Friday   Saints of this Day May 06 Prídie Nonas Maii  
CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016  

Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.



 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life.

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary  .

1350 BC Job The righteous (whose name means "persecuted"), God's faithful servant, the perfect image of every virtue
 64-67 Evodius of Antioch 1/72 disciples commissioned by Jesus believed Evodius coined the word 'Christian' (RM)
 66    Photina (Svetlana) The Samaritan Woman  Holy Martyr Woman, with whom the Savior conversed at Jacob's Well (John. 4:5-42). fearlessly preached the Gospel in Carthage she and family miracle workers

362 Barbarus the Soldier, Bacchus, Callimachus and Dionysius The Holy Martyrs served in the army of the emperor Julian the Apostate miracles caused many conversions.
698 St. Eadbert Abbot bishop of Lindisfarne Ireland learning and knowledge of the Scriptures obedience to God's commandments
9th v.  Barbarus The Holy Martyr, formerly a robber, lived in Greece and for a long time he committed robberies, extortions and murders miracles after death
11th v.  Salérni Translátio sancti Matthǽi, Apóstoli et Evangelístæ

1300 Bl.  Bonizella Piccolomini Widow devoted herself and all her wealth to the service of the poor (PC)
    At Damascus, the birthday of St. John Damascene, priest and doctor of the Church, renowned for sanctity and learning.  By means of his writing and preaching, he courageously resisted Leo the Isaurian, in defending the veneration paid to sacred images.  By order of this emperor his right hand was cut off, but commending himself before an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which he had defended, his hand was immediately restored to him, entire and sound.  His feast day is the 27th of March.

May 6 – Our Lady of Saint John (Italy, 1658)  
A veneration greater than that of angels and saints
The veneration of the Virgin Mary is based on the dignity of Mother of God and the resulting consequences. We can indeed never overestimate the one whom the Incarnate Word reveres as his Mother, whom the Father contemplates lovingly as his beloved daughter and whom the Holy Spirit looks upon as his favored temple.

The Father treated her with great respect by sending an angel to greet her as full of grace, and asked for her consent in the work of the Incarnation for which he wanted to associate her so closely; the Son honored, obeyed and loved her as his Mother; the Holy Spirit came in her and took his delight in her. By venerating the Virgin Mary, we are simply associating ourselves with the three divine persons—we value what they themselves value.

This veneration must be greater than the one we have for the angels and the saints because by her dignity as Mother of God, her role as mediatrix and her holiness, she surpasses all other creatures. Therefore, devotion to the Virgin Mary, even though it is a form of dulia (veneration reserved for saints) and not of latria (worship reserved for God), is rightly called hyperdulia, being greater than the one we give to angels and saints.
  
Adolphe Tanquerey,
In Précis de Théologie Ascétique et Mystique, 10th edition, Desclée et Cie, 1928

 
The Woman I Love (III) May 6 - Our Lady of Saint John (Italy, 1658)
I decided to give the Blessed Mother another chance. I went to the grotto about ten o'clock at night. A portly American gentleman tapped me on the shoulder: "Are you an American priest?" "Yes." "Do you speak French?" "Yes." "Will you come to Paris with my wife and daughter tomorrow, and speak French for us?" He walked me back to the hotel; then he asked me perhaps the most interesting question I have ever heard in my life: "Have you paid your hotel bill yet?" I out fumbled him for the bill. The next day we went to Paris and for twenty years or more after that, when I would go to New York on weekends to instruct converts, I would enjoy the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Farrell, who had become the agents of the Blessed Mother to save me from my creditors.

When I finished my university studies, I made another pilgrimage to Lourdes. I was deeply concerned that perhaps I would not be permitted to return to Mary's Shrine again, for I knew not to what task the Bishop would assign me.
I asked the Blessed Mother to give me some sign that despite the odds of returning to Lourdes, she would do what seemed impossible. The sign I asked for was this: that after I offered the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and before I would reach the outer gate of the shrine, a little girl age about twelve, dressed in white, would give me a white rose.

About twenty feet from the gate I could see no one. I remember saying: "You had better hurry, there is not much time left." As I arrived at the gate a little girl age twelve, dressed in white, gave me the white rose.
Fulton Sheen, Treasure in Clay - The Autobiography of Fulton J. Sheen,
Image Books 1982. (Society for the Propagation of the Faith)

The spouse of the Church cannot be defiled. Whosoever separates from the Church and is joined to an adulteress is separated from the promises of the Church. Nor can he who forsakes the Church of Christ attain the rewards of Christ:
He is a stranger; he is a worldling; he is an enemy. -- St. Cyprian of Carthage


May 6 – Our Lady of Saint John (Italy, 1658) 
Devotion to the Mother of God ought to spring from the heart
For it to be right and good, devotion to the Mother of God ought to spring from the heart;
acts of the body have here neither utility nor value if the acts of the soul have no part in them.
Now these latter can only have one object, which is that we should fully carry out what the divine Son of Mary commands. (…).
What this most prudent Virgin said to the servants at the marriage feast of Cana she addresses also to us:
"Whatsoever he shall say to you, do ye" (Jn 2:5). Now here is the word of Jesus Christ:
"If you would enter into life, keep the commandments" (Mt 19:17).
Let them each one fully convince himself of this, that if his piety towards the Blessed Virgin does not hinder him from sinning, or does not move his will to amend an evil life,
it is a piety deceptive and lying, wanting as it is in proper effect and its natural fruit.
 Saint Pius X
Encyclical Letter Ad Diem Illum Laetissimum, February 2, 1905

 
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Salérni Translátio sancti Matthǽi, Apóstoli et Evangelístæ; cujus sacrum corpus, olim ex Æthiópia ad divérsas regiónes et demum ad eam urbem delátum, ibídem, in dedicáta ejus nómine Ecclésia, summo honóre cónditum fuit.
At Salerno, the translation of St. Matthew, apostle and evangelist.  His revered body, previously transferred from Ethiopia to various countries, was finally taken to Salerno, and with great pomp was there placed in a church dedicated to his name.

May 6 - Feast of Our Lady of Saint John (Italy, 1658)  Exraordinary Apparitions in Zeitoun, Egypt (II)
The apparitions of the Blessed Virgin were indeed visible to many people, for long periods of time, over a span of several weeks, and crowds often reached a total of 250,000 people, causing enormous traffic jams. On April 13, 1968, the photographer Wagih Rizk Matta was the first to take some amazing photographs of the apparitions.
He was cured right there and then of a wound on his arm, just as many others who were also cured while visiting the site.
Since 1969, the Coptic Orthodox Church added the Feast of the Transfiguration of Mary in Zeitoun to its liturgical calendar, which is now celebrated each year on April 2nd.
What could be the significance of such impressive manifestations of the Virgin?
Zeitoun in Arabic means “Arabic olives”, and the olive-tree, whose branch the Blessed Virgin held in her hands at the time of some of her apparitions, is a well-known symbol of peace and very welcome at the time when the Coptic minority was threatened by oppression and The Six Day War of 1967, plunging the Middle East into mourning.
Following the capture of Jerusalem by the Israelis, it became practically impossible for Coptic Christians to go on pilgrimages to the Holy Land.
Jehan Sadate, the widow of the assassinated President, wrote the following words in the name of the Blessed Virgin in her autobiography entitled A Woman of Egypt (1987):
 “People of Egypt, I know that you are no longer able to come to see me in Jerusalem. So I have come to see you in Cairo.”
      Excerpt from the Dictionary of the Apparitions of the Virgin (Dictionnaire des Apparitions de la Vierge)
By Father Laurentin, Fayard Press 2007
1350 BC Job The righteous (whose name means "persecuted"), God's faithful servant, the perfect image of every virtue
 64-67 Evodius of Antioch 1/72 disciples commissioned by Jesus believed Evodius coined the word 'Christian' (RM)
 66    Photina (Svetlana) The Samaritan Woman  Holy Martyr Woman, with whom the Savior conversed at Jacob's
Well (John. 4:5-42). fearlessly preached the Gospel in Carthage she and family miracle workers
 94?
Romæ sancti Joánnis, Apóstoli et Evangelístæ, ante Portam Latínam
On Tuesday of St Thomas week we remember those Orthodox Christians from all ages who have died in faith, and in the hope of resurrection.
1st v. St Lucius Bishop of Cyrene 1/of “prophets and doctors” in Ptolemais, Africa
 259 Sts. Marian a lector or reader; and James a deacon; experienced visions, including martyred bishop
 286  Gundula starb um 286 als Märtyrerin in der Nähe von Mailand.
3rd v. St Heliodorus Martyr with Venustus and companions (7 to 77) in Africa
 325 Theodotus Bishop of Cyprus suffered a long term of imprisonment B (RM)
 335 St. Heliodorus Martyred Persian bishop of Mesopotamia with two priests Desan and Marjab
 362 Barbarus the Soldier, Bacchus, Callimachus and Dionysius The Holy Martyrs served in the army of the emperor Julian the Apostate miracles caused many conversions.
4th v. Protogenes of Syria priest & bishop of Carrhaes banished by the Arian Emperor B (RM)
6th v. St. Benedicta Mystic nun St Peter appeared in vision warn her of death
7th v. Colman Mac Ui Cluasigh took his students to an island in the ocean to escape the pestilence (AC)
 698 St. Eadbert Abbot bishop of Lindisfarne Ireland learning and knowledge of the Scriptures obedience to God's
commandments
 747 St. Petronax Abbot “the Second Founder of Monte Cassino.” restored after Lombards destruction rule of St
Benedict
9th v.  Barbarus The Holy Martyr, formerly a robber, lived in Greece and for a long time he committed robberies,
extortions and murders miracles after death
11th v.  Salérni Translátio sancti Matthǽi, Apóstoli et Evangelístæ
1300 Bl.  Bonizella Piccolomini Widow devoted herself and all her wealth to the service of the poor (PC)
1385 St Micah of Radonezh one of the first disciples of St Sergius of Radonezh Appearance of the Most Holy
Theotokos Holy Apostles Peter and John the Theologian to St Sergius of Radonezh.
1492 Bl.  Prudentia Castori abbess-founder  her fame rests on miracles reported wrought after her death; Her zeal was displayed not only amongst her nuns, whom she ruled with great prudence, but also in  bringing about the restoration of the church of the Visitation at Como OSA V (PC)
1590 Bl.  Edward Jones missionary priest and Anthony Middleton priest.
Damásci natális beáti Joánnis Damascéni, Presbyteri, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris, doctrína et sanctitáte célebris.  Hic, pro cultu sanctárum Imáginum, verbo et scriptis advérsus Leónem Isáuricum strénue decertávit; cujus Imperatóris ob calúmnias cum ipsi Joánni déxtera manus e Saracenórum Príncipe amputáta esset, idem, beátæ Maríæ Vírgini, cujus Imágines defénderat, se comméndans, prótinus déxteram íntegram sanámque recépit.  Ejus autem festívitas sexto Kaléndas Aprílis celebrátur.
    At Damascus, the birthday of St. John Damascene, priest and doctor of the Church, renowned for sanctity and learning.  By means of his writing and preaching, he courageously resisted Leo the Isaurian, in defending the veneration paid to sacred images.  By order of this emperor his right hand was cut off, but commending himself before an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which he had defended, his hand was immediately restored to him, entire and sound.  His feast day is the 27th of March.


Translation of Relics Saint Sava_1st_Archbishop_of_Serbia
Job_and_Monk_Seraphim
Seraphim_of_Lebadeia.
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him" (Psalm 21:28)

1350 B.C. Job The righteous (whose name means "persecuted"), God's faithful servant, was the perfect image of every virtue  
Hiob (Ijob)
Orthodoxe Kirche: 6. Mai  Katholische Kirche: 10. Mai
Nach der Tradition der Ostkirche lebte Hiob zwischen 2000 und 1500 vor Christus im Land Uz im nördlichen Arabien. Er wurde 248 Jahre alt und die im Buch Hiob dargestellten Ereignisse fielen in sein 108. Lebensjahr. Hesekiel nennt Hiob als einen vorbildlichen Menschen (Hes. 14, 14/20) und es kann vermutet werden, daß Hiob schon zur Zeit der Patriarchen (ca. 1900 v. Chr) bekannt und geschätzt war. Auch in außerisraelitischen Quellen aus dieser Zeit wird ein Hiob erwähnt.

   The son of Zarah and Bossorha (Job 42), Job was a fifth-generation descendent of Abraham. He was a truthful, righteous, patient and pious man who abstained from every evil thing. Job was very rich and blessed by God in all things, as was no other son of Ausis (his country, which lay between Idoumea and Arabia).
However, divine condescension permitted him to be tested.  Job lost his children, his wealth, his glory, and every consolation all at once. His entire body became a terrible wound covered with boils. Yet he remained steadfast and patient in the face of his misfortune for seven years, always giving thanks to God.

Later, God restored his former prosperity, and he had twice as much as before.
Job lived for 170 years after his misfortune, completing his earthly life in 1350 B.C. at the age of 240.
Some authorities say that Job's afflictions lasted only one year, and that afterwards he lived for 140 years, reaching the age of 210.


    Job's explanations are among the most poetic writings in the Old Testament book which bears his name. It is one of the most edifying portions of Holy Scripture. Job teaches us that we must endure life's adversities patiently and with trust in God. As St Anthony the Great (January 17) says, without temptations, it is impossible for the faithful to be saved.
   The Orthodox Church reads the book of Job, the first of the seven wisdom books of the Old Testament, during Holy Week, drawing a parallel between Job and Christ as righteous men who suffered through no fault of their own. God allowed Satan to afflict Job so that his faithfulness would be proven.
Christ, the only sinless one, suffered voluntarily for our sins. The Septuagint text of Job 42:17 says that Job "will rise again with those whom the Lord raises up." This passage is read on Great and Holy Friday, when the composite Gospel at Vespers speaks of the tombs being opened at the moment the Savior died on the Cross, and the bodies of the saints were raised, and they appeared to many after Christ's Resurrection (Mt.27:52)

   Saint Job the Righteous lived about 2000-1500 years before the Birth of Christ, in Northern Arabia, in the country of Austidia in the land of Uz. His life and sufferings are recorded in the Bible (Book of Job). There exists an opinion, that Job was by descent a nephew of Abraham, and that he was the son of a brother of Abraham -- Nakhor. Job was a man God-fearing and pious. With all his soul he was devoted to the Lord God and in everything conducted himself in accord with God's will, refraining from everything evil not only in deeds, but also in thoughts. The Lord blessed his earthly existence and rewarded Righteous Job with great wealth: he had many cattle and all kinds of possessions. Righteous Job's seven sons and three daughters were amiable amongst themselves and gathered for common repast all together in turns at each of their homes. Every seven days Righteous Job made for his children offerings to God, saying: "If perchance any of them hath sinned or offended God in their heart". For his justness and honesty Saint Job was held in high esteem by his fellow citizens and he had great influence in public matters.
   One time however, when the Holy Angels did stand before the Throne of God, Satan appeared amongst them. The Lord God asked Satan, whether he had seen His servant Job, a man righteous and without blemish. Satan answered audaciously, that it was not for nothing that Job was God-fearing -- since God was watching over him and multiplying his riches, but if misfortune were sent him, he would then cease to bless God. Then the Lord, wishing to prove Job's patience and faith, said to Satan: "Everything, that Job hath, I give into thine hand, but only he himself touch not". After this Job suddenly lost all his wealth, and then also all his children. Righteous Job turned to God and said:
"Naked did I emerge from the womb of my mother, and naked shalt I be returned to my mother the earth. The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away. "Blest be the Name of the Lord!"
And thus did Job not sin before the Lord God, nor utter even an unthinking word.
   When the Angels of God again did stand before the Lord and amongst them Satan also, then said the devil, that Job was righteous, since that he himself was without harm. Thereupon declared the Lord: "I permit thee to do with him, what thou wishest, sparing only his soul". After this Satan inflicted upon Righteous Job an horrid illness, leprous boils, which covered him head to foot. The sufferer was compelled to remove himself from the company of people, he sat outside the city on an heap of ashes and had to scrape at his pussing wounds with an shard of clay. All his friends and acquaintances abandoned him. His wife had to see after her own welfare, toiling and roaming from house to house. She not only did not support her husband with patience, but rather she thought, that God was punishing Job for some kind of secret sins, and she wept, and wailed against God, she reproached also her husband and finally advised Righteous Job to curse God and die. Righteous Job sorrowed grievously, but even in these sufferings he remained faithful to God. He answered his wife: "Thou speakest, like someone hysterical. Shalt we have from God only the good, and have nothing bad?" And Righteous Job did sin in nothing before God.

   Hearing about the misfortunes of Job, three of his friends came afar off to comfort his sorrow. They reckoned, that Job was being punished by God for his sins, and they urged this righteous man though innocent to repent. The righteous one answered, that he was suffering not for sins, but that these tribulations were sent him from the Lord in accord with the Divine Will, which is inscrutable for man. His friends however did not believe him and they continued to think that the Lord was dealing with Job in accord withe the laws obtaining under human standards, thus punishing Job for the committing of sins. In begrieved sorrow of soul Righteous Job turned with a prayer to God, beseeching Him Himself to bear witness before them of his innocence. God thereupon manifested Himself in a tempestuous whirlwind and reproached Job, in that he had tried to penetrate by his reason into the mystery of the world-order and the judgemental-purposes of God. The Righteous Job with all his heart repented himself in these thoughts and said: "I am as nothing, and I foreswear and repent myself in dust and ashes". The Lord thereupon commanded the friends of Job to have recourse to him in asking him to offer sacrifice for them. "Since, -- said the Lord, -- only the person Job do I accept it of, lest I spurn ye for this, that ye did speak concerning Me not thus rightly, as hath instead My servant Job". Job offered sacrifice to God for his friends, and the Lord accepted his intercession, and the Lord likewise returned to Righteous Job his health and gave him twice over more than he had previously. In place of his deceased children was born to him seven sons and three daughters, more beautiful than any other in that land. After bearing his sufferings, Job lived yet another 140 years (altogether he lived 248 years) and he lived to see his descendants down to the fourth generation.
Saint Job prefigures the Lord Jesus Christ, having come down to earth and suffering for the salvation of mankind, and then glorified in His glorious Resurrection.
"I know, -- said Righteous Job, afflicted with the leprous boils, -- I know, that my Redeemer liveth and He wilt raise up from the dust on the last day my decayed skin, and I in my flesh shalt see God. I shalt see Him myself with mine own eyes, and not through the eyes of some other see Him. In expectation of this, my heart doth jump within my bosom!" (Job 19: 25-27).
"Know ye, the judgement, in which be justified only those having true wisdom -- the fear of the Lord, and true understanding -- the departing from evil" (Job 28: 28).

   Saint John Chrysostom says:
"There was no human misfortune, which this man did not undergo. He was the firmest and most adamant, beset by sudden tribulation by hunger, and by woe, and sickness, and bereft of children, and loss of riches, and then suffering abuse from his wife, insult from his friends, reproach from his servants, and in everything he showed himself more solid than a stone, and a source before the Law also of Grace".
On Tuesday of St Thomas week we remember those Orthodox Christians from all ages who have died in faith, and in the hope of resurrection.
anastasis2.jpg
There are indications of this commemoration in the sermons of the Fathers of the Church. St John Chrysostom, for example, mentions it in his homily "On the Cemetery and the Cross."

In pre-Revolutionary Russia bars remained closed and alcoholic beverages were not sold until this Day of Rejoicing so that the joy people felt would be because of the Resurrection, and not an artificial joy brought on by alcohol.
Today the Church remembers its faithful members at Liturgy, and kollyva is offered in remembrance of those who have fallen asleep. Priests visit cemeteries to bless the graves of Orthodox Christians, and to share the paschal joy with the departed. It is also customary to give alms to the poor on this day.

64-67 Evodius of Antioch 1/72 disciples commissioned by Jesus believed that Evodius coined the word 'Christian' BM (RM)
Antiochíæ sancti Evódii, qui (ut beátus Ignátius ad Antiochénses scribit), primus ibídem a sancto Petro Apóstolo ordinátus Epíscopus, glorióso martyrio vitam finívit.
    At Antioch, St. Evodius, who, as the blessed Ignatius wrote to the people of Antioch, was consecrated first bishop of that city by the apostle St. Peter, and ended his life by a glorious martyrdom.
Euodias Orthodoxe Kirche: 7. September 

64? ST EVODIUS, BISHOP OF ANTIOCH
We learn from Origen and from Eusebius the predecessor of St Ignatius the God-bearer in the see of Antioch was Evodius, who had been ordained and consecrated by the Apostles themselves—doubtless when St Peter was about to leave Antioch for Rome. Later writers have tried to identify Evodius with the Evodias or Evodia mentioned by St Paul in his epistle to the Philippians—though this person was almost certainly a woman—and have also described him as a martyr. According to tradition, he was one of the seventy disciples sent out by our Lord to preach. He is supposed to have coined the word “Christian”, which, as we know from the Acts of the Apostles, was first used in Antioch to denote members of the Church of Christ. This is stated by the chronicler Malalas, who wrote in the latter part of the sixth century, and we further learn from him that St Peter happened to be passing through Antioch at the time when St Evodius died, and that he thereupon consecrated St Ignatius to be bishop in his room. If this be true, Evodius must have died before A.D. 64.

There is a short notice in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i; but consult also G. Salmon in DCB., vol. ii, p. 428, and Harnack, Chronologie d. Altchrist. Literatur, vol. i, p. 94, as well as Die Zeit des Ignatius by the same author.

Euodias (Evodus) wurde nach Petrus Bischof von Antiochia (Syrien). Eusebius nennt ihn als zweiten Bischof vor Ignatius während andere Quellen Ignatius als direkten Nachfolger Petri nennen. Euodias wurde um 66 verhaftet, nach Rom gebracht und dort hingerichtet.
  Evodius is traditionally conceived as one of the 72 disciples commissioned by Jesus. Tradition has him ordained and consecrated bishop of Antioch by one of the Apostles, probably Peter, who it is said he succeeded. It is believed that Evodius coined the word 'Christian'
(Benedictines, Coulson, Delaney).
66 Photina (Svetlana) The Samaritan Woman  Holy Martyr Woman, with whom the Savior conversed at Jacob's Well (John. 4:5-42). fearlessly preached the Gospel in Carthage she and family miracle workers
Her sons Victor (named Photinus) and Joses; and her sisters Anatola, Phota, Photis, Paraskeva, Kyriake; Nero's daughter Domnina; and the Martyr Sebastian: The holy Martyr Photina was the Samaritan Woman, with whom the Savior conversed at Jacob's Well (John. 4:5-42).
During the time of the emperor Nero (54-68), who displayed excessive cruelty against Christians, St Photina lived in Carthage with her younger son Joses and fearlessly preached the Gospel there. Her eldest son Victor fought bravely in the Roman army against barbarians, and was appointed military commander in the city of Attalia (Asia Minor). Later, Nero called him to Italy to arrest and punish Christians. Sebastian, an official in Italy, said to St Victor, "I know that you, your mother and your brother, are followers of Christ. As a friend I advise you to submit to the will of the emperor. If you inform on any Christians, you will receive their wealth. I shall write to your mother and brother, asking them not to preach Christ in public. Let them practice their faith in secret."
St Victor replied, "I want to be a preacher of Christianity like my mother and brother." Sebastian said, "O Victor, we all know what woes await you, your mother and brother."
Then Sebastian suddenly felt a sharp pain in his eyes. He was dumbfounded, and his face was somber.

For three days he lay there blind, without uttering a word. On the fourth day he declared, "The God of the Christians is the only true God." St Victor asked why Sebastian had suddenly changed his mind. Sebastian replied, "Because Christ is calling me." Soon he was baptized, and immediately regained his sight. St Sebastian's servants, after witnessing the miracle, were also baptized.
Reports of this reached Nero, and he commanded that the Christians be brought to him at Rome.
Then the Lord Himself appeared to the confessors and said,
 "Fear not, for I am with you. Nero, and all who serve him, will be vanquished."
 The Lord said to St Victor, "From this day forward, your name will be Photinus,
because through you, many will be enlightened and will believe in Me."

The Lord then told the Christians to strengthen and encourage St Sebastian to peresevere until the end.

All these things, and even future events, were revealed to St Photina.
She left Carthage in the company of several Christians and joined the confessors in Rome.

  At Rome the emperor ordered the saints to be brought before him and he asked them whether they truly believed in Christ. All the confessors refused to renounce the Savior. Then the emperor gave orders to smash the martyrs' finger joints. During the torments, the confessors felt no pain, and their hands remained unharmed.
Nero ordered that Sts Sebastian, Photinus and Joses be blinded and locked up in prison, and St Photina and her five sisters Anatola, Phota, Photis, Paraskeva and Kyriake were sent to the imperial court under the supervision of Nero's daughter Domnina. St Photina converted both Domnina and all her servants to Christ. She also converted a sorcerer, who had brought her poisoned food to kill her.
    Three years passed, and Nero sent to the prison for one of his servants, who had been locked up. The messengers reported to him that Sts Sebastian, Photinus and Joses, who had been blinded, had completely recovered, and that people were visiting them to hear their preaching, and indeed the whole prison had been transformed into a bright and fragrant place where God was glorified.
    Nero then gave orders to crucify the saints, and to beat their naked bodies with straps. On the fourth day the emperor sent servants to see whether the martyrs were still alive. But, approaching the place of the tortures, the servants fell blind. An angel of the Lord freed the martyrs from their crosses and healed them. The saints took pity on the blinded servants, and restored their sight by their prayers to the Lord. Those who were healed came to believe in Christ and were soon baptized.
    In an impotent rage Nero gave orders to flay the skin from St Photina and to throw the martyr down a well. Sebastian, Photinus and Joses had their legs cut off, and they were thrown to dogs, and then had their skin flayed off. The sisters of St Photina also suffered terrible torments. Nero gave orders to cut off their breasts and then to flay their skin. An expert in cruelty, the emperor readied the fiercest execution for St Photis: they tied her by the feet to the tops of two bent-over trees. When the ropes were cut the trees sprang upright and tore the martyr apart. The emperor ordered the others beheaded. St Photina was removed from the well and locked up in prison for twenty days.
    After this Nero had her brought to him and asked if she would now relent and offer sacrifice to the idols. St Photina spit in the face of the emperor, and laughing at him, said, "O most impious of the blind, you profligate and stupid man! Do you think me so deluded that I would consent to renounce my Lord Christ and instead offer sacrifice to idols as blind as you?"
Hearing such words, Nero gave orders to again throw the martyr down the well, where she surrendered her soul to God (ca. 66).
On the Greek Calendar, St Photina is commemorated on February 26.
Romæ sancti Joánnis, Apóstoli et Evangelístæ, ante Portam Latínam; qui, ab Epheso, jussu Domitiáni, vinctus Romam est perdúctus, et, judicánte Senátu, ante eándem portam in ólei fervéntis dólium missus, exívit inde púrior et vegétior quam intrávit.
    At Rome, the Apostle and Evangelist St. John before the Latin Gate.  He was bound and brought to Rome from Ephesus by the order of Domitian, and the Senate condemned him to be taken to that gate and placed in a cauldron of boiling oil, from which he came forth more healthy and vigorous than before
.

94? ST JOHN BEFORE THE LATIN GATE
IN the Roman Martyrology for May 6 the first announcement takes the following form: “At Rome, of St John before the Latin Gate, who, at the command of Domitian, was brought in fetters from Ephesus to Rome, and by the verdict of the Senate, was cast into a cauldron of boiling oil before that gate, and came forth thence more hale and more hearty (purior atque vegetior) than he entered it”.
   The phrase is that of St Jerome (Adversus Jovinianum, i, 26), and it is based upon the still earlier statement of Tertullian (De praescriptionibus, ch. 36). Alban Butler, in common with the Bollandists and the most critical scholars of his time, such as Tillemont, raises no question as to the historic fact and lays stress upon it as an equivalent martyrdom. His devotional treatment of the subject may be here recapitulated.
  When the two sons of Zebedee, James and John, strangers as yet to the mystery of the cross and the nature of Christ’s kingdom, had, through their mother’s lips, petitioned for places of honour in the day of His triumph, He asked them if they were prepared to drink of His cup. They answered boldly, assuring their master that they were ready to undergo anything for His sake.
Our Lord thereupon promised them that their sincerity should be put to trial and that they should both be partakers of the cup of His sufferings. This was literally fulfilled in St James on his being put to death for the faith by Herod, and this day’s festival records in part the manner in which it was verified in St John. It may, indeed, be said that this favourite disciple who so tenderly loved his Master, had already had experience of the bitterness of the chalice when he was present on Calvary. But our Saviour’s prediction was to be fulfilled in a more particular manner, which should entitle him to the merit and crown of martyrdom, the instrument of this trial, postponed for more than half a century, being Domitian, the last of the twelve Caesars.
    He was a tyrant, detestable on account of his cruelty, and he was the author of the second general persecution of the Church. St John, the only surviving apostle, who was famous for the veneration paid to him while he governed the churches of Asia, was arrested at Ephesus and sent prisoner to Rome about the year 94. Regardless of his victim’s great age and gentle bearing, the emperor condemned him to a barbarous form of death. He was probably first scourged, according to the Roman custom, and then thrown into a cauldron of boiling oil.
We cannot doubt that St John exulted in the thought of laying down his life for the faith and rejoining the Master whom he loved. God accepted his oblation and in some sense crowned his desire. He conferred on him the merit of martyrdom, but suspended the operation of the fire, as he had formerly preserved the three children from hurt in the Babylonian furnace. The seething oil was changed into a refreshing bath, so that Domitian, who entertained a great idea of the power of magic, and who, it is alleged, had previously found himself baffled by some prodigy when Apollonius of Tyana was brought before him, now contented himself with banishing the apostle to the island of Patmos. Under the mild rule of Domitian’s successor, Nerva, St John is believed to have returned to Ephesus and there peacefully to have fallen asleep in the Lord.

   The localization of the alleged miracle outside the Latin gate is certainly not historical, for the Ports Latina belongs to the walls of Aurelian, two centuries later than St John’s time. This particular festival cannot be traced farther back in the Roman church than the sacramentary of Pope Adrian, towards the close of the eighth century. There is a church of St John at the Porta Latina, replacing an older one which owed its existence to that pontiff and presumably was dedicated on this day.
   Mgr Duchesne suggests that the choice of this date (May 6) is connected with the occurrence in the Byzantine calendar of a feast on May 8, commemorating a miracle of St John at Ephesus. In the so-called Missale Gothicum there is a Mass of St John the Evangelist which must have fallen in May, not long after that of the Finding of the Cross. The incident of the boiling oil seems originally to have belonged to certain apocryphal but early “Acts of John”, of which we now only possess fragments.

In a Motu Proprio of John XXIII dated July 25 1960, this feast was dropped from the Roman Calendar.
See L. Duchesne, Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, pp. 508, 521, and Christian Worship (1920), pp. 281—282. On the general question, see K. A. Kellner, Heortology (1908), p. 298.

1st v. St. Lucius Bishop of Cyrene 1/of “prophets and doctors” in Ptolemais, Africa
Cyréne, in Líbya, sancti Lúcii Epíscopi, quem in Actibus Apostolórum sanctus Lucas commémorat.
    At Cyrene in Africa, Bishop St. Lucius, who is mentioned by St. Luke in the Acts of the Apostles.
Bishop of Cyrene in Ptolemais, Africa. He is one of the “prophets and doctors” mentioned in Acts.
Lucius of Cyrene B (RM) 1st century.
Saint Lucius was one of the 'prophets and doctors' in the church at Antioch when Paul and Barnabas were consecrated for their apostolate (Acts 13:1). It is said that he was from 'Cyrene,' which is the source of the tradition that he was the first bishop of the city in the Ptolemais
(Africa) (Benedictines).
259 Sts. Marian a lector or reader; and James a deacon; experienced visions, including martyred bishop
Often, it’s hard to find much detail from the lives of saints of the early Church. What we know about the third-century martyrs we honor today is likewise minimal. But we do know that they lived and died for the faith. Almost 2,000 years later, that is enough reason to honor them.

Born in North Africa, Marian was a lector or reader; James was a deacon. For their devotion to the faith they suffered during the persecution of Valerian.

Prior to their persecution Marian and James were visited by two bishops who encouraged them in the faith not long before they themselves were martyred. A short time later, Marian and James were arrested and interrogated. The two readily confessed their faith and, for that, were tortured. While in prison they are said to have experienced visions, including one of the two bishops who had visited them earlier.

On the last day of their lives, Marian and James joined other Christians facing martyrdom. They were blindfolded and then put to death. Their bodies were thrown into the water. The year was 259.

286 Gundula starb um 286 als Märtyrerin in der Nähe von Mailand.
Orthodoxe und katholische Kirche: 6. Mai
Gundula starb um 286 als Märtyrerin in der Nähe von Mailand. Weitere Daten aus ihrem Leben sind nicht bekannt.
3rd v. St. Heliodorus Martyr with Venustus and companions (7 to 77) in Africa
In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Heliodóri et Venústi, cum áliis septuagínta quinque.
   In Africa, the holy martyrs Heliodorus and Venustus and seventy-five others.
    They suffered under Emperor Diocletian Heliodorus and seventy others died in Africa. Others are reported as being martyred in Milan, Italy.
    Heliodorus, Venustus & Comp. MM (RM) 3rd century. Heliodurus and Venustus were among a group of 77 martyrs who suffered under Diocletian. Heliodorus and seven others died in Africa; Saint Ambrose (December 7) claims the rest of them for Milan. 
(Benedictines).
325 Theodotus Bishop of Cyprus suffered a long term of imprisonment B (RM)
In Cypro sancti Theódoti, Epíscopi Cyríniæ, qui, sub Licínio Imperatóre, gravíssima passus est, ac tandem, in Ecclésiæ pace, spíritum Deo réddidit.
    In Cyprus, St. Theodotus, bishop of Cyrinia, who having undergone grievous afflictions under Emperor Licinius, at length yielded his soul to God when peace was restored to the Church.
Bishop Theodotus of Cyrenia, Cyprus,under Lucinius (Benedictines).
335 St. Heliodorus Martyred Persian bishop of Mesopotamia with two priests Desan and Marjab
   
He died with his two priests, Desan and Marjab, and many others. King Shapur II instituted the persecution that brought about their martyrdom.
Damásci natális beáti Joánnis Damascéni, Presbyteri, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris, doctrína et sanctitáte célebris.  Hic, pro cultu sanctárum Imáginum, verbo et scriptis advérsus Leónem Isáuricum strénue decertávit; cujus Imperatóris ob calúmnias cum ipsi Joánni déxtera manus e Saracenórum Príncipe amputáta esset, idem, beátæ Maríæ Vírgini, cujus Imágines defénderat, se comméndans, prótinus déxteram íntegram sanámque recépit.  Ejus autem festívitas sexto Kaléndas Aprílis celebrátur.

At Damascus, the birthday of St. John Damascene, priest and doctor of the Church, renowned for sanctity and learning.  By means of his writing and preaching, he courageously resisted Leo the Isaurian, in defending the veneration paid to sacred images.  By order of this emperor his right hand was cut off, but commending himself before an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which he had defended, his hand was immediately restored to him, entire and sound.  His feast day is the 27th of
March.

4th v. Protogenes of Syria priest & bishop of Carrhaes banished by the Arian Emperor B (RM)
Carrhis, in Mesopotámia, sancti Protógenis, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
    At Carrhae in Mesopotamia, St. Protogenes, bishop and confessor.
Carrhis, in Mesopotámia, sancti Protógenis, Epíscopi et Confessóris.  At Carrhae in Mesopotamia, St. Protogenes, bishop and confessor.
Protogenes, a priest, was banished by the Arian Emperor Valens. He was recalled under Theodosius and consecrated bishop of Carrhae, Syria
(Benedictines).
362 Barbarus the Soldier, Bacchus, Callimachus and Dionysius; The Holy Martyrs served in the army of the emperor Julian the Apostate; miracles caused many conversions.
St Barbarus was secretly a Christian, and in a war with the Franks he gained victory in single combat against a mighty enemy soldier. For this he received great honor in the army and the acclamation of the emperor, and was given the title of comitus (imperial bodyguard). After the victory over the Franks, Bacchus wanted to offer sacrifice to the pagan gods, and he deferred to Barbarus as the victor, allowing him to have the honor of making the first sacrificial offering.
St Barbarus openly confessed himself a Christian and refused to offer the sacrifice. He was subjected to much torture for this, by order of Julian the Apostate. They suspended the saint and tore his body until his insides were falling out. St Barbarus called out to the Lord for help, and then an angel of God appeared and healed his wounds, so that not a trace of them remained.

Seeing this miracle, the military commander Bacchus and two soldiers, Callimachus and Dionysius, believed in Christ and repudiated the pagan gods. For this, they were immediately beheaded. They continued to torture St Barbarus. They tied him to a wheel and lit a fire under it, and they sprinkled the body of the sufferer with oil. But here also the power of God preserved the holy martyr unharmed. The fire burned many of the torturers, however, killing two. After this they continued to torment the holy Martyr Barbarus for another seven days.

Through miraculous help from on high, the saint remained unharmed. Seeing in this miracle the manifest power of God, many pagans were converted to the true God. St Barbarus finally completed his glorious endeavor by being beheaded by the sword in the year 362.
The martyr's body was buried in the city of Methona in the Peloponnesus by the pious Bishop Philikios.
6th v. St. Benedicta Mystic nun; St. Peter appeared in vision warn her of death
Romæ sanctæ Benedíctæ Vírginis.    At Rome, the virgin St. Benedícta.
Benedicta lived in a convent founded by St. Galla in Rome. Pope St. Gregory the Great states that St. Peter appeared in a vision to warn her of her approaching death.
    Benedicta of Rome V (RM). Benedicta a nun of the convent founded in Rome by Saint Galla (A Roman widow of the sixth century; feast, 5 October. According to St. Gregory the Great (Dial. IV, ch. xiii) she was the daughter of the younger Symmachus, a learned and virtuous patrician of Rome, whom Theodoric had unjustly condemned to death (525). Becoming a widow before the end of the first year of her married life, she, still very young, founded a convent and hospital near St. Peter's, there spent the remainder of her days in austerities and works of mercy, and ended her life with an edifying death. The letter of St. Fulgentius of Ruspe, "De statu viduarum", is supposed to have been addressed to her. Her church in Rome, near the Piazza Montanara, once held a picture of Our Lady, which according to tradition represents a vision vouchsafed to St. Galla. It is considered miraculous and was carried in recession in times of pestilence. It is now over the high altar of Santa Maria in Campitelli, of whom Saint Gregory the Great narrates her death was foretold to her by Saint Peter in a vision
(Benedictines).
7th v. Colman Mac Ui Cluasigh took his students to an island in the ocean to escape the pestilence (AC)
(also known as Colman of Cork)
  This Saint Colman was a professor at Cork. About 664, he wrote a prayer in verse (or lorica) seeking protection for the yellow plague that killed one-third of Ireland's population. He took his students to an island in the ocean to escape the pestilence. En route they chanted the prayer, which is believed to be the only extant writing from Finbarr's school at Cork. The prayer was included in Kathleen Hoagland's 1000 years of Irish poetry
(D'Arcy, Healy, Hoagland).
698 St. Eadbert Abbot bishop of Lindisfarne Ireland learning and knowledge of the Scriptures obedience to God's commandments
In Anglia, sancti Eadbérti, Epíscopi Lindisfarnénsis, doctrína et pietáte insígnis.
    In England, St. Eadbert, bishop of Lindisfarne, famed for his teachings and his piety.

698 ST EDBERT, BISHOP OF LINDISFARNE
THE Venerable Bede, writing of St Edbert, states that he was remarkable for his knowledge of the Bible, as well as for his faithful observance of the divine precepts. All his life long he was extremely generous to the poor, for whose benefit he set aside a tenth part of his possessions.
   Ordained successor to St Cuthbert in the see of Lindisfarne, he governed wisely for eleven years, and covered with lead St Finan’s great wooden cathedral church which had previously been thatched only with reeds, Scottish fashion. He made it a practice to retire twice a year for forty days of solitary prayer to the retreat—probably the tiny island known as St Cuthbert’s Isle—where his great predecessor had spent some time before finally withdrawing to Farne. When the relics of St Cuthbert were found incorrupt, St Edbert gave instructions that the body should be put into a new coffin which was to be raised above the pavement for greater veneration. He added that the space below would not long remain empty. Scarcely had his orders been carried out when he was seized with a fever which proved mortal, and his own remains were laid in the empty grave. A commemoration of St Edbert is made to-day in the diocese of Hexham.

All our information is, practically speaking, derived from Bede in his Historia Ecclesiastica, bk iv. C. Plummet in his notes, Canon Raine in DCB., the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. i, and Symeon of Durham add very little. St Edbert’s relics shared the wanderings of those of St Cuthbert, and ultimately rested with them at Durham.

Successor of St. Cuthbert (Born in Northumbria, England (?) or Ireland, c. 634; died on Inner Farne in March 20, 687; incorrupt 11 years after death) He was praised by St. Bede ("I have devoted my energies to the study of Scriptures, observing monastic discipline, and singing the daily services in church.") for his learning and knowledge of the Scriptures. Eadbert’s relics were enshrined in Durham, England, circa 875. In some lists he is called Edbert.
Edbert of Lindisfarne, OSB B (RM) (also known as Eadbert, Eadbeorht)
Died May 6, 698. When Saint Cuthbert (Born in Northumbria, England (?) or Ireland, c. 634; died on Inner Farne in March 20, 687), bishop of Lindisfarne, died in 687, he was succeeded by Saint Edbert. The venerable Bede (Born in Northumbria, England, 673; died at Jarrow, England, on May 25, 735; named Doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII in 1899) wrote that Edbert was a man noted for his knowledge of the Scriptures and for his obedience to God's commandments, and especially for his generosity. Bede tells us that Saint Edbert every year "obeyed the law of the Old Testament by giving one tenth of all his cattle, his crops, his fruit, and his clothing to the poor."
    Eleven years after St. Cuthbert's death, his coffin was opened and the body was found to be incorrupt, the joints still pliable and the clothing fresh and bright. Edbert kissed the clothing that had covered the saint's body, then ordered that new garments be put on the saint and a new coffin made. The coffin, he said, must be given a place of honor. And he instructed his monks to leave a space under it for his own grave, which he filled within a very short time.
    Edbert imitated his predecessor in other acts of godliness, spending 40 days in solitary meditation twice annually (Lent and before Christmas) on a small island, and building fine churches for the worship of God. He installed a leaden roof on the wooden church built by Saint Finan (Died 661 Irish monk of Iona succeeded Saint Aidan in the governance of the Northumbrian church) and dedicated to Saint Peter on Lindisfarne. Edbert lies, like Cuthbert, in Durham Cathedral, for the bodies of both saints were carried there in 875 after many years of being moved around to escape the marauders from Scandinavia
(Benedictines, Bentley, Farmer, Husenbeth).
747 St. Petronax Abbot “the Second Founder of Monte Cassino” restored after Lombards destruction
747 ST PETRONAX, ABBOT OF MONTE CASSINO
THE second founder of the abbey of Monte Cassino, St Petronax, was a native of Brescia. When on a visit to Rome he seems to have been induced by Pope St Gregory II to make a pilgrimage to the tomb of St Benedict, in the year 717. There, among the ruins of the old monastery which had been destroyed by the Lombards in 581, he found a few solitaries, who elected him their superior. Other disciples soon gathered round them. Through the generosity of prominent nobles, chief amongst whom was the Lombard duke of Beneventum, and with the strong support of three popes, he succeeded in rebuilding Monte Cassino, which, under his long and vigorous rule, regained its old eminence.
The English St Willibald, afterwards bishop of Eichstätt, received the habit at his hands. St Sturmius, founder of the abbey of Fulda, spent some time at Monte Cassino learning the primitive Benedictine rule, and great men of all kinds, princes as well as ecclesiastics, stayed within its hospitable walls. St Petronax ruled over the community until his death, the date of which was probably 747. Recent investigation has shown that St Willibald himself, during the ten years he spent at Monte Cassino, contributed much to the restoration of Benedictine discipline and to the general development of this great abbey.

The more relevant texts in Paul Warnefrid’s Historia Langobardorum have been extracted by the Bollandists, and by Mabillon, vol. iii, part x, pp. 693—698. But see especially Abbot J. Chapman, “La Restauration du Mont Cassin par l’Abbe Petronax” in the Revue Bene­dictine, vol. xxi (1904), pp. 74—80, and H. Leclercq in DAC., vol. xi, cc. 3451—3468.

From Brescia, Italy, he joined the Benedictines and in 717 was asked by Pope St. Gregory II to go to Monte Cassino to examine the ruins of the famed abbey which had been badly damaged by the Lombards in 580. After visiting St. Benedict's tomb, Petronax gathered together the hermits who occupied the old abbey and began rebuilding. Elected abbot for the reflowering abbey, he ruled Monte Cassino for three decades, making it once more the chief Benedictine institution.
Petronax of Monte Cassino, OSB Abbot (AC) Born at Brescia, Lombardy, Italy;
Just as the English monks suffered the depredations of marauders from Scandinavia, so the monastery of Monte Cassino had been grievously ruined when Lombards invaded that part of Italy in 581. Scarcely a stone stood on another in 717 when Petronax was induced by Pope Saint Gregory II (731; The 89th pope Laterane ducated subdeacon under Pope Saint Sergius Church treasurer/librarian under four popes known for learning/wisdom. As deacon -710- distinguished himself in his replies to Emperor Justinian when he accompanied Pope Constantine to Constantinople to oppose the Council of Trullo canon that declared patriarchate of Constantinople independent of Rome and helped to secure Justinian's acknowledgment of papal supremacy.) to make a pilgrimage to the tomb of Saint Benedict (Born Nursia Italy 490; died at Monte Cassino, 543) and visit the fallen monastery with the view of restoring cenobitical life at the monastery.
    Petronax found a few hermits there, who elected him their superior. Other disciples soon gathered around them. The saint determined to raise Monte Cassino to its old glory. Generous nobles, especially the duke of Beneventum, and three popes supported this effort. From Pope Zachary he obtained the rule of the monastery, written in Saint Benedict's own hand. The pope also gave him the monastery's old measure for bread and wine. Before Petronax died, Benedict's monastery on Monte Cassino was reborn, its old vigor restored. Saint Willibald, bishop of Eichstätt, and Saint Sturmius of Fulda were both monks under Petronax, the 'second founder of Monte Cassino'
(Benedictines, Bentley, Coulson, Walsh).
9th v. Barbarus The Holy Martyr, formerly a robber, lived in Greece and for a long time he committed robberies, extortions and murders; miracles after death; relics are located at the monastery of Kellios in Thessaly, near the city of Larissa.
But the Lord, Who does not desire the death of a sinner, turned him to repentance. Once, when Barbarus was sitting in a cave and gazing upon his stolen possessions, the grace of God touched his heart. He thought about the inevitability of death, and about the dread Last Judgment. Pondering over the multitude of his wicked deeds, he was distressed in his heart and he decided to make a beginning of repentance, saying, "The Lord did not despise the prayer of the robber hanging beside Him. May He spare me through His ineffable mercy."
    Barbarus left all his treasures behind in the cave and he went to the nearest church. He did not conceal his wicked deeds from the priest, and he asked to be accepted for repentance. The priest gave him a place in his own home, and St Barbarus followed him, going about on his hands and knees like a four-legged animal, since he considered himself unworthy to be called a man. In the household of the priest he lived with the cattle, eating with the animals and considering himself more wicked than any creature. Having received absolution from his sins from the priest, Barbarus went into the woods and lived there for twelve years, naked and without clothing, suffering from the cold and heat. His body became dirty and blackened all over.

Finally, St Barbarus received a sign from on high that his sins were forgiven, and that he would die a martyr's death.
Once, merchants came to the place where St Barbarus labored. In the deep grass before them they saw something moving. Thinking that this was an animal, they shot several arrows from their bows. Coming closer, they were terrified to see that they had mortally wounded a man. St Barbarus begged them not to grieve. He told them about himself and he asked that they relate what had happened to the priest at whose house he had once lived.
After this, St Barbarus yielded up his spirit to God. The priest, who had accepted the repentance of the former robber, found his body shining with a heavenly light. The priest buried the body of St Barbarus at the place where he was killed. Afterwards, a curative myrrh began to issue forth from the grave of the saint, which healed various maladies. His relics are located at the monastery of Kellios in Thessaly, near the city of
Larissa.
11th v. Salérni Translátio sancti Matthǽi, Apóstoli et Evangelístæ; cujus sacrum corpus, olim ex Æthiópia ad divérsas regiónes et demum ad eam urbem delátum, ibídem, in dedicáta ejus nómine Ecclésia, summo honóre cónditum fuit.
    At Salerno, the translation of St. Matthew, apostle and evangelist.  His revered body, previously transferred from Ethiopia to various countries, was finally taken to Salerno, and with great pomp was there placed in a church dedicated to his name
.

1300 Blessed Bonizella Piccolomini; Widow, devoted herself and all her wealth to the service of the poor (PC)
When Naddo Piccolomini died, his Sienese wife Bonizella devoted herself and all her wealth to the service of the poor in the district of Belvederio, Italy
(Benedictines).
1385  St Micah of Radonezh one of the first disciples of St Sergius of Radonezh Appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos Holy Apostles Peter and John the Theologian to St Sergius of Radonezh.
He lived with him in the same cell, and under his guidance he attained a high degree of spiritual perfection. For his meekness of soul and purity of heart, St Micah was permitted to witness the appearance of the Mother of God to his great teacher. Once, after St Sergius had completed the morning Rule of prayer, sat down to rest for awhile, but suddenly he said to his disciple, "Be alert, my child, for we shall have a wondrous visitation."
    Hardly had he uttered these words when a voice was heard, "The All-Pure One draws near." Suddenly there shone a light brighter than the sun. St Micah fell down upon the ground in fear, and lay there as if he were dead. When St Sergius lifted up his disciple, he asked, "Tell me, Father, what is the reason for this wondrous vision? My soul has nearly parted from my body from fright." St Sergius then informed his disciple about the appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos.
St Micah fell asleep in the Lord in the year 1385.
   St Micah's relics rest in a crypt at the Trinity-Sergiev Lavra. On December 10, 1734, over St Micah's tomb, a church was consecrated in honor of the Appearance of the Most Holy Theotokos and the Holy Apostles Peter and John the Theologian to St Sergius of Radonezh.
1492 Blessed Prudentia Castori abbess-founder; her fame rests on miracles reported wrought after her death; Her zeal was displayed not only amongst her nuns, whom she ruled with great prudence, but also in  bringing about the restoration of the church of the Visitation at Como OSA V (PC)
Blessed Prudentia joined the hermits of Saint Augustine(13 November, 354 28 August, 430) at Milan and later became abbess-founder of a new convent at Como, where she died
(Benedictines).
1492 BD PRUDENCE, VIRGIN her fame rests on miracles reported wrought after her death; Her zeal was displayed not only amongst her nuns, whom she ruled with great prudence, but also in  bringing about the restoration of the church of the Visitation at Como
This life of Bd Prudence seems to have been quite uneventful, and her fame rests entirely upon the miracles she is reported to have wrought after her death. A member of the noble Milanese family of the Casatori, she joined the Hermitesses of St Augustine in her native city. She was promoted to be superior of the convent of St Mark at Como, and succeeded in settling the dissensions which were dividing the two communities. Her zeal was displayed not only amongst her nuns, whom she ruled with great prudence, but also in  bringing about the restoration of the church of the Visitation at Como. Full of years, labours and merits, she passed to her eternal reward after she had governed the house at Como for thirty-eight years.

Here the Bollandists, apparently with good reason, complain of the lack of materials though the Augustinian historiographer, Father A. Torelli, had done his best to help them. Their account is printed in vol. ii for May.

1590 Bl. Edward Jones a missionary priest and Anthony Middleton priest
1590 BB. EDWARD JONES AND ANTONY MIDDLETON, MARTYRS
EDWARD Jones was a Welshman from the diocese of St Asaph, and Antony Middle-ton was a Yorkshireman. Both were educated at the Douai College in Rheims, raised to the priesthood and chosen for the English mission. Middleton came to London in 1586, and owing to his juvenile appearance and small stature was able to labour for a considerable time without rousing suspicion. Jones, who followed two years later, at once made a name for himself as a fervent and eloquent preacher. They were tracked down by spies who professed to be Catholics, and they appear to have been hanged before the doors of the houses in Fleet Street and Clerkenwell within which they had been arrested, the words “For Treason and Foreign Invasion” being posted up in large letters as an explanation of this summary “justice” which, as attested by witnesses present at the trial, was full of irregularities. Middleton, whose request that he might address the people was refused, called God to witness that he died simply and solely for the Catholic faith and for being a priest and preacher of the true religion. He then prayed that his death might obtain the forgiveness of his sins, the advancement of the Catholic faith and the conversion of heretics. According to the testimony of eye-witnesses, he was flung off the ladder, cut down, and disembowelled while still alive. They died on May 6, 1590.

The account originally given by Challoner in MMP., pp. 162—163 is not altogether accurate. See the fuller narrative printed by the Catholic Record Society, vol. v, pp. 182—186, and cf. Pollen, Acts of English Martyrs, pp. 308—309 and 315—317. It appears that Bd Edward Jones was sentenced in virtue of his own confession that he was a priest, made under torture.

   Blessed Edward Jones and Anthony Middleton, Martyrs Edward Jones from Wales and Anthony Middleton from Yorkshire were both educated at the Douai College in Rheims. They became priests and were sent to the English mission in the time of Elizabeth II. Middleton was the first to arrive in England, in 1586, and pursued the ministry for some time without being discovered, helped considerably by his youthful appearance and slight stature. Jones followed, in 1588, and quickly became known by the English Catholics as a devout and eloquent preacher. The two men of God were hunted down and captured with the aid of spies posing as Catholics, and they were hanged before the very doors of the houses in Fleet Street and Clerkenwell where they were arrested. Their trial is regarded as full of irregularities; the reason for the summary justice dispensed to them was spelled out in large letters: "For treason and foreign invasion." After offering their death for the forgiveness of their sins, the spread of the true Faith, and the conversion of heretics, they died on May 6, 1590
Blessed Antony Middleton & Edward Jones MM (AC); beatified in 1929. Antony Middleton was born at Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire, England, and educated for the secular priesthood at Rheims, France. Edward Jones was born in the diocese of Saint Asaph, Wales, and educated at Douai. He labored as a missionary priest in England from 1635 until his death. Both were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Clerkenwell, London, for being priests
(Benedictines).