Sunday   Saints of this Day May 08 Octávo Idus Maii   
  Sunday, May 8, 2016
The Ascension of the Lord (Solemnity)

Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

 



 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life.

CAUSES OF SAINTS 

May 8 – Our Lady of the Rosary (Pompeii, 1875) 
 
‘‘If you make known the Rosary you shall be saved’’  
The "Supplication to the Queen of the Holy Rosary" is a popular Marian tradition still very much alive in Italy. It was composed in 1883 by Blessed Bartolo Longo, a lawyer and founder of the new city of Pompeii, near Naples, 250 km south of Rome.

One day, during a walk in the countryside, Longo heard a voice say, "If you make known the Rosary you shall be saved." He decided to spread the devotion to the Virgin Mary, beginning with a new church dedicated to Our Lady of the Rosary.
With this church, now a Pontifical Shrine and international pilgrimage site, Bartolo Longo founded many organizations to help children and youth, especially the orphaned and abandoned.
Saint John Paul II visited Pompeii in 1979 and again for the closing of the Year of the Rosary, on October 7, 2003. And Pope Benedict XVI went there on pilgrimage on October 19, 2008.   Zenit.org, May 7, 2014

 
St John this day The Church commemorates because of the annual pilgrimage to his grave miracle of red dust
 193 St. Dionysius Bishop of Vienne, in Dauphine, France, successor of St. Justus 1/of 10 missionaries sent with St. Peregrinus to Gaul, by Pope St. Sixtus I.
 350 St Nikolaus von Myra Bischof von Myra in Lykien (heute Demre/Türkei) condemned Arianism
 496 St Michael Archangel appeared on Mount Gargano {San Giovanni Rotondo is there} in Apulia, South Italy, in the days of Pope Gelasius to bishop of Siponto
 515 St Abran Hermit and his brothers and sisters were all declared saints Ireland

615 Boniface IV, Pope student under Gregory the Great converted Roman temple of gods {Pantheon} into a Christian church dedicated to Our Lady and all saints corresponded with Saint Columba (RM)
618 ST DEUSDEDIT, POPE
 652 Bl Ida of Nivelles built a double monastery at Nivelles OSB Widow (AC)

685 St Benedict II, Pope Scripture scholar and an expert in sacred chants amended the process to speed approval of papal elections by having the exarch of Ravenna confirm Papal elections patron saint of Europe brought to orthodoxy Macarius, ex-patriarch of Antioch, from Monothelitism,  restored Roman churches upheld cause of Saint Wilfred of York
1079 St. Stanislaus noted for his preaching Bishop of Cracow killed by excommunicated King
14th v. St Arsenius the Lover of Labor gift of wonderworking
1416 Julian von Norwich 'Sixteen Revelations of Divine Love' niederschrieb

15-16 th v The Monks Zosima and Adrian of Volokolamsk, founders of the Sestrinsk monastery on the banks of the River Sestra
1785 Monk Arsenii of Novgorod, Fool-for-Christ transfer relics and "Saints-name-in-common" ("tezoimenitstvo") of this day
1835 St. Maria Magdalen of Canossa Foundress of the Daughters of Charity at Verona, Italy saw the Blessed Mother surrounded by six religious dressed in brown She herself tended the poorest and dirtiest children witnesses observed her rapt in ecstasy, seen levitating.


Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .

Do you want our Lord to give you many graces? Visit Him often. Do you want Him to give you few graces? Visit Him seldom. Visits to the Blessed Sacrament are powerful and indispensable means of overcoming the attacks of the devil. Make frequent visits to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament and the devil will be powerless against you.
-- St. John Bosco



May 8 – Our Lady of the Rosary (Pompeii, Italy, 1875) 
 
The holy Rosary is a blessed blending of mental and vocal prayer 
The Rosary is made up of two things: mental prayer and vocal prayer. In the Holy Rosary mental prayer is none other than meditation of the chief mysteries of the life, death and glory of Jesus Christ and of His Blessed Mother.
Vocal prayer consists in saying fifteen decades of the Hail Mary, each decade headed by an Our Father, while at the same time meditating on and contemplating the fifteen principal virtues which Jesus and Mary practiced in the fifteen mysteries of the Holy Rosary.
In the first five decades we must honor the five Joyous Mysteries and meditate on them; in the second five decades the Sorrowful Mysteries and in the third group of five, the Glorious Mysteries. So the Rosary is a blessed blending of mental and vocal prayer by which we honor and learn to imitate the mysteries and virtues of the life, death, passion and glory of Jesus and Mary.
Saint Louis de Montfort The Secret of the Rosary, Part 1, first Rose

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Our Lady of Pompeii (I) May 8 - Our Lady of Pompeii
In the autumn of 1872, Bartolo Longo (a lawyer, born in Latiana, Italy on February 11, 1841) arrived at the plain of Pompeii to take care of the affairs of Countess Marianna Farnararo De Fusco.
Bartolo was determined to evangelize the people of Pompeii. With the help of his wife, he inaugurated a confraternity of the Rosary and sought an image of the Blessed Virgin before which the Rosary could be recited every day.
He obtained one as a gift from a religious of the Monastery of the Rosary in Porta Medina.
The painting had modest artistic merit and was in very poor condition.
It portrayed Our Lady of the Rosary, with Saint Dominic and Saint Catherine of Siena.
The painting was provisionally exposed in a small chapel, but in that same month Bartolo Longo received permission from the Bishop of Nola to build a new church. Miracles were reported and pilgrimages began to frequent the shrine, which was consecrated on May 8, 1891. Bartolo Longo addressed an appeal to the faithful:
"In this place selected for its prodigies, we wish to leave a monument to the Queen of Victories to present and future generations."
Adapted from A. Rum, Dictionary of Mary, Catholic Book Publishing Co., NY, 1985.
MULTIMEDIA : Bogoroditse Dyevo Raduisya (Sergei Tolstokulakov)

God holding a tiny thing in his hand, like a small brown nut, which seemed so fragile and insignificant that she wondered why it did not crumble before her eyes. She understood that the thing was the entire created universe, which is as nothing compared to its Creator, and she was told,
 "God made it, God loves it, God keeps it." --
1416 Dame Julian of Norwich
"God knows that I love you, but I cannot remain with God and with men at the same time. The Heavenly Powers all have one will and praise God together.
On earth, however, there are many human wills, and each man has his own thoughts. I cannot leave God in order to live with people."
"My child, you must study and learn the Holy Scriptures constantly, even if you do not understand their power...
For when we have the words of the Holy Scriptures on our lips, the demons hear them and are terrified.
Then they flee from us, unable to bear the words of the Holy Spirit Who speaks through His apostles and prophets."  -- Saint Arsenius
       St John on this day The Church commemorates because of the annual pilgrimage to his grave miracle of red dust
 193 St. Dionysius Bishop of Vienne, in Dauphine, France, successor of St. Justus 1/of 10 missionaries sent with St.
Peregrinus to Gaul, by Pope St. Sixtus I.

 303 St. Victor the Moor ( from Mauretania, Africa) praetorian guard Martyr
 303 St Acacius of Byzantium Cappadocian centurion in the Roman army stationed in Thrace body was afterwards
miraculously brought to the shore of Squillace
in Calabria M (RM)
  306 THE FOUR CROWNED ONES, MARTYRS
 350 St Nikolaus von Myra Bischof von Myra in Lykien (heute Demre/Türkei) condemned Arianism
 375 St Emilia  mother of St Basil the Great Gregory of Nyssa, Peter of Sebaste, Macrina and Theosevia founded a
monastery in her old age

387 St. Helladius of Auxerre Bishop of Auxerre, France, for 3 decades. He converted his successor, St. Amator, to the religious life.
 450 St Arsenius the Great deacon Sketis monastery in midst of the desert standing at prayer, surrounded by a flame
5v  St. Odrian One of the first bishops of Waterford, Ireland -- part of an ancient deanery system at the time, ruled by abbot bishops. Odrian was a prelate.
 496 St Michael Archangel appeared on Mount Gargano {San Giovanni Rotondo is there} in Apulia, South Italy, in
the days of Pope Gelasius to bishop of Siponto

 515 St Abran Hermit and his brothers and sisters were all declared saints Ireland
6th v. Antony du Rocher disciple of Saint Benedict companion of Saint Maurus during mission to France, OSB Abbot
6th v. ST CYBI, on CUBY, ABBOT
6th v. St. Desideratus  Desire brothers- Desiderius & Deodatus miracles condemned Nestorianism/Eutychianism
 615 Boniface IV, Pope student under Gregory the Great converted Roman temple of gods {Pantheon} into a Christian
church dedicated to Our Lady and all saints corresponded with
Saint Columba (RM)
618 ST DEUSDEDIT, POPE
652 Bl Ida of Nivelles built a double monastery at Nivelles OSB Widow (AC)
 685 St Benedict II, Pope Scripture scholar and an expert in sacred chants amended the process to speed approval of
papal elections by having the exarch of Ravenna confirm Papal
elections patron saint of Europe brought to
orthodoxy Macarius, ex-patriarch of Antioch, from Monothelitism,  restored Roman churches upheld cause of
Saint Wilfred of York

7th v. St. Wiro A holy Irish bishop, who traveled to Rome with St. Plechelm, and the deacon Otger preached the faith
of Christ to the pagans in the Low Countries
       Saint Pimen, Faster of the Caves, won fame by his exploit of fasting
7th v. ST TYSILIO, OR SULIAU, ABBOT
 753 St. Wiro Bishop and missionary with Sts. Plechelm and Otger (sharing the same feast day) Boniface named Wiro
bishop of Utrecht, Netherlands

 789 ST WILLEHAD, BISHOP OF BREMEN
1079 St. Stanislaus noted for his preaching Bishop of Cracow killed by excommunicated King
1115 ST GODFREY, Bishop OF AMIENS
1175  St. Peter of Tarantaise (not Pope Innocent V) Cistercian archbishop reformer purging clergy of corrupt &
immoral members, aiding poor, promoting education Trusted advisor by popes and kings;
The author of his life, his constant companion at this period, testifies to numerous miracles which he wrought, mainly in curing the sick and multiplying provisions in time of famine.
1292 Bl Amatus Ronconi lay-brother at San Giuliano Abbey near Rimini, OSB (AC)
14th v. St Arsenius the Lover of Labor gift of wonderworking
1416 Julian von Norwich 'Sixteen Revelations of Divine Love' niederschrieb
1458 Bl Angelus of Masaccio martyred by the Fraticelli or Bertolani heretics because of his preaching in defense of the
Catholic faith , OSB Cam. M (AC)
15-16 th v The Monks Zosima and Adrian of Volokolamsk, founders of the Sestrinsk monastery on the banks of the
River Sestra
1785 Monk Arsenii of Novgorod, Fool-for-Christ transfer of his relics and with the "Saints-name-in-common"
("tezoimenitstvo") of this day
1835 St. Maria Magdalen of Canossa Foundress of the Daughters of Charity at Verona, Italy saw the Blessed Mother
surrounded by six religious dressed in brown She herself tended the poorest and dirtiest children witnesses
observed her rapt in ecstasy, and once she was seen levitating.
Plenary Indulgence for the Year of Priests  
(B) All truly penitent Christian faithful who, in church or oratory, devotedly attend Holy Mass and offer prayers to Jesus Christ, supreme and eternal Priest, for the priests of the Church, or perform any good work to sanctify and mould them to His Heart, are granted Plenary Indulgence, on the condition that they have expiated their sins through Sacramental Confession and prayed in accordance with the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff.

 This may be done on the opening and closing days of the Year of Priests, on the 150th anniversary of the death of St. Jean Marie Vianney, on the first Thursday of the month, or on any other day established by the ordinaries of particular places for the good of the faithful.


The elderly, the sick and all those who for any legitimate reason are unable to leave their homes, may still obtain Plenary Indulgence if, with the soul completely removed from attachment to any form of sin and with the intention of observing, as soon as they can, the usual three conditions, "on the days concerned, they pray for the sanctification of priests and offer their sickness and suffering to God through Mary, Queen of the Apostles".

Partial Indulgence is offered to all faithful each time they pray five Our Father, Ave Maria and Gloria Patri, or any other duly approved prayer "in honour of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, to ask that priests maintain purity and sanctity of life"
127 Sixtus I 115-125  , Pope survived as pope for about 10 years before being killed by the Roman authorities M (RM)
 Romæ natális beáti Xysti Primi, Papæ et Mártyris; qui, tempóribus Hadriáni Imperatóris, summa cum laude rexit Ecclésiam, ac demum, sub Antoníno Pio, ut sibi Christum lucrifáceret, libénter mortem sustínuit temporálem.
      At Rome, the birthday of blessed Pope Sixtus the First, martyr, who ruled the Church with distinction during the reign of Emperor Hadrian, and finally in the reign of Antoninus Pius he gladly accepted temporal death in order to gain Christ for himself. 
(also known as Xystus)

496 Pope St. Gelasius I feast Nov 21 conspicuous for his spirit of prayer, penance, and study. He took great delight in the company of monks, and was a true father to the poor

684-685 Benedict II, Pope Scripture scholar and an expert in sacred chants amended the process to speed approval of papal elections by having the exarch of Ravenna confirm Papal elections patron saint of Europe brought back to orthodoxy Macarius, the ex-patriarch of Antioch, from his Monothelitism, restored several Roman churches upheld the cause of Saint Wilfred of York (RM)




608-615 Boniface IV, Pope student under Gregory the Great converted Roman temple of gods {Pantheon} into a Christian church dedicated to Our Lady and all saints corresponded with Saint Columba (RM)
Romæ sancti Bonifátii Papæ Quarti, qui Pántheon in honórem beátæ Maríæ ad Mártyres dedicávit.
    At Rome, Pope St. Boniface IV, who dedicated the Pantheon to the honour of our Lady and the martyrs.
St. Boniface IV  608-615  25 May converted Pantheon into a Christian Church, the temple by Agrippa to Jupiter the Avenger, to Venus, and to Mars consecrated by the pope to the Virgin Mary and all the Martyrs. (Hence the title S. Maria Rotunda.) the first instance at Rome of a pagan temple into a place of Christian worship.

684-685 Pope St. Benedict II distinguished knowledge of the Scriptures and by his singing, and as a priest was remarkable for his humility, love of the poor, and generosity; Many of the churches of Rome were restored by him; and its clergy, its deaconries for the care of the poor, and its lay sacristans all benefited by his liberality.

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Plenary Indulgence for the Year of Priests
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
    These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is general and binds all the followers of Christ.

St John on this day The Church commemorates because of the annual pilgrimage to his grave miracle of red dust
When St John was more than one hundred years old, he took seven of his disciples and went to a spot outside the city of Ephesus.
There he told them to dig a grave in the form of a cross. Then he climbed into the grave and told his disciples to cover him with earth.  Later, the grave was opened and the saint's body was not there. 
Each year on May 8 a red dust would arise from the grave which the faithful collected in order to be healed of their illnesses.
St John's main Feast is on September 26.
Apostel und Evangelist Johannes
Orthodoxe Kirche: 8. Mai
Orthodoxe Kirche: 26. September - Niederlegung der Gebeine
Orthodoxe Kirche: 20. Juni - Übertragung der Gebeine und Kleider (in die Apostelkirche in Konstantinopel)
Katholische, Anglikanische und Evangelische Kirche: 27. Dezember

Das Neue Testament berichtet uns, dass Johannes und sein Bruder Jakobus Söhne des Zebedäus und der Salome waren und mit ihrem Vater als Fischer am See Genezareth arbeiteten. Nach außerbiblischer Überlieferung soll Salome eine Verwandte Marias gewesen sein und Jakobus soll der älteste, Johannes dagegen der jüngste Jünger Jesu gewesen sein. Johannes war wie Andreas wohl ein Schüler Johannes des Täufers. Johannes, der Lieblingsjünger Jesu ist neben Petrus sicher der wichtigste Apostel. Beide sind die Führer der Jerusalemer Gemeinde nach der Himmelfahrt Jesu. nach dem Apostelkonzil verläßt auch Johannes Jerusalem. Er ist wohl nach Kleinasien gegangen und hat von Ephesus aus die neu entstandenen Gemeinden geleitet, insbesondere jene sieben Gemeinden, die in der Offenbarung genannt sind. Vielleicht hat er auch in Persien unter den Parthern missioniert. Unter Diokletian wurde Johannes nach Patmos verbannt. Eine alte Legende berichtet, er sei vorher in Rom zum Tode verurteilt und in einen Kessel mit siedenden Öl geworfen worden, sei aber unversehrt geblieben (Gedenktag 6.5.). Unter Kaiser Nero soll Johannes nach Ephesus zurückgekehrt sein und Nachfolger des Bischofs Timotheus geworden sein. Her schrieb er nun sein Evangelium und die drei überlieferten Briefe. Johannes starb in hohem Alter um 100. In der theologischen Wissenschaft ist (und bleibt vielleicht) ungeklärt, ob Johannes der (alleinige) Verfasser des Evangeliums, der Briefe und der Offenbarung war.

The Holy Apostle and Evangelist John the Theologian occupies an unique place in the ranks of the chosen disciples of Christ the Saviour. Often in iconography the Apostle John is depicted as a gentle, majestic and spiritual elder, with features of innocent tenderness, with the imprint of complete calm upon his forehead and the deep look of a contemplator of unuttered revelations. Another main trait of the spiritual countenance of the Apostle John is revealed through his teaching about love, for which the title "Apostle of Love" is preeminently designated to him. Actually, all his writings are permeated by love, the basic concept of which leads to the comprehension, that God in His Being is Love (1 Jn. 4: 8). In his writings, Saint John dwells especially upon the manifestations of the inexpressible love of God for the world and for mankind, the love of his Divine Teacher. He constantly exhorts his disciples to mutual love one for another.

The service of Love -- was the entire pathway of life of the Apostle John the Theologian.

The qualities of calmness and profound contemplation were in him combined with an ardent fidelity, tender and boundless love with intensity and even a certain abruptness. From the brief indications of the Evangelists it is apparent, that he was endowed in the highest degree with an ardent nature, and his hearty passionateness sometimes reached such a stormy zealousness, that Jesus Christ was compelled to give the admonishment, that it was discordant with the spirit of the new teaching (Mk. 9: 38-40; Lk. 9: 49-50, 54?56) and He called the Apostle John and his brother by birth the Apostle James "Sons of Thunder" ("Boanerges"). During this while Saint John shows scant modesty, and besides his particular position among the Apostles as "the disciple whom Jesus loved", he did not stand out among the other disciples of the Saviour. The distinguishing features of his character were the observance and sensitivity to events, permeated by a keen sense of obedience to the Will of God. Impressions received from without rarely showed up in his word or actions, but they penetrated deeply and powerfully into the inner life of the holy Apostle John. Always sensitive to others, his heart ached for the perishing. The Apostle John with pious tremulation was attentive to the Divinely-inspired teaching of his Master, to the fulness of grace and truth, in pure and sublime comprehending the Glory of the Son of God. No feature of the earthly life of Christ the Saviour slipped past the penetrating gaze of the Apostle John, nor did any event occur, that did not leave a deep impression on his memory, since in him was concentrated all the fulness and wholeness of the human person. The thoughts also of the Apostle John the Theologian are imbued with suchlike an integral wholeness. The dichotomy of person did not exist for him. In accord with his precepts, where there is not full devotion, there is nothing. Having chosen the path to service to Christ, to the end of his life he fulfilled it with complete and undivided devotion. The Apostle John speaks about wholistic a devotion to Christ, about the fulness of life in Him, wherefore also sin is considered by him not as a weakness and injury of human nature, but as evil, as a negative principle, which is completely set in opposition to the good (Jn. 8: 34; 1 Jn. 3: 4, 8-9). In his perspective, it is necessary to belong either to Christ or to the devil, it is not possible to be of a mediocre lukewarm, undecided condition (1 Jn. 2: 22, 4: 3; Rev. 3: 15-16). Therefore he served the Lord with undivided love and self-denial, having repudiated everything that appertains to the ancient enemy of mankind, the enemy of truth and the father of lies (1 Jn. 2: 21-22). Just as strongly as he loves Christ, just as strongly he contemns the Anti-Christ; just as intensely he loves truth, with an equal intensity does he contemn falsehood, -- for light doth expel darkness (Jn. 8: 12; 12: 35-36). By the manifestation of the inner fire of love he witnesses with the unique power of spirit about the Divinity of Jesus Christ (Jn. 1: 1-18; 1 Jn. 5: 1-12).

To the Apostle John was given to express the last word of the Divine Revelation (i.e. the final book of the Holy Scripture), ushering in the most treasured mysteries of the Divine inner life, known only to the eternal Word of God, the Only-Begotten Son.

Truth is reflected in his mind and in his words, wherein he senses and grasps it in his heart. He has comprehension of eternal Truth, and as he sees it, he transmits it to his beloved spiritual children. The Apostle John with simplicity affirms or denies and speaks always with absolute precision (1 Jn. 1: 1). He hears the voice of the Lord, revealing to him what He Himself hears from the Father.

The theology of the Apostle John abolishes the borderline between the present and the future. Looking at the present time, he does not halt at it, but transports his gaze to the eternal in the past time and to the eternal in the future time. And therefore he, exhorting for holiness in life, solemnly proclaims, that "all, born of God, sin not" (1 Jn. 5: 18; 3: 9). In communion with God the true Christian partakes of life Divine, whereby the future of mankind is accomplished already on earth. In his explanation and disclosing of the teaching about the Economia of salvation, the Apostle John crosses over into the area of the eternal present, in which Heaven would co-incide with earth and the earth would be enlightened with the Light of Heavenly Glory.

Thus did the Galilean fisherman, this son of Zebedee, become Theologian proclaiming through Revelation the mystery of world-existence and the fate of mankind.

The celebration on 8 May of the holy Apostle John the Theologian was established by the Church in remembrance of the annual drawing forth on this day at the place of his burial of fine rose ashes, which believers gathered for healing from various maladies. The account about the life of the holy Evangelist John the Theologian is situated under 26 September, the day of his repose.

The Holy Apostle and Evangelist John SerbianOrthodoxChurch.net
The main commemoration of this great Apostle and Evangelist is on September 26th, but on May 8th is commemorated a wonderful revelation about his grave. When St John was more than a hundred years old, he took seven of his disciples, went outside the city of Ephesus and told the disciples to dig a grave in the form of a cross. Then the old man went down alive into the grave and was buried. When the faithful later opened John's grave, they did not find the body in it.
And on May 8th each year a dust arose from the grave, from which those suffering from many diseases were healed.

Martyrdom of the Great Saint Mark, the Apostle The Evangelist of the Land of Egypt. {COPTIC CHURCH}

On this day, which coincided with the 26th. of April 68 A.D., the great apostle St. Mark, the evangelist of the land of Egypt, was martyred. He was the first Pope of Alexandria and one of the Seventy Apostles.

His name was John, as the Holy Bible says: "He came to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose surname was Mark, where many were gathered together praying" (Acts 12:12). He was the one that the Lord Christ, to Whom is the glory, meant when He said: "Go into the city to a certain man, and say to him, The Teacher says, My time is at hand; I will keep the Passover at your house with My disciples" (Matthew 26:18).

His house was the first Christian church, where they ate the Passover, hid after the death of the Lord Christ, and in its upper room the Holy Spirit came upon them.

This Saint was born in Cyrene (One of the Five Western cities, Pentapolis - in North Africa). His father's name was Aristopolus and his mother's name was Mary. They were Jewish in faith, rich and of great honor. They educated him with the Greek and Hebrew cultures. He was called Mark after they emigrated to Jerusalem, where St. Peter had become a disciple to the Lord Christ. St. Peter was married to the cousin of Aristopolus. Mark visited St. Peter's house often, and from him he learned the Christian teachings.

Once Aristopolus and his son Mark were walking near the Jordan river, close by the desert, they encountered a raving lion and a lioness. It was evident to Aristopolus that it would be his end and the end of his Son, Mark. His compassion for his son compelled him to order him to escape to save himself. Mark answered, "Christ, in whose hands our lives are committed, will not let them prey on us." Saying this, he prayed, "O, Christ, Son of God protect us from the evil of these two beasts and terminate their offspring from this wilderness." Immediately, God granted this prayer, and the two beasts fell dead. His father marvelled and asked his son to tell him about the Lord Christ. He believed in the Lord Christ at the hands of his son who baptized him.

After the ascension of the Lord Christ, he accompanied Paul and Barnabas to preach the Gospel in Antioch, Seleucia, Cyprus, Salamis, and Perga Pamphylia where he left them and returned to Jerusalem. After the Apostolic Council in Jerusalem, he went with Barnabas to Cyprus.

After the departure of Barnabas, with the order of the Lord Christ, St. Mark went to Afrikia, Berka, and the Five Western cities. He preached the Gospel in these parts, and believed on his hands most of its people. From there, he went to Alexandria in the 1st. of Bashans 61 A.D.

When he entered the city, his shoe was torn because of the much walking in preaching and evangelism. He went to a cobbler in the city, called Anianus, to repair it. While he was repairing it the awl pierced his finger. Anianus shouted in Greek saying "EIS THEOS" which means "O, ONE GOD". When St. Mark heard these words his heart rejoiced exceedingly. He found it suitable to talk to him about the One God. The Apostle took some clay, spat on it and applied it to Anianus' finger, saying in the Name of Jesus Christ the Son of God, and the wound healed immediately, as if nothing happened to it.Moses, who brought the children of Israel out of Egypt, and gave them the Law, the captivity of the children of Israel to Babylon, and the prophecies that foretold the coming of Christ.

Anianus invited him to go to his house and brought to him his children. The Saint preached and baptized them in the Name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.

When the believers in the Name of Christ increased and the pagan people of the city heard that, they were raged with anger and thought of slaying St. Mark. The faithful advised him to get away for a short while for the sake of the safety of the church and its care. St. Mark ordained St. Anianus a Bishop for Alexandria, three priests and seven deacons. He went to the Five Western Cities, remained there for two years preaching, and ordained bishops, priests, and deacons.

He returned to Alexandria where he found the believers had increased in number, and built a church for them in the place known as Bokalia (The place of cows), east of Alexandria on the sea shore.
It came to pass, when he was celebrating the feast of the Resurrection on the 29th day of Baramudah, year 68 A.D., the same day coincided with the great pagan Celebration for the feast of the god Syrabis, a multitude of them assembled and attacked the church at Bokalia and forced their way in. They seized St. Mark, bound him with a thick rope and dragged him in the roads and streets crying, "Drag the dragon to the place of Cows." They continued dragging him with severe cruelty. His flesh was torn and scattered everywhere, and the ground of the city was covered with his blood. They cast him that night into a dark prison.
The angel of the Lord appeared to him and told him: "O Mark, the good servant, rejoice for your name has been written in the book of life, and you have been counted among the congregation of the saints." The angel disappeared, then the Lord Christ appeared to him, and gave him peace. His soul rejoiced and was glad.
The next morning (30th of Baramudah), the pagans took St. Mark from the prison. They tied his neck with a thick rope and did the same as the day before, dragging him over the rocks and stones. Finally, St. Mark delivered up his pure soul in the hand of God, and received the crown of martyrdom, the apostolic crown, the crown of evangelism, and the crown of virginity.
Nevertheless, St. Mark's death did not satisfy the rage of the pagans and their hatred. They gathered much firewood and prepared an inferno to burn him. A severe storm blew and heavy rains fell. The pagans became frightened, and they fled away in fear.  The believers came and took the holy body, carried it to the church they built at Bokalia, wrapped it up, prayed over him and place it in a coffin. They laid it in a secret place in this church.  The prayers of this great Saint and honorable Evangelist be with us and Glory be to our God forever. Amen.
193 St. Dionysius Bishop of Vienne, in Dauphine, France, successor of St. Justus one of the ten missionaries sent with St. Peregrinus to Gaul, by Pope St. Sixtus I.
Viénnæ, in Gállia, sancti Dionysii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.    At Vienne in France, St. Denis, bishop and confessor.
Dionysius of Vienne B (RM) Died after 193. Saint Dionysius is said to have been one of the ten missionaries sent into Gaul with Saint Peregrinus by Pope Sixtus I in the early 2nd century. He succeeded Saint Justus as bishop of Vienne in the Dauphiné. Some have erroneously described him as a martyr
(Benedictines).
303 St. Victor the Moor ( from Mauretania, Africa) praetorian guard Martyr
Medioláni item natális sancti Victóris Mártyris, qui, natióne Maurus et a primæva ætate Christiánus, a Maximiáno, cum esset in castris imperiálibus miles, compúlsus ut idólis sacrificáret, et in confessióne Dómini fortíssime persevérans, ideo, primum gráviter fústibus cæsus, sed, Deo protegénte, dolóris expers; deínde liquénti plumbo perfúsus, sed nihil pénitus læsus; novíssime gloriósi martyrii cursum, cápite abscíssus, implévit.
    At Milan, the birthday of the holy martyr Victor, a Moor.  He became a Christian in his youth and served in the imperial army.  When Maximian wished to force him to offer sacrifice to idols, he persevered with the greatest fortitude in the confession of the Lord.  He was first beaten with rods, but by God's protection without feeling any pain.  Following this, melted lead was poured over him, which did him no injury whatever.  The career of his glorious martyrdom was finally ended by his being beheaded.
also listed as Victor Maurus. He was labeled "the Moor" because he came from Mauretania, Africa. He was a member of the praetorian guard when a young man. He was in his old age when he was tortured and then beheaded at Milan, Italy, during the persecutions of co-Emperor Maximian.

303? ST VICTOR MAURUS, MARTYR
ST AMBROSE says of St Victor that he was one of the patrons of Milan, and as such he is associated with St Felix and St Nabor. According to tradition, he was a native of Mauretania, and was called Maurus to distinguish him from other con­fessors of the name of Victor. He is stated to have been a soldier in the Praetorian guard, a Christian from his youth, and to have been arrested for the faith when quite an old man. After enduring severe tortures, he suffered martyrdom by decapitation under Maximian in Milan about the year 303. His body was buried by order of the bishop, St Maternus, beside a little wood, and a church was after­wards built over his remains. St Gregory of Tours tells us that God honoured his tomb by many miracles. St Charles Borromeo caused the relics to be translated in 1576 to the new church in Milan which had then been recently built by the Olivetan monks and which still bears St Victor’s name.
In the passio of this martyr we have the usual fantastic accumulation of torments. He is said, for example, to have been basted with molten lead, which instantaneously cooled on touching his flesh, and did him no sort of harm. Nevertheless, the fact of his martyrdom and early veneration at Milan is beyond doubt. There is quite a considerable literature concerning St Victor the Moor, for which see CMH., p. 238. Consult especially F. Savio, .I santi Martiri di Milano (1906), pp. 3—24 and 59-65. The passio is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. ii.
   Called Maurus to distinguish him from other confessors named Victor. He is believed to have been a soldier in the Praetorian guard. Victor was a Christian from his youth, but it was not until he was an elderly man that he was arrested for the Faith. After severe tortures, including being basted with molten lead, he was decapitated under Maximian in Milan around the year 303. Later a church was erected over his grave. According to St. Gregory of Tours, many miracles occurred at the shrine. In 1576, at the request of St. Charles of Borromeo, Victor's relics were transferred to a new church in Milan established by the Olivetan monks. The church still bears St. Victor's name today. After a life of adherence to the Faith during perilous times, St. Victor Maurus was taken prisoner and tortured as an old man. Despite age, infirmity, and declining health, he remained steadfast in the Faith, gladly giving up his life for the Kingdom. His generous response to the call to martyrdom stands as a solemn sign to the modern church of the folly of the things of this world.
   Victor Maurus M (RM) (also known as Victor the Moor)  Born in Mauritania, North Africa; died in Milan, Italy, in 303. Saint Victor was a soldier in the Praetorian Guard who is associated by Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan from 374 to 397, with the martyrs SS. Nabor and Felix. He was martyred under Maximian. Many churches, especially in Milan, are dedicated to his honor. His cultus spread readily as far as England. Although little is known of his life, hagiographers have not hesitated to add details to the little information that is available (Benedictines, Farmer). In art, Saint Victor is depicted as a Moorish soldier trampling on a broken altar. He might also be portrayed as being roasted in an oven or a brazen bull, or thrown into a furnace. He is venerated in Milan
(Roeder).
303 Acacius of Byzantium Cappadocian centurion in the Roman army stationed in Thrace body was afterwards miraculously brought to the shore of Squillace in CalabriaM (RM)
Constantinópoli sancti Agáthii Centuriónis, qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni et Maximiáni, a Firmo Tribúno delátus quod Christiánus esset, et a Júdice Perínthi Bibiáno sævíssime tortus, Byzántii demum a Procónsule Flaccíno cápitis damnátus est.  Ipsíus corpus ad Scyllácium littus, in Calábria, divínitus póstea delátum est, atque ibi honorífice asservátum.
    At Constantinople, St. Acathius, who, being denounced as a Christian by the tribune Firmus, and cruelly tortured at Perinthus by the judge Bibian, was finally condemned to death at Byzantium by the procunsul Flaccinus.  His body was afterwards miraculously brought to the shore of Squillace in Calabria, where it is preserved with honour.
(also known as Agathus, Agario, Acato)

303 OR 305 ST ACACIUS, OR AGATHUS, MARTYR
WITH the exception of St Mucius, St Acacius, or Agathus, is the only genuine ancient martyr of Byzantium. He was a Cappadocian, a centurion in the imperial army, who perished for the faith during the persecution under Diocletian and Maximian. He suffered alone, and the seventy-seven companions who are com­monly associated with him must be referred elsewhere. According to his so-called “acts”, which, however, are not trustworthy, he was denounced by the tribune Firmus at Perinthus in Thrace, where he was cruelly tortured under the judge Bibienus. He was then taken to Byzantium, publicly scourged and finally beheaded.

Constantinople contained two, if not three, churches dedicated in honour of St Acacius, one of which was built by Constantine the Great. It was nicknamed “the Walnut”, because built into its structure was the walnut tree upon which the saint was said to have been suspended for his flagellation.

The Greek text of the Acts of Acacius is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. ii, and there is also an ancient Syriac version edited by P. Bedjan. See what has been written concerning this martyr by Delehaye in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxi (1912), p. 228, as well as in his Origines du Culte des Martyrs, pp. 233—236, and in his CMH., p. 239. This martyr’s name is found both in the ancient Syriac Breviarium of c. 412, and in the Spanish calendar of Carmona. Cf. also Salaville, “Les Églises de St Acace” in Échos d’Orient, vol. xi, pp. 105 seq.
Saint Acacius was a Cappadocian centurion in the Roman army stationed in Thrace, who was tortured and beheaded at Byzantium under Diocletian. Constantine the Great built a church in his honor (Benedictines). In art, Saint Acacius is a centurion with a bunch of thorns. He may also be shown (1) in armor with a standard and shield, or (2) in Byzantine art, with Saint Theodore Tyro (Roeder). He is venerated as San Acato in Avila and Cuenca (Spain) and as Saint Agario in Squillace (Calabria, Italy) (Roeder).
St. Acacius Martyr centurian in the imperial army
Acacius was a Cappadocian by birth, also known as Agathus. He was a enturian in the imperial army, was arrested for his faith on charges by Tribune Firmus in Perinthus, Thrace, tortured and then brought to Byzantium (Constantinople), where he was scourged and
beheaded.
306 THE FOUR CROWNED ONES, MARTYRS see also Nov 08
Ibídem, via Lavicána, natális sanctórum Quátuor Coronatórum fratrum, id est Sevéri, Severiáni, Carpóphori et Victoríni; qui, sub eódem Imperatóre, íctibus plumbatárum usque ad mortem cæsi sunt.  Horum autem nómina, quæ póstea, interjéctis annis, Dómino revelánte, osténsa sunt, cum mínime reperíri tunc potuíssent, statútum fuit ut anniversária dies ipsórum, una cum illis quinque, sub nómine sanctórum Quátuor Coronatórum recolerétur; qui mos, étiam postquam reveláta sunt, in Ecclésia perseverávit.
    Also, on the Lavican Way, the birthday of the saintly brothers, Severus, Severian, Carpophorus, and Victorinus, called the Four Crowned, who were scourged to death with leaded whips, during the reign of the same emperor.  Because their names, known some years afterwards by revelation, could not then be ascertained, it was ordered that their anniversary should be commemorated with the preceding five, under the name of the Four Saints Crowned.  This custom was retained by the Church, even after their names had been revealed.

Romæ, via Lavicána, tértio ab Urbe milliário, pássio sanctórum Mártyrum Cláudii, Nicóstrati, Symphoriáni, Castórii et Simplícii, qui, primo in cárcerem missi, deínde scorpiónibus gravíssime cæsi, tandem, cum ex fide Christi dimovéri non possent, a Diocletiáno jussi sunt in flúvium præcípites dari.
    At Rome, on the Lavican Way, three miles from the city, the martyrdom of the Saints Claudius, Nicostratus, Symphorian, Castorius, and Simplicius.  They were first sent to prison, then scourged with whips set with metal, but since they could not be made to forsake the faith of Christ, Diocletian ordered them to be thrown into the river.

THE Roman Martyrology has today: “At Rome, three miles from the City on the Via Lavicana, the passion of the holy martyrs Claudius, Nico­stratus, Symphorian, Castorius and Simplicius, who were first cast into prison, then terribly beaten with loaded whips, and finally, since they could not be turned from Christ’s faith, thrown headlong into the river by order of Diocletian. Likewise on the Via Lavicana the birthday of the four holy crowned brothers, namely, Severus, Severian, Carpophorus and Victorinus, who, under the same emperor, were beaten to death with blows from leaden scourges. Since their names, which in after years were made known by divine revelation, could not be discovered it was appointed that their anniversary, together with that of the other five, should be kept under the name of the Four Holy Crowned Ones; and this has continued to be done in the Church even after their names were revealed.”
These two entries and the passio upon which they are founded provide a puzzle which has not yet been solved with complete certainty. Severus, Severian, Carpophorus and Victorinus, names which the Roman Martyrology and Breviary say were revealed as those of the Four Crowned Martyrs, were borrowed from the martyrology of the diocese of Albano, where their feast is kept on August 8. On the other hand, the Four Crowned Martyrs were sometimes referred to as Claudius, Nicostratus, Symphorian and Castorius. These, with the addition of Simplicius, so far from being the names of Roman martyrs (as stated above), belonged to five martyrs under Diocletian in Pannonia.

The legend falls into two distinct parts, the conventional and vague “Roman passio”, preceded by the vivid and interesting “Pannonian passio” wherein, as Father Delehaye points out, we have a striking picture of the imperial quarries and workshops at Sirmium (Mitrovica in Yugoslavia), and Diocletian appears not simply as a commonplace blood-stained monster but as the emperor of rather unstable temperament with a passion for building. His attention is drawn by the work of four specially skilled carvers, Claudius, Nicostratus, Simpronian and Castorius, all Christians, and a fifth, Simplicius, who also has become a Christian, because it seems to him that the skill of the others is due to their religion. Dio­cletian orders them to do a number of carvings, which are duly executed with the exception of a statue of Aesculapius, which they will not make because they are Christians (though their other commissions have already included a large statue of the Sun-god). “If their religion enables them to do such good work, all the better”, says the emperor, and confides Aesculapius to some heathen workmen.

But public opinion was aroused against Claudius and his comrades, and they were jailed for refusing to sacrifice to the gods. Both Diocletian and his officer Lampadius treated them with moderation at first; but Lampadius dying suddenly, his relatives furiously blamed the five Christians, and the emperor was induced to order their death. Thereupon each was enclosed in a leaden box, and thrown into the river to drown. Three weeks later the bodies were retrieved by one Nico­demus.

A year later Diocletian was in Rome, where he built a temple to Aesculapius in the baths of Trajan, and ordered all his troops to sacrifice to the god. Four cornicularii refused: whereupon they were beaten to death with leaded scourges and their bodies cast into the common sewer. They were taken up and buried on the Via Lavicana by St Sebastian *[* The names Claudius, Nicostratus, Symphorian and Castorius, with Victorinus, also occur in the legend of St Sebastian, among the converts of St Polycarp the Priest who were cast into the sea, and have as such separate mention in the Roman Martyrology on July 7] and Pope Miltiades, who later directed, their names having been forgotten, that they should be commemorated under the names of Claudius, Nicostratus, Simpronian and Castorius.

A basilica was built and dedicated in honour of the Four Crowned Ones on the Coelian hill at Rome, probably during the first half of the fifth century: it became, and its successor still is, one of the titular churches of the cardinal-priests of the City. There is evidence that those thus commemorated were four of the Pannonian martyrs (why Simplicius was omitted does not appear), and that their relics were later translated to Rome. Then, it has been suggested, their names and history became known, and there emerged the difficulty that they were five, not four; and accordingly a hagiographer produced the second story outlined above, showing that the Quatuor Coronati were four Romans, not five Pannonians, and soldiers, not stone-masons. Of which convenient fiction Father Delehaye remarks that it is “ l’opprobre de l’hagiographie”.

It was natural that in the medieval organizations of” operative” masonry the Four Crowned Ones should be held in great honour. A poem of the early fifteenth century setting out the articles of one of these stone-mason gilds is preserved in MS. Royal XVII. A. i at the British Museum. It has a section headed Ars quatuor coronatorum, beginning: 

Pray we now to God almyght
And to hys moder Mary bryght;
and it then goes on to tell briefly the story “of these martyres fowre, that in thys craft were of gret honoure”. It is stated that those who want to know more about them may find—
In the legent of sanctorum
[i.e. the book Legenda Sanctorum]
The names of quatuor coronatorum.
Their fest wol be, withoute nay,
After Alle Halwen the eyght day.

The English Freemasons of modern times have in a sense clung to the tradition, and the most scholarly organ of the craft in this country has for many years past been published under the name Ars Quatuor Coronatorum. Bede refers to a church at Canterbury dedicated in honour of the Four Crowned Martyrs so early as c. 620.

Any detailed discussion of the problems outlined above would be out of place here. In the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii, Delehaye in 1910 devoted thirty-six folio pages to the question, editing the text of the passio of the Pannonian group, written, it is believed, by a certain Porphyry, and also the tenth-century recension of the same, due to one Peter of Naples. The Depositio martyrum of the fourth century, confirmed by the Leonine and other sacramentaries, leaves no doubt that this group of martyrs was honoured in Rome at an early date, and Delehaye, in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxii (1913), pp. 63—71, as well as in his Les passions des martyrs . . . (1921), pp. 328—344, his Etude sur le légendier romain (1936), pp. 65—73, and the CMH., pp. 590—591, adheres firmly to the view that there was only one group of martyrs, the stone-masons of Pannonia, whose relics were brought to Rome and interred in the catacomb on the Via Labicana. Other theories, however, have been propounded, notably by Mgr Duchesne in Mélanges d’archéologie et d’histoire, vol. xxxi (1911), pp. 231—246; by P. Franchi de’ Cavalieri in Studi e Testi, vol. xxiv (1912), pp. 57—66; and J. P. Kirsch in the Historisches Jahrbuch, vol. xxxviii (1917), pp. 72—97.

350 Nikolaus von Myra Bischof von Myra in Lykien (heute Demre/Türkei) condemned Arianism
Alle Kirchen: 6. Dezember  Orthodoxe Kirche auch 9. Mai (Übertragung der Gebeine)  Katholische Kirche auch 8. Mai (Übertragung der Gebeine)

Nikolaus von Myra
Legende, Brauchtum und Geschichte lassen sich bei der auch heute bekannten und beliebten Gestalt des Nikolaus kaum trennen. Der Nikolaus, den wir heute verehren, ist aber wahrscheinlich aus zwei historischen Personen entstanden, nämlich dem Bischof Nikolaus von Myra und dem Abt Nikolaus von Sion, der Bischof von Pinora war und am 10.12.564 in Lykien starb. Die nachfolgende Lebensgeschichte des Nikolaus von Myra entstand im 6. Jahrhundert. Sie konnte bisher historisch nicht belegt werden: Nikolaus wurde demnach um 300 Bischof von Myra in Lykien (heute Demre/Türkei). Während der bald darauf einsetzenden Verfolgungen wurde er um 310 gefangengenommen und im Kerker gefoltert. Unter Konstantin kam er dann frei und konnte sein Bischofsamt wieder wahrnehmen. 325 nahm er an dem Konzil in Nicäa teil. Er starb am 6. Dezember um 350 (342/343).

St. Nicholas, called "of Bari", Bishop of Myra (Fourth Century) 6 Dec. Feast day. The great veneration with which this saint has been honored for many ages and the number of altars and churches which have been everywhere dedicated in his memory are testimonials to his holiness and of the glory which he enjoys with God. He is said to have been born at Patara in Lycia, a province of Asia Minor. Myra, the capital, not far from the sea, was an episcopal see, and this church falling vacant, the holy Nicholas was chosen bishop, and in that station became famous by his extraordinary piety and zeal and many astonishing miracles. The Greek histories of his life agree that he suffered imprisonment of the faith and made a glorious confession in the latter part of the persecution raised by Dioletian, and that he was present at the Council of Nicaea and there condemned Arianism. The silence of other authors makes many justly suspect these circumstances. He died at Myra, and was buried in his cathedral.

Der Kult um Nikolaus entwickelte sich etwa 200 Jahre später in Griechenland und kam dann zunächst in die slawischen Länder (Nikolaus ist der Nationalheilige Rußlands). Nachdem Nikolaus im 9. Jahrhundert bereits der am meisten verehrte Heilige der Ostkirche nach der Gottesmutter war, wurden am 8. Mai 1087 seine Gebeine von Myra nach Bari übertragen (ob sie in Myra von Seeleuten geraubt wurden oder von Kaufleuten vor anrückenden Muslimen in Sicherheit gebracht wurden, ist unklar). Sein Fest wurde nun auch in der Westkirche begangen.

Eine Legende von Nikolaus berichtet, er habe drei Töchter einer armen Familie vor dem Bordell bewahrt, indem er durch das Fenster ihres Hauses drei Beutel mit Gold warf. Diese Legende dürfte ein Ursprung unseres Brauchtums am Nikolaustag sein. Eine andere ostkirchliche Legende berichtet von drei Hauptleuten, die der Kaiser aufgrund falscher Anklagen verurteilt und in einen Turm gesperrt hatte. Die drei riefen Nikolaus um Hilfe an und wurden wunderbar befreit. Anscheinend wurde der Turm auf ostkirchlichen Ikonen im Westen als Pökelfaß interpretiert und so entstand vielleicht die Legende von den fahrenden Scholaren, die von einem Metzger eingepökelt und von Nikolaus wieder zum Leben erweckt wurden. In einigen Gegenden wird Nikolaus auch als einer der 14 Nothelfer verehrt.

The greatest popularity of St. Nicholas is found neither in the eastern Mediterranean nor north-western Europe, great as that was, but in Russia. With St. Andred the Apostle he is patron of the nation, and the Russian Orthodox Church even observes the feast of his translation; so many Russian pilgrims came to Bari before the revolution that their government supported a church, hospital and hospice there. He is a patron saint also of Greece, Apulia, Sicily and Loraine, and of many cities and dioceses (including Galway) and churches innumerable. At Rome the basilica of St. Nicholas in the Jail of Tully (in Carcere) was founded between the end of the sixth and the beginning of the seventh centuries. He is named in the preparation of the Byzantine Mass.
375 St Emilia  mother of St Basil the Great Gregory of Nyssa, Peter of Sebaste, Macrina and Theosevia founded a monastery in her old age
She was the mother of St Basil the Great. In her youth, she desired to remain a life-long virgin, but was forced to marry. She bore nine children, and so endowed each of them with a Christian spirit that five of them became Christian saints: Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, Peter of Sebaste, Macrina and Theosevia.
She founded a monastery in her old age, where she lived with her daughter Macrina, and where she entered into rest in the Lord on May 8th, 375. SerbianOrthodoxChurch.net
387 St. Helladius of Auxerre Bishop of Auxerre, France, for three decades. He converted his successor, St. Amator, to the religious life
Antisiodóri sancti Helládii Epíscopi.    At Auxerre, St. Helladius, bishop.
Helladius of Auxerre B (RM) Helladius was bishop of Auxerre, France, for 30 years. He converted his own successor, Saint Amator, to a devout life (Benedictines).
450 Saint Arsenius the Great; deacon, Sketis monastery in the midst of the desert standing at prayer, surrounded by a flame
Arsenius der Große Orthodoxe Kirche: 8. Mai Katholische Kirche: 19. Juni
Born in the year 354 at Rome into a pious Christian family, which provided him a fine education and upbringing. He studied rhetoric and philosophy, and mastered the Latin and Greek languages. St Arsenius gave up philosophy and the vanity of worldly life, seeking instead the true wisdom praised by St James "pure, peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits" (Jas. 3:17). He entered the ranks of the clergy as a deacon in one of the Roman churches, dedicating himself to the service of God.

The emperor Theodosius (379-395), who ruled the eastern half of the Roman Empire, heard about his erudition and piety, and he wished to entrust Arsenius with the education of his sons Arcadius and Honorius. Arsenius, however, protested that he had given up secular studies in order to serve God. Against his will, but in obedience to the will of Pope Damasus (December 11), St Arsenius agreed to teach the imperial children, hoping to teach them Christian piety as well.  When he arrived at Constantinople, Arsenius was received with great honor by the emperor Theodosius, who charged him to educate his sons not only in wisdom, but also in piety, guarding them from the temptations of youth.
"Forget that they are the emperor's sons," said Theodosius, "for I want them to submit to you in all things, as to their father and teacher."

With fervor the saint devoted himself to the education of the youths, but the high esteem in which he was held troubled his spirit, which yearned for the quietude of monastic life. St Arsenius entreated the Lord to show him the way to salvation. The Lord heard his prayer and one time he heard a voice telling him,
"Arsenius, flee from men, and you shall be saved."
And then, removing his rich clothing and replacing it with old and tattered garments, he secretly left the palace, boarded a ship for Alexandria, and he made his way to Sketis, a monastery in the midst of the desert. Arriving at the church, he asked the priests to accept him into the monastic brotherhood, calling himself a wretched wanderer, though his very manner betrayed him as a cultivated man. The brethren led him to Abba John the Dwarf

St Arsenius zealously passed through his obediences and soon he surpassed many of the desert Fathers in asceticism. The saint again heard the Voice while he was praying, (November 9), famed for his holiness of life. He, wishing to test the newcomer's humility, did not seat Arsenius with the monks for the trapeza meal. He threw him a piece of dry bread saying, "Eat if you wish." St Arsenius got down on his hands and knees, and picked up the bread with his mouth. Then he crawled off into a corner and ate it. Seeing this, Elder John said, "He will be a great ascetic!" Then accepting Arsenius with love, he tonsured him into monasticism.
"Arsenius, hide from people and dwell in silence, this is the root of virtue."
From that moment St Arsenius settled in a solitary cell deep in the desert.
Having taken on the struggle of silence he seldom left his seclusion. He came to church only on Sundays and Feast days, observing complete silence and conversing with no one. When Abba Moses asked him why he hid himself from people, St Arsenius replied, "God knows that I love you, but I cannot remain with God and with men at the same time. The Heavenly Powers all have one will and praise God together. On earth, however, there are many human wills, and each man has his own thoughts. I cannot leave God in order to live with people."

Though absorbed in constant prayer, the saint did not refuse visiting monks his counsel and guidance, giving short, but perceptive answers to their questions. Once, a monk from Sketis saw the great Elder through a window standing at prayer, surrounded by a flame.
The handicraft of St Arsenius was to weave baskets, for which he used the fronds of date palms soaked in water. For a whole year St Arsenius did not change the water in the container, but merely added a little water to it from time to time. This caused his cell to be permeated with a foul stench. When asked why he did this, the saint replied that it was fitting for him to humble himself in this way, because in the world he had used incense and fragrant oils. He prayed that after death he would not experience the stench of hell.

The fame of the great ascetic spread far, and many wanted to see him, and they disturbed his tranquility. As a result, the saint was forced to move around from place to place. But those thirsting to receive his guidance and blessing still found him.  St Arsenius taught that many take upon themselves great deeds of repentance, fasting, and vigil, but it is rare for someone to guard his soul from pride, greed, jealousy, hatred of one's brother, remembrance of wrongs, and judgment. In this they resemble graves which are decorated outwardly, but filled with stinking bones.

A certain monk once asked St Arsenius what he should do when he read the Holy Scriptures and did not comprehend their meaning. The Elder answered, "My child, you must study and learn the Holy Scriptures constantly, even if you do not understand their power... For when we have the words of the Holy Scriptures on our lips, the demons hear them and are terrified. Then they flee from us, unable to bear the words of the Holy Spirit Who speaks through His apostles and prophets."

The monks heard how the saint often urged himself on in his efforts with the words, "Rouse yourself, Arsenius, work! Do not remain idle! You have not come here to rest, but to labor." He also said, "I have often regretted the words I have spoken, but I have never regretted my silence."

The great ascetic and keeper of silence was given the gift of tears with which his eyes were constantly filled. He spent fifty-five years at monastic labors and struggles. He spent forty years at Sketis, and ten years on the mountain of Troe near Memphis. Then he spent three years at Canopus, and two more years at Troe, where he fell asleep in the Lord.  Our holy, God-bearing Father Arsenius reposed when he was nearly one hundred years old, in the year 449 or 450.  His only disciples seem to have been Alexander, Zoilos, and Daniel (June 7).
Arsenius der Große Orthodoxe Kirche: 8. Mai Katholische Kirche: 19. Juni
   Arsenius der GrosseArsenius wurde 354 in Rom geboren. Er erwarb sich ein umfangreiches Wissen, wollte aber lieber Gott dienen und wurde Diakon an einer römischen Stadtkirche. Kaiser Theodosius (379-395) hörte von der Gelehrsamkeit des Arsenius und bat ihn, die Erziehung seiner Söhne Arcadius und Honorius zu übernehmen. Arsenius lehnte diese Aufgabe ab, wurde aber von Papst Dymas 383 nach Konstantinopel entsandt. Arsenius flehte ständig zu Gott, ihm zu zeigen, wie er sein Heil finden könne. Eines Tages hörte er eine Stimme, die ihm sagte: "Arsenius, flieh die Menschen und du wirst gerettet". Daraufhin verließ er heimlich Konstantinopel und ging in ein ägyptisches Skete-Kloster. Hier hörte er nach einiger Zeit wiederum eine Stimme, die ihm sagte: "Arsenius, flieh die Menschen und bleibe in der Stille". Arsenius ging daraufhin aus dem Kloster und lebte in einer Einsiedelei. Einem Mönch, der ihn fragte, warum er sich von den Menschen fernhielte, erwiderte Arsenius "Ich liebe alle, aber ich kann nicht gleichzeitig mit Gott und Menschen zusammen sein. Ich kann aber Gott nicht im Stich lassen, um mit den Menschen zu leben". Arsenius gab den Mönchen, die zu ihm kamen, kurze aber treffende Antworten auf ihre Fragen. Als ihn immer mehr Menschen aufsuchten, zog er in eine andere Einsiedelei. Mehrmals ging Arsenius in eine neue Einsiedelei, weil ihm zu viele Menschen seinen Rat und seinen Segen suchten. Arsenius gehört zu den großen "Wüstenvätern" Er starb in hohem Alter 449 oder 450.

Our Holy Father Arsenius the Great SerbianOrthodoxChurch.net
This famous saint was born of a patrician family in Rome, and was well-educated both in secular learning and philosophy and in spiritual wisdom. Abandoning all secular studies, he gave himself to the service of the Church and was deacon in a large church in Rome. Unmarried, retiring, silent and prayerful, Arsenius thought that he would spend his whole life in that way. But, by the providence of God, his life was directed in a different way. The Emperor Theodosius summoned him to bring up and educate his two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, and made him a senator, surrounding him with wealth, honour and luxury. But this was a greater burden than pleasure to the heart of Arsenius. It happened at one time that Arcadius was at fault, and Arsenius punished him for it. The insulted Arcadius thought up a harsh revenge on his teacher, and, when Arsenius discovered this, he dressed himself in simple clothing, went to the coast, got into a boat and sailed off to Egypt. When he arrived at the famous Scetis, he became a disciple of John the Dwarf and gave himself to asceticism. He considered himself as one dead, and, when he was informed that a rich kinsman had died and left him all his goods, he replied: `I died before he did. How, then, can I be his heirT He retired to a cell in the desert as into a grave, and there he spent his days weaving baskets from palm-leaves and his nights in prayer. He fled from men and from every conversation with men. Only on feast-days did he leave his cell and come to the church for Communion. In order not to become idle, he often put this question to himself: `Arsenius, why did you come into the desert?' He spent thirty-five years as a hermit, and all that time he was an example to the monks and the glory of monasticism. In all, he lived a hundred years and departed this life peacefully in 448, after long labours and trials voluntarily taken on himself. He went to the Kingdom of Christ the Lord, whom he had loved with all his heart and soul.
492- 496 Archangel Saint Michael appeared on Mount Gargano in Apulia, South Italy, in the days of Pope Gelasius
sancti Michaélis Archángeli In monte Gargáno Apparítio , quem Pius Papa Duodécimus Radiólogis et Radiumtherapéuticis Patrónum et Protectórum constítuit.
    On Mount Gargano {San Giovanni Rotondo is there}, the apparition of St. Michael Archangel, whom Pope Pius XII named the patron and protector of radiologists and radiotherapists.

492? THE APPEARING OF ST MICHAEL THE ARCHANGEL
WHEN people had become familiar with the idea that Michael the Arch­angel was not only the captain of the heavenly host and the great protector, but also the arbiter of man’s destinies on the threshold of the world to come (cf. his feast on September 29), some public and external manifestation of the appeals made to this beneficent influence in private could not long be delayed. Any nucleus provided by an alleged miraculous happening would awaken ready response and would suffice to crystallize into one determined form the latent devotion of the crowd.

There are indications of an early cult of St Michael, connecting him with the wonders wrought by the hot springs of Phrygia, notably at Hierapolis, and it seems certain that already in the fourth century a church was dedicated under his name near Constantinople, possibly in the lifetime of the first Christian emperor, Constantine. This impulse came from the East, though there is evidence that a basilica in honour of St Michael was constructed near Rome at the sixth milestone along the Via Salaria at an early date. Several Masses, appar­ently connected with this shrine, or possibly with others bearing the same dedication within the city, are provided in the earliest Roman Mass-book, the so-called Leonianum, and are assigned to the end of September.

Whether the dedication on Mount Garganus, in Apulia, where Greek influences were dominant, is older than this cannot be easily determined. According to the written legend, still sum­marized in the Breviary, it occurred in the time of Pope Gelasius (492-496). A bull which had strayed from the herd of a certain rich land-owner found its way into a cave near the summit of the eminence called Mount Garganus. In the search which was made for it portents occurred by which the archangel manifested his desire that this spot should be consecrated in his honour. Numberless miracles were believed to have been wrought in the cave or crypt, where a spring trickled which was accredited with healing virtue. That the fame of this shrine soon spread all over the West is manifested by the fact that Mount Garganus is mentioned in one of the oldest manuscripts of the Hieronymianum in connection with the feast of St Michael on September 29. Even in England the Anglo-Saxon collection of ser­mons called the Blickling Homilies, written before the end of the tenth century, supplied an account of Mount Garganus and its crypt chapel, from which, to quote a modern English version, we may learn that: “There was also from the same stone of the church roof, at the north side of the altar, a very pleasant and clear stream issuing, used by those who still dwell in that place. Beside this piece of water was a glass vessel hung on a silver chain, which received this joy-giving tide, and it was the custom of this people when they had been houselled (i.e. had received holy communion) that they by steps should ascend to the glass vessel and there take and taste the heavenly fluid.” This is an interesting piece of evidence for the fact that long before communion under both kinds was abolished for the laity, it was customary to take a draught of water after receiving the Precious Blood, or more probably, under Greek influences, after receiving the dipped Host, which is still the usual manner of administering the sacrament of the Eucharist in the East.
In a Motu Proprio of John XXIII dated July 25, 1960, this feast was dropped from the Roman Calendar. The full text of the legend is printed in Ughelli, vol. vii, cc. 1107—1111, and in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. viii; on which cf Ebert, Geschichte der Literatur des Mittelalters, vol. ii, p. 358. See also K. A. Kellner, Heortology (1908), pp. 328—332, and H. Leclercq in DAC., vol. xi, cc. 903—907. There has been confusion between this feast and that of St Michael on September 29, and Pope Benedict XIV proposed to suppress to-day’s observance, which has in fact now been done in the Benedictine calendar. There can be little doubt that the story of the foundation of Saint-Michel au Peril de Mer, the famous Mont-Saint-­Michel near Avranches, which is traditionally dated 709, was based on the legend of Monte Gargano. At what date St Michael’s Mount at Marazion in Cornwall received its name is not certainly known; but it may have been before Robert of Mortain presented the Mount to the monks of St Michael in Periculo Maris (Mont-Saint-Michel) c. 1086, if that charter be genuine: see T. Taylor, The Celtic Christianity of Cornwall (1916), pp. 141-168. See also Taylor’s St Michael’s Mount (1932); and J. R. Fletcher, Short History of St Michael’s Mount (1951).

Several apparitions of the Archangel Michael have been reported during the Christian centuries. One of the most outstanding of all such apparitions is the one which is commemorated in the universal Church on May 8. The Archangel Saint Michael appeared on Mount Gargano in Apulia, South Italy, in the days of Pope Gelasius (492- 496).
A shrine was erected in the cave of the apparition and it became the goal of devout pilgrimages in subsequent centuries.

The Apparition of St. Michael the Archangel (RM)
Today's feast commemorates the appearance of the archangel Michael (meaning "Who is like God?) on Mount Gargano near Manfredonia in southern Italy in the 6th century. In this apparition to the bishop of Siponto, the archangel requested that a church be built in his honor at the site. When the emperor Otho III reneged on his word not to kill the rebellious Roman senator Creseentius, he was overcome with remorse. Saint Romuald assigned him the penance of a barefoot pilgrimage to Saint Michael's on Mount Gargano (Benedictines, Husenbeth).
The grotto of St. Michael on Mount Gargano in Italy.
5v  St. Odrian  One of the first bishops of Waterford, Ireland. Waterford was part of an ancient deanery system at the time, ruled by abbot bishops. Odrian was a prelate.
O
drian of Waterford B (AC). Odrian is one of the early bishops of Waterford, Ireland
(Benedictines, Husenbeth).
515 Saint Abran Hermit  many miracles reported at his tomb, especially the healing of blindness his brothers and sisters were all declared saints also called Gibrian.
555 ST GIBRIAN
TOWARDS the end of the fifth century—so we are told—there arrived in Brittany from Ireland a family consisting of seven brothers and three sisters, all of whom had abandoned their native land that they might serve God more freely in a strange country. The men were St Gibrian, St Helan, St Tressan, St German, St Veran, St Abran and St Petran, and the women’s names were Francla, Pomptia and Posemna. St Gibrian, who was the eldest and a priest, was their leader. They eventually settled as solitaries in the forest land near the Marne, living alone, but not so far apart that they could not visit each other from time to time. Gibrian’s hermitage was at the junction of the Coole and the Marne. He died in his retreat after a life of prayer and austerity, and a chapel was erected over his tomb. To preserve his relics from the ravages of the Normans they were afterwards removed to the abbey of St Remigius at Rheims, where they remained until the French Revolution, when they were scattered and lost.

The Bollandists deal with this alleged family of saints in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. ii, printing what purports to be their story from a medieval manuscript at Rheims. A collection of reputed miracles at the shrine after the translation to Rheims is to be found in an appendix to the seventh volume for May. Dom Gougaud, in his Gaelic Pioneers of Chris­tianity, p. 4, seems to be right in treating the account as legendary, but these saints are still liturgically commemorated in some French dioceses, notably at Rheims itself. See also O’Hanlon, LIS., vol. v, p. 129.
From Ireland, Abran, the eldest of five brothers and three sisters, sailed to Brittany with his siblings. There all of them continued their hermitages and greatly influenced the people of the area. Abran and his brothers and sisters were all declared saints.
Gibrian (AC) The Irish hermit Saint Gibrian was the eldest of nine (or eight) siblings, all of whom migrated to Brittany where they became saints. They include his brothers Tressan (Trasain, a priest), Helan(us) (priest), Germanus, Abran (seems to be Gibrian himself), Petran, and sisters Franca, Promptia, Possenna. Gibrian labored near Rheims and was buried at a place now called after him Saint Gibrian. His cultus spread because of the many miracles reported at his tomb, especially the healing of blindness. His relics were translated to the basilica of Saint Remigius in Rheims
(Benedictines, Montague).
6th v. St. Desideratus is also known as Desire and brother of Desiderius and Deodatus miracles condemned Nestorianism and Eutychianism

550 ST DESIDERATUS, BISHOP OF BOURGES
ST DESIDERATUS (Désiré) was one of a holy trio, his two brothers, Desiderius and Deodatus, being locally venerated as saints, although there is no mention of any one of the three in the Roman Martyrology. They were the sons, we are told, of a worthy couple of Soissons, who not only devoted their time and possessions to relieving the poor, but practically turned their house into a hospital. Desideratus attached himself to the court of King Clotaire, to whom he became a sort of secre­tary of state, and over whom he exercised a most salutary influence. In the midst of the splendours by which he was surrounded he lived a mortified life, and he used the great powers with which he was entrusted to stamp out heresy and to punish simony. On various occasions he expressed a desire to retire into a monastery, but the proposal was always vetoed by the king, who declared that he ought rather to consult the public weal than to indulge his own private inclinations. Upon the death of St Arcadius in 541, Desideratus was chosen bishop of Bourges, and during the nine years of his episcopate he acquired a great reputation as a peacemaker and wonder-worker. The holy bishop took part in various synods—notably the fifth Council of Orleans and the second of Auvergne, both of which dealt with the errors of Nestorius and Eutyches, besides providing for the restoration of ecclesiastical discipline. In his old age St Desideratus obtained as vicar a young priest named Flavian, whose untimely death hastened his own end. He died on May 8, probably in the year 550.

The narrative printed in the Acta Sanctorum,, May, vol. ii, is of late date and unreliable; but there can be no question of the historical existence and pious activity of St Desideratus. See Duchesne, Faustus Épiscopaux, vol. ii, p. 28.

He became a courtier at the court of king Clotaire, was active in combating heresy and simony, and in 541, was made bishop of Bourgues. He attended several councils that condemned Nestorianism and Eutychianism, was reputed to have performed miracles and was known for his peace making abilities
Desideratus of Bourges B (AC) Desideratus succeeded Saint Arcadius as bishop of Bourges
(Benedictines).
6th v. ST CYBI, on CUBY, ABBOT see also Nov 08
OF the numerous Celtic saints whose feasts occur this month Cybi was probably one of the most important, but information about him is dependent chiefly on a very unreliable Latin vita of the thirteenth century and whatever can be gleaned from the evidence of place-names and local traditions. He was born in Cornwall, we are told, the son of Selyf (“St Levan”), and two old churches in his native county are dedicated in his honour, at Duloe, near Liskeard, and at Cuby, in Tregony. The life says he learned to read at seven, and twenty years later, after the common imaginary pilgrimage to Jerusalem, became a disciple of St Hilary, by whom he was made bishop at Poitiers. This is chronologically impossible. Cybi is supposed to have left Cornwall because he would not consent to be king there, and gone into what is now Monmouthshire; there is a place there called Llangibby, on the Usk. Then, by way of St David’s Menevia, he visited Ireland and spent four years on Aranmore with St Enda. He had to leave there because of a dispute with another monk, called Fintan the Priest, about a straying co~, and he went to the south of Meath where he founded a church. But Fintan followed him and turned him out and drove him eastward across Ireland and over the sea. The crossing was made in a coracle which had the usual framework, but no hides to cover it.

There is no necessity to suppose that St Cybi was ever in Ireland, for probably the writer of his life knew the traditions about St Enda, and by a confusion of names took Cybi to Aran and associated him with various incidents in the life of Enda. But when St Cybi lands in Anglesey we are on more solid ground, for this island was the chief centre of his cultus. Here he founded a monastery, and around that monastery rose the town called in English Holyhead but in Welsh Caer Gybi (“Cybi’s Fort”), as the smaller island on which it stands, Holy Island, is called Ynys Gybi. From it Cybi evangelized the neighbourhood, where his name appears in places and local legends, as elsewhere in Wales; and there he died and was buried, and his shrine was a place of pilgrimage. Throughout the middle ages his monastic community was represented by a college of secular canons, and on a gable of the fifteenth-century church of Holyhead may still be read the invocation, Sancte Kebie, ora pro nobis.

It is probable that St Cybi, like so many other Celtic saints, journeyed by water whenever he could; all the chief places bearing his name are on or near the sea. An old Welsh proverb is attributed to him, in conversation with “the son of Gwrgi”—“There is no misfortune like wickedness.” November 8 for his feast is taken from the Latin life; Welsh calendars and other sources give several other dates.

The Latin life spoken of above has been printed in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii, and the tangled story which it tells has been discussed very completely by Canon Doble in his booklet St Cuby (1929), nn. 22, in his Cornish Saints Series. See also A. W. Wade-Evans, The Life of St David (1923), pp. 98—500; and LBS., vol. ii, pp. 202—215. In his Vitae Sanctorum Brittaniae (1944) Wade-Evans gives the text and translation of the two versions of the Vita Kebii. Cf. E. G. Bowen, Settlements of the Celtic Saints in Wales (1954), pp. 118-120.
6th v. Antony du Rocher; disciple of Saint Benedict and a companion of Saint Maurus during his mission to France, OSB Abbot (AC)
Saint Antony was said to have been a disciple of Saint Benedict and a companion of Saint Maurus during his mission to France. He was the founder and abbot of Saint-Julian at Tours. His surname comes from his ending his days as a recluse on a spot called le Rocher. Only Francophiles still accept the story of Saint Maurus's French mission as factual
(Benedictines).
615 Boniface IV, Pope student under Gregory the Great converted Roman temple of gods {Pantheon} into a Christian church dedicated to Our Lady and all saints corresponded with Saint Columba (RM)
Romæ sancti Bonifátii Papæ Quarti, qui Pántheon in honórem beátæ Maríæ ad Mártyres dedicávit.
    At Rome, Pope St. Boniface IV, who dedicated the Pantheon to the honour of our Lady and the martyrs.

615 ST BONIFACE IV, POPE
NOT very much is known to us about the saintly pope who ruled the Church for six years under the title of Boniface IV. He was the son of a physician and a native of the “city” of Valeria in the Abruzzi. He is supposed to have been a pupil of St Gregory the Great in Rome, and the Benedictines accordingly claim him as a member of their order.
   His reign was signalized by the conversion of the Pantheon—the temple erected by Marcus Agrippa in honour of all the Roman deities—into a Christian church, dedicated in honour of our Lady and All Martyrs. The building was bestowed by the Emperor Phocas upon the Roman pontiff, who consecrated it on May 13, 609, as recorded in the Roman Martyrology (the church is now often called Santa Maria Rotonda from its shape). At a synod of Italian bishops, summoned primarily for the restoration of discipline, St Boniface conferred with St Mellitus, bishop of London, then on a visit to Rome, about the affairs of the English church. Boniface IV was the recipient of a famous and much-discussed letter from St Columban, which combines remarkable expressions of devotion and loyalty to the Holy See with unwarrantable insinuations of laxity in the matter of doctrine. This holy pope was buried in the portico of St Peter’s, but his remains were afterwards transferred to the interior of the basilica.
In the Acta Sanctorum Boniface is noticed on May 25 (May, vol. vi), but a more up-to-date account of his pontificate will be found in Mann, The Lives of the Popes, vol. i, pp. 268--279. Sec also. Duchesne, Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, pp. 317—318; and Laux, Der hl. Kolumban (1919), or in an earlier English form, The Life and Writings of St Columban (1914).
Born at Valeria, Abruzzi, Italy; Son of a doctor named John, Boniface may have been a student under Gregory the Great. Boniface was possibly a Benedictine monk of Saint Sebastian in Rome and became a dispensator when he entered papal service. He was elected pope in 608, was responsible for converting the Roman temple of the gods, the Pantheon in Rome, into a Christian church dedicated to Our Lady and all the saints. Boniface corresponded with Saint Columba (or Saint Columbanus?), who chided him for some of his theological stances while expressing devotion and loyalty to him (Benedictines, Delaney).

618 ST DEUSDEDIT, POPE see also Nov 08
Item Romæ sancti Deúsdedit Papæ Primi, qui tanti mériti fuit, ut leprósum ósculo a lepra sanáverit.
    Also at Rome, St. Deusdedit, pope, whose merit was so great that he cured a leper by kissing him.

VERY little is known of the life and three-year pontificate of Pope Deusdedit (Adeodatus I), who was a Roman by birth and son of a subdeacon named Stephen. The times were troubled by civil disorder, war, and by an epidemic of skin disease following an earthquake; St Deusdedit was foremost in caring for the suffering (the Roman Martyrology mentions the tradition of his having healed a “leper” by a kiss), and encouraged his impoverished clergy to do the same. He is said to have been the first pope to have used the leaden seals called bullae, from which papal “bulls” get their name: one such seal dating from his time still exists. Pope St Deusdedit is called a Benedictine in ancient Benedictine calendars, but there is no certain evidence for the statement.
See Duchesne, Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, pp. 319—320; H. K. Mann, Lives of the Popes, vol. i, pp. 280—293.
652 Blessed Ida of Nivelles built a double monastery at Nivelles OSB Widow (AC)
(also known as Itta, Iduberga) After the death of Blessed Pepin of Landen, his wife Ida built a double monastery at Nivelles. She and her younger daughter, Saint Gertrude entered the monastery, which was placed under the Benedictine Rule and governed by Gertrude (Benedictines). Several art historians give a stag with flaming horns as the emblem of Saint Ida of Nivelles, but it seems likely that this is a confusion with Ida of Toggenburg, whose proper attribute it is (Roeder). She is invoked against toothache and erysipelas
(Roeder).
685 Benedict II, Pope Scripture scholar and an expert in sacred chants amended the process to speed approval of papal elections by having the exarch of Ravenna confirm Papal elections patron saint of Europe brought back to orthodoxy Macarius, the ex-patriarch of Antioch, from his Monothelitism, restored several Roman churches upheld the cause of Saint Wilfred of York (RM)
Item Romæ sancti Benedícti Secúndi, Papæ et Confessóris.    Also at Rome, St. Benedict II, pope and confessor.
685 ST BENEDICT II, POPE
POPE St Benedict II was brought up from infancy in the service of the Church and became at an early age proficient in the Holy Scriptures, as also in ecclesiastical chant, for which he was an enthusiast. A Roman by birth, he took part in the government of the Church under Popes St Agatho and St Leo II. After the death of the latter in 683, he was elected to the chair of St Peter, his virtues, his liberality and his intellectual abilities marking him out as specially suited to fill that sacred office.
   In accordance with ancient custom, the popes were at that time still chosen by the clergy and people of Rome, the consent of the Christian emperor being also required. The embassies between Rome and Constantinople necessary before this sanction could be obtained frequently entailed not only inconvenience, but also delay, and nearly a year elapsed between the death of Pope Leo and the consecration of Benedict II. One of the successful efforts of the new pontiff was to induce the Emperor Constantine IV to issue a decree enacting that, for the future, the suffrages of the clergy and people of Rome should suffice for the election of the pope, the necessity for imperial confirmation being abolished or else its delegation to the exarch in Italy being allowed. But there were further examples of imperial ratification.
So great was the emperor’s regard for St Benedict that he sent him locks of the hair of his two sons, Justinian and Heraclius—thus signifying to him, according to the symbolism of the time, that they were the Holy Father’s spiritual sons. St Benedict strove to win back to the true faith Macarius, Patriarch of Antioch, who had been deposed for heresy, and in his short pontificate (eleven months) he found time to restore several of the Roman churches. He was also interested in the English church, upholding the cause of St Wilfrid of York. St Benedict II died on May 8, 685, and was buried in St Peter’s.

The Acta Sanctorum treat Pope St Benedict II under May 7 (vol. ii). The Liber Ponti­ficalis (Duchesne, vol. i, pp. 363—365) is our principal authority; but see also Muratori, Annales, ad. ann. 684, and Hefele-Leclercq, Histoire des Conciles, vol. iii, pp. 549 seq. Mgr Mann in his Lives of the Popes, vol. i, part a, pp. 54—63, has gathered all the available infor­mation.
   Born in Rome, Italy; died March 8, 685. Not much is known of Saint Benedict's youth except that he was active in Church affairs. He became a Scripture scholar and an expert in sacred chants. Elected to succeed Leo II in 683, his consecration was delayed almost a year until June 26, 684, awaiting the emperor's confirmation. During his term, he amended the process to speed approval of papal elections by having the exarch of Ravenna confirm the election, rather than the emperor, thus eliminating long delays.

Benedict was greatly respected by Emperor Constantine the Bearded, who sent him locks of his sons' hair, making them the pope's spiritual sons. Benedict brought back to orthodoxy Macarius, the ex-patriarch of Antioch, from his Monothelitism, and restored several Roman churches. He upheld the cause of Saint Wilfred of York, who sought the return of his see from which he had been deposed by Saint Theodore. Benedict ruled for only 11 months. He is the patron saint of Europe
(Benedictines, Delaney, White).
7th v. St. Wiro A holy Irish bishop, who traveled to Rome with St. Plechelm, and the deacon Otger preached the faith of Christ to the pagans in the Low Countries
He afterwards preached the faith of Christ to the pagans in the Low Countries.
Prince Pepin of Herstal was a great admirer of his sanctity, and bestowed on him a lonely wood, called the Mount of St. Peter, now of St. Odilia, near the river Roer, one league from Ruremund; and repaired to him often barefoot to confess his sins. Broken by austerities and old age, he departed to our Lord in the seventh century.
See Mirebus, and his ancient life in the Bollandists, with a hymn, and several other memoirs t. 2, Maij. p. 309.
7th v. ST TYSILIO, OR SULIAU, ABBOT
ACCORDING to the Breton account and the few surviving Welsh references, Tysilio was son of Brochwel Ysgythrog, prince of Powys in North Wales. When a young man he ran away to be a monk under the abbot Gwyddfarch at Meifod in  Montgomeryshire. His father sent to fetch him back, but Tysilio refused to go and fled for greater security to an islet in the Menai Straits, Ynys Suliau. At the end of seven years he came back to Meifod, where he found Gwyddfarch in spite of his great age contemplating a pilgrimage to Rome. “I know what that means”, was Tysilio’s comment. “You want to see the churches and palaces there. Dream about them, instead of going all that way.” He took the old man a long walk over the mountains and tired him out, and Tysilio did not fail to point out that Rome was a much longer journey than they had been. Then they sat down and Gwydd­farch went to sleep, and dreamed he saw all the glory of Rome, and he was satisfied. When he died, Tysilio became abbot in his place.

When his elder brother, the prince of Powys, died, his widow Haiarnwedd wished to marry Tysilio and make him prince. To this he would not agree, for he had no taste for war and secular pursuits or for marriage, least of all within the prohibited degrees. His sister-in-law took this refusal as a personal insult, drove him from Meifod, and he took refuge at Builth in Breconshire. As her anger still pursued him, he left Wales altogether and sailed for Armorica with some of his monks. They landed at the mouth of the Rance, established contact with St Malo, and settled at the placc still called Saint-Suliac. When Haiarnwedd died, a deputa­tion came to fetch Tysilio back to Meifod; he did not go, but sent a book of the gospels and his staff as an indication of goodwill and blessing. He died and was buried in Brittany. As well as Ynys Suliau, Tysilio’s name is associated with other places in Wales; it is an element of the Anglesey (faked) place-name which has the distinction of having twenty-four syllables in it. A twelfth-century bard, Cynddelw, wrote of Tysilio, “the royal saint of Powys”:

A lord magnificent
A prince with princes holding intercourse.
Whoso loves cruelty he sorely hates,
Whilst all whose ends are loveable he loves;
To chastisement he charity prefers.

See LBS., vol. iv, pp. 296—305; the Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales, vol. iii (1807) A.. W. Wade-Evans, Welsh Christian Origins (1934), pp. 200-201; and especially G. H. Doble, St Sulian and St Tysilio (1936); they seem to have been two (or three) different people, one Breton and one Welsh. See E. G. Bowen, Settlements of the Celtic Saints in Wales (1954).

Saint Pimen, Faster of the Caves, won fame by his exploit of fasting. The relics of the saint rest in the Far Caves. He is also commemorated on August 28.
753 St. Wiro Bishop and missionary with Sts. Plechelm and Otger (sharing the same feast day) Saint Boniface named Wiro bishop of Utrecht, Netherlands
Apud Ruræmóndam, in Géldria, sancti Wirónis, Epíscopi Scoti.    At Ruremonde in Holland, St. Wiro, bishop of Scotland.

8th v. SS. WIRO AND PLECHELM, BISHOPS, AND ST OTGER
With respect to the birthplace of St Wiro we can only say that it was somewhere in the British Isles, for whereas Alcuin asserts that he was a Northumbrian, certain other writers declare that he was a Scotsman and others that he was a native of County Clare in Ireland. We read that from his earliest youth he modelled himself upon St Patrick, St Cuthbert and St Columban. After his ordination he went with another priest, St Plechelm (probably also a Northumbrian) and a deacon, St Otger, to Rome, where he and St Plechelm are said to have been consecrated to be regionary bishops. When they had laboured for some time in their native land, the three friends—perhaps at the suggestions of St Willibrord—passed over to the Netherlands, where they spent part of their time evangelizing the lower valley of the Meuse, and the rest in retirement and prayer. Pepin of Herstal gave them St Peter’s Hill, afterwards called the Odilienberg, at a league’s distance from Roermond, and there they built several cells and a church. Pepin is said to have held Wiro in such great veneration that he appointed him his director and made it a rule to repair to him barefoot every Lent, and at other times, to receive penance from him or from St Plechelm.

A medieval biography of St Wiro is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. ii, and of Plechelm in July, vol. iv, but they are late and unreliable. See rather Van der Essen, Etude critique et littéraire sur les vitae des saints merovingiens, pp. 105—109; J. Snieders, “L’In­fluence de l’hagiographie irlandaise”, in the Revue d’Histoire Ecclésiastique, vol. xxiv (1928), pp. 849—850; and W. Levison, England and the Continent . . . (1946), pp. 82—83.

 Originally from Northumbria, England, or perhaps Scotland He went with the priest Pleehelm (also from Northumbria) and a deacon, Otger, to Rome where Wiro and Plechelm were consecrated bishops.

 They labored for a time in Northumbria and then journeyed to Germany where he gave assistance to St. Boniface in his missionary enterprise. Boniface named Wiro bishop of Utrecht, Netherlands, circa 741 and with two companions Wiro founded a monastery at Odilienburg, in the lower Meuse River valley of Belgium and France, on land donated by Pepin of Heristal (r. 687-714).

Wiro, Plechelm & Otger, OSB MM (RM) (Plechelm is also known as Pleghelm & Otger as Odger or Oteger) Born in Northumbria; died c. 739 or 753 (the later date seems more probable). While Wiro is believed to have been a native of Northumbria, he might possibly be from Ireland or Scotland--the record is not clear. (The Roman Martyrology styles him Wiro, bishop of Scotiae.) His biographer tells us that he was ordained a priest and with Plechelm (a fellow Northumbrian and priest) and Otger (a deacon) went to Rome, where Wiro and Plechelm were consecrated regionary bishops. Others say that Wiro was consecrated bishop of Utrecht by Saint Boniface. He joined with Boniface in his letter of correction to King Ethelbald of Mercia in 746.

After doing missionary work in Northumbria, they went to Friesland in the Netherlands where they evangelized the inhabitants of the lower Meuse Valley under the direction of either Saint Swithbert or Saint Willibrord. They built a small church and monastery at Peterkloster (later Odilienberg) on land granted them by Pepin of Herstal. Later they were martyred by the Frieslanders while preaching the Gospel. The relics of Wiro and Plechelm were translated to the church they built at Roermond, but Otger's remained at their original burial place at Odilienberg (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer).
Saint Wiro is portrayed as hearing the confession of the king. He is venerated in Peterkloster (Odilienberg) (Roeder).
789 ST WILLEHAD, BISHOP OF BREMEN:  see also Nov 08: St Anskar, seems to be responsible for the book of miracles attached to his life
In vico Blexen, ad Visúrgim flúvium, in Germánia, sancti Willehádi, qui primus éxstitit Breménsis civitátis Epíscopus; atque, una cum sancto Bonifátio, cujus discípulus fuit, in Frísia et Saxónia Evangélium propagávit.
    In the village of Plexem, on the Weser River in Germany, St. Willehad, first bishop of Bremen, who, together with St. Boniface, whose disciple he was, spread the Gospel in Friesland and Saxony.
WILLEHAD was an Englishman, a native of Northumbria, and was educated probably at York, for he became a friend of Alcuin. After his ordination the spiritual conquests which many of his countrymen had made for Christ, with St Willibrord in Friesland and St Boniface in Germany, seemed a reproach to him, and he also desired to carry the saving knowledge of the true God to some of those barbarous nations. He landed in Friesland about the year 766 and began his mission at Dokkum, the place near which St Boniface and his companions had received the crown of martyrdom in 754. (The Roman Martyrology mistakenly calls St Wille­had a disciple of St Boniface.) After baptizing some, he made his way through the country now called Overyssel, preaching as he went. In Humsterland the mission­aries were all put in peril of their lives, for the inhabitants cast lots whether he and his companions should be put to death; Providence determined the lots for their preservation. Having escaped out of their hands, St Willehad thought it prudent to go back to Drenthe, in the more favourable neighbourhood of Utrecht. Here, in spite of the labours of St Willibrord and his successors, there was still plenty of heathens to convert, but the promising field was spoiled by imprudent zeal. Some of Willehad’s fellow missionaries venturing to demolish the places dedicated to idolatry, the pagans were so angered that they resolved to massacre them. One struck at St Willehad with such force that the sword would have severed his head but that the force of the blow, as his biographer assures us, was entirely broken by cutting a string about the saint’s neck by which hung a little box of relics which he always carried with him. The whole incident bears a suspicious resemblance to that recorded of St Willibrord on the island of Waicheren.

Having made so little progress among the Frisians St Willehad went to the court of Charlemagne, who in 780 sent him to evangelize the Saxons, whom he had recently subdued. The saint thence proceeded into the country where Bremen now stands, and was the first missionary who passed the Weser; some of his com­panions got beyond the Elbe. For a short time all went well, but in 782 the Saxons rose in revolt against the Franks. They put to death all missionaries that fell into their hands, and St Willehad escaped by sea into Friesland, whence he took an opportunity of going to Rome and laying before Pope Adrian I the state of his mission. He then passed two years in the monastery of Echternach, founded by St Willibrord, and assembled his fellow labourers whom the war had dispersed; here, too, he made a copy of the letters of St Paul.

Charlemagne put down the Saxon rebellion in ruthless fashion, and Willehad was able to return to the country between the Weser and the Elbe.*[* Charlemagne’s dealings with the barbarous Saxons were not such as to make solid missionary work any easier.]

 When the saint had founded many churches, Charlemagne in 787 had him ordained bishop of the Saxons, and he fixed his see at Bremen, which city seems to have been founded about that time. St Willehad redoubled his zeal and his solicitude in preaching. His cathedral church he built of wood and consecrated it on November I, 789, in honour of St Peter. A few days later he was taken ill, and it was seen that he was very bad. One of his disciples said to him, weeping, “Do not so soon forsake your flock exposed to the fury of wolves”. He answered, “Withhold me not from going to God. My sheep I recommend to Him who intrusted them to me and whose mercy is able to protect them.” And so he died, and his successor buried his body in the new stone church at Bremen. St Willehad was the last of the great English missionaries of the eighth century.

Our knowledge of St Willehad is almost entirely derived from a Latin life written about the year 856 by some ecclesiastic of Bremen. It was formerly attributed to the authorship of St Anskar, but this view has now been abandoned, though Anskar seems to be responsible for the book of miracles attached to the life. The best text of both is that edited by A. Poncelet in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii ; but they have been printed several times before, e.g. by Mabillon, and in Pertz, MGH., Scriptores, vol. ii. See also H. Timerding, Die Christliche Frühzeit Deutschlands, vol. ii (1929); Louis Halphen, Etudes critiques sur l’histoire de Charlemagne (1921); and Hauck, Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands, vol. ii. Cf. W. Levison, England and the Continent . . . (1946).
1079 St. Stanislaus noted for his preaching; Bishop of Cracow, feast day April 11th.; killed by excommunicated King
Sancti Stanislái, Epíscopi Cracoviénsis et Mártyris, qui sequénti die, corónam martyrii consecútus est.
    St. Stanislas, bishop of Cracow and martyr, who received the crown of martyrdom on the the previous day.
Cracóviæ, in Polónia, natális sancti Stanislái, Epíscopi et Mártyris, qui a Bolesláo, ímpio Rege, necátus est.  Ipsíus autem festum prídie hujus diéi celebrátur.
    At Cracow in Poland, the birthday of St. Stanislas, bishop and martyr, who was slain by the wicked King Boleslas.  His feast is celebrated on this day.
Stanislaus was born of noble parents on July 26th at Szczepanow near Cracow, Poland. He was educated at Gnesen and was ordained there. He was given a canonry by Bishop Lampert Zula of Cracow, who made him his preacher, and soon he became noted for his preaching. He became a much sought after spiritual adviser. He was successful in his reforming efforts, and in 1072 was named Bishop of Cracow. He incurred the enmity of King Boleslaus the Bold when he denounced the King's cruelties and injustices and especially his kidnapping of the beautiful wife of a nobleman. When Stanislaus excommunicated the King and stopped services at the Cathedral when Boleslaus entered, Boleslaus himself killed Stanislaus while the Bishop was saying Mass in a chapel outside the city on April 11.
Stanislaus has long been the symbol of Polish nationhood. He was canonized by Pope Innocent IV in 1253 and is the principle patron of Cracow. His feast day is April 11th.
1115 ST GODFREY, Bishop OF AMIENS; see also Nov 08.
Suessíone, in Gálliis, sancti Godefrídi, Ambianénsis Epíscopi, magnæ sanctitátis viri.
    At Soissons in France, St. Godfrey, bishop of Amiens, a man of great sanctity.
AT the age of five Godfrey was entrusted to the care of the abbot of Mont-Saint­Quentin and, having in due course decided to become a monk, he was ordained priest. He was chosen abbot of Nogent, in Champagne, a house whose community was reduced to half a dozen monks, whose discipline was, like their buildings, neglected and dilapidated. Under his direction this house began again to flourish; but when in consequence of this the archbishop of Rheims and his council pressed the saint to take upon him the government of the great abbey of Saint-Remi, he started up in the assembly and alleged contrary canons with vehemence, adding, “God forbid I should ever desert a poor bride by preferring a rich one!” Never­theless, in 1104 he was appointed bishop of Amiens. His residence was truly the house of a disciple of Christ, for he never allowed himself to forget that he was a monk. He lived in the simplest fashion, and when he thought the cook was treating him too well he took the best food from the kitchen and gave it away to the poor and sick.

But in his episcopal capacity St Godfrey was unbending, severe, and inflexibly just. One Christmas when singing Mass before the count of Artois at Saint-Omer he refused to accept the offerings of the court until the nobles had modified the ostentation of their dress and deportment; the abbess of St Michael’s at Doullens had to go On foot to Amiens and back to receive a rebuke and warning for her ill-treatment of a nun (she is said to have been kept there all day looking for the missing nun, whom the bishop had concealed in his house); and the claim of his see to jurisdiction over the abbey of Saint-Valery was vigorously pursued. The refusal of the monks to allow him to bless altar-linen for their church was the occasion of a long dispute. St Godfrey had a bitter struggle in his own diocese against simony and for the celibacy of the clergy, in the course of which it is said an attempt was made on his life by a disgruntled woman. His rigid discipline made him very unpopular among the less worthy, and he became so discouraged that he wanted to resign and join the Carthusians. St Godfrey’s severity seems in some things to have been excessive, e.g. he forbade the eating of meat on Sundays in Lent. He set out in November 1115 to discuss affairs with his metropolitan and died on the way at Soissons, where he was buried.

What Guibert of Nogent in his autobiography tells us concerning Godfrey is our most reliable source of information. The Latin life by Nicholas, a monk of Soissons, is much more detailed and in many respects valuable, but it is written in a tone of undiscriminating panegyric, and certain statements made in it are demonstrably incorrect. It was compiled about 1538, and it is printed, with the relevant passages of Guibert and an illuminating introduction, by A. Poncelet in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii. See also A. de Calonne, Histoire de la ville d’Amiens (1899), vol. i, pp. 523—542; C. Brunel in Le moyen age, vol. xxii (1909), pp. 176—196; and J. Corblet, Hagiographie d’Amiens (1870), vol. ii, pp. 373—445.
1175  St. Peter of Tarantaise (not Pope Innocent V) Cistercian archbishop; reformer purging clergy of corrupt & immoral members, aiding poor, promoting education, Trusted advisor by popes and kings; The author of his life, who was his constant companion at this period, testifies to numerous miracles which he wrought, mainly in curing the sick and multiplying provisions in time of famine.
In monastério Bellæ Vallis, in território Bisuntíno, sancti Petri, qui ex Mónacho Cisterciénsi factus est Tarentasiénsis in Sabáudia Epíscopus.
    In the monastery of Bella Vallis, in the diocese of Besançon, St. Peter, Cistercian monk, who was made bishop of Tarantaise in Savoy.
1175 ST PETER, ARCHBISHOP OF TARENTAISE
ST PETER of Tarentaise, one of the glories of the Cistercian Order, was born near Vienne in the French province of the Dauphiné. He early displayed a remarkable memory, coupled with a great inclination for religious studies, and at the age of twenty he entered the abbey of Bonnevaux. With great zeal he embraced the austerities of the rule, edifying all who came into contact with him by his charity, his humility and his modesty. After a time, his father and the other two sons followed Peter to Bonnevaux, whilst his mother, with the only daughter, entered a neighbouring Cistercian nunnery. Besides these members of his own humble family, men of high rank were led by the example of Peter to become monks at Bonnevaux.
He was not quite thirty when he was chosen superior of a new house built at Tamié, in the desert mountains of Tarentaise. It overlooked the pass which was then the chief route from Geneva to Savoy, and the monks were able to be of great use to travellers. There, with the help of Amadeus III, Count of Savoy, who held him in high esteem, he founded a hospice for the sick and for strangers, in which he was wont to wait upon his guests with his own hands.
In 1142 came his election to the archbishopric of Tarentaise, and Peter was compelled by St Bernard and the general chapter of his order, though much against the grain, to accept the office. He found the diocese in a deplorable state, due mainly to mismanagement of his predecessor, an unworthy man who had eventually to be deposed. Parish churches were in the hands of laymen, the poor were neglected, and the clergy, who ought to have stemmed the general tide of iniquity, too often promoted irregularity by their evil example. In place of the cathedral clergy whom he found lax and careless, St Peter substituted canons regular of St Augustine, and he soon made his chapter a model of good order. He undertook the constant visitation of his diocese; recovered property which had been alienated; appointed good priests to various parishes; made excellent foundations for the education of the young and the relief of the poor; and everywhere provided for the due celebration of the services of the Church. The author of his life, who was his constant companion at this period, testifies to numerous miracles which he wrought, mainly in curing the sick and multiplying provisions in time of famine.
Apprehension at finding himself honoured as a wonder-worker, and the natural longing of a monk for solitude, turned his mind back to the cloister and in 1155, after he had administered the diocese for thirteen years, Peter suddenly disappeared, leaving no trace behind. Actually he had made his way to a remote Cistercian abbey in Switzerland, where, being yet unknown, he was accepted as a lay-brother. Great was the dismay throughout the diocese of Tarentaise when the departure of the archbishop became known, and diligent was the search made for him throughout the religious houses of the neighbouring provinces. Not until a year later was he discovered. His identity having been revealed to his new superiors, Peter was obliged to leave and to return to his see, where he was greeted with great joy. He took up his duties more zealously than ever. The poor were ever his first consideration: twice in bitterly cold weather he gave away his own habit at the risk of his life. He rebuilt the hospice of the Little St Bernard and founded other similar refuges for travellers in the Alps. He also inaugurated a practice, kept up until the French Revolution—and even a little after—of making a free distribution of bread and soup during, the months preceding the harvest, when food was scarce in many parts of his hilly diocese. The dole came to be called “May bread”. All his life he continued to dress and to live like a Cistercian, replacing manual labour by the spiritual functions of his office.
Essentially a man of peace, St Peter had a singular gift for allaying seemingly implacable enmities and on several occasions averted bloodshed by reconciling contending parties. His chief political efforts, however, were directed to supporting the cause of the true pope, Alexander III, against the pretensions of the antipope, Victor, who had behind him the redoubtable Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. At one time, indeed, it seemed as though the archbishop of Tarentaise was the only subject of the empire who dared openly to oppose the pretender, but it soon became apparent that he carried with him the whole of the great Cistercian Order. To establish the claims of the true pontiff, St Peter preached in Alsace, Lorraine, Burgundy and many parts of Italy, the effect of his words being enhanced by miracles of healing. He also spoke out fearlessly in various councils and even in the presence of the emperor himself, who was so far impressed by his sanctity and courage as to permit in him a freedom of speech he would endure from no one else.
It was not granted to the saint to die amongst his mountain flock. His reputation as a peacemaker led Alexander III to send him in 1174 to try to effect a reconciliation between King Louis VII of France and Henry II of England. St Peter, though he was old, set out at once, preaching everywhere on his way. As he approached Chaumont in the Vexin, where the French court was being held, he was met by King Louis and by Prince Henry, the rebellious heir to the English throne. The latter, alighting from his horse to receive the archbishop’s blessing, asked for the saint’s old cloak, which he reverently kissed. Both at Chaumont and at Gisors where he interviewed the English king, St Peter was treated with utmost honour, but the reconciliation for which he laboured did not take place until after his death. As he was returning to his diocese he was taken ill on the road near Besançon, and died as he was being carried into the abbey of Bellevaux. This St Peter was canonized in 1191.
Our most copious and trustworthy source of information is the life written by the Cis­tercian, Geoffrey of Auxerre, Abbot of Hautecombe, in response to the request of Pope Lucius III. It is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, and we know that it was completed before 1185, that is, within ten years of the death of the saint. But there are besides this many references to St Peter in the correspondence, chronicles and hagiographical literature of the time. Even a man like Walter Map, who was prone to write of the Cistercians with the utmost bitterness, speaks with reverence of St Peter of Tarentaise. See The Life of St Hugh of Lincoln (Quarterly Series), pp. 625—626, and in the same work an account of the relations between St Hugh, the Carthusian, and his Cistercian brother bishop (pp. 60—64, etc.). Consult further Le Couteulx, Annales Ordinis Cartusiensis, vol. ii passim; G. Muller, Leben des hl. Petrus von Tarentaise (1892); and the biographies in French by Dom M. A. Dimier (1935) and H. Brultey (1945).

Peter was born
1102
near Vienne, in Dauphine, France, and joined the Cistercian Order at Bonneveaux at the age of twenty with his two brothers and father. Known for his piety, at age thirty he was sent to serve as the first abbot of Tamie, in the Tarantaise Mountains, between Geneva and Savoy. There he built a hospice for travelers. In 1142, he was named the archbishop of Tarantaise against his wishes, and he devoted much energy to reforming the diocese, purging the clergy of corrupt and immoral members, aiding the poor, and promoting education.
He is also credited with starting the custom of distributing bread and soup the so called May Bread just before the harvest; a custom which endured throughout France until the French Revolution. After thirteen years as bishop, Peter suddenly disappeared. Eventually he was discovered serving as a lay brother in a Cistercian abbey in Switzerland and was convinced to return to Tarantaise and resume his episcopal duties.
Trusted as an advisor by popes and kings, he defended papal rights in France and was called upon to assist in bringing about a reconciliation between King Louis VII of France and then Prince Henry II of England. Peter was canonized in 1191. He should not be confused with Peter of Tarantaise, who became Pope Innocent V.

Peter of Tarentaise, OSB Cist. B (RM) Born at Saint-Maurice (near Vienne), Dauphiné, France, 1102; died at Bellevaux, 1175; canonized in 1191. First, it should be noted that there are two saints named Peter of Tarentaise: today's bishop and one who became known as Pope Innocent V (born c. 1225).

Few bishops have both been so successful as Peter of Tarentaise and so unwilling to take up the office. His one true desire was to be a Cistercian monk. He had entered a Cistercian monastery at Bonnevaux when he was 20 (12 according to some sources), persuading his parents and brothers and sister to follow him into the religious life. Before he was 30, he was chosen to be abbot of a new Cistercian house at Tamié in the desolate Tarentaise hills, overlooking the pass which was the chief route from Geneva to Savoy.  Here he was entirely happy. He struck up a fruitful friendship with Count Amadeus III of Savoy. Together they built a hospital for the sick--a place which also served as a guest house for strangers passing over the Little Saint Bernard mountain pass. Peter like nothing better than to join in conversation with those staying in this hospital, humbly waiting upon his guests with his own hands.
But in 1142, he was elected archbishop of Tarentaise. Saint Bernard and the general chapter of his order compelled Peter to accept the office.

The whole Cistercian order decided that whatever the saint wished, they must accept. Peter's predecessor had been so incompetent and lax that he had been deposed. The diocese was in complete disorder. Reluctantly Peter set about its renovation, refusing to let his personal feelings hamper the work. Only once did he give way.  He replaced the lax and careless cathedral clergy with canons regular of the Order of Saint Augustine. He regularly visited his entire diocese; recovered property that had been alienated; appointed good priests to parishes; arranged for the education of the young; made foundations to serve the poor; and made it possible to appropriately celebrate the rites of the church everywhere. The author of his vita, who was his constant companion throughout his episcopacy, recounts many miracles wrought by Saint Peter, including physical healings and the multiplication of provisions during famines.

After 13 years as archbishop, he ran off and secretly offered himself as a lay member of a Cistercian house in a remote area of Switzerland. Of course, he was found concealing himself under the guise of a novice lay brother, but not until a year had elapsed. The reluctant archbishop was forced to return to his see by his new superiors. He was greeted with joy at his homecoming. Again, he set to work with a will, founding travellers' refuges on the Alpine passes. He also endowed a charity for the free distribution of soup and bread for the hill-farmers during the lean spring months; this came to be known as pain de mai, May-bread, and continued until the French Revolution.
Peter was not completely happy outside a monastery. He often visited the Grande Chartreuse, where he was attended by a young monk later to be known as Saint Hugh of Lincoln.

Uncompromisingly Peter supported the true pope, Alexander III, against his false rivals--even though the antipope Victor was supported by no less than the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. Though it seemed that he was the only subject who dared to openly oppose the pretender, Saint Peter preached in Alsace, Lorraine, Burgundy, and parts of Italy in an attempt to establish the claims of the true pontiff. He spoke out fearlessly in various councils and even in the presence of the emperor himself, who was so impressed by his sanctity and courage that he permitted him to speak freely.

Such an honest man could be trusted to intercede between the warring kings of England and France. In 1174, Pope Alexander III requested that he meet with King Louis VII of France and Henry II of England. Though he was old, he set out at once and stopped to preach everywhere en route. He met both sovereigns near Chaumont in the Vexin, where the French court was being held, but did not succeed in reconciling them.
On returning to Tarentaise from this mission of peace, he became ill near Besançon and died as he was being carried into the abbey of Bellevaux (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Walsh).
1292 Blessed Amatus Ronconi lay-brother at San Giuliano Abbey near Rimini, OSB (AC)
Born in Rimini, Italy; Amatus made four pilgrimages to Santiago de Compostella before becoming a lay-brother at San Giuliano Abbey near Rimini (Benedictines).

14th v. Saint Arsenius the Lover of Labor e gift of wonderworking
He lived during the fourteenth century.
This ascetic was distinguished by his love for toil, and living in asceticism in the Kiev Caves monastery of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos, he knew no rest.
He prayed constantly and partook of food only at the setting of the sun.
For his humility and love of labor the Lord gave him the gift of wonderworking.
His memory is also celebrated together with the Saints of the Far Caves on August 28.

15th v 16 th v The Monks Zosima and Adrian of Volokolamsk, founders of the Sestrinsk monastery on the banks of the River Sestra
pursued asceticism during the XV-XVI Centuries.
Their remains were buried in the Uspenie-Dormition church of the monastery founded by them.


1416 Julian von Norwich 'Sixteen Revelations of Divine Love' niederschrieb
Anglikanische Kirche: 08. Mai Catholische Kirche May 13 HERE 1423  Bl. Juliana of Norwich Benedictine English mystic anchorite In 1373 experienced sixteen revelations. Her book,
       Revelations of Divine Love - a work on the love of God, the Incarnation, redemption, and divine consolation.
       Among English mystics none is greater


Julian von Norwich, auch Juliana genannt, wurde wohl 1342 geboren. Sie war Reklusin im Kirchgarten von St. Julian in Norwich. Hier hatte sie im Mai 1373 während einer schweren Erkrankung sechzehn Gesichte, die sie nach 1390 in den 'Sixteen Revelations of Divine Love' niederschrieb. Es gibt zwei Fassungen ihres Werkes, wobei sie in der späteren Fassung ihre Schau auch theologisch interpretiert und in anschauliche Bilder umsetzt. Wohl am bekanntesten ist ihr Bild von der Mutterschaft Gottes. Juliana starb vermutlich nach 1416.

Dame Julian of Norwich, Contemplative 8 May 1417
The Lady Juliana was born about 1342, and when she was thirty years old, she became gravely ill and was expected to die. Then, on the seventh day, the medical crisis passed, and she had a series of fifteen visions, or "showings," in which she was led to contemplate the Passion of Christ. These brought her great peace and joy. She became an anchoress, living in a small hut near to the church in Norwich, where she devoted the rest of her life to prayer and contemplation of the meaning of her visions. The results of her meditations she wrote in a book called Revelations of Divine Love, available in modern English in a Penguin Paperback edition. During her lifetime, she became known as a counselor, whose advice combined spiritual insight with common sense, and many persons came to speak with her. Since her death, many more have found help in her writings.  The precise date of her death is uncertain.
Her book is a tender meditation on God's eternal and all-embracing love, as expressed to us in the Passion of Christ.

She describes seeing God holding a tiny thing in his hand, like a small brown nut, which seemed so fragile and insignificant that she wondered why it did not crumble before her eyes. She understood that the thing was the entire created universe, which is as nothing compared to its Creator, and she was told, "God made it, God loves it, God keeps it."

She was concerned that sometimes when we are faced wiith a difficult moral decision, it seems that no matter which way we decide, we will have acted from motives that are less then completely pure, so that neither decision is defensible. She finally wrote: "It is enough to be sure of the deed. Our courteous Lord will deign to redeem the motive."
A matter that greatly troubled her was the fate of those who through no fault of their own had never heard the Gospel. She never received a direct answer to her questions about them, except to be told that whatever God does is done in Love, and therefore "that all shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well."
Speaking of her visions of heaven and hell, she said, "To me was shown no harder hell than sin."
Of our response to the sins of others, she said (ch. 76): "The soul that would preserve its peace, when another's sin is brought to mind, must fly from it as from the pains of hell, looking to God for help against it. To consider the sins of other people will produce a thick film over the eyes of our soul, and prevent us for the time being from seeing the 'fair beauty of the Lord'-- unless, that is, we look at them contrite along with the sinner, being sorry with and for him, and yearning over him for God. Without this it can only harm, disturb, and hinder the soul who considers them. I gathered all this from the revelation about compassion...This blessed friend is Jesus; it is his will and plan that we hang on to him, and hold tight always, in whatever circumstances; for whether we are filthy or clean is all the same to his love."

    "Glad and merry and sweet is the blessed and lovely demeanour of our Lord towards our souls, for he saw us always living in love-longing, and he wants our souls to be gladly disposed toward him . . . by his grace he lifts up and will draw our outer disposition to our inward, and will make us all at unity with him, and each of us with others in the true, lasting joy which is Jesus." -- Julian of Norwich
The following was translated by Liz Broadwell.
    And from the time that [the vision] was shown, I desired often to know what our Lord's meaning was. And fifteen years and more afterward I was answered in my spiritual understanding, thus: 'Would you know your Lord's meaning in this thing? Know it well, love was his meaning. Who showed it to you? Love. What did he show you? Love. Why did he show it? For love. Keep yourself therein and you shall know and understand more in the same. But you shall never know nor understand any other thing, forever.'
    Thus I was taught that love was our Lord's meaning. And I saw quite clearly in this and in all, that before God made us, he loved us, which love was never slaked nor ever shall be. And in this love he has done all his work, and in this love he has made all things profitable to us. And in this love our life is everlasting. In our creation we had a beginning. But the love wherein he made us was in him with no beginning. And all this shall be seen in God without end ...
"A reader has sent the following message, which I reproduce slightly edited."
    The (Anglican) Order of Julian of Norwich was founded in Norwich, Connecticut, by the Revd John (Julian) Swanson. It is an order for both men and women, with an emphasis on the Divine Office and work and contemplation. It seems to be holding its own in terms of new members arriving and remaining. Their Ordo includes the lessons for every day of the Year for the Daily Office, and the Mass for every day of the year with three lessons each day!. It sells for $6.00, is very useful and may be obtained by writing: The Order of Julian of Norwich, S10 W26392 Summit Avenue, Waukesha Wisconsin 53188. I would add that they are new, they are committed to poverty and thus do not and will not have endowments; and if, at this season of giving you can spare a bit, please send it to them. There was a time a year ago, I understand, when monastic poverty was not only not owning things, but nearly not eating anything either. We are fortunate to have them in the Church. John Julian has produced an annotated translation of Julian's works for devotional reading (Lesson of Love), which is stupendous.
Prayer (traditional language)
    Lord God, who in thy compassion didst grant to the Lady Julian many revelations of thy nurturing and sustaining love: Move our hearts, like hers, to seek thee above all things, for in giving us thyself thou givest us all; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.
Prayer (contemporary language)
    Lord God, who in your compassion granted to the Lady Julian many revelations of your nurturing and sustaining love: Move our hearts, like hers, to seek you above all things, for in giving us yourself you give us all; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.
Psalm 27:5-11 or 103:1-4,13-18 Hebrews 10:19-24 John 4:23-26 (Ep)
1458 Blessed Angelus of Masaccio martyred by the Fraticelli or Bertolani heretics because of his preaching in defense of the Catholic faith , OSB Cam. M (AC)
Angelus spent his life at the Camaldolese monastery of Santa Maria di Serra in the Marches of Ancona. He was martyred by the Fraticelli or Bertolani heretics because of his vehement preaching in defense of the Catholic faith
(Benedictines).
1785 The Monk Arsenii of Novgorod, Fool-for-Christ transfer of his relics and with the "Saints-name-in-common" ("tezoimenitstvo") of this day
 reposed in the year 1570, (the account about him is located under 12 July, -- the day of his repose).
The celebration was established on 8 May in connection with the transfer of his relics in 1785, and with the "Saints-name-in-common" ("tezoimenitstvo") of this day.

Our Holy Father Arsenius the Lover of Labour 
A monk of Kiev, he never gave himself any rest, but worked with-out pause. He ate only once a day, at sunset. He lived in asceticism and died in the 14th century.
SerbianOrthodoxChurch.net
1835 St. Maria Magdalen of Canossa; Foundress of the Daughters of Charity at Verona, Italy saw the Blessed Mother surrounded by six religious dressed in brown: She herself tended the poorest and dirtiest children witnesses observed her rapt in ecstasy, and once she was seen levitating

1835 BD MAGDALEN DI CANOSSA, VIRGIN, FOUNDRESS OF THE CANOSSIAN DAUGHTERS OF CHARITY: spent her time giving religious instruction, working in hospitals and looking after children.
IN the foothills of the Appenine mountains, some eighteen miles from Parma, stand the few remains of the once mighty castle of Canossa. It was here, while the guest of Matilda, Countess of Tuscany, in the winter of 1076-77, that Pope St Gregory VII received that ostensible submission of Henry IV of Germany whose circumstances have been so much exaggerated and significance misunderstood. And it was the family of this Countess Matilda that seven hundred years later produced Magdalen Gabriela, Marchioness of Canossa, a "valiant woman" of a somewhat different stamp.
Her parents were the Marquis Ottavio and his wife Teresa Szlukhe, and her birth was at Verona, in 1774. There is still in existence a portrait of Magdalen at the age of four, an attractive, rather imperious-looking child, with strongly marked features, dressed in the complicated clothes of a grown woman as was the eighteenth-century (and later) way with children. After looking at it, one is not surprised to learn that little Magdalen, while frank and straightforward, was also stubborn, wilful and quick-tempered. Her nurse remarked in later years, "It's a marvel to me how that naughty little thing has changed. I didn't think she would ever be tamed."
A boy and two more girls were born to Magdalen's parents and then, when he was only thirty-nine, her father died. This was a sad blow to Magdalen, and it was followed two years later by another: her mother married again and went to live with her new husband, the Marquis Zanetti, in Mantua, leaving her children to the care of their uncles. Magdalen, who was now eight, with her elder sister Laura, was put in charge of a governess, a woman who "took out" on Magdalen a spite she had for someone who had criticized her inadequate religious instruction of the children. It was six years before Uncle Jerome found out how badly his second niece was being treated, and dismissed the governess. Apparently Magdalen had never said a word, and would not let her sisters do so. Perhaps these years of domestic tyranny had something to do with the period of painful sickness that followed them, during which Magdalen "took stock" with herself: she was definite that she did not wish to marry, but was not sure that she wanted to be a nun, which in those days still generally meant joining an enclosed order. She did eventually go into the Carmelite convent at Conegliano, but it was soon recognized that she had no vocation for that life, and she returned home again.
During the revolutionary wars the Canossas went to Venice for a time, and after they had returned they were visited by Napoleon Bonaparte at their mansion in Verona. Napoleon showed respect and indeed admiration for the marchioness, and she felt encouraged to ask a favour of him: it was that he would assign to her the empty convent of St Joseph in Verona, as a centre for work for poor people and neglected children, whose sad state she set vividly before him. And he granted the request.
The reason for this action went back to the time when she was in Venice. There Magdalen had had a vision, or a dream as she herself called it, in which she saw our Lady surrounded by six religious in a brown dress; it then seemed to her that our Lady took the religious two by two to a church filled with girls and women, to a hospital, and to a hall full of ragged children, telling them to work there, but especially in the third. Magdalen at once took this as a divinely appointed programme, and henceforward spent her time giving religious instruction, working in hospitals and looking after children. She was soon joined by other young women; but she saw that if the work was to go on and be made permanent by means of a congregation it was necessary to have a proper house for the purpose. And at a time when he was turning monks and nuns out of their convents, Napoleon made this possible by his own gift.
Magdalen was now thirty-four years old, and it was not easy for her to leave the Canossa household, where among other responsibilities was an orphaned baby cousin. Her family looked on her projects as rather undignified for one of her birth. Pope Pius XI seems to have been glancing sideways at this when, in his address at the reading of the decree which declared Magdalen di Canossa's virtues to have been heroic, he quoted the great man "who was humble enough to serve the poor at table with his own hands, but not quite humble enough to sit at table with them". A remark which, as his Holiness added, "suggests a lot of things and goes a long way". Magdalen's brother Boniface was especially sad that she should leave them. But it was done, and on May 8, 1808 Magdalen and her few companions opened the doors of their house to the poor girls of the San Zeno quarter, Verona's "east end". They began by teaching them the simplest prayers and the elements of the Christian faith, with a little reading, writing and sewing, and within a few months the effects of this centre of goodness and decency were seen in the quarter.
Good news spreads no less than bad, and before long Venice asked for a centre like Verona's. By this time other associates had joined Sister Magdalen and, after some hesitation, she extended the work accordingly. Over a period of twenty-five years other foundations followed, at Milan, Bergamo, Trent and elsewhere in northern Italy and, especially in the early days, the sisters were often too few for the work; it was the foundress herself who would come to the rescue, working in the scullery or anywhere with what she called her two servants-by which must be understood her own two hands. She had a predilection for the dirtiest and most troublesome children, and would look after them from the combing of their hair to the brushing of their minds, so that to this day a specially difficult child is known in the congregation as "One of our holy foundress's".
In amplifying his words quoted above Pope Pius XI said that "Many are charitable enough to help and even to serve the poor, but few are able deliberately to become poor with the poor", and that that is exactly what Bd Magdalen did. Such a life can only grow from a rooted interior humility, and it was through no will of hers that others came to know how she had to struggle with her quick imagination and keen senses-to say nothing of unavoidable external distractions- to attain the degree of religious recollection that was hers. In fact she reached a high state of contemplation: on several known occasions she was rapt in ecstasy and at least once was seen to be lifted from the ground. Such an intense life of the soul was not inconsistent (only through misunderstanding could it be supposed to be) with a life of daily cares in which it was possible, for example, for her to be held up at pistol-point in the parlour. This actually happened. Mother Magdalen found a refuge for a penitent girl who had been seduced. The young man concerned threatened her with a pistol to disclose the girl's whereabouts. "If you want to kill me, here I am", she replied. "But are you really brave enough?" He slunk away, leaving the weapon behind, and before long he too had answered the call to repentance.
Bd Magdalen told her Daughters of Charity that their mission on earth was to make Jesus Christ known to little children, and they primarily concerned themselves with those who were poor and neglected. But she also opened high-schools and colleges, made special provision for the deaf-and-dumb, and organized closed retreats for women and girls. After her death the congregation also undertook work on the foreign missions. At Venice in 1831 Bd Magdalen even launched a small congregation of men, which carries on similar work among boys.
At the end of 1834 Bd Magdalen was taken ill at Bergamo; she struggled back to the mother house at Verona, and by passion-week in the following year she knew she was dying. Nobody else, neither her religious nor her medical advisers, thought so; but she asked for the last sacraments, and having received them the end came suddenly. For some years Mother Magdalen had been bent almost double and could sleep only in a sitting position. On the evening of April 10, 1835 she asked to be helped to her knees while she joined in her daughters' prayers, and thus, with an exclamation of joy, she died, leaning on the arms of Mother Annetta.* [* As a little girl Annetta had declared she would rather burn down the convent than be a nun. Whereupon Mother Magdalen had foretold, "One day you will be one of us. And you will be there to help me when I die."]
She was beatified in 1941.
There are several biographies in Italian, but the above account relies on A Short Life of the Venerable Servant of God Magdalen, Marchioness of Canossa, written by a sister of her congregation and published at Bangalore in India in 1933. It includes translations of the decree of 1927 pronouncing the heroism of Mother Magdalen's virtues and of the address given by Pope Pius XI to the Canossian Daughters of Charity to mark that occasion.
Born in 1774, she was the daughter of the Marquis of Canossa, who died when Maria Magdalen was three. Her mother abandoned the family, and Maria Magdalen managed her father’s estate until she was thirty-three, then founding her institute. When she died, her Daughters of Charity were widespread. She was canonized in 1988 by Pope John Paul II.

Magdalen of Canossa, Founder (RM)  Born in Verona, Italy, March 1, 1774; died there on April 10, 1835; declared venerable on January 6, 1927; beatified December 7, 1941, by Pope Pius XII; canonized by Pope John Paul II on October 2, 1988; feast day formerly on May 14.

Saint Magdalen was only five years old when her father, the marquis of Canossa, died. Two years later her mother remarried and abandoned her four children to the care of their uncles. Although they treated the children well enough, their French governess was harsh. Perhaps as a result of this ill-treatment, Magdalen suffered a painful illness when she was fifteen. Upon her recovery, she was determined to become a nun. In October 1791, she enter the Carmel for a short time before returning home to manage her father's estate until she was 33.

During the Napoleonic wars, her family took refuge in Venice. There she had a dream in which she saw the Blessed Mother surrounded by six religious dressed in brown. Our Lady led them two by two into a church filled with women and girls, into a hospital, and into a hall filled with bedraggled children. She admonished the religious to serve all three, but especially to help the poor children. Almost immediately she began tending the sick in the city's hospitals and working with children.. The family returned to Verona, where they were visited by Napoleon himself. Magdalen requested from him the empty convent of Saint Joseph, which she intended to use for the poor. Several women had already joined her in her charitable work and with the gift of the convent, they opened the first house of her institute, the Daughters of Charity. Its mission followed her vision: the education of poor girls, the service of the sick in hospitals, and the teaching of the catechism in parishes.

The doors of the house in the San Zeno district was opened to poor girls on May 8, 1808. Thereafter, community prospered and its fame spread. The Canossians were invited to open a house in Venice, then in Milan, Bergamo, Trent, and elsewhere in northern Italy. Since Saint Magdalen's death, well over 400 have been established throughout the world.

Saint Magdalen drew up the rule in Venice. The congregation received formal papal approval from Pope Pius VII in 1816 and definitive approval from Pope Leo XII in an apostolic brief dated December 23, 1828. When she was declared venerable by Pope Pius XI in 1927, he wrote that "many are charitable enough to help and even to serve the poor, but few are able deliberately to become poor with the poor."
But that is exactly what the marchioness did. She herself tended the poorest and dirtiest children. Although the congregation's primary concern was poor and neglected children, she also founded high schools and colleges, especially for the deaf and dumb. Magdalen organized closed retreats for females. In Venice, she even launched a small congregation of men to carry on similar work with boys. Following her death, the Daughters of Charity entered the mission field.

Despite, or perhaps because of, the hectic pace of her life, Saint Magdalen developed enormous powers of recollection and prayer. She attained remarkable levels of contemplation. On several occasions, witnesses observed her rapt in ecstasy, and once she was seen levitating.
Towards the end of her life, Magdalen was bent almost double and could sleep only in a sitting position. She became seriously ill in Bergamo at the end of 1834 and was taken back to the mother house in Verona. By Holy Week 1835, she knew she was dying, though none of her doctors agree with her. She asked for the last rites, then died suddenly (Benedictines, Walsh).
  Complete
    Revelations of Divine Love - Christian Classics Ethereal Library
  Excerpts
    The Motherhood of God - Order of Julian
    The Joy of God in Us - Order of Julian
    Choosing Jesus: Christ our Heaven in Well and Woe - Order of Julian
    No Wrath in God - Order of Julian
    Mercy Healing Our Wrath - Order of Julian
    Julian on "God our Mother" - Elizabeth G. Melillo
    Julian on Sin - Elizabeth G. Melillo
    Excerpts from the Westminster Manuscript of Showings - Julia Bolton Holloway, et al.
    An Excerpt from Showings: Chapter 59 - John F. Tinkler, Towson University
     
Julian | Life | Works | Bibliography | Essays | Links | Books | Middle English Literature


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Created by Anniina Jokinen on July 21, 1997. Last updated on March 14, 2007.


 Sunday   Saints of this Day May 08 Octávo Idus Maii   
  Sunday, May 8, 2016
The Ascension of the Lord (Solemnity)

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.