated under orders from Marshal Jozef Pilsudski.

Fr Vasily zealously participated in the subsequent process of obtaining autocephaly {autonomy} for the Orthodox Church in Poland, which was granted during the tenure of Metropolitan Dionysius (Walednski) in 1925. Fr Vasily became the Metropolitan's closest advisor and confidant. He often accompanied the Metropolitan and acted as liaison with the Polish Head of State, Marshal Pilsudski. He was often invited to attend cabinet meetings at Belvedere, the Royal Castle, where he regularly signed the guest book on holidays.

In addition to his work as chief military chaplain, Fr Vasily devoted much time to organizing pastoral ministry in the Ukrainian internment camps. In February 1921, Fr Vasily appointed Fr Peter Biton as chaplain for the camp in Aleksandrow Kujawski. He visited the Ukrainian internees himself and helped arrange camp churches. On July 8, 1921, he celebrated the Divine Liturgy in the Ukrainian language for over 5,000 prisoners, while visiting this camp. His sermon, delivered in Ukrainian, greatly improved their morale. He also assisted in organizing chaplains' training courses in other Ukrainian army camps.

The Polish Secretary of the Army, Lucjan Zeligowski sent a congratulatory letter to Father Vasily on the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his ordination, December 7, 1925, stating "The virtues of this remarkably talented, conscientious and diligent servant, completely devoted to the Polish nation, expressed in his receiving a high distinction, the Order of Polonia Restituta, which is conferred upon him for his efforts in securing the Autocephaly of the Orthodox Church in Poland."

Father Vasily retired from his government position in 1936. The couple decided to leave Warsaw and return to their home region, Hrubieszowszczna. They built two houses in Teratyn, one for themselves and another for their widowed mothers. They did not enjoy this peaceful life for very long, because in 1939 the German Army invaded Poland. The village gradually declined. Both of their mothers died. Matushka herself did not live to see the end of the war, but died in 1943. Then Father Vasily's youngest daughter, Helen, moved into his house with her husband and daughter in order to support him.

Father Martysz spent the difficult war years in Teratyn. On May 4, 1945 (Great and Holy Friday), a few days before the surrender of Nazi Germany, his house was attacked. A female acquaintance warned him of the danger, but he replied, "I have done no harm to anyone and I will not run away from anyone. Christ did not run away." Father Vasily did not fear and did not flee from his tormentors. He faced them bravely, in a Christ-like way, accepting the crown of martyrdom. The villains, seeking gold and money, had no respect for his uniform as a colonel in the Polish Army, nor for his priestly vestments.

MARTYRDOM
The bandits broke into the house by breaking a window. With callous cruelty they tortured Father Vasily though his only crime was that he was an Orthodox priest. They beat his pregnant daughter Helen, causing her to miscarry. They beat Father Vasily for four hours, reviving him by throwing water on him when he lost consciousness. Horribly tortured, he was finally murdered by a gun shot. The criminals threatened to shoot Helen as well, When she knelt before the icon of Christ and began to pray, the executioner's aim and resolve weakened. They left, threatening to return and kill her as well.

On Great and Holy Saturday, Father John Lewczuk celebrated the burial rites for Father Vasily in Chelm. He was buried at the local cemetery in Teratyn.

In October 1963, the earthly remains of Father Vasily Martysz were brought to Warsaw and solemnly reinterred in the Orthodox cemetery in the Wola district, next to his wife and mother-in-law. At the beginning of 2003, his holy relics were uncovered and placed in the church of St John Climacus in Warsaw. The Holy Synod of the Autocephalous Orthodox Church of Poland promulgated the official Act of Canonization on March 20, 2003, and the rites glorifying St Vasily Martysz were celebrated in Chelm on June 7-8.

Orthodox Christians in the Polish Army have taken St Vasily Martysz as their heavenly patron. They martyrdom of St Vasily was the crowning accomplishment of his pious and dedicated life, a testimony to his amazing courage. He carried his cross to the end without complaint, accepting the crown of martyrdom as he had dedicated his life to Christ and the Holy Orthodox Faith.  Written by Jaroslaw Charkiewicz
1951 Blessed Mezlényi, martyr of the Hungarian communist regime
Bishop Zoltán Lajos Meszlényi was a brave pastor and a martyr of the Hungarian communist regime, who died after being tortured in the Kistarcsa concentration camp on March 4th, 1951. Auxiliary Bishop of the diocese of Esztergom from 1937 to 1950, Meszlényi sacrificed his life for the Church during the dictatorial persecutions.

He was beatified on October 31st at the Esztergom Basilica during a Eucharistic celebration presided over by Cardinal Péter Erdö, the Primate of Hungary.

“Blessed Zoltán Meszlényi invites us to be faithful to the Gospel of life and truth. This is his message for today: to live in communion, in liberty, and in charity and to build, promote, and give testimony of a civilization of love, life, and universal fraternity.” Thus read the message from Archbishop Angelo Amato, the prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, who, as the Pope’s representative, read the beatification formula at the ceremony.

In his homily, Cardinal Péter Erdö, archbishop of Esztergom-Budapest, called the Servant of God Meszlényi an example of a Christian man who is strengthened by the Holy Sprit, a testimony fully relevant for our time: “Today we also perceive how our individual and collective egoism, our myopia, our desire for power, and our hatred make us fall into a trap from which we cannot free ourselves with our own strength. It is only the merciful love of God that can save us from this infernal circle.” In conclusion, the Cardinal said that “the martyrs’ fidelity is a source of hope for us”.

 Wednesday   Saints of this Day May 04   Quarto Nonas Maii.  
  Sixth Week in Easter
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
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