Wednesday  Saints of this Day May 17 Sextodécimo Kaléndas Junii  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016

Our Lady of Guadalupe's Eyes May 17
 Mary Auxiliatrix (Turino, Italy, 1903)
In 1951, an artist, Carlos Salinas Chavez, noticed a bearded man in the Virgin's right eye using a simple magnifying glass.
Later examination of the eyes found several representations of people in the Virgin's eyes.
According to the phenomenon of Purkinje-Samson, the images are threefold-
the reflection of the image, its size and orientation that are found in the glare of a real pupil.
When light is approached, one sees the same reflections as on the human eye: the cornea, the edge of the pupil and the lens move when the light source is moved (a phenomenon that can be seen in the human eye,
but has never been painted on canvas or opaque surfaces that have no reflection).
"This is pure folly. But the images are there and we can't pretend they don't exist,"
 several scientists have observed.

May 17 – Ville-Marie (Mary’s City), the original Montreal, founded in 1642
by Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve (d. 1676) 
 
Montreal, Canada: a Marian mission
 Ville-Marie is now a district of the city of Montreal, Canada. The name Ville-Marie comes from the city’s origins as a ​​Marian city. Its founders, who came from France in the 17th century, devoted themselves to charitable works, beginning with hospitals for the native Indians. They lived an intense Marian spirituality inspired by the French school, which was a spirituality of the Incarnation and union with Jesus through Mary.

These pioneer missionaries actually created a new type of mission because they were lay people who envisioned a unique type of Marian mission. Over a short period, 248 men, 45 women and children left France for the New World. The first travelers reached the island of Montreal on May 17, 1642, the official date of the founding of Ville-Marie. Quite simply, they came there to live a life of prayer and charity.

Today, Canada's principal Marian shrine is that of Our Lady of the Cape in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, dedicated to the Holy Rosary and visited by Saint John Paul II who entrusted Canada to Mary. In fact the city of Montreal still has many churches dedicated to the Virgin Mary, as well as a well-known oratory dedicated to Saint Joseph.
 
www.mariedenazareth.com

 
Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary  .

1592 St Paschal Baylon Franciscan lay brother mystic labored as shepherd for father performed miracles distinguished for austerity spent most of his life as a humble doorkeeper rigorous asceticism deep love for the Blessed Sacrament defended doctrine of the Real Presence against Calvinists born and died on Whitsunday 
 
He who does not meditate, acts as one who never looks into the mirror; and so does not bother to put himself in order, since he can be dirty without knowing it.
The person who meditates and turns his thoughts to God who is the mirror of the soul, seeks to know his defects and tries to correct them, moderates himself in his impulses and puts his conscience in order.
-- Saint Pio of Pietrelcina

Saints
May
18
17
16
May 17 - Ascension Day
 The Fiat of the Ascension
Everything that happened on the day of the Ascension, Mary kept in her heart. She was educated by her Son's example, so Mary understood the Father's will for her. "Thy will be done" - the Fiat of the Annunciation and the Fiat of the Cross took Mary to the Fiat of the Ascension.

Jesus disappeared before her eyes of flesh. She was forced to accept this mystery of separation, which made her detachment purer and more perfect than all those that she had experienced up to that point.
Marie Benoite Angot  See: www.mariedenazareth.com/index.php?id=367&L=1
May 17 – Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve (d. 1676) founds the city of Ville-Marie (Montreal, Canada, 1642) 
 
My Immaculate Heart will triumph: What does this mean?
 “Finally, I would like to revisit another key message of the secret made quite rightly famous: ‘My Immaculate Heart will triumph.’ What does this mean?” Cardinal Ratzinger asked.

He answered: the triumph of one who leaves everything to God like Mary did, and in imitation of Mary: “The heart that is open to God, purified by the contemplation of God, is stronger than guns and arms of all kinds.” The victory of Mary's Heart therefore is an appeal to the freedom of each Christian to enter into God's loving plan for us on a daily basis.

And he also explained: “Mary's fiat, the word of her heart, changed the course of history, because she introduced the Savior into the world – since, thanks to her 'yes,' God could become man in our world and remain so for ever. The devil has some power over this world, we can see it and experience it continually;
he has some power because our freedom accepts to be diverted from God.”
 May 13, 2013 (Zenit.org)


There are over 10,000 named saints beati from history and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources Monsignor James M. Reardon Basilica of Saint Mary Minneapolis, MN

AND ASCENDED INTO HEAVEN
1st v. Andronicus and Junias liturgically honored among the Greeks referenced by Saint Paul in Romans 16:7 "Salute Andronicus and Junias, my kinsmen and fellow-prisoners, who are of not among the Apostles, who also were in Christ before me."
       St Adrio Victor & Basilla Martyrs of Alexandria Egypt MM (RM)

255 St Restituta Virgin martyr maiden in Africa died for Christ
300 Saint Solochon, a native of Egypt imperial army in regiment of tribune Campanus
303 St Heradius Martyr with Aquilinus Paul and 2 companions died at Nyon on Lake Geneva Switzerland 
305 Solochon and Companions Egyptian soldiers in the imperial army at Chalcedon died for their faith MM (RM) 
 
545 St Madern Hermit of Cornish descent St. Madern’s Well, is still popular many cures are said to have been performed
 
596 St. Dodo of Gareja ("Mamadavitoba" in Tbilisi, An admirer of poverty and solitude, he labored as a hermit at Ninotsminda in Kakheti.
650 St Cathan Bishop of the isle of Bute, in Scotland  
673 Maildulf of Malmesbury Abbot spread the Gospel in England community of scholars known as Malmesbury (AC)
 
       Saint Maw Born in Ireland name in Cornish means "a boy."
 
893 Saint Stephen, Patriarch of Constantinople concerned himself with widows and orphans, and distinguished himself by his temperance
    Blessed Rasso of Grafrath man of great stature brave warrior against invading Hungarians founder monk OSB AC

1045 St Bruno of Würzburg bishop spent his private fortune on building the cathedral of Saint Kilian and other churches B (RM

1100 Silaus of Lucca Irish monk abbot of Saint Brendan's monastery zealous and charitable bishop B (AC)
 
1152 St. Thethmar missionary among the Wends
1407 Saint Euphrosyne The holy princess was tonsured as a nun builder of churches founded Ascension women's monastery in the Moscow  Kremlin patronage the famous icon of the Archangel Michael
1450 BD ANDREW ABELLON distinguished for his piety and the zeal with which he enforced regular observance; he exercised his talents as an artist in many of the Dominican churches of the south of France.
1549 Adrian of Ondrosov The MonkMartyr uncovering of the relics of the saint 1551
1592 St Paschal Baylon Franciscan lay brother mystic labored as shepherd for father performed miracles distinguished for austerity spent most of his life as a humble doorkeeper rigorous asceticism deep love for the Blessed Sacrament defended the doctrine of the Real Presence against a Calvinists born and died on Whitsunday 
1616 Georgian martyrs of Persia are commemorated on Ascension.


AND ASCENDED INTO HEAVEN...." V. Rev. George Florovsky, D.D.
"I ascend unto My Father and your Father, and to My God, and your God" (John 20:17).
In these words the Risen Christ described to Mary Magdalene the mystery of His Resurrection. She had to carry this mysterious message to His disciples, "as they mourned and wept" (Mark 16:10). The disciples listened to these glad tidings with fear and amazement, with doubt and mistrust. It was not Thomas alone who doubted among the Eleven. On the contrary, it appears that only one of the Eleven did not doubt - St John, the disciple "whom Jesus loved." He alone grasped the mystery of the empty tomb at once: "and he saw, and believed" (John 20:8).
Even Peter left the sepulcher in amazement, "wondering at that which was come to pass" (Luke 24:12).

The disciples did not expect the Resurrection. The women did not, either. They were quite certain that Jesus was dead and rested in the grave, and they went to the place "where He was laid," with the spices they had prepared, "that they might come and anoint Him." They had but one thought: "Who shall roll away the stone from the door of the sepulcher for us?" (Mark 16:1-3; Luke 24:1). And therefore, on not finding the body, Mary Magdalene was sorrowful and complained: "They have taken away my Lord, and I know not where they have laid Him' (John 20:13). On hearing the good news from the angel, the women fled from the sepulchre in fear and trembling: "Neither said they anything to any man, for they were afraid" (Mark 16:8). And when they spoke no one believed them, in the same way as no one 'had believed Mary, who saw the Lord, or the disciples as they walked on their way into the country, (Mark 16:13), and who recognized Him in the breaking of bread. "And afterward He appeared unto the Eleven as they sat at meat, and upbraided them with their unbelief and hardness of heart, because they believed not them who had seen Him after He was risen' (Mark 16:10-14).

From whence comes this "hardness of heart" and hesitation? Why were their eyes so "holden," why were the disciples so much afraid of the news, and why did the Easter joy so slowly, and with such difficulty, enter the Apostles' hearts? Did not they, who were with Him from the beginning, "from the baptism of John," see all the signs of power which He performed before the face of the whole people? The lame walked, the blind saw, the dead were raised, and all infirmities were healed. Did they not behold, only a week earlier, how He raised by His word Lazarus from the dead, who had already been in the grave for four days? Why then was it so strange to them that the Master had arisen Himself? How was it that they came to forget that which the Lord used to tell them on many occasions, that after suffering and death He would arise on the third day?

The mystery of the Apostles' "unbelief" is partly disclosed in the narrative of the Gospel: "But we trusted that it had been He which should have redeemed Israel," with disillusionment and complaint said the two disciples to their mysterious Companion on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:21). They meant: He was betrayed, condemned to death and crucified. The news of the Resurrection brought by the women only "astonished" them. They still wait for an earthly triumph, for an exernal victory. The same temptation possesses their hearts, which first prevented them from accepting "the preaching of the Cross" and made them argue every time the Saviour tried to reveal His mystery to them. "Ought not Christ to have suffered these things and to enter into His glory?" (Luke 24:26). It was still difficult to understand this.

He had the power to arise, why did He allow what that had happened to take place at all? Why did He take upon Himself disgrace, blasphemy and wounds? In the eyes of all Jerusalem, amidst the vast crowds assembled for the Great Feast, He was condemned and suffered a shameful death. And now He enters not into the Holy City, neither to the people which beheld His shame and death, nor to the High Priests and elders, nor to Pilate - so that He might make their crime obvious and smite their pride. Instead, He sends His disciples away to remote Galilee and appears to them there. Even much earlier the disciples wondered, "How is it that Thou wilt manifest Thyself unto us, and not unto the world?" (John 14:22). Their wonder continues, and even on the day of His glorious Ascension the Apostles question the Lord, "Lord, wilt Thou at this time restore again the kingdom to Israel?" (Acts 1:6). They still did not comprehend the meaning of His Resurrection, they did not understand what it meant that He was "ascending" to the Father. Their eyes were opened but later, when "the promise of the Father" had been fulfilled.
In the Ascension resides the meaning and the fullness of Christ's Resurrection.
The Lord did not rise in order to return again to the fleshly order of life, so as to live again and commune with the disciples and the multitudes by means of preaching and miracles. Now he does not even stay with them, but only "appears" to them during the forty days, from time to time, and always in a miraculous and mysterious manner.
 "He was not always with them now, as He was before the Resurrection," comments St John Chrysostom. "He came and again disappeared, thus leading them on to higher conceptions. He no longer permitted them to continue in their former relationship toward Him, but took effectual measures to secure these two objects: That the fact of His Resurrection should be believed, and that He Himself should be ever after apprehended to be greater than man."
 There was something new and unusual in His person (cf. John 21:1-14). As St John Chrysostom says, "It was not an open presence, but a certain testimony of the fact that He was present." That is why the disciples were confused and frightened. Christ arose not in the same way as those who were restored to life before Him. Theirs was a resurrection for a time, and they returned to life in the same body, which was subject to death and corruption - returned to the previous mode of life. But Christ arose for ever, unto eternity.

 He arose in a body of glory, immortal and incorruptible. He arose, never to die, for "He clothed the mortal in the splendor of incorruption." His glorified Body was already exempt from the fleshly order of existence. "It is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption. It is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness, it is raised in power. It is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body" (I Cor. 15:42-44).
   This mysterious transformation of human bodies, of which St Paul was speaking in the case of our Lord, had been accomplished in three days. Christ's work on earth was accomplished. He had suffered, was dead and buried, and now rose to a higher mode of existence. By His Resurrection He abolished and destroyed death, abolished the law of corruption, "and raised with Himself the whole race of Adam." Christ has risen, and now "no dead are left in the grave" (cf. The Easter Sermon of St John Chrysostom). And now He ascends to the Father, yet He does not "go away," but abides with the faithful for ever (cf. The Kontakion of Ascension). For He raises the very earth with Him to heaven, and even higher than any heaven.
 God's power, in the phrase of St John Chrysostom, "manifests itself not only in the Resurrection, but in something much stronger." For "He was received up into heaven, and sat on the right hand of God" (Mark 16:19).
And with Christ, man's nature ascends also.
"We who seemed unworthy of the earth, are now raised to heaven," says St John Chrysostom. "We who were unworthy of earthly dominion have been raised to the Kingdom on high, have ascended higher than heaven, have came to occupy the King's throne, and the same nature from which the angels guarded Paradise, stopped not until it ascended to the throne of the Lord." By His Ascension the Lord not only opened to man the entrance to heaven, not only appeared before the face of God on our behalf and for our sake, but likewise "transferred man" to the high places. "He honored them He loved by putting them close to the Father." God quickened and raised us together with Christ, as St Paul says, "and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus" (Ephes. 2:6). Heaven received the inhabitants of the earth. "The First fruits of them that slept" sits now on high, and in Him all creation is summed up and bound together. "The earth rejoices in mystery, and the heavens are filled with joy."

"The terrible ascent...." Terror-stricken and trembling stand the angelic hosts, contemplating the Ascension of Christ. And trembling they ask each other, "What is this vision? One who is man in appearance ascends in His body higher than the heavens, as God."

Thus the Office for the Feast of the Ascension depicts the mystery in a poetical language. As on the day of Christ's Nativity the earth was astonished on beholding God in the flesh, so now the Heavens do tremble and cry out. "The Lord of Hosts, Who reigns over all, Who is Himself the head 'Of all, Who is preeminent in all things, Who has reinstated creation in its former order - He is the King of Glory." And the heavenly doors are opened: "Open, Oh heavenly gates, and receive God in the flesh." It is an open allusion to Psalms 24:7-10, now prophetically interpreted. "Lift up your heads, Oh ye gates, and be lifted up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of Glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord strong and mighty...." St Chrysostom says, "Now the angels have received that for which they have long waited, the archangels see that for which they have long thirsted. They have seen our nature shining on the King's throne, glistening with glory and eternal beauty.... Therefore they descend in order to see the unusual and marvelous vision: Man appearing in heaven."

The Ascension is the token of Pentecost, the sign of its coming, "The Lord has ascended to heaven and will send the Comforter to the world'

For the Holy Spirit was not yet in the world, until Jesus was glorified. And the Lord Himself told the disciples, "If I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you" (John 16:7). The gifts of the Spirit are "gifts of reconciliation," a seal of an accomplished salvation and of the ultimate reunion of the world with God. And this was accomplished only in the Ascension. "And one saw miracles follow miracles," says St John Chrysostom, "ten days prior to this our nature ascended to the King's throne, while today the Holy Ghost has descended on to our nature." The joy of the Ascension lies in the promise of the Spirit.' "Thou didst give joy to Thy disciples by a promise of the Holy Spirit." The victory of Christ is wrought in us by the power of the Holy Spirit.

"On high is His body, here below with us is His Spirit. And so we have His token on high, that is His body, which He received from us, and here below we have His Spirit with us. Heaven received the Holy Body, and the earth accepted the Holy Spirit. Christ came and sent the Spirit. He ascended, and with Him our body ascended also" St John Chrysostom). The revelation of the Holy Trinity was completed. Now the Spirit Comforter is poured forth on all flesh. "Hence comes foreknowledge of the future, understanding of mysteries, apprehension of what is hidden, distribution of good gifts, the heavenly citizenship, a place in the chorus of angels, joy without end, abiding in God, the being made like to God, and, highest of all, ,the being made God!" (St Basil, On the Holy Spirit, IX). Beginning with the Apostles, and through communion with them - by an unbroken succession - Grace is spread to all believers. Through renewal and glorification in the Ascended Christ, man's nature became receptive of the spirit. "And unto the world He gives quickening forces through His human body," says Bishop Theophanes. "He holds it completely in Himself and penetrates it with His strength, out of Himself; and He likewise draws the angels to Himself through the spirit of man, giving them space for action and thus making them blessed." All this is done through the Church, which is "the Body of Christ;" that is, His "fullness" (Ephesians 1:23). "The Church is the fulfillment of Christ," continues Bishop Theophanes, "perhaps in the same way as the tree is the fulfillment of the seed. That which is contained in the seed in a contracted form receives its development in the tree."

The very existence of the Church is the fruit of the Ascension. It is in the Church that man's nature is truly ascended to the Divine heights. "And gave Him to be Head over all things" (Ephesians 1:22). St John Chrysostom comments: "Amazing! Look again, whither He has raised the Church. As though He were lifting it up by some engine, He has raised it up to a vast height, and set it on yonder throne; for where the Head is, there is the body also. There is no interval of separation between the Head and the body; for were there a separation, then would the one no longer be a body, nor would the other any longer be a Head." The whole race of men is to follow Christ, even in His ultimate exaltation, "to follow in His train." Within the Church, through an acquisition of the Spirit in the fellowship of Sacraments, the Ascension continues still, and will continue until the measure is full. "Only then shall the Head be filled up, when the body is rendered perfect, when we are knit together and united," concludes St John Chrysostom.

The Ascension is a sign and token of the Second Coming. "This same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen Him go into heaven" (Acts 1:11).

The mystery of God's Providence will be accomplished in the Return of the Risen Lord. In the fulfillment of time, Christ's kingly power will be revealed and spread over the whole of faithful mankind. Christ bequeathes the Kingdom to the whole of the faithful. "And I appoint unto you a Kingdom as My Father has appointed unto me. That ye may eat and drink at My table in My Kingdom, and sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel" (Luke 22:29-30). Those who followed Him faithfully will sit with Him on their thrones on the day of His coming. "To him that overcomes will I grant to sit with Me in My throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with My Father in His throne" (Rev. 3:21). Salvation will be consummated in the Glory. "Conceive to yourself the throne, the royal throne, conceive the immensity of the privilege. This, at least if we chose, might more avail to startle us, yea, even than hell itself" (St John Chrysostom).

We should tremble more at the thought of that abundant Glory which is appointed unto the redeemed, than at the thought of the eternal darkness. "Think near Whom Thy Head is seated...." Or rather, Who is the Head. In very truth, "wondrous and terrible is Thy divine ascension from the mountain, 0 Giver of Life." A terrible and wondrous height is the King's throne. In face of this height all flesh stands silent, in awe and trembling. "He has Himself descended to the lowest depths of humiliation, and raised up man to the height of exaltation."


What then should we do? "If thou art the body of Christ, bear the Cross, for He bore it' (St John Chrysostom).
"With the power of Thy Cross, Oh Christ, establish my thoughts, so that I may sing and glorify Thy saving Ascension."
Originally published in St Vladimir's Seminary Quarterly, Vol. 2 # 3, 1954. Used with permission.
1st v. Andronicus and Junias liturgically honored among the Greeks referenced by Saint Paul in Romans 16:7 "Salute Andronicus and Junias, my kinsmen and fellow- prisoners, who are of not among the Apostles, who also were in Christ before me." MM (AC)
Andronicus_Atanasias_of_Christianoupolis_Junia

Andronikus und Junia Orthodoxe Kirche: 17. Mai Andronikus auch 30. Juli
Andronikus und Junias werden in Röm 16, 7 von Paulus genannt. Nach dieser Stelle waren er und Junia (oder Junias) Verwandte und Mitgefangene des Paulus. Andronikus wurde von Paulus zum Priester geweiht und war dann Bischof von Pannonien (Ungarn).
Junia(s) war sein Helfer bzw. seine Helferin (Nach dem griechischen Text ist beides möglich). Beide heilten Kranke, trieben Dämonen aus und erlitten das Martyrium.

Saint Andronicus Apostle of the Seventy and Saint Junia were relatives of the holy Apostle Paul. They labored much, preaching the Gospel to pagans. St Paul mentions them in his Epistle to the Romans: "Salute Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen and fellow prisoners, who are of note among the Apostles, who also were in Christ, before me" (Romans 16:7).

St Andronicus was made Bishop of Pannonia, but his preaching also took him and St Junia to other lands, far from the boundaries of his diocese. Through the efforts of Sts Andronicus and Junia the Church of Christ was strengthened, pagans were converted to the knowledge of God, many pagan temples closed, and in their place Christian churches were built. The service in honor of these saints states that they suffered martyrdom for Christ.

In the fifth century, during the reign of the emperors Arcadius and Honorius, their holy relics were uncovered on the outskirts of Constantinople together with the relics of other martyrs at the gate of Eugenius (February 22).

It was revealed to the pious cleric Nicholas Kalligraphos that among the relics of these seventeen martyrs were the relics of the holy Apostle Andronicus. Afterwards, a magnificent church was built on this spot.
Saint Andronicus Apostle of the Seventy and Saint Junia were relatives of the holy Apostle Paul. They labored much, preaching the Gospel to pagans. St Paul mentions them in his Epistle to the Romans: "Salute Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen and fellow prisoners, who are of note among the Apostles, who also were in Christ, before me" (Romans 16:7).
St Andronicus was made Bishop of Pannonia, but his preaching also took him and St Junia to other lands, far from the boundaries of his diocese. Through the efforts of Sts Andronicus and Junia the Church of Christ was strengthened, pagans were converted to the knowledge of God, many pagan temples closed, and in their place Christian churches were built. The service in honor of these saints states that they suffered martyrdom for Christ.
In the fifth century, during the reign of the emperors Arcadius and Honorius, their holy relics were uncovered on the outskirts of Constantinople together with the relics of other martyrs at the gate of Eugenius (February 22).
It was revealed to the pious cleric Nicholas Kalligraphos that among the relics of these seventeen martyrs were the relics of the holy Apostle Andronicus. Afterwards, a magnificent church was built on this spot.
1st century; liturgically honored among the Greeks. These saints are referenced by Saint Paul in Romans 16:7: "Salute Andronicus and Junias, my kinsmen and fellow- prisoners, who are of not among the Apostles, who also were in Christ before me." This is all that is known about them (Benedictines).

One of the Seventy, he was a kinsman of the Apostle Paul, as Paul wrote (Rom. 16:17), remembering also St Junia, Andronicus's helper. Andronicus was made Bishop of Pannonia, and did not stay in one place, but preached the Gospel throughout the whole of Pannonia. With St Junia, he was successful in bringing many to Christ and in demolishing many temples of idolatry. Both of them had the grace of wonder-working, by which they drove out demons and healed every sort of sickness and disease. They both suffered for Christ, and thus received a twofold crown: of apostleship and of martyrdom. Their holy relics were found in the excavations in Eugenius (see Feb. 2nd).
St. Adrio  Victor & Basilla Martyrs of Alexandria Egypt MM (RM)
Alexandríæ sanctórum Mártyrum Adriónis, Victóris et Basíllæ.
    At Alexandria, the holy martyrs Adrion, Victor, and Basilla.

Martyr of Alexandria, Egypt, with Basilla and Victor. No details of their suffering are extant.
Adrio, Victor & Basilla MM (RM). Martyrs of Alexandria, whether at the hands of pagans or Arians is unknown (Benedictines).
255 St. Restituta Virgin martyr maiden in Africa died for Christ
Eódem die sanctæ Restitútæ, Vírginis et Mártyris; quæ, in Africa, Valeriáno imperánte, a Próculo Júdice várie torta, et in navículam pice et stupa refértam, ut in mari comburerétur, impósita, tandem, cum in incensóres, immísso igne, flamma converterétur, in oratióne spíritum Deo réddidit.  Ipsíus corpus cum eádem navícula, Dei nutu, ad Ænáriam ínsulam, prope Neápolim, in Campánia, devéctum est, et a Christiánis magna veneratióne suscéptum; ac póstmodum in ejus honórem Constantínus Magnus Basílicam in ipsa urbe Neápoli erigéndam curávit.
    Also St. Restituta, virgin and martyr, who was subjected to various kinds of tortures in Africa by the judge Proculus, in the reign of Valerian, and then put in a boat filled with pitch and oakum, to be burned to death on the sea.  But the flame turned on those who kindled it, and the saint yielded her soul to God in prayer.  Her body was, by Divine Providence, carried in the boat to the island of Ischia, near Naples, where it was received by the Christians with great veneration.  A church was afterwards erected in her honour at Naples by Constantine the Great.
She was put to death during the Roman persecutions at Carthage. Her date of death has been set at 255, which would mean she was martyred under Emperor Valerian; there is a possibility that she was executed at a later date, under Emperor Diocletian. Her relics are in Naples, Italy.

Restituta of Carthage VM (RM) Died 255 or 304. An African girl who died for Christ during the persecution of Valerian or Diocletian, probably at Carthage.
Her relics are housed in the cathedral of Naples (Attwater2, Benedictines).
300 Saint Solochon, a native of Egypt imperial army in regiment of tribune Campanus
Chalcédone sanctórum Mártyrum Solochónis et Sociórum mílitum, sub Maximiáno Imperatóre.
    At Chalcedon, the holy martyrs Solochan and his companions.

Suffered for Christ during the reign of the emperor Maximian (284-305). The holy martyrs Pamphamirus and Pamphalon also gave their lives for Christ at the same time. All of them served in the imperial army in the regiment of the tribune Campanus.
During the persecution against Christians by the emperors Maximian and Diocletian, Campanus was sent to the city of Chalcedon with his soldiers. All the soldiers of his regiment were required to offer sacrifice in a pagan temple. The three soldiers, Sts Solochon, Pamphamirus and Pamphalon, refused to offer sacrifice to idols, explaining that they worshiped only the true God, the Lord Jesus Christ.
On the orders of Campanus they were subjected to terrible tortures, during which the holy martyrs Pamphamirus and Pamphalon died. St Solochon survived the torture and remained alive, glorifying Christ. In great anger, the torturer gave orders to open St Solochon's mouth and force him to drink blood offered to idols. But St Solochon clenched his teeth so strongly, that they could not open them even with iron. The sword bent, and the saint broke his bonds and stood before the torturer, continuing to glorify Christ.

St Solochon heard a voice from the heavens encouraging him to persevere to the end.

The saint endured a merciless beating, after which they dragged him over sharp stones, demanding that he renounce Christ, but the holy martyr remained steadfast. Then he was hung up by one hand, with a heavy weight tied to his leg. St Solochon remained in this position for about three hours. When finally they cut the ropes, then to everyone's surprise, St Solochon stood upright on his feet, like a healthy man. Insane with anger, Campanus took a stylus and thrust it into the martyr's ear.
The sufferer fell down, and Campanus and the soldiers departed, casting him aside. Christians carried the martyr to the house of a certain pious widow and placed him on a cot. The saint ate some food and conversed with the Christians, exhorting them to stand firmly for the Faith, and then after he prayed and lifted up his eyes to heaven, he surrendered his soul to the Lord Jesus Christ.

He was an Egyptian by birth, and a Roman soldier under the commander Campanus, in the reign of the wicked Emperor Maximian. When the imperial command that all soldiers offer sacrifice to idols arrived, Solochon revealed that he was a Christian. Two of his friends, Pamphamir and Pamphylon, also did the same. The commander ordered that they be beaten and tortured with great harshness, under which St Pamphamir and St Pamphylon breathed their last. Solochon remained alive, and was put to new torture: the commander ordered the soldiers to force his teeth open with a sword and stuff his mouth with food sacrificed to idols. The martyr broke the iron with his teeth and did not receive the foul, idolatrous sacrifice. Finally, they stabbed him with a quill through both cars and left him thus to die. Christians took the martyr and carried him to the home of a widow, where he gained a little strength with food and drink, and continued to give counsel to the faithful to be steadfast in their faith and in torture for it. After this, he breathed a thanksgiving to God, finished his earthly course and went to the Kingdom of heaven, to the Lord whom he had served so faithfully, in the year 298.

303 St. Heradius Martyr with Aquilinus Paul and 2 companions. They were put to death at Nyon on Lake Geneva, Switzerland
Noviodúni, in Gálliis, sanctórum Mártyrum Herádii, Pauli et Aquilíni, cum duóbus áliis.
    At Noyon in France, the holy martyrs Heradius, Paul, and Aquilinus, with two other

Heradius, Paul, Aquilinus & Companions MM (RM). This group of five martyrs was put to death at Nyon (Noviodunum) on the lake of Geneva under Diocletian (Benedictines).

305 Solochon and Companions Egyptian soldiers in the imperial army at Chalcedon died for their faith MM (RM)
Chalcédone sanctórum Mártyrum Solochónis et Sociórum mílitum, sub Maximiáno Imperatóre.
    At Chalcedon, the holy martyrs Solochan and his companions.
Solochon was one of three Egyptian soldiers in the imperial army at Chalcedon, who were clubbed to death for the faith under Maximian (Benedictines).
545 St. Madern Hermit of Cornish descent St. Madern’s Well, is still popular many cures are said to have been performed

6th v. ST MADRON, OR MADERN
THIS saint, who has given his name to a large parish in the extreme south-west of England and to its unusually interesting church (the mother church of Penzance) has not been satisfactorily identified and nothing is known for certain about his life. Alban Butler does not venture beyond connecting him with Brittany. Some claim him to be the Welsh St Padarn; others say he is the same as St Medran, brother of St Odran, a disciple of St Kieran of Saighir—on the assumption that the last named was identical in his turn with St Piran. Professor Loth inclined to the view, and Canon Doble agreed, that Madron was Matronus, a disciple of St Tudwal who went with his master to Brittany and was buried close to him at Tréguier.
In any case St Madron is of interest because of the persistence of a cultus associated with his well and chapel. This well is out among the fields three-quarters of a mile north-west of Madron churchtown. Close by is the chapel or baptistery, of which the remains are of great interest: water from the spring flows through it at the west end, where there is a sort of tiny structural baptistery in the angle of the south and west walls. The repute of this sanctuary for miraculous occurrences did not end with the Reformation: and if John Norden the topographer wrote in 1584 that Madron was “coye of his cures”, less than sixty years later a happening there caused widespread interest. The Anglican bishop of Exeter, Dr Joseph Hall, himself examined it in 1641, and wrote in a treatise On the Invisible World:

The commerce which we have with the good spirits is not now discerned by the eyes, but is, like themselves, spiritual. Yet not so, but that even in bodily occasions, we have many times insensible helps from them: in such manner as that by the effects we can boldly say: “Here hath been an angel, though we see him not.” Of this kind was that (no less than miraculous) cure which at St Madern’s in Cornwall was wrought upon a poor cripple, John Trelille, whereof (besides the attestation of many hundreds of neighbours) I took a strict and personal examination in that last visitation which I either did or ever shall hold. This man, that for sixteen years together, was fain to walk upon his hands, by reason of the close contraction of his legs (upon three admonitions in a dream to wash in that well) was suddenly so restored to his limbs that I saw him able to walk and get his own maintenance. I found here was no art nor collusion: the thing done, the author invisible.

A more detailed description of the same cure is given by another writer, Francis Coventry, in a book entitled Paralipomena Philosophica de Mundo Peripatetico (Antwerp, 1652).* [* Francis Coventry was none other than Christopher Davenport, better known as Francis a Sancta Clara, the Franciscan Recollect who was chaplain to Queen Henrietta Maria and sought to interpret the Thirty-Nine Articles in a Catholic sense. Apparently on the strength of a statement by Alban Butler, the judicious Dr Oliver states in his Collections (1857) that Father Francis “lived in Cornwall before the civil wars”. This seems to be a mistake.]
It appears that the story of the miracle came to the ears of King Charles I, who caused further inquiries to be made, from which it was ascertained that:

A certain boy of twelve years old, called John Trelille as they were playing at football, snatching up the ball ran away with it: whereupon a girl in anger struck him with a thick stick on the back-bone, and so bruised or broke it that for sixteen years after he was forced to go creeping on the ground. In this condition he arrived to the twenty-eighth year of his age, when he dreamed that if he did but bathe in St Madern’s well, or in the stream running from it, he should recover his former strength and health.

 This is a place in Cornwall from the remains of ancient devotion still frequented by Protestants on the Thursdays in May, and especially on the feast of Corpus Christi; near to which well is a chapel dedicated to St Madern, where is yet an altar, and right against it a grassy hillock (made every year anew by the country people) which they call St Madern’s bed. The chapel roof is quite decayed; but a kind of thorn of itself shooting forth of the old walls so extends its boughs that it covers the whole chapel and supplies as it were a roof. On a Thursday in May, assisted by one Berriman his neighbour, entertaining great hopes from his dream, thither he crept, and lying before the altar, and praying very fervently that he might regain his health and the strength of his limbs, he washed his whole body in the stream that flowed from the well and ran through the chapel: after which, having slept about an hour and a half on St Madern’s bed, through the extremity of pain he felt in his nerves and arteries, he began to cry out; and his companions helping and lifting him up, he perceived his hams and joints somewhat extended and himself become stronger, in so much that, partly with his feet, partly with his hands, he went much more erect than before. Before the following Thursday he got two crutches, resting on which he could make shift to walk, which before he could not do. And coming to the chapel as before, after having bathed himself he slept on the same bed, and awaking found himself much stronger and upright; and so leaving one crutch in the chapel, he went home with the other. The third Thursday he returned to the chapel and bathed as before, slept, and when he awoke rose up quite cured: yea, grew so strong that he wrought day-labour among the hired servants; and four years after listed himself a soldier in the king’s army, where he behaved himself with great stoutness, both of mind and body; at length in 1644 he was slain at Lyme in Dorsetshire.

For a long time the local Wesleyan Methodists have met annually for a service at St Madron’s chapel on the first two Sundays of May, and since about 1920 the Anglicans do the like on St John’s day in summer. A child was baptized there in June 1951. On the other hand, the custom, especially during May month, of passing children through the spring water to alleviate skin affections has also been observed within living memory, and young people still visit the well and drop pins and little crosses therein, though no doubt “more from the pleasure of each other’s company than from any real faith” in its power of divination. But those customs go back in all probability to long before St Madron may have built his chapel and hermitage here, to a time when no child in these islands had yet been christened.
See Canon H. R. Jennings, Historical Notes on Madron . . . (1936); LBS., vol. iii, pp. 396—398; W. Scawen in an appendix to D. Gilbert’s Parochial History of Cornwall (1838); R. Hunt, Popular Romances of the West of England (1903), pp. 294—295; A. K. H. Jenkin, Cornwall and Its People (1945), pp. 309—310.

Nothing is known of his life, but he was of Cornish descent and connected with Brittany, France. Numerous churches in England bear his name, and the reputed site of his hermitage,

Madron of Cornwall, Hermit (AC) (also known as Maden, Madern) Died near Land's End, Cornwall, c. 545. Saint Madron, a hermit in Brittany of Cornish descent, is the patron of many churches, including the site of his hermitage at Saint Madern's Well in Cornwall and two parishes in Saint-Malo. Many miracles are ascribed to Saint Madron, including one experienced, investigated, and attested to by the Protestant bishop of Exeter, Dr. Joseph Hall, a strong opponent of Catholicism who wrote Dissuasive from popery to W. D.. In On the invisible world he wrote of the miraculous cure at Saint Madern's Well:

"The commerce that we have with the good spirits is not now discerned by the eye, but is, like themselves, spiritual. Yet not so, but that even in bodily occasions we have many times insensible helps from them; in such manner as that by the effects we can boldly say: Here hath been an angel, though we see him not. Of this kind was that (no less than miraculous) cure which at Saint Madern's in Cornwall was wrought upon a poor cripple, John Trelille, whereof (besides the attestation of many hundreds of neighbors) I took a strict and personal examination in that last visitation which I either did or ever shall hold. This man, that for sixteen years together was fain to walk upon his hands, by reason of the close contraction of the sinews of his legs (upon three admonitions in a dream to wash in that well), was suddenly so restored to his limbs, that I saw him able to walk and get his own maintenance. I found here was neither art nor collusion: the thing done, the author invisible."
Another writer of the same period gives a fuller account of the same miraculous cure:
"I will relate one miracle more done in our own country, to the great wonder of the neighboring inhabitants, but a few years ago, viz., about the year 1640. The process of the business was told the king when at Oxford, which he caused to be further examined. It was this: a certain boy of twelve years old, called John Trelille, in the county of Cornwall, not far from the Land's End, as they were playing at football, snatching up the ball ran away with it; whereupon a girl in anger struck him with a thick stick on the backbone, and so bruised or broke it, that for sixteen years after he was forced to go creeping on the ground.

"In this condition he arrived to the twenty-eighth year of his age, when he dreamed that if he did but bathe in Saint Madern's well, or in the stream running from it, he should recover his former strength and health. This is a place in Cornwall from the remains of ancient devotion still frequented by Protestants on the Thursdays in May, and especially on the feast of Corpus Christi; near to which well is a chapel dedicated to Saint Madern, where is yet an altar, and right against it a grassy hillock (made every year anew by the country people) which they call Saint Madern's bed. The chapel-roof is quite decayed; but a kind of thorn of itself shooting forth of the old walls, so extends its boughs that it covers the whole chapel, and supplies as it were a roof.
"On a Thursday in May, assisted by one Periman his neighbor, entertaining great hopes from his dream, thither he crept, and lying before the altar, and praying very fervently that he might regain his health and the strength of his limbs, he washed his whole body in the stream that flowed from the well, and ran through the chapel: after which, having slept about an hour and a half on Saint Madern's bed, through the extremity of pain he felt in his nerves and arteries, he began to cry out, and his companion helping and lifting him up, he perceived his hams and joints somewhat extended, and himself become stronger, insomuch, that partly with his feet, partly with his hands, he went much more erect than before.
"Before the following Thursday he got two crutches, resting on which he could make shift to walk, which before he could not do. And coming to the chapel as before, after having bathed himself he slept on the same bed, and awaking found himself much stronger and more upright; and so leaving one crutch in the chapel, he went home with the other.
"The third Thursday he returned to the chapel. and bathed as before, slept, and when he awoke rose up quite cured; yea, grew so strong, that he wrought day-labor among other hired servants; and four years after listed himself a soldier in the kings army, where he behaved himself with great stoutness, both of mind and body at length, in 1644, he was slain at Lime in Dorsetshire."
The author emphasizes notice that Thursday and Friday were the days chosen out of devotion to the blessed Eucharist and the Passion of Christ.

This well-attested miracle aroused interest in Saint Madron, but still little is known about the saint except for the dedications in Cornwall and Brittany. He has been identified as Saint Medran, the disciple of Saint Kieran, the Welsh Saint Padarn, or a local man when accompanied Saint Tudwal to Brittany (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson, Husenbeth).
596 St. Dodo of Gareja ("Mamadavitoba" in Tbilisi, An admirer of poverty and solitude, he labored as a hermit at Ninotsminda in Kakheti.
A companion of St. Davit of Gareji, St. Dodo belonged to the royal family Andronikashvili. He was tonsured a monk while still an youth, and was endowed with every virtue.

Having heard about the miracles of Davit of Gareji, St. Dodo set off for the Gareji Wilderness to witness them himself. The venerable fathers greeted one another warmly and began laboring there together.  After some time, St. Davit became deeply impressed with Dodo’s devotion to the Faith, and he proposed that he take with him some of the other monks and begin to construct cells on the opposite mountain.

The brothers built cells and began to labor there with great ardor. Before long the number of cells had reached two hundred. St. Dodo isolated himself in a narrow crevice, where there was barely room for one man. Day and night, winter and summer, in the heat and the cold, he prayed with penitent tears for the forgiveness of his sins, the strengthening of the souls of his brothers, and the bolstering of the true Faith throughout the country.

Once St. Davit miraculously healed the son of Prince Bubakar of Rustavi. In return, the grateful prince donated food and other necessities to the monks of Gareji Monastery. St. Davit took part of his contributions and sent what remained to St. Dodo. He advised Bubakar to have St. Dodo baptize him, and St. Dodo joyously baptized Bubakar, his sons, and all his suite.
St. Dodo labored to an advanced age in the monastery he had founded and reposed peacefully.
His spiritual sons and companions buried him in the cave where he had labored, and a church was later built over his grave.
650 St. Cathan Bishop of the isle of Bute, in Scotland called Kil-Cathan in his honor. A tomb bearing his name was found near Londonderry, Ireland, but Scottish scholars claim his remains are at Kil-Cathan.

Cathan B (AC) (also known as Catan, Cadan) 6th or 7th century. According to the Scots, the relics of Bishop Saint Cathan rest on the Isle of Bute, where he may have been bishop. They were so famous that the land was often called Kilcathan. His tomb is also shown at Tamlacht near Londonderry. There is the possibility that there were two saints by this name (Benedictines, Husenbeth).
673 Maildulf of Malmesbury Abbot spread the Gospel in England community of scholars known as Malmesbury (AC)

(also known as Maeldubh) Died at Malmesbury Abbey, England, in 673.

The Irish monk Saint Maildulf left his homeland to spread the Gospel in England. He settled in the lonely forest country that in those days lay in the northeast of Wiltshire. After living for a time as a hermit, he gathered the children of the neighborhood for instruction. In the course of time his hermitage became a school, where he had Saint Aldhelm among his disciples. The school and foundation flourished even after his death, acquiring fame as a community of scholars known as Malmesbury (Benedictines, Husenbeth, Montague).
Saint Maw Born in Ireland name in Cornish means "a boy."
Only Husenbeth mentions this saint, whose name in Cornish means "a boy." He appears to have left his homeland in search of solitude in Cornwall. In his hermitage on the sea near Falmouth, he lived a life of prayer and austere penance at Saint Mawes. A church, chair of solid stone in the churchyard, and a holy well still bear his name. Leland writes that Maw had been a teacher and later a bishop in Britain (Husenbeth).

893 Saint Stephen, Patriarch of Constantinople concerned himself with widows and orphans, and distinguished himself by his temperance younger son of Emperor Basil the Macedonian brother of Emperor Leo the Wise
He was ordained to the priesthood under Patriarch Photius. When St Photius was compelled to resign the patriarchal throne in the year 886, St Stephen was elevated to the See of Constantinople. The saint vigilantly stood watch over his spiritual flock, he was merciful and interceded for the defenseless, he concerned himself with widows and orphans, and distinguished himself by his temperance. He died peacefully in the year 893 and was buried in the Sikellian monastery.

The son of the Emperor Basil the Macedonian and brother of Leo the Wise, he came to the patriarchal throne after Photius, and governed the Church of God from 886 to 893. He died peacefully, and went to the Lord whom he had greatly loved.

953 Blessed Rasso of Grafrath man of great stature brave warrior against invading Hungarians founder monk OSB (AC) (also known as Ratho).
953 BD RATHO OF ANDECUS
THE famous pilgrimage-place of Grafrath in Bavaria derives its name from Bd Ratho, Graf von Andechs, who is buried there and whose intercession is sought at his shrine by countless invalids, especially by those suffering from hernia and stone. The beatus, whose name is also written Ratto, Rasso, Rago and Rapoto, is popularly known as St Grafrath. His father was count of Diessen and Andechs, and he had one brother who died on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and a sister, Halta, who became the mother of St Conrad of Constance.
He himself was remarkable for his great stature and for his prowess in all knightly exercises; he also distinguished himself in battle as leader of the Bavarians against the Hungarians. Peace having been restored, about 948 he laid aside his weapons to undertake pilgrimages to Rome and to the Holy Land from which he brought back numerous relics, the greater part of which are now at Andechs. On what was then an island in the Amper, under the shadow of the height crowned by the castle afterwards known as the Rassoburg, he built a monastery for Benedictine monks to which he gave the name of Worth. The church was consecrated by St Ulric on May 1, 951. The following year Ratho assumed the habit at Worth and in 953 he died there. Although shortly after his death the monastery and church were destroyed by the Hungarians, the relics of Bd Ratho were saved, and his tomb escaped the ravages of that period.

It is very difficult to decide what historical value attaches to the narrative compiled by I. Keferlocher from earlier materials. There has been of late a reaction against the complete discredit into which all the Andechs story had fallen. The text is in the Acta Sanctorum (for June 19). See also Rader, Bavaria Sancta, vol. i, pp. 161—165; Blattmann, Der hl. Rasso (1892) R. Bauerreiss, Fuss-Wallfahrt zum hl. Berg Andechs (1927

Count Rasso of Andechs (Bavaria), a man of great stature, was a brave warrior. He led the Bavarians in several campaigns against the invading Hungarians. After a midlife pilgrimage to the Holy Land and Rome, he founded a Benedictine abbey at Wörth (now Grafrath) in Bavaria where he himself became a monk. Saint Rasso gives his name to the healing shrine of Grafrath in Bavaria (Attwater2).
1045 Saint Bruno of Würzburg bishop spent his private fortune on building the cathedral of Saint Kilian and other churches B (RM)
1045 ST BRUNO, BISHOP OF
Würzburg
ST BRUNO of Wurzburg was the son of Conrad, Duke of Carinthia, and of Baroness Matilda, niece of St Bruno Boniface of Querfurt, the second apostle of Prussia, after whom his great-nephew was named. Having entered the, ecclesiastical state, the younger Bruno became bishop of Wurzburg in 1033 and ruled his diocese successfully for eleven years. The whole of his patrimony he spent in building the magnificent cathedral of St Kilian and in restoring other churches under his rule. A wise man and a profound scholar, he became the counsellor of two emperors and wrote various books, including commentaries on the Holy Scriptures, the Lord’s Prayer, the Apostles’ Creed and the Creed of St Athanasius. He accompanied his kinsman, Conrad II, to Italy, and is said to have persuaded him to abandon the siege of Milan and to make terms with its inhabitants, as the result of a warning he received in a vision from the great St Ambrose of Milan. When the Emperor Henry III, “the Black”,  marched against the Hungarians in 1045, he took St Bruno with him. On their way through Pannonia the royal party put up for a night at the castle of Bosenburg, or Porsenberg, on the Danube, opposite the present town of Ips in Upper Austria. The building seems to have been in a dilapidated condition, for, while the court was at dinner, the banqueting gallery suddenly collapsed. By grasping at a window the emperor escaped disaster, but all the rest were more or less injured, several of them being killed outright. St Bruno, though dying, lingered on for seven days. His body was taken back to Würzburg, where it was buried in the basilica he had erected.
There seems to be no proper biography, but there is a notice in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv. See also H. Bresslau, Jahrbiicher der deutsche Geschichte unter Konrad II (1884); and J. Baier, Der hl. Bruno von Würzburg (1893).

Feast day formerly May 27. Saint Bruno, great-nephew of Saint Bruno of Querfurt, was consecrated bishop of Würzburg in 1033. He spent his private fortune on building the cathedral of Saint Kilian and other churches in the diocese. The saint was killed by the collapse of a gallery while dining with Emperor Henry III at Bosenburg on the Danube (Attwater2, Benedictines, Coulson).

1100 Silaus of Lucca Irish monk abbot of Saint Brendan's monastery zealous and charitable bishop B (AC)
(also known as Silave, Silanus, Sillaeus, Sillao, Siollan) Born in Ireland; died at Lucca, Italy, in 1100; canonized by Pope Lucius III in 1183; feast day sometimes shown as May 21. Saint Silaus, an Irish monk and the abbot of Saint Brendan's monastery, was a zealous and charitable bishop. He spent the end of his life in Italy, where he was known as the "father of the poor." He died at Lucca on his return home from a pilgrimage to Rome. He is the subject of many extravagant tales (Benedictines, Husenbeth).

1152 St. Thethmar missionary among the Wends
Premonstratensian canon and missionary. He labored to convert the Wends, a tribe in modern Germany. A co-worker of St. Vicelinus, Thethmar is also called Theodemar in some accounts.
Thethmar of Neumuenster (AC) (also known as Theodemar) Born at Bremen, Germany; died at Neumünster, 1152. Saint Thethmar was a missionary among the Wends and a disciple of Saint Vicelin. He was probably a a Premonstratensian (Attwater2, Benedictines).

1407 Saint Euphrosyne The holy princess was tonsured as a nun builder of churches founded Ascension women's monastery in the Moscow Kremlin patronage the famous icon of the Archangel Michael
in the world Eudokia, was the daughter of the Suzdal prince Demetrius Constantovich (+ 1383), and from 1367 was the wife of the Moscow Great Prince Demetrius of the Don. Their happy union was for Russia a pledge of unity and peace between Moscow and Suzdal.   St Alexis, Metropolitan of Moscow, and even St Sergius of Radonezh, who baptized one of the sons of Demetrius and Eudokia, had a great influence upon the spiritual life of Princess Eudokia. St Demetrius of Priluki (February 11) was the godfather of another son.
Archangel_Michael

The holy princess was a builder of churches. In 1387 she founded the Ascension women's monastery in the Moscow Kremlin. In 1395, during Tamerlane's invasion into the southern regions of Russia, the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God was transferred to Moscow upon her advice, miraculously defending the Russian land. During Lent, the princess secretly wore chains beneath her splendid royal garb. By her patronage the famous icon of the Archangel Michael was painted, and later became the patronal icon of the Kremlin's Archangel Cathedral.

After raising five sons (a sixth died in infancy), the princess was tonsured as a nun with the name Euphrosyne. She completed her earthly journey on July 7, 1407 and was buried in the Ascension monastery she founded.
An old Russian church poem has survived, the lament of the princess for her husband, who had died at the age of thirty-nine. St Euphrosyne is also commemorated on July 7.
1450 BD ANDREW ABELLON distinguished for his piety and the zeal with which he enforced regular observance; he exercised his talents as an artist in many of the Dominican churches of the south of France.
THE birthplace of Bd Andrew Abellon was Saint-Maximin, the ancient Provençal town which for the last seven hundred years has claimed to possess the relics of St Mary Magdalen and has been visited by countless pilgrims. Andrew received the Dominican habit in his native town and became prior of the royal monastery of St Mary Magdalen at a time when the great church which is supposed to enshrine the head of its holy patroness was slowly approaching completion; it was begun in 1295, but not finished until 1480. Bd Andrew was distinguished for his piety and the zeal with which he enforced regular observance. In addition to labouring as a missioner, he exercised his talents as an artist in many of the Dominican churches of the south of France. He died in 1450.
Not much seems to be known about the life of Bd Andrew. The decree of confirmation of cultus is printed with some other matter in the Analecta Ecclesiastica, vol. x (1902), pp. 443—448; but most of this space is taken up with the proof that the beatus after his death was held in great veneration. There is also an account of Bd Andrew by Father H. Cormier (1903), and sundry references in Fr Mortier’s Histoire des Maitres Generaux O..P., vol. iv. It need hardly be pointed out that the sanctity of Bd Andrew is in no way prejudiced by the fact that historical evidence is lacking to establish the genuineness of the relics in which he so devoutly believed. On this question of the authenticity of the St Mary Magdalen legend, see herein under July 22.
1592 St. Paschal Baylon Franciscan lay brother mystic labored as shepherd for father performed miracles distinguished for austerity spent most of his life as a humble doorkeeper rigorous asceticism deep love for the Blessed Sacrament defended the doctrine of the Real Presence against a Calvinists born and died on Whitsunday
Apud Villam Regálem, in Hispánia, sancti Paschális, ex Ordine Minórum, Confessóris, miræ innocéntiæ et pæniténtiæ viri; quem Leo Papa Décimus tértius cæléstem eucharisticórum Cœtuum et Societátum a sanctíssima Eucharístia Patrónum declarávit.
    At Villareal in Spain, St. Paschal of the Order of Friars Minor, confessor.  He was a man remarkable for innocence of life and the spirit of penance, whom Pope Leo XIII declared to be the heavenly patron of Eucharistic Congresses and of societies formed to honour the Most Blessed Sacrament.
Patron of shepherds, the Eucharist and Eucharistic guilds, societies and congresses
1592 ST PASCHAL BAYLON
THE notice of St Paschal Baylon in the Roman Martyrology tells us not only that he was a man of wonderful innocence and austerity of life, but also that he has been proclaimed by the Holy See patron of all eucharistic congresses and confraternities of the Blessed Sacrament. It is a striking fact that a humble friar, of peasant birth, who was never even a priest, whose name in his own day was hardly known to any but his townsfolk in a corner of Spain, should now from his place in Heaven preside over those imposing assemblies of the Catholic Church.
Thanks mainly to his fellow religious, superior and biographer, Father Ximenes, we are well informed regarding Paschal’s early days. He first saw the light at Torre Hermosa, on the borders of Castile and Aragon, on a Whitsunday, and to that accident he seems to have owed his Christian name, for in Spain, as well as in Italy, the term Pascua is given to other great feasts of the year besides Easter. So the little son born to Martin Baylon and his wife Elizabeth Jubera was called Pascual, just as we are told that the famous Cervantes was christened Miguel because he came into the world on St Michael’s day.
The pious couple possessed little in the way of worldly goods, but they owned a flock of sheep, and from his seventh to his twenty-fourth year Paschal, first as the deputy of his own father, and then serving other employers, led the life of a shepherd. Some of the incidents ascribed to that time are probably legendary, but one or two certain facts stand out: for example, that this shepherd lad, who never had any schooling, taught himself to read and write, being determined to recite the Little Office of our Lady, the central feature of the Howe B. Mariae Virginis, then the prayer-book universally in use among lay-folk. It was noticed with surprise that he went barefoot despite the briars and stony mountain tracks, lived on the poorest fare, fasted often, and wore under his shepherd’s cloak some sort of imitation of a friar’s habit. He could not always get to Mass, but when he was unable to leave his charge in the early morning he knelt for long spaces of time absorbed in prayer, his eyes fixed upon the distant sanctuary of Nuestra Señora de Ia Sierra where the holy sacrifice was being offered. Fifty years afterwards an aged shepherd who had known Paschal in those days deposed that on such occasions the angels more than once brought to the lad the Blessed Sacrament suspended in the air above a chalice, that he might gaze upon and venerate It. He is also alleged to have had a vision of saints, identified by conjecture with St Francis and St Clare, who directed him to offer himself to God in the Order of Friars Minor. More convincing than this testimony is the evidence given of his scrupulous sense of justice. The damage which his beasts occasionally caused to the vines or growing crops was to him a continual source of worry. He insisted that compensation should be made to the owners and often paid for it out of his own slender wage. In that matter his fellows, though they respected him for it, thought he went to absurd lengths.
When Paschal, seemingly about the age of eighteen or nineteen, first sought admission among the barefooted Friars Minor, St Peter of Alcantara, the author of the reform, was still living. The austerity of the rule which he had revived was only equalled by the fervour of those who practised it. Probably the friars of the Loreto convent, knowing nothing of the young shepherd who came from a district two hundred miles away, doubted his fortitude. At any rate, they put him off, but when they admitted him some few years later, they soon realized that God had committed a treasure to their keeping.
The community lived at the level of the first fervour of the reform, but Brother Paschal even in this ascetical atmosphere was recognized as being eminent in every religious virtue. One is apt to regard with some distrust the extravagant eulogiums of hagiographers, but no discerning reader can make himself acquainted with the description which Father Ximenes has left of his friend without feeling that we have here no conventional panegyric, but a straightforward statement of his own inmost conviction. In charity towards all, Paschal was a marvel even to those mortified men who shared the same hard external conditions and were bound by the same rule. In what he deemed to be matters of conscience he was inflexible. There is the story of the ladies who, when Paschal was porter, came to the door to ask the father guardian to come down to hear their confessions. “Tell them”, said the guardian, “ that I am out.” “I will tell them”, amended Paschal, “that your Reverence is engaged.” “No”, the guardian insisted, “tell them that I am not at home.” “Forgive me, Father”, objected the brother very humbly and respectfully, “I must not say that, for that would not be the truth and would be a venial sin”; and thereupon he returned to the door in perfect peace of mind. It is such little flashes of independence which relieve the monotony of the catalogue of virtues, and enable us to see something of the human element in a soul so exalted and purified.
It is pleasant, too, to read of the little devices by which Paschal schemed to secure special delicacies for the sick, the poor, and those whom he regarded as exceptionally deserving, as well as of the tears sometimes seen in the eyes of this austere man, who normally repressed all signs of emotion, when he was brought into contact with some pathetically hard case. Although, it seems, he never laughed, still he was gay, and there was nothing gloomy about his devotion or even his spirit of penance. Ximenes tells us how on one occasion when Paschal was refectorian and had shut himself in to lay the tables, another friar, peeping through the buttery-hatch, caught sight of the good brother executing an elaborate dance, like a second jongleur de Notre-Dame, leaping high and moving rhythmically backwards and forwards, before the statue of our Lady which stood over the refectory door. The intruder withdrew noiselessly, but coming in again a few minutes later with the customary salutation, “Praised be Jesus Christ”, he found Paschal with so radiant a countenance that the memory of the scene was a spur to his devotion for many days afterwards. It is no small tribute that Father Ximenes, who was himself a minister provincial of the Alcantarines within little more than half a century of their inauguration, says of St Paschal: “In no single case do I remember to have noted even the least fault in him, though I lived with him in several of our houses and was his companion on two long journeys; such journeys being commonly an occasion when a man, worn out with fatigue and the monotony, allows himself some indulgence which is not entirely free from blame”.
It is, however, as the Saint of the Eucharist that St Paschal is best remembered outside his own country. Many years before the great work of annual eucharistic congresses was instituted and our saint was nominated its patron, the title-page of Father Salmeron’s Spanish biography bore the heading Vida del Santo del Sacramento S. Pascual Bailon. The long hours which he spent before the tabernacle, kneeling without support, his clasped hands held up in front of, or higher than, his face, had left a deep impression upon his brethren. No wonder that he was for them the Saint of the Blessed Sacrament”. The recognition of this special characteristic goes back to his earliest biographer. Ximenes tells us how the good brother, whenever he had a moment free from his other duties, invariably made his way to the church to honour the presence of our Lord, how it was his delight to serve Mass after Mass in succession beginning with the very earliest, how he stayed behind in choir when after Matins and Lauds the rest of the community had retired again to sleep, and how the dawn found him there still on his knees, eager as soon as the bell rang to visit the altars at which the Holy Sacrifice was to be offered.
Father Ximenes prints some specimens, too lengthy to quote, of the simple heartfelt prayers recited by Paschal at the time of communion. Whether they were his own composition, as his biographer supposes, is not so clear. The saint had long kept what he himself calls a cartapacio (a home-made scrap-book, formed, it seems, out of odds and ends of paper which he had rescued from the rubbish-heap) a and in this he noted down in a beautiful handwriting certain prayers and reflections which he had either come across in his reading or had composed himself. One at least of these books—there seem to have been two—is still preserved. Shortly after Paschal’s death some of these prayers were brought to the notice of Bd John de Ribera, then archbishop of Valencia. He was so impressed that he begged to have a relic of this holy lay-brother who, it seemed to him, had achieved so perfect an understanding of spiritual things. When a relic was brought him by Father Ximenes, the archbishop said to him, “Ah Father Provincial, what are we to do? These simple souls are wresting Heaven from our hands. There is nothing for it but to burn our books.” To which Ximenes answered, “My Lord, it is not the books that are in fault, but our own pride. Let us burn that.”
St Paschal, the Saint of the Eucharist, had, it appears, some experience in his own person of the ferocity with which Protestant reformers sometimes manifested their dislike of the sacraments and of faithful sons of the Church. He was on one occasion sent into France as the bearer of an important communication to Father Christopher de Cheffontaines, the very learned Breton scholar who at that time was minister general of the Observants. For a friar wearing the habit of his order the journey across France at that time, when the wars of religion had reached their most acute phase, was extremely dangerous, and the choice for such an errand of a simple lay-brother, who certainly did not know any French, remains a mystery. Perhaps his superior believed that his simplicity and trust in God would carry him through where more diplomatic methods would fail. He succeeded in his mission, but was very roughly handled; on several occasions barely escaping with his life. At one town in particular, where he was stoned by a party of Huguenots, he seems to have sustained an injury to his shoulder which was a cause of suffering for the rest of his days. At Orleans, we are told by most of his biographers, even by Ximenes, he was questioned as to his belief in the Blessed Sacrament, and when he unhesitatingly made profession of his faith, his opponents instituted a sort of formal disputation in which they were worsted by the good brother, who was preternaturally aided from on high. Here again in their fury the Huguenots stoned him, but he escaped, because all their missiles fell wide of the mark. It seems, however, a little difficult to believe in such a disputation in argumentative form with citation of authorities.
St Paschal died, as he was born, on a Whitsunday, in the friary at Villareal. He was fifty-two years old. It was held to be significant of his life-long devotion to the Blessed Sacrament that, with the holy name of Jesus on his lips, he passed away just as the bell was tolling to announce the consecration at the high Mass.
He had long been honoured as a saint, partly owing to the miracles of all kinds attributed to him in life, especially in his dealings with the sick and poor, and these miracles were multiplied beside his bier. There can be little doubt that the unusually great number of remarkable cures, reported then and later, influenced ecclesiastical authorities to take unwontedly speedy action in the matter of his beatification. He was in fact beatified in 1618, before St Peter of Alcantara, the author of the reform to which he belonged, though Peter had died thirty years earlier than he. Perhaps a bizarre factor which intervened in the case, causing considerable popular excitement, contributed to this. It was universally believed that curious knockings (golpes) proceeded from Paschal’s tomb, which knockings were invested with portentous significance. This phenomenon is said to have continued for a couple of centuries, and his later biographers devote much space to the golpes and their interpretation. St Paschal’s canonization took place in 1690.
 Our information concerning St Paschal comes almost entirely from the life by Father Ximenes and the process of beatification. A Latin version of Ximenes’ biography, somewhat abridged, is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv. Lives in Spanish, Italian and French are numerous, e.g. those by Salmeron, Olmi, Briganti, Beaufays, Du Lys and L. A. de Porrentruy this last has been translated from the French by O. Staniforth, under the title of The Saint of the Eucharist (1908). See also O. Englebert’s French sketch (1944), and Leon, Aureole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp. 177—197. Probably the best modern life is that written in German by Father Grötcken (1909).

Born to a peasant family at Torre Hermosa, in Aragon, on Whitsunday, he was christened Pascua in honor of the feast. According to accounts of his early life, Paschal labored as a shepherd for his father, performed miracles, and was distinguished for his austerity. He also taught himself to read. Receiving a vision which told him to enter a nearby Franciscan community, he became a Franciscan lay brother of the Alcantrine reform in 1564, and spent most of his life as a humble doorkeeper.
He practiced rigorous asceticism and displayed a deep love for the Blessed Sacrament, so much so that while on a mission to France, he defended the doctrine of the Real Presence against a Calvinist preacher and in the face of threats from other irate Calvinists. Paschal died at a friary in Villareal, and was canonized in 1690. In 1897 Pope Leo XIII declared him patron of all eucharistic confratemities and congresses. Since 1969, his veneration has been limited to local calendars.

Paschal Baylon, OFM (RM) Born in Torre Hermosa, Aragon, Spain, in 1540; died Villareal, Spain, 1592; beatified in 1618; canonized in 1690; declared patron of all Eucharistic congresses and confraternities in 1897.
Saint Paschal Baylon, son of the peasants Martin Baylon and Elizabeth Jubera, received his name from the day on which he was born: Whitsunday. He worked as a shepherd for his father and others until the age of 24. At 18, after a vision, he had applied to join the Franciscans at Loreto, 200 miles away, but the monks turned him down, knowing nothing of him personally. He applied again, a few years later (1564), and was accepted, and he lived a strict life according to the recently initiated reforms of Saint Peter of Alcantara.
He served primarily as a doorkeeper at various friaries in Spain. His intense devotion to the Blessed Sacrament is obvious from the long hours he spent kneeling before the tabernacle, with his clasped hands outstretched.
He was sent to France with a message to Father Christopher de Cheffontaines, the minister general of the Observants, and travelled wearing his habit during a dangerous time of religious wars. He was accosted several times and once narrowly escaped with his life, after he defended the doctrine of the Real Presence of the Holy Eucharist to a Calvinist preacher and a crowd. He was stoned by a party of Hugenots and suffered from the injury for the rest of his life.
This miracle worker died on a Whitsunday, just as the bell was tolling to announce the consecration at the high Mass.

Saint Paschal Baylon is the patron of shepherds, the Eucharist and Eucharistic guilds, societies and congresses, and of Italian women (there seems no obvious explanation of this except that his name-- "Baylonna," in Italian--rhymes with "donna"). He is portrayed in art in the act of adoration before the Host; or watching sheep (Attwater2, Benedictines, White).
Thursday, May 17, 2012  St. Paschal Baylon (1540-1592)
In Paschal’s lifetime the Spanish empire in the New World was at the height of its power, though France and England were soon to reduce its influence. The 16th century has been called the Golden Age of the Church in Spain, for it gave birth to Ignatius of Loyola, Francis Xavier, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Peter of Alcantara, Francis Solano and Salvator of Horta.
Paschal’s Spanish parents were poor and pious. Between the ages of seven and 24 he worked as a shepherd and began a life of mortification. He was able to pray on the job and was especially attentive to the church bell which rang at the Elevation during Mass. Paschal had a very honest streak in him. He once offered to pay owners of crops for any damage his animals caused!
In 1564, Paschal joined the Friars Minor and gave himself wholeheartedly to a life of penance. Though he was urged to study for the priesthood, he chose to be a brother. At various times he served as porter, cook, gardener and official beggar.
Paschal was careful to observe the vow of poverty. He would never waste any food or anything given for the use of the friars. When he was porter and took care of the poor coming to the door, he developed a reputation for great generosity. The friars sometimes tried to moderate his liberality!
Paschal spent his spare moments praying before the Blessed Sacrament. In time many people sought his wise counsel. People flocked to his tomb immediately after his burial; miracles were reported promptly. Paschal was canonized in 1690 and was named patron of eucharistic congresses and societies in 1897.

Comment:  Prayer before the Blessed Sacrament occupied much of St. Francis’ energy. Most of his letters were to promote devotion to the Eucharist. Paschal shared that concern. An hour in prayer before our Lord in the Eucharist could teach all of us a great deal. Some holy and busy Catholics today find that their work is enriched by those minutes regularly spent in prayer and meditation.
Quote:  "Meditate well on this: Seek God above all things. It is right for you to seek God before and above everything else, because the majesty of God wishes you to receive what you ask for. This will also make you more ready to serve God
and will enable you to love him more perfectly" (St. Paschal).

1549 The MonkMartyr Adrian of Ondrosov uncovering of the relics of the saint
(+ 1549 , 26 August). On this day is celebrated the uncovering of the relics of the saint, which occurred in the year 1551. The account about him is located under 26 August.

1616 Georgian martyrs of Persia are commemorated on Ascension.

Throughout history Georgia has frequently been forced to defend what St. Ilia the Righteous called its “threefold treasure”— language, fatherland, and Faith. In this regard, the events of the 17th century are some of the most tragic in all of Georgian history.

In 1616 the bloodthirsty Persian ruler Shah Abbas I invaded Georgia with a massive army. His goal was to level the country completely, to leave not a single building standing. The shah’s army kidnapped hundreds of thousands of Kakhetian Georgians and then sent them to Persia to be sold as slaves. They settled Turkmen in the newly depopulated Georgian regions. In collaboration with the shah, many Lezgin peoples from the mountainous North Caucasus moved south to occupy the homes of the exiled Georgians.

The 17th-century Italian traveler Pietro della Valle described the Georgian exile in Persia: “It would be too long to narrate all that has passed in this miserable migration, how many murders, how many deaths caused by privation, how many seductions, rapes, and acts of violence, how many children drowned by their own parents or cast into rivers through despair, some snatched by force from their mother’s breasts because they seemed too weak to live and thrown down by the wayside and abandoned there to be food for wild beasts or trampled underfoot by the horses and camels of the army, which marched for a whole day on top of dead bodies; how many sons separated from their fathers, wives from their husbands, sisters from their brothers, and carried off to distant countries without hope of ever meeting again. Throughout the camp, men and women were sold on this occasion much cheaper than beasts, because of the great number of them.” (Quoted in David Marshall Lang, Lives and Legends of the Georgian Church (London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd., 1956), p. 170.)

The Georgian exiles in Persia included a large number of clergy. Many of them celebrated the divine services in secret and inspired the people to remain faithful to God. Those discovered were punished severely. Many Georgians were martyred for the Christian Faith during the Persian exile. Not only Georgian researchers, but historians and travelers of other nationalities attest to the truth of this. Furthermore, ethnic Georgians currently residing in formerly Persian territories continue to commemorate their fallen ancestors to this day. They make pilgrimages to the sites where their ancestors were martyred and prepare feasts there in honor of their memory. One of these sites has been called “Ascension.”

Of language, fatherland, and Faith, only language remains alive among Georgians in the formerly Persian territories. Most have lost touch with both their fatherland and the Christian Faith. Those fortunate enough to be able to return to Georgia often convert to Orthodox Christianity. In 2001, when Catholicos-Patriarch Ilia II visited the ethnic Georgians in Iran, he presented them with a mound of Georgian soil. With great emotion the Georgians scattered the soil over the ground where their ancestors were martyred.

On September 18, 2003, the Holy Synod of the Georgian Orthodox Church prayerfully considered the martyric contest of the Georgians in Persia. The Synod declared all those martyred at the hands of Muslims in the 17th and 18th centuries worthy to be numbered among the saints. Their commemoration day was set on the feast of Holy Ascension, in honor of the place where many of them were martyred.


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR MAY
Christians in Africa.
That Christians in Africa, in imitation of the Merciful Jesus,
may give prophetic witness to reconciliation, justice, and peace.


ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest
and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
 
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
Saints and Popes Mentioned on May 01
600 BC Jeremiah,The Holy Prophet  one of the four great Old Testament prophets     In Egypt, St. Jeremias, prophet, who was stoned to death by the people at Taphnas, where he was buried.  St. Epiphanius tells that the faithful were accustomed to pray at his grave, and to take away from it dust to heal those who were stung by serpents.
Son of the priest Helkiah from the city of Anathoth near Jerusalem.  He lived 600 years before the Birth of Christ, under the Israelite king Josiah and four of his successors. He was called to prophetic service at the age of fifteen, when the Lord revealed to him that even before his birth the Lord had chosen him to be a prophet. Jeremiah refused, citing his youth and lack of skill at speaking, but the Lord promised to be always with him and to watch over him.
He touched the mouth of the chosen one and said, "Behold, I have put My words into your mouth. Behold, I have appointed you this day over nations and kingdoms, to root out and to pull down, to destroy and to rebuild, and to plant" (Jer. 1:9-10).
When Jeremiah prophesied that the King of Babylon would invade Egypt and annihilate the Jews living there, the Jews murdered him.  In that very same year the saint's prophecy was fulfilled.
There is a tradition that 250 years later, Alexander the Great transported the relics of the holy Prophet Jeremiah to Alexandria.

The Prophet Jeremiah wrote his Book of Prophecies and also the Book of Lamentations about the desolation of Jerusalem and the Exile.  The times in which he lived and prophesied are described in 4/2 Kings (Ch. 23-25) and in the Second Book of Chronicles (36:12) and in 2 Maccabbees (Ch. 2).

In the Gospel of Matthew it is said that the betrayal of Judas was foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah, "And they took thirty pieces of silver, the price of him on whom the sons of Israel had set a price, and they gave them for the potter's field, as the Lord directed me" (Mt. 27:9-10). Perhaps Jeremiah 32:6-15 is meant.
The birthday of the blessed apostles Philip and James.  Philip, after having converted nearly all of Scythia to the faith of Christ, went to Hieropolis, a city in Asia, where he was fastened to a cross and stoned, and thus ended his life gloriously.  James, who is also called the brother of our Lord, was the first bishop of Jerusalem.  Being hurled down from a pinnacle of the temple, his legs were broken, and being struck on the head with a dyer's staff, he expired and was buried near the temple. 
St. Joseph Feastday: March 19, May 1 Patron of the Universal Church.
We know he was a carpenter, a working man, for the skeptical Nazarenes ask about Jesus, "Is this not the carpenter's son?" (Matthew 13:55). He wasn't rich for when he took Jesus to the Temple to be circumcised and Mary to be purified he offered the sacrifice of two turtledoves or a pair of pigeons, allowed only for those who could not afford a lamb (Luke 2:24).
Despite his humble work and means, Joseph came from a royal lineage. Luke and Matthew disagree some about the details of Joseph's genealogy but they both mark his descent from David, the greatest king of Israel (Matthew 1:1-16 and Luke 3:23-38). Indeed the angel who first tells Joseph about Jesus greets him as "son of David," a royal title used also for Jesus.
We know Joseph was a compassionate, caring man. When he discovered Mary was pregnant after they had been betrothed, he knew the child was not his but was as yet unaware that she was carrying the Son of God. He planned to divorce Mary according to the law but he was concerned for her suffering and safety. He knew that women accused to adultery could be stoned to death, so he decided to divorce her quietly and not expose her to shame or cruelty (Matthew 1:19-25).
We know Joseph was man of faith, obedient to whatever God asked of him without knowing the outcome. When the angel came to Joseph in a dream and told him the truth about the child Mary was carrying, Joseph immediately and without question or concern for gossip, took Mary as his wife. When the angel came again to tell him that his family was in danger, he immediately left everything he owned, all his family and friends, and fled to a strange country with his young wife and the baby.
He waited in Egypt without question until the angel told him it was safe to go back (Matthew 2:13-23).
We know Joseph loved Jesus. His one concern was for the safety of this child entrusted to him. Not only did he leave his home to protect Jesus, but upon his return settled in the obscure town of Nazareth out of fear for his life. When Jesus stayed in the Temple we are told Joseph (along with Mary) searched with great anxiety for three days for him (Luke 2:48). We also know that Joseph treated Jesus as his own son for over and over the people of Nazareth say of Jesus, "Is this not the son of Joseph?" (Luke 4:22)
We know Joseph respected God. He followed God's commands in handling the situation with Mary and going to Jerusalem to have Jesus circumcised and Mary purified after Jesus' birth. We are told that he took his family to Jerusalem every year for Passover, something that could not have been easy for a working man.
Since Joseph does not appear in Jesus' public life, at his death, or resurrection, many historians believe Joseph probably had died before Jesus entered public ministry.
Joseph is the patron of the dying because, assuming he died before Jesus' public life, he died with Jesus and Mary close to him, the way we all would like to leave this earth.
208 St Andeolus Martyr sent to France by St Polycarp,     In France, in the Province of Vivarias, blessed Andeol, subdeacon, who was sent from the East into Gaul with others by St. Polycarp to preach the word of God.  Under Emperor Severus he was scourged with thorny sticks, and having his head split with a wooden sword into four parts, in the shape of a cross, he completed his martyrdom.
Martyr and companion of St. Polycarp. Originally from Smyrna, Andeolus was sent to France by Polycarp. There he labored until arrested and martyred at Viviers.
  604 St. Arigius Bishop 20 yrs greatest priest pastor of his era of Gap, France. He served as bishop for twenty years after earning a reputation as one of the greatest priest pastors of his era. His cult was confirmed by Pope St. Pius X.
  893 St Theodard Benedictine bishop rebuilt churches ransom captives selling treasures spending his own money to
feed poor suffering practiced severe austerities
.  The Montauban breviary describes him as “an eye to the blind, feet to the lame, a father of the poor, and the consoler of the afflicted”. Greatly beloved by all, he was unanimously chosen archbishop of Narbonne at the death of Sigebold, who had nominated him as his successor. The perils which then beset travellers did not deter the newly-elected prelate from undertaking a visit to Rome, where he received the pallium.  Born at Montauban (Monlauriol), France, he studied law at the University of Toulouse and then at the Benedictine abbey of Montauban before becoming a lawyer.
Appointed secretary to Archbishop Sigebold of Narbonne, he soon was named an archdeacon and finally succeeded Sigebold as archbishop. He devoted much of his effort to repairing the damage, physical and spiritual, caused by the raids of Saracens, including rebuilding churches, ransoming captives, selling off treasures, and spending his own money to feed the poor and suffering. His death at St. Martin's Abbey (where he received the Benedictine habit) was probably hastened by the severe austerities he practiced
.
1012 St Benedict of Szkalka hermit martyr gifted mystic of Hungary.   Benedict was a recluse on Mount Zabor, near a Benedictine monastery, trained by St. Andrew Zorard.
A gifted mystic, Benedict was murdered by a mob in 1012. He was canonized in 1083
Gregory VII 1073-1085.
1200 Tamar In 1166 a daughter, Tamar, was born to King George III (1155–1184) and Queen Burdukhan of Georgia.
The king proclaimed that he would share the throne with his daughter from the day she turned twelve years of age. The royal court unanimously vowed its allegiance and service to Tamar, and father and daughter ruled the country together for five years. After King George’s death in 1184, the nobility recognized the young Tamar as the sole ruler of all Georgia. Queen Tamar was enthroned as ruler of all Georgia at the age of eighteen. She is called “King” in the Georgian language because her father had no male heir and so she ruled as a monarch and not as a consort.
At the beginning of her reign, Tamar convened a Church council and addressed the clergy with wisdom and humility: “Judge according to righteousness, affirming good and condemning evil,” she advised. “Begin with me—if I sin I should be censured, for the royal crown is sent down from above as a sign of divine service. Allow neither the wealth of the nobles nor the poverty of the masses to hinder your work. You by word and I by deed, you by preaching and I by the law, you by upbringing and I by education will care for those souls whom God has entrusted to us, and together we will abide by the law of God, in order to escape eternal condemnation.… You as priests and I as ruler, you as stewards of good and I as the watchman of that good.”
Having encamped near Basiani, Rukn al-Din sent a messenger to Queen Tamar with an audacious demand: to surrender without a fight. In reward for her obedience, the sultan promised to marry her on the condition that she embrace Islam; if Tamar were to cleave to Christianity, he would number her among the other unfortunate concubines in his harem. When the messenger relayed the sultan’s demand, a certain nobleman, Zakaria Mkhargrdzelidze, was so outraged that he slapped him on the face, knocking him unconscious. At Queen Tamar’s command, the court generously bestowed gifts upon the ambassador and sent him away with a Georgian envoy and a letter of reply. “Your proposal takes into consideration your wealth and the vastness of your armies, but fails to account for divine judgment,” Tamar wrote, “while I place my trust not in any army or worldly thing but in the right hand of the Almighty God and the infinite aid of the Cross, which you curse. The will of God—and not your own—shall be fulfilled, and the judgment of God—and not your judgment—shall reign!”  The Georgian soldiers were summoned without delay. Queen Tamar prayed for victory before the Vardzia Icon of the Theotokos, then, barefoot, led her army to the gates of the city. Hoping in the Lord and the fervent prayers of Queen Tamar, the Georgian army marched toward Basiani. The enemy was routed. The victory at Basiani was an enormous event not only for Georgia, but for the entire Christian world.
1345 Peregrine Laziosi received a vision of Our Lady who told him to go to Siena, Italy, and there to join the Servites healed by Jesus incorrupt fervant preacher, excellent orator, and gentle confessor.  1345 St Peregrine Laziosi; he spent hours upon his knees in the chapel of our Lady in the cathedral. One day the Blessed Virgin herself appeared to him in that place, and addressed him, saying, “Go to Siena: there you will find the devout men who call themselves my servants: attach yourself to them”.  The only son of well-to-do parents, St Peregrine Laziosi was born in 1260 at Forli, in the Romagna.
After he had spent some years in Siena, his superiors sent him to Forli to found a new house for the order. By this time he had been ordained and had proved himself to be an ideal priest—fervent in the celebration of the holy mysteries, eloquent in preaching, untiring in reconciling sinners. A great affliction now befell him in the form of cancer of the foot, which, besides being excruciatingly painful, made him an object of repulsion to his neighbours. He bore this trial without a murmur. At last the surgeons decided that the only thing to do was to cut off the foot. St Peregrine spent the night before the operation in trustful prayer; he then sank into a light slumber, from which he awoke completely cured—to the amaze­ment of the doctors, who testified that they could no longer detect any trace of the disease. This miracle greatly enhanced the reputation which the holy man had already acquired by his exemplary life. He lived to the age of 80, and was canon­ized in
1726 Benedict XIV 1758.
1852 St John-Louis Bonnard priest Martyr of Vietnam.   Born at St. Christot-en-Jarret, France, he became a priest of the Paris Society of Foreign Missions and was ordained in 1850. Sent to western Vietnam, he was arrested in a persecution and beheaded. Pope John Paul II canonized him in 1988. 

Saints and Popes Mentioned on May 02
373 St. Athanasius Bishop and Doctor of the Church refusal to tolerate Arian heresy refuge among desert monks became ascetic renowned for sanctity beloved by followers volumes of writings extant.   At Alexandria, the birthday of St. Athanasius, bishop of that city, confessor and doctor of the Church, most celebrated for sanctity and learning.  Although almost all of the world had formed a conspiracy to persecute him, he courageously defended the Catholic faith, from the reign of Constantine to that of Valens, against emperors, governors, and a multitude of Arian bishops, whose underhanded attacks forced him to wander as an exile over the whole earth without finding a place of security.  At length, however, he was restored to his church, and after overcoming many trials, and winning many crowns by his patience, he departed for heaven in the forty-sixth year of his priesthood, in the time of the emperors Valentinian and Valens.
born in Spain, about 346; died at Milan, 17 January, 395), is still used in the liturgy of the Catholic Church.
Five times Athanasius had been banished; seventeen years he had spent in exile: but for the last seven years of his life he was left in the unchallenged occupation of his see. It was probably at this time that he wrote the Life of St Antony.
St Athanasius died in Alexandria on May 2, 373, and his body was subsequently translated first to Constantinople and then to Venice.
The greatest man of his age and one of the greatest religious leaders of any age, Athanasius of Alexandria rendered services to the Church the value of which can scarcely be exaggerated, for he defended the faith against almost overwhelming odds and emerged triumphant. Most aptly has he been described by Cardinal Newman as “a principal instrument after the Apostles by which the sacred truths of Christianity have been conveyed and secured to the world”. Although the writings of St Athanasius deal mainly with controversy, there is beneath this war of words a deep spiritual feeling which comes to the surface at every turn and reveals the high purpose of him who writes. Take, for example, his reply to the objections which the Arians raised from the texts: “Let this chalice pass from me”, or “Why hast thou forsaken me?”
Is it not extravagant to admire the courage of the servants of the Word, yet to say that that Word Himself was in tenor, through whom they despised death? For that most enduring purpose and courage of the holy martyrs demonstrates that the Godhead was not in terror but that the Saviour took away our terror. For as He abolished death by death, and by human means all human evils, so by this so-called terror did He remove our terror, and brought about for us that never more should men fear death. His word and deed go together. . . . For human were the sounds: “Let this chalice pass from me”, and “Why hast thou forsaken me?” and divine the action whereby He, the same being, did cause the sun to fail and the dead to rise. And so He said humanly: “Now is my soul troubled”; and He said divinely: “I have power to lay down my life and power to take it again”. For to be troubled was proper to the flesh, but to have power to lay down His life and take it again when He would, was no property of man, but of the Word’s power. For man dies not at his own arbitrament, but by necessity of nature and against his will; but the Lord being Himself immortal, not having a mortal flesh, had it at His own free will, as God, to become separate from the body and to take it again, when He would. . . . And He let His own body suffer, for therefore did He come, that in the flesh He might suffer, and thenceforth the flesh might be made impassible and immortal; and that contumely and the other troubles might fall upon Him, but come short of others after Him, being by Him annulled utterly; and that henceforth men might for ever abide incorruptible, as a temple of the Word.

The principal source of information for the life of St Athanasius is the collection of his own writings, but his activities were so interwoven with not only the religious, but the secular history of his times that the range of authorities to be consulted is very wide. For English readers Cardinal Newman in his Anglican days, both in his special work on St Athanasius and in his tract on the “Causes of the Rise and Successes of Arianism”, rendered the whole complicated situation intelligible. There is also a brilliantly written chapter on St Athanasius in Dr A. Fortescue’s volume, The Greek Fathers (1908). Two excellent little monographs have appeared in France, by F. Cavallera (1908) and by G. Bardy (1914) in the series “Les Saints”. Reference should also be made to four valuable papers by E. Schwartz in the Nachrichten of the Göttingen Akademie from 1904 to 1911. For a fuller bibliography, see Bardenhewer in the latest edition of his Patrologie, or in his larger work, Geschichte des altkirchlichen Literatur, and for a survey of more recent work, F. L. Cross, The Study of St Athanasius (1945).
Even in exile Athanasius managed to tend his flock. It was primarily for them that he wrote the most illuminating theological treatises on Catholic dogma. He authored Against the Heathen (c. 318), Contra Arianos (c. 358 ?), Apologia to Constantius, (primary historical source), History of the Arians Defense of His Flight, many letters, The Life of Antony (c. 357), and other pieces. In Against the Arians, Athanasius drew on the work of Saints Justin (Born in Flavia Neapolis, Samaria, c. 100; died 165) and St Irenaeus (115-125? 200?), who interpreted Scripture in an orthodox tradition, to insist that the Nicene term homoousios, although not Scriptural itself, was necessary to formulate correctly the truth of Christ's Scriptural revelation.
His Life of Saint Antony showed his friend as singularly devoted to combatting the powers of evil. It became a widely diffused classic. From the time of Saint Bede (Born in Northumbria, England, 673; died at Jarrow, England, on May 25, 735; named Doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII in 1899), it inspired other monastic hagiographers.
An 8th-century monk wrote, "If you find a book by Athanasius and have no paper on which to copy it, write it on your shirts."

All his thinking was soteriologically determined, {the branch of Christian theology that deals with salvation as the effect of a divine agency --  The theological doctrine of salvation as effected by Jesus.} hence 'the Word could never have divinized us if He were merely divine by participation and were not himself the essential Godhead.'
Athanasius defended the oneness of God, yet the separateness of the three Divine Persons. He also went forward to add the Holy Spirit to the Godhead to counter Tropici. His theology of the Holy Spirit is found in his letters to Serapion. In his enlightening treatises on Catholic dogma, Athanasius showed that asceticism and virginity were effective ways to restore the divine image in man.
Several of his works were addressed to monks, to whom he also gave repeated practical help.
When he returned to Alexandria after his final exile, Athanasius spent the last seven years of his life helping to build the Nicene party.

Before the outbreak of the Arian controversy, which began in 319, Athanasius had made himself known as the author of two essays addressed to a convert from heathenism, one of them entitled Against the Gentiles, and the other On the Incarnation of the Word. Both are of the nature of apologetical treatises, arguing such questions as monotheism, and the necessity of divine interposition for the salvation of the world; and already in the second may be traced that tone of thought respecting the essential divinity of Christ as the "God-man" for which he afterwards became conspicuous. There is no distinct evidence of the connection of Athanasius with the first contentions of Arius and his bishop, which ended in the exile of the former, and his entrance into Palestine under the protection of Eusebius the historian, who was bishop of Caesarea and subsequently of his namesake the bishop of Nicomedia. It can hardly be doubted, however, that Athanasius would be a cordial assistant of his friend and patron Alexander, and that the latter was strengthened in his theological position by the young enthusiastic student who had already expounded the nature of the divine Incarnation, and who seems about this time to have become archdeacon of Alexandria. At the Council of Nicaea, in the year 325, he appears prominently in connection with the dispute. He attended the council, not as one of its members (who were properly only bishops or delegates of bishops), but merely as the attendant of Alexander. In this capacity, however, he was apparently allowed to take part in its discussions, for Theodoret (i. 26) states that "he contended earnestly for the apostolic doctrines, and was applauded by their champions, while he earned the hostility of their opponents".
   Within `five months' after the return of Alexander to the scene of his episcopal labours he expired, and his friend and archdeacon was chosen to succeed him. He was elected in the sight and amidst the acclamations of the people. He was now about 30 years of age, and is spoken of as remarkable both for his physical and mental characteristics. He was small in stature, but his face was radiant with intelligence, as 'the face of an angel. This is the expression of Gregory of Nazianzus (Orat., xxii. 9), who has written an elaborate panegyric upon his friend, describing him as fit 'to keep on a level with common-place views yet also to soar high above the more aspiring,' as accessible to all, slow to anger, quick in sympathy, pleasant in conversation, and still more pleasant in temper, effective alike in discourse and in action, assiduous in devotions, helpful to Christians of every class and age, a theologian with the speculative, a comforter of the afflicted, a staff to the aged, a guide of the young."


686 St. Ultan Benedictine abbot founder chaplain to St Gertrude's nuns escaped Mercians  by supernatural revelation he knew of the death of St Foillan, who was murdered by robbers in the forest of Seneffe, and he foretold to St Gertrude, at her request, the day of her own death. He said that St Patrick was preparing to welcome her, and in point of fact she died on March 17.
ST ULTAN (or Ultain) and his more celebrated brothers, St Fursey and St Foillan, were Irish monks who crossed over to East Anglia, where they founded the abbey of Burgh Castle, near Yarmouth, on territory bestowed upon them by King Sigebert or Sigebert I. In consequence of raids by the Mercians, St Fursey went to France, where he died. When St Foillan and St Ultan visited their brother’s tomb at Péronne on their way back from a pilgrimage to Rome, they were warmly welcomed by Bd Itta and St Gertrude at Nivelles, who offered them land at Fosses on which to build a monastery and a hospice for strangers. Ultan became the abbot of Fosses. We are told that by supernatural revelation he knew of the death of St Foillan, who was murdered by robbers in the forest of Seneffe, and he foretold to St Gertrude, at her request, the day of her own death. He said that St Patrick was preparing to welcome her, and in point of fact she died on March 17. St Ultan later became abbot of, and died at, Péronne, but his relics were subsequently translated to Fosses.

 880  Departure of Pope Sinuthius (Shenouda I), 55th Pope of Alexandria (coptic).  On this day, of the year 596 A.M. (April 19th., 880 A.D.), the great father Pope Sinuthius (Shenouda I), 55th Pope of the See of St. Mark, departed. This holy father was a monk in the monastery of St. Macarius. He advanced in righteousness and worship, and was ordained archpriest for the monastery.

Shortly after, he was chosen for the Patriarchate with the recommendation of the people and bishops. He was enthroned on the 13th day of Tubah 575 A.D. (January 8th., 859 A.D.), and great tribulations and severe persecutions befell him. God performed through him many signs and healed many grievous sicknesses.

Once there was a drought in the city of Mariout for three years, the wells dried up and the farm land became barren. This father came to the church of St. Mina, celebrated the Divine Liturgy, and supplicated God to have mercy upon His creation. At the setting of the sun of that day, the rain began lightly then ceased. This father entered his room and stood up praying and he said: "O My Lord Christ, have mercy on Thy people with the riches of Thy compassion, and let them be filled with Thy good pleasure." Before he finished his prayer, mighty thunders and lightnings started, and the rain descended like a flood, until the wells, the vineyards, and the farms were filled with water. The people rejoiced, glorifying God the wonder worker.
907 The Holy Equal of the Apostles Tsar Boris, in Holy Baptism Michael on March 3, 870 Bulgaria was joined to the Eastern Church, and Orthodoxy was firmly established there.  His apostolic deeds were foretold by an uncle, St Boyan. The first years of the reign of Tsar Boris were marked by misfortune. The Bulgarians were frequently at war with surrounding nations, famine and plague beset the land, and in the year 860 Bulgaria found itself in dire straits. Tsar Boris saw the salvation of his land, which was darkened by paganism, in its enlightenment by the faith in Christ.

During one of the battles of the Bulgarians with the Greeks he captured the illustrious courtier Theodore Kuphares, who had become a monk. He was the first man to plant the seed of the Gospel in the soul of the Bulgarian tsar. In one of the campaigns with the Greeks the young sister of Tsar Boris was taken captive, and was raised in the Orthodox Faith at the court of the Byzantine Emperor.

When the emperor Theophilus died, Tsar Boris decided to take advantage of this circumstance to take revenge upon the Greeks for his former defeats. But the widow of the emperor, Theodora, showed courage and sent a messenger to the Bulgarian tsar saying that she was prepared to defend the Empire and humiliate its opponents. Tsar Boris agreed to a peace alliance, and Theodore Kuphares was exchanged for the Bulgarian princess, who influenced her brother toward Christianity. A while later St Methodius was sent into Bulgaria. He and his brother St Cyril were enlightening the Slavic peoples wit