Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

Fifth Week of Easter

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary
 to those who recite the Rosary

Mary's Divine Motherhood



 We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life.

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .


 250 St. Venantius Martyr native at Camerino near the Marquisate of Ancona in Italy
305 St. Dioscorus Martyr of Egypt a reader on the parish of Kynopolis
526 St. Pope John I Martyr succeeded persuading Emperor Justin I mitigate treatment of Arians avoid reprisals against Catholics in Italy visit  brought reconciliation of Western and Eastern Churches plagued by a schism since 482 when Zeno's Henoticon had been published
863 St. Feredarius Irish abbot of lona, Scotland moved the relics of St. Columba to Ireland
944 St. Elgiva Benedictine nun Queen mother of Kings Edwy of the Saxons and Edgar, King of England wife of Edmund the First
1160  King Eric IX Patron of Sweden aid Christianity in his realm responsible for codifying laws of his kingdom
1486 Blessed Camilla Gentili holy virgin venerated at church of the Dominican friars at San Severino V (AC)
1587 St. Felix of Cantalice noted for austerities, piety, 38 years in monastery as questor aiding sick the poor and revered by all; 


May 18 – Our Lady of the Holy Desire (Vinovo, Italy, province of Turin, 1890) 
 
Let us learn to be like Mary 
Mary is the model of the disciple, the model of the heart that listens and is in perfect unison with the will of God. Simply speaking, to convert is to learn to be like Mary. And to be like Mary is quite simple! God is simple. We are the ones who are complicated!

To be like Mary, we must learn to know her through the Gospel. In Nazareth, for example, it was not uncommon for her to go out from her home. In fact, the "outgoing Church" that Pope Francis talks about has Mary for model. She went out to meet the other women of the village just as she went to meet the guests of the wedding at Cana.

She spoke to people kindly; she was benevolent. No criticism ever came from her mouth. She spoke well of her neighbors; she would encourage and console others. Her meekness was her strength. Joy and humility are twin sisters who feed each other. Don Bosco once said: "Remember that the devil is afraid of happy people!"
Think about this sentence often: "The devil is afraid of happy people!"
 
Father Emmanuel Gobilliard, Meditation posted on March 24, 2015
Rector of the Cathedral Our Lady of Le Puy en Velay


Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Fatima Peace Conference in India
May 18 - Our Lady of Fatima (Portugal)
From January 30 to February 5, 2008, the Fatima Center held its "Only Way to World Peace" conference in Chennai, India. Hundreds of priests and bishops attended from countries throughout the world. At least 13 nations were represented, including India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Ghana, Tanzania, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Scotland, Italy, the United States and Canada.
The conference focused on the central importance of the Fatima Message, stressing Our Lady's requests at Fatima; the Rosary; Marian Doctrine and Devotion; current trends detrimental to the Catholic Faith; the United Nations as the false solution for world peace; and much more. Tens of thousands of scapulars, leaflets, flyers, magazines and books were distributed to participants eager to bring the full Fatima Message home to their dioceses and parishes.
Father Nicholas Gruner spoke of the establishment of the Fatima Movement of Priests, a worldwide movement for Catholic priests to stress the importance of Our Lady's Message at Fatima. Practically all of the attendants noted their appreciation of the event. One priest said, "My devotion to Mary was enhanced and my vocation was strengthened." Another priest said, "The conference gave me a very clear exposition of the urgency of the Message. It was challenging. I am going to be a Marian priest and do all I can to please Our Lady and obey her commands." A bishop who attended wrote these words of encouragement:
"Keep going onward, do not give up!"
See: www.fatimaondemand.org

1587 St. Felix of Cantalice noted for austerities, piety, 38 years in monastery as questor aiding sick the poor and revered by all; There is record of a great number of miracles worked after his death, and he was canonized in 1709. helped in St. Charles Borromeo's revision of the rule for his Oblates:
 
“All earthly creatures can lift us up to God if we know how to look at them with an eye that is single.” loved to dwell upon the sufferings of our Lord, never weary of contemplating that great mystery.
Always cheerful, always humble, he never resented an insult or an injury.
If reviled he would only say, “I pray God that you may become a saint”.
 

May 18 – Our Lady of the Holy Desire (Italy, 1890) 
 
The “I” of Mary is also our “I”
Mary has a unique destiny in human history. She is at the center of the work of salvation.
Yet her language is the same one that God himself put on her lips on the day of the Visitation,
and that he unceasingly continues to put on the lips of believers.
The “I” of the Magnificat is Mary's “I.” And by the “I” of Mary, we are reminded of the whole history of Israel. The “I” of Mary is the “I” of all the believers who came before her. But the “I” of Mary is also our “I.”

Through her mouth, it is the whole Church who is speaking, the visible Church established “from age to age,” from “generation to generation” by the men and women who have succeeded one another throughout the ages, and of whom we are a part.
Who sang that song? Mary did (…). But how much more, a billion times more, the successive generations of Christians who welcomed those words, received a light through them, and found the meaning of their life in this mystery given to each one of us through Mary.
Jean-Marie Cardinal Lustiger

Saints
May
18
17

There are over 10,000 named saints beati from history
and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources
Monsignor James M. Reardon
Basilica of Saint Mary Minneapolis, MN

250 St. Venantius Martyr native at Camerino near the Marquisate of Ancona in Italy
304 St. Felix of Spoleto Bishop and martyr of Spoleto Italy or of Spello in Umbria
304 St. Theodotus Martyr with Thecusa, Alexandra, Claudia, faina (Phaina), Euphrasia, Matrona, and Julitta
305 St. Dioscorus Martyr of Egypt a reader on the parish of Kynopolis
340 St. Potamon Bishop of Heraclea, Upper Egypt. Arrested in the final persecution of the Church
526 St. Pope John I Martyr succeeded persuading Emperor Justin I mitigate treatment of Arians avoid reprisals against Catholics in Italy visit  brought reconciliation of Western and Eastern Churches plagued by a schism since 482 when Zeno's Henoticon had been published
6th v.  Conval of Strathclyde archdeacon to Saint Kentigern active missionary (AC)
8th v. St. Merililaun Martyred pilgrim from England, journeying to Rome
863 St. Feredarius Irish abbot of lona, Scotland moved the relics of St. Columba to Ireland
944 St. Elgiva Benedictine nun Queen mother of Kings Edwy of the Saxons and Edgar, King of England wife of
       Edmund the First

1160    King Eric IX Patron of Sweden aid Christianity in his realm responsible for codifying laws of his kingdom
1486 Blessed Camilla Gentili holy virgin venerated at church of the Dominican friars at San Severino V (AC)
1587 St. Felix of Cantalice noted for austerities, piety, 38 years in monastery as questor aiding sick the poor and revered by all; There is record of a great number of miracles worked after his death, and he was canonized in 1709. helped in St. Charles Borromeo's revision of the rule for his Oblates:  “All earthly creatures can lift us up to God if we know how to look at them with an eye that is single.” loved to dwell upon the sufferings of our Lord, never weary of contemplating that great mystery. Always cheerful, always humble, he never resented an insult or an injury. If reviled he would only say, “I pray God that you may become a saint”.

250 St. Venantius Martyr native at Camerino near the Marquisate of Ancona in Italy
Cameríni sancti Venántii Mártyris, qui, annos quíndecim natus, sub Decio Imperatóre et Antíocho Præside, una cum áliis decem, gloriósi certáminis cursum, cervícibus abscíssis implévit.
    At Camerino, the holy martyr Venantius, who, at fifteen years of age, along with ten others, ended a glorious ordeal by being beheaded under Emperor Decius and the governor Antiochus.
257? ST VENANTIUS, MARTYR
IT is necessary to devote a notice to St Venantius because he is commemorated on this day with Mass and office throughout the Western church. Moreover, the fictitious history of this youth of seventeen is narrated in three long lessons in the Breviary and emphasized by a set of hymns written expressly for the feast. The honour thus paid to the martyr of Camerino is due to the personal action of Pope Clement X, who after having held the see of Camerino for close on forty years was elected pope at the age of eighty (1670—1676).
There is but the slenderest evidence of any cultus of this martyr. The fact that the name of Venantius appears in church dedications, or was attached to relics, proves little, because there was an authentic St Venantius who was the first bishop of Salona in Dalmatia, on the shore of the Adriatic. The apocryphal “acts” of the martyr of Camerino narrate that this youth came before the judge to profess himself a Christian, that he was scourged, seared with torches, suspended head downward over fire and smoke, had his teeth knocked out and his jaw broken, was thrown to the lions who only licked his feet, was precipitated without suffering any injury from a high cliff, and finally had his head cut off, with a number of other martyrs who had declared themselves Christians after witnessing the spectacle of his constancy. All this was attended with supernatural apparitions, with the death of two judges who successively presided over the tribunal before which he appeared, and finally with earthquakes and a portentous storm of thunder and lightning.
The text in which all these things are recorded is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv (see also May, vol. vii, appendix), but with a commentary emphasizing its unhistorical character. It seems, in fact, to be of no earlier date than the twelfth century and to be a mere imitation of the equally spurious “acts” of St Agapitus of Praeneste. It is possible that some earlier fiction which grew up round the authentic martyr, St Venantius of Salona, may have influenced both. See Karl Bihlmeyer in the Kirchliches Handlexikon, vol. ii, c. 2563.
He made a glorious confession of his faith, and after suffering many torments was beheaded in the persecution of Decius in 250, at Camerino, a city near the Marquisate of Ancona in Italy; of which place he was a native. His body is kept with singular veneration in that city. Pope Clement X., who had been bishop of Camerino, had a particular devotion to this martyr, who suffered very young. See the Bollandists.
 304 St. Felix of Spoleto Bishop and martyr of Spoleto Italy or of Spello in Umbria.
Spoléti  sancti Felícis Epíscopi, qui, sub Maximiáno Imperatóre, martyrii palmam adéptus est.
    At Spoleto, St. Felix, a bishop who obtained the palm of martyrdom under Emperor Maximian.

304 St. Theodotus Martyr with Thecusa, Alexandra, Claudia, faina (Phaina), Euphrasia, Matrona, and Julitta
Ancyræ, in Galátia, sancti Theódoti Mártyris, et sanctárum septem Vírginum et Mártyrum, scílicet Thecúsæ, quæ ipsíus Theódoti erat ámita, Alexándræ, Cláudiæ, Phaínæ, Euphrásiæ, Matrónæ et Julíttæ.  Hæ a Prǽside primum prostitútæ, sed Dei virtúte servátæ, deínde, lapídibus ad colla ligátis, in palúdem mersæ sunt; quarum relíquias colléctas cum Theódotus honorífice sepelísset, ídeo, comprehénsus a Prǽside, sævíssime dilaniátus est, ac demum, ense percússus, martyrii corónam accépit.
    At Ancyra in Galatia, the martyr St. Theodotus, and the holy virgins Thecusa, his aunt, Alexandra, Claudia, Faina, Euphrasia, Matrona, and Julitta.  They were at first taken to a place of debauchery, but the power of God prevented them from evil, and they later had stones fastened to their necks and were plunged into a lake.  For gathering the remains and burying them honorably, Theodotus was arrested by the governor, and after having been horribly lacerated, was put to the sword, and thus received the crown of martyrdom.
304? SS. THEODOTUS, THECUSA AND THEIR COMPANIONS, MARTYRS
LIKE many other narratives which have found more or less authoritative acceptance both in the Eastern and Western church, the story of SS. Theodotus, Thecusa and their companions is not historical fact but a pious romance. Shorn of many picturesque details, the tale runs as follows: Theodotus was a charitable and devout Christian who had been brought up by a maiden called Thecusa; he plied the trade of an innkeeper at Ancyra in Galatia. The faithful in this province, during the persecution of Diocletian, suffered terribly at the hands of a particularly cruel governor. Theodotus fearlessly assisted the imprisoned Christians and buried the martyrs at the risk of his life. He was bearing back the relics of St Valens, which he had rescued from the river Halys, when he encountered, near the town of Malus, a party of Christians who had recently regained their liberty through his exertions. They were overjoyed at the meeting, and sat down to an alfresco meal, to which they invited Fronto, the local Christian priest. In the course of conversation, Theodotus remarked that the place would be an ideal site for a confessio or chapel for relics.
“Yes”, was the priest’s reply, “but you must first have the relics”. “Build the church”, said Theodotus, “and I will provide the relics.” With these words he gave Fronto his ring as a pledge.
Soon afterwards there occurred in Ancyra an annual feast to Artemis and Athene, during the course of which statues of the goddesses were washed at a pond, in which women consecrated to their service bathed in view of the public. There happened to be at that time imprisoned in the town seven Christian maidens, amongst whom was Thecusa. The governor, who had been unable to shake their constancy, condemned them to be stripped, to be carried naked in an open chariot after the idols, and then to be drowned in the pond, unless they consented to wear the garlands and robes of the priestesses. As they indignantly refused to do this, the sentence was carried out, stones having been attached to the necks of the martyrs to prevent their bodies from rising. However, Theodotus recovered them one tempestuous night while the guards were sheltering from the storm, and gave them Christian burial. The secret was betrayed by an apostate, and Theodotus, after being subjected to appalling tortures, was decapitated.
Now it came to pass on the day of his friend’s death that the priest Fronto had occasion to come to Ancyra with his ass to sell wine. Night had fallen when he arrived, and as the gates were closed he gladly accepted the hospitality of a little band of soldiers encamped outside the city. In the course of conversation he discovered that they were guarding the pyre on which the body of the dead
Theodotus was to be burnt on the morrow. Thereupon he plied them with his wine till they were completely intoxicated and, after replacing the ring on its former owner’s finger, he laid the body of Theodotus across the back of his ass which he set at liberty, well knowing that it would return home. In the morning he loudly bewailed the theft of the ass and thus escaped suspicion. The animal, as he had anticipated, bore its burden back to Malus, and there the confessio which Theodotus had desired was built to enshrine his own remains.
It might be said without exaggeration that the attitude adopted by modern scholars towards the story of Theodotus is typical of the change which has come over the whole science of hagiography. Alban Butler, following the footsteps of such generally sound authorities as Ruinart, the early Bollandists and Tillemont, believed that this narrative was written by one Nilus, “who had lived with the martyr, had been his fellow prisoner and was an eye-witness of what he relates”. But there are grave reasons for believing that Nilus has merely been invented by an artifice common to all fiction, and that the story, with its reminiscences of a tale occurring in Herodotus, must be treated as a romance written by an author possessing rather more literary skill than we commonly find in such cases. See Delehaye in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxii (1903), pp. 320—328 and vol. xxiii (1904), pp. 478—479. The texts are best given in P. Franchi de’ Cavalieri Studi e Testi, no. 6 (5901), and no. 33 (5920). See also the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv, and the Revue des Questions historiques, vol. xviii (1904), pp. 288—291.

During the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Theodotus was an innkeeper at Ancyra, Galatia (modern Turkey), who gave burial to seven virgins after their martyrdom for refusing to wear pagan priestess robes and take part in a pagan festival. Theodotus was himself betrayed by an apostate and was martyred.

In turn, his remains were gathered up by a Christian and sent to Malus where they received a proper burial and were enshrined in a chapel.
305 St. Dioscorus Martyr of Egypt a reader on the parish of Kynopolis
In Ægypto sancti Dióscori Lectóris, in quem Præses multa et vária torménta ita exércuit, ut ungues ejus effóderet et lampádibus látera inflammáret, sed, cæléstis lúminis fulgóre pertérriti, cecidérunt minístri; novíssime autem ipse Dióscorus, láminis ardéntibus adustus, martyrium consummávit.
    In Egypt, St. Dioscorus, a lector, who was subjected by the governor to many and diverse torments, such as the tearing off of his nails and the burning of his sides with torches; but a light from heaven having prostrated the executioners, the saint's martyrdom was finally ended by having red-hot metal plates applied to his body.
He was a reader on the parish of Kynopolis when arrested. Burned with hot irons, he died under torture.
340 St. Potamon Bishop of Heraclea, Upper Egypt. Arrested in the final persecution of the Church
Heracléæ, in Ægypto, sancti Potamónis Epíscopi, qui primum, sub Maximiáno Galério, Confessor fuit; deínde, sub Constántio Imperatóre et Ariáno Prǽside Philágrio, martyrio coronátus est.  Ipsum vero beátum virum sancti Ecclésiæ Patres Athanásius et Epiphánius suis láudibus celebrárunt.
    At Heraclea in Egypt, Bishop St. Potamon, first a confessor under Maximian Galerius, and afterwards, a martyr under Emperor Constantius, and the Arian governor Philagrius.  Athanasius and Epiphanius, Fathers of the Church, have sung the praises of this holy man.

340 ST POTAMON, BISHOP OF HERACLEA, MARTYR the Council of Nicaea in 325; he accompanied St Athanasius to the Council of Tyre;  

ST POTAMON (Potamion) was bishop of Heraclea in Egypt. St Athanasius says that he was doubly a martyr, inasmuch as he suffered cruel persecution first for vindicating the Catholic faith before the heathen and then for defending the divinity of our Lord before the Arians. When Maximinus Daia persecuted the Christians in 350, St Potamon made a bold confession, and was subjected to savage tortures which entailed permanent lameness as well as the loss of an eye. These marks of his sufferings rendered him a conspicuous figure at the Council of Nicaea in 325, where he took a vigorous part. Ten years later he accompanied St Athanasius to the Council of Tyre and nobly defended that champion of the faith. Under the Arian Emperor Constantius, the prefect of Egypt, Philagrius, and the heretical priest Gregory who had usurped the see of Athanasius, travelled over all Egypt, tormenting and banishing the orthodox. Foremost among their victims was St Potamon, whose uncompromising attitude had specially incurred their animosity. By their order he was arrested and beaten with clubs until he was left for dead. The tender care of those who rescued him enabled him to make a partial recovery, but he died soon afterwards as the result of the ill-treatment he had received.

The available information, gathered almost entirely from SS. Epiphanius and Athanasius, is set out in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv. See also Hefele. Leclercq, Conciles, vol. i, pp. 658—659.
He was condemned to the mines and had one eye gouged out and one leg rendered lame, as was the custom of branding prisoners. Released by the decree of Emperor Constantine the Great, Potamon took part in the Council of Nicaea but was then severely persecuted by the Arians of Egypt, who were outraged by his unequivocal support for the equally persecuted St. Athanasius of Alexandria. He died from the indignities and cruelties inflicted upon him by the heretics. Some accounts state that the Arians beat him to death.
6th v. Conval of Strathclyde archdeacon to Saint Kentigern active missionary (AC)
Despite the efforts of Protestant reformers to eradicate the memory of Conval, archdeacon to Saint Kentigern, there is a church still in Glasgow dedicated to his memory. He was active throughout the region of Strathclyde, south of Glasgow, especially in Renfrewshire (Montague)
526 St. John I Pope Martyr he succeeded persuading Emperor Justin I to mitigate treatment of Arians thus avoid reprisals against Catholics in Italy. The Pope's visit also brought reconciliation of Western and Eastern Churches plagued by a schism since 482 when Zeno's Henoticon had been published
Ravénnæ, natális sancti Joánnis Primi, Papæ et Mártyris; qui, ab Ariáno Itáliæ Rege Theodoríco illuc dolo evocátus, ibídem, ab eo propter orthodóxam fidem diu macerátus in cárcere, vitam finívit.  Ipsíus autem festum recólitur sexto Kaléndas Júnii, quo die sacrum ejus corpus, Romam relátum, in Basílica sancti Petri, Apostolórum Príncipis, sepúltum est.
    The birthday of St. John I, pope and martyr, who was called to Ravenna by the Arian king of Italy, Theodoric, and died there after being in prison a long time for the true faith.  His feast, however, is celebrated on the 27th of May, the day on which his revered body was taken to Rome and buried in the basilica of St. Peter, prince of the apostles.

A native of Tuscany in Italy, John was elected Pope while he was still an archdeacon upon the death of Pope Hormisdas in 523. At that time, the ruler of Italy was Theodoric the Goth who subscribed to the Arian brand of Christianity, but tolerated and even favored his Catholic subjects during the early part of his reign. However, about the time of St. John's accession to the Papacy, Theodoric's policy underwent a drastic change as a result of two events:
the treasonable (in the sovereign's view) correspondence between ranking members of the Roman Senate and Constantinople
and the severe edict against heretics enacted by the emperor Justin I, who was the first Catholic on the Byzantine throne in fifty years.

Spurred on by the appeals of Eastern Arians, Theodoric threatened to wage war against Justin but ultimately decided to negotiate with him through a delegation of five Bishops and four senators. At its head he named Pope John - much against the latter's wishes. Little is known for certain about the nature of the message which the Pope bore and the manner in which he carried out his mission. What is known is that he succeeded in persuading the Emperor to mitigate his treatment of the Arians and thus avoid reprisals against the Catholics in Italy.
The Pope's visit also brought about the reconciliation of the Western and Eastern Churches which had been plagued by a schism since 482 when Zeno's Henoticon had been published.
However, Theodoric had been becoming more suspicious with each passing day.

While waiting for the delegation to return, he ordered the execution of the philosopher Boethius and his father-in-law Symmachus on a charge of treason; and as he got word of the friendly relations between the Pope and the emperor, he concluded that they were plotting against him. Hence, on the delegation's return to the capitol city of Ravenna, Pope John was imprisoned by order of Theodoric and died a short time later as a result of the treatment he experienced there.

John I, Pope M (RM) Born in Tuscany, Italy; died May 18 or 19, 526; feast day formerly May 27. Saint John became archdeacon in Rome, and on August 13, 523, was elected pope to succeed Saint Hormisdas. At that time he was already very old and frail. Despite his protests, he was sent by the Arian King Theodoric of the Ostrogoths to Constantinople to secure a moderation of Emperor's Justin's decree of 523 against the Arians, compelling them to surrender to Catholics the churches they held in the East.
Theodoric threatened that if John should fail in his mission, there would be reprisals against the orthodox Catholics in the West.

Theodoric also resented the increasing cordiality between the Latin and Greek churches, fearing that it might lead to the restoration of imperial Byzantine authority in Italy, which he ruled. John was warmly received by Justin and huge crowds; however, his mission was not a success for Theodoric. He won only minor concessions from the Eastern emperor.

When Pope John returned to Ravenna (Theodoric's capital) he discovered that Theodoric had murdered his friend and confidant, the great philosopher Severinus Boëthius, as well as his father-in-law Symmachus. Theodoric had John arrested as soon as he landed in Italy on the suspicion of having conspired with Emperor Justin. He was imprisoned at Ravenna, where he died of neglect and ill treatment. Some modern writers contest his claim to martyrdom.
Pope Saint John is responsible for introducing to the West the Alexandrian calculation for the date of Easter (Attwater2, Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer).

John I is depicted in art as looking through the bars of a prison or imprisoned with a deacon and a subdeacon. He is venerated at Ravenna and in Tuscany (Roeder).
St. John I (d. 526)Friday, May 18, 2012
Pope John I inherited the Arian heresy, which denied the divinity of Christ. Italy had been ruled for 30 years by an emperor who espoused the heresy, though he treated the empire’s Catholics with toleration. His policy changed at about the time the young John was elected pope.
When the eastern emperor began imposing severe measures on the Arians of his area, the western emperor forced John to head a delegation to the East to soften the measures against the heretics. Little is known of the manner or outcome of the negotiations—designed to secure continued toleration of Catholics in the West.
When John returned to Rome, he found that the emperor had begun to suspect his friendship with his eastern rival.
On his way home, John was imprisoned when he reached Ravenna because the emperor suspected a conspiracy against his throne. Shortly after his imprisonment, John died, apparently from the treatment he had received.

Comment: We cannot choose the issues for which we have to suffer and perhaps die. John I suffered because of a power-conscious emperor. Jesus suffered because of the suspicions of those who were threatened by his freedom, openness and powerlessness. “If you find that the world hates you, know it has hated me before you” (John 15:18).
Quote: “Martyrdom makes disciples like their Master, who willingly accepted death for the salvation of the world, and through it they are made like him by the shedding of blood. Therefore, the Church considers it the highest gift and supreme test of love. And while it is given to few, all however must be prepared to confess Christ before humanity and to follow him along the way of the cross amid the persecutions which the Church never lacks” (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 42, Austin Flannery translation).
8th v. St. Merililaun Martyred pilgrim from England, journeying to Rome
He was from England, journeying to Rome, when he was slain at Reims, France, under circumstances that warranted his being considered a martyr.
863 St. Feredarius Irish abbot of lona, Scotland moved the relics of St. Columba to Ireland
He moved the relics of St. Columba to Ireland because of Danish raids.
944 St. Elgiva Benedictine nun Queen mother of Kings Edwy of the Saxons and Edgar, King of England wife of Edmund the First
She gave up public life and became a Benedictine nun at Shaftesbury.
1160 King Eric IX Patron of Sweden; aid Christianity in his realm; responsible for codifying laws of his kingdom
Upsali, in Suécia, sancti Eríci, Regis et Mártyris.    At Upsal in Sweden, St. Eric, king and martyr.

1161 ST ERIC OF SWEDEN, MARTYR
ST ERIC was acknowledged king in most parts of Sweden in 1150, and his line subsisted for a hundred years. He did much to establish Christianity in Upper Sweden and built or completed at Old Uppsala the first large church to be erected in his country. It is said that the ancient laws and constitutions of the kingdom were by his orders collected into one volume, which became known as King Eric’s Law or the Code of Uppland. The king soon had to take up arms against the heathen Finns, who were making descents upon his territories and pillaging the country. He vanquished them in battle, and at his desire, St Henry, Bishop of Uppsala, an Englishman, who had accompanied him on the expedition, remained in Finland to evangelize the people.

The king’s zeal for the faith was far from pleasing to some of his nobles, and we are told that they entered into a conspiracy with Magnus, the son of the king of Denmark. St Eric was hearing Mass on the day after the feast of the Ascension when news was brought that a Danish army, swollen with Swedish rebels, was marching against him and was close at hand. He answered calmly, “Let us at least finish the sacrifice the rest of the feast I shall keep elsewhere”  After Mass was over, he recommended his soul to God, and marched forth in advance of his guards. The conspirators rushed upon him, beat him down from his horse, and cut off his head. His death occurred on May 18, 1161.

Although St Eric was never formally canonized, he was regarded as the principal patron of Sweden until the Protestant Reformation. His banner, which was always carried in battle, has played a great part in Swedish history and was regarded as a portent of victory. The king’s relics are preserved in the cathedral of Uppsala, and his effigy appears in the arms of Stockholm.
Eric IX of Sweden King of Sweden from 1150, Eric did much to aid Christianity in his realm and was responsible for codifying the laws of his kingdom, which became known as King Eric's Law (also the code of Uppland).
The principal source for the life of St Eric is the biography written more than a century and a half after his death by the Dominican Israel Erlandson, little enough of which is confirmed by other sources. It is printed with annotations, in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv. In the Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche, vol. iii, c. 753, references are given to some more modern authorities in Swedish who deal with the events of St Eric’s reign. See Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lx, p. 267.

He led a victorious expedition against the marauding Finns and persuaded English bishop Henry of Uppsala to remain in Finnland to evangelize the Finns. Eric was killed and beheaded near Uppsala by rebelling Swedish nobles in the army of Magnus, son of the King of Denmark, who had invaded his territory, on May 18.
Though never formally canonized, Eric was long considered the Patron of Sweden.

1369 BD WILLIAM OF TOULOUSE and with the triple promise he made at his profession he dedicated himself to the Holy Trinity. With the vow of obedience he offered himself to the Father under whom all things are in subjection, with the vow of poverty to the Son who for our sake became poor, and with the vow of chastity to the Holy Ghost, the spouse of our Lady and all pure souls.

AT a very early age Bd William de Naurose joined the Hermits of St Augustine in his native city of Toulouse. Young though he was, he had already begun to tread the path of perfection, and with the triple promise he made at his profession he dedicated himself to the Holy Trinity. With the vow of obedience he offered himself to the Father under whom all things are in subjection, with the vow of poverty to the Son who for our sake became poor, and with the vow of chastity to the Holy Ghost, the spouse of our Lady and all pure souls.
After his ordination he was sent to pursue higher studies at the University of Paris, then the educational centre of Christendom. His course completed, he was entrusted with mission work and soon became celebrated as a preacher and as a director of souls. A great promoter of prayer for the holy souls in Purgatory, he was once visited by a wealthy woman who gave him gold, requesting his prayers for her deceased relations. Bd William at once said aloud, “Eternal rest give to them, 0 Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace,” and stopped short— much to the disappointment of his visitor, who plainly intimated that she expected more prayers for her money. The holy priest replied by bidding her write down his prayer and weigh it in a balance with her bag of gold. She did so, and lo! it was the money which kicked the beam, while down came the scale with the prayer. Bd William had a reputation for delivering those possessed by devils, but was himself said to be troubled by evil spirits, who sometimes appeared to him in visible form and tried to do him bodily harm. He died on May 18, 1369, and his cult was confirmed in 1893.

The short life by Nicholas Bertrand which is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv, was written a century and a half after the death of Bd William. There is also a brief historical summary in the decree approving the cult and a compendious account of the beatus by N. Mattioli, in Italian, was published in 1894.

1486 Blessed Camilla Gentili holy virgin venerated at church of the Dominican friars at San Severino V (AC)
cultus approved in 1841. Camilla was a holy virgin who is venerated at the church of the Dominican friars at San Severino (Benedictines).
1587 St. Felix of Cantalice; noted for his austerities, piety, 38 years in monastery as questor aiding sick the poor and revered by all helped in St. Charles Borromeo's revision of the rule for his Oblates; There is record of a great number of miracles worked after his death, and he was canonized in 1709.
Romæ sancti Felícis Confessóris, ex Ordine Minórum Capuccinórum, evangélica simplicitáte et caritáte conspícui; quem Clemens Undécimus, Póntifex Máximus, Sanctórum fastis adscrípsit.
    At Rome, St. Felix, confessor of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, celebrated for his evangelical simplicity and charity.  He was inscribed on the roll of the saints by the Sovereign Pontiff Clement XI.

1587 ST FELIX OF CANTALICE “All earthly creatures can lift us up to God if we know how to look at them with an eye that is single.” He loved to dwell upon the sufferings of our Lord, never weary of contemplating that great mystery. Always cheerful, always humble, he never resented an insult or an injury. If reviled he would only say, “I pray God that you may become a saint”.

ST FELIX was born at Cantalice, near Città Ducale in Apulia. His parents were devout peasants and he himself early evinced such piety that his little companions when they saw him approach would cry out, “Here comes Felix the saint!” As a child he acted as cowherd and often, after driving his cattle to some quiet pasturage, he would spend much time praying at the foot of a tree in the bark of which he had cut a cross. At the age of twelve he was hired out, first as a shepherd and afterwards as a ploughman, to a well-to-do landowner of Città Ducale, named Mark Tully Pichi or Picarelli.
When still quite young, Felix taught himself to meditate during his work, and he soon attained to a high degree of contemplation. In God, in himself, and in all creatures round him, he found a perpetual fund of religious thoughts and affections. In his later life a religious once asked him how he con­trived to keep himself constantly in the presence of God amid the bustle of daily cares and the multiplicity of distractions. “All earthly creatures can lift us up to God”, he replied, “if we know how to look at them with an eye that is single.” He loved to dwell upon the sufferings of our Lord, and he was never weary of contemplating that great mystery. Always cheerful, always humble, he never resented an insult or an injury. If anyone reviled him he would only say, “I pray God that you may become a saint”. An account he heard read of the fathers in the desert attracted him to the life of a hermit, but he decided that it might prove to be a dangerous one for him.

He was still in doubt as to his future vocation when the question was decided for him through an accident. He was ploughing one day with two fresh young bullocks when his master unexpectedly entered the field. His sudden appearance or something else scared the animals and they bolted, knocking down Felix as he tried to hold them in. He was trampled upon; the plough passed over his body, but in spite of this he arose unhurt. In gratitude for this deliverance he promptly betook himself to the Capuchin monastery of Città Ducale, where he asked to be received as a lay-brother. The father guardian, after warning him of the austerity of the life, led him before a crucifix, saying, See what Jesus Christ has suffered for us!” Felix burst into tears, and impressed the superior with the conviction that a soul which felt so deeply must be drawn by God.

During the noviciate, which he passed at Anticoli, Felix appeared already filled with the spirit of his order, with a love of poverty, humiliations and crosses. Often he would beg the novice-master to double his penances and mortifications and to treat him with greater severity than the rest who, he declared, were more docile and naturally more inclined to virtue. Although he thought everyone in the house better than himself, his fellow religious, like the children of Cantalice, spoke of him amongst themselves as “The saint”.
In 1545, when he was about thirty, he made his solemn vows. Four years later he was sent to Rome where for forty years, practically until his death, he filled the post of questor, with the daily duty to go round begging for food and alms for the sustenance of the community. The post was a trying one, but Felix delighted in it because it entailed humiliations, fatigue, and discomforts, and his spirit of recollection was never interrupted. With the sanction of his superiors, who placed entire confidence in his discretion, he assisted the poor liberally out of the alms he collected; and he loved to visit the sick, tending them with his own hands, and consoling the dying.
   St Philip Neri held him in great regard and delighted in conversing with him: the two men, as a greeting, would wish each other sufferings for Christ’s sake. When St Charles Borromeo sent to St Philip the rules he had drawn up for his Oblates with a request that he would revise them, St Philip excused himself but referred them to the Capuchin lay-brother. In vain did St Felix protest that he was illiterate: the rules were read to him and he was commanded to give his opinion about them. He advised the omission of certain regulations which struck him as being too difficult. These emendations were accepted by St Charles, who expressed great admiration for the judgement that had prompted them.

St Felix chastised himself with almost incredible severity and invariably went barefoot, without sandals. He wore a shirt of iron links and plates studded with iron spikes. When he could do so without singularity, he fasted on bread and water, picking out of the basket for his own dinner the crusts left by others. He tried to conceal from notice the remarkable spiritual favours he received, but often when he was serving Mass he was so transported in ecstasy that he could not make the responses. For everything that he saw, for all that befell him, he gave thanks to God, and the words “Deo gratias” were so constantly on his lips that the Roman street-urchins called him Brother Deogratias. When he was old and was suffering from a painful complaint, their cardinal protector, who loved him greatly, told his superiors that he ought to be relieved of his wearisome office. But Felix asked to be allowed to continue his rounds, on the ground that the soul grows sluggish if the body is pampered. He died at the age of seventy-two, after being consoled on his death-bed by a vision of our Lady. There is record of a great number of miracles worked after his death, and he was canonized in 1709.

The Bollandists, in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. iv, have published a considerable selection of materials presented in the beatification process, a process which was begun only a short time after Brother Felix’s death, when witnesses were still available who had lived with him and had been the spectators of his virtues. There is no lack of other biographies, but they are mostly based on the same materials, e.g. those by John Baptist of Perugia, Maximus of Valenza, Angelo Rossi, etc. Lady Amabel Kerr published in 1900 a very acceptable sketch entitled A Son of St Francis. See also Léon, L’Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp. 198—n3, and Etudes franciscaines, t. xxxiii, pp. 97—109.
Felix of Cantalice was born of peasant parents at Cantalice, Apulia, Italy. He was a shepherd and a farm laborer in his youth, became a Capuchin lay brother at nearby Citta Ducale Monastery in Anticoli, and became noted for his austerities and piety. He was sent to Rome in 1549 and spent the next thirty-eight years in the monastery there as questor, aiding the sick and the poor and revered by all.
He was a friend of St. Philip Neri and helped in St. Charles Borromeo's revision of the rule for his Oblates. Felix was canonized in 1709.

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR MAY
Christians in Africa.
That Christians in Africa, in imitation of the Merciful Jesus,
may give prophetic witness to reconciliation, justice, and peace.


ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

Fifth Week of Easter

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest
and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
 
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
Saints and Popes Mentioned on May 01
600 BC Jeremiah,The Holy Prophet  one of the four great Old Testament prophets     In Egypt, St. Jeremias, prophet, who was stoned to death by the people at Taphnas, where he was buried.  St. Epiphanius tells that the faithful were accustomed to pray at his grave, and to take away from it dust to heal those who were stung by serpents.
Son of the priest Helkiah from the city of Anathoth near Jerusalem.  He lived 600 years before the Birth of Christ, under the Israelite king Josiah and four of his successors. He was called to prophetic service at the age of fifteen, when the Lord revealed to him that even before his birth the Lord had chosen him to be a prophet. Jeremiah refused, citing his youth and lack of skill at speaking, but the Lord promised to be always with him and to watch over him.
He touched the mouth of the chosen one and said, "Behold, I have put My words into your mouth. Behold, I have appointed you this day over nations and kingdoms, to root out and to pull down, to destroy and to rebuild, and to plant" (Jer. 1:9-10).
When Jeremiah prophesied that the King of Babylon would invade Egypt and annihilate the Jews living there, the Jews murdered him.  In that very same year the saint's prophecy was fulfilled.
There is a tradition that 250 years later, Alexander the Great transported the relics of the holy Prophet Jeremiah to Alexandria.

The Prophet Jeremiah wrote his Book of Prophecies and also the Book of Lamentations about the desolation of Jerusalem and the Exile.  The times in which he lived and prophesied are described in 4/2 Kings (Ch. 23-25) and in the Second Book of Chronicles (36:12) and in 2 Maccabbees (Ch. 2).

In the Gospel of Matthew it is said that the betrayal of Judas was foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah, "And they took thirty pieces of silver, the price of him on whom the sons of Israel had set a price, and they gave them for the potter's field, as the Lord directed me" (Mt. 27:9-10). Perhaps Jeremiah 32:6-15 is meant.
The birthday of the blessed apostles Philip and James.  Philip, after having converted nearly all of Scythia to the faith of Christ, went to Hieropolis, a city in Asia, where he was fastened to a cross and stoned, and thus ended his life gloriously.  James, who is also called the brother of our Lord, was the first bishop of Jerusalem.  Being hurled down from a pinnacle of the temple, his legs were broken, and being struck on the head with a dyer's staff, he expired and was buried near the temple. 
St. Joseph Feastday: March 19, May 1 Patron of the Universal Church.
We know he was a carpenter, a working man, for the skeptical Nazarenes ask about Jesus, "Is this not the carpenter's son?" (Matthew 13:55). He wasn't rich for when he took Jesus to the Temple to be circumcised and Mary to be purified he offered the sacrifice of two turtledoves or a pair of pigeons, allowed only for those who could not afford a lamb (Luke 2:24).
Despite his humble work and means, Joseph came from a royal lineage. Luke and Matthew disagree some about the details of Joseph's genealogy but they both mark his descent from David, the greatest king of Israel (Matthew 1:1-16 and Luke 3:23-38). Indeed the angel who first tells Joseph about Jesus greets him as "son of David," a royal title used also for Jesus.
We know Joseph was a compassionate, caring man. When he discovered Mary was pregnant after they had been betrothed, he knew the child was not his but was as yet unaware that she was carrying the Son of God. He planned to divorce Mary according to the law but he was concerned for her suffering and safety. He knew that women accused to adultery could be stoned to death, so he decided to divorce her quietly and not expose her to shame or cruelty (Matthew 1:19-25).
We know Joseph was man of faith, obedient to whatever God asked of him without knowing the outcome. When the angel came to Joseph in a dream and told him the truth about the child Mary was carrying, Joseph immediately and without question or concern for gossip, took Mary as his wife. When the angel came again to tell him that his family was in danger, he immediately left everything he owned, all his family and friends, and fled to a strange country with his young wife and the baby.
He waited in Egypt without question until the angel told him it was safe to go back (Matthew 2:13-23).
We know Joseph loved Jesus. His one concern was for the safety of this child entrusted to him. Not only did he leave his home to protect Jesus, but upon his return settled in the obscure town of Nazareth out of fear for his life. When Jesus stayed in the Temple we are told Joseph (along with Mary) searched with great anxiety for three days for him (Luke 2:48). We also know that Joseph treated Jesus as his own son for over and over the people of Nazareth say of Jesus, "Is this not the son of Joseph?" (Luke 4:22)
We know Joseph respected God. He followed God's commands in handling the situation with Mary and going to Jerusalem to have Jesus circumcised and Mary purified after Jesus' birth. We are told that he took his family to Jerusalem every year for Passover, something that could not have been easy for a working man.
Since Joseph does not appear in Jesus' public life, at his death, or resurrection, many historians believe Joseph probably had died before Jesus entered public ministry.
Joseph is the patron of the dying because, assuming he died before Jesus' public life, he died with Jesus and Mary close to him, the way we all would like to leave this earth.
208 St Andeolus Martyr sent to France by St Polycarp,     In France, in the Province of Vivarias, blessed Andeol, subdeacon, who was sent from the East into Gaul with others by St. Polycarp to preach the word of God.  Under Emperor Severus he was scourged with thorny sticks, and having his head split with a wooden sword into four parts, in the shape of a cross, he completed his martyrdom.
Martyr and companion of St. Polycarp. Originally from Smyrna, Andeolus was sent to France by Polycarp. There he labored until arrested and martyred at Viviers.
  604 St. Arigius Bishop 20 yrs greatest priest pastor of his era of Gap, France. He served as bishop for twenty years after earning a reputation as one of the greatest priest pastors of his era. His cult was confirmed by Pope St. Pius X.
  893 St Theodard Benedictine bishop rebuilt churches ransom captives selling treasures spending his own money to
feed poor suffering practiced severe austerities
.  The Montauban breviary describes him as “an eye to the blind, feet to the lame, a father of the poor, and the consoler of the afflicted”. Greatly beloved by all, he was unanimously chosen archbishop of Narbonne at the death of Sigebold, who had nominated him as his successor. The perils which then beset travellers did not deter the newly-elected prelate from undertaking a visit to Rome, where he received the pallium.  Born at Montauban (Monlauriol), France, he studied law at the University of Toulouse and then at the Benedictine abbey of Montauban before becoming a lawyer.
Appointed secretary to Archbishop Sigebold of Narbonne, he soon was named an archdeacon and finally succeeded Sigebold as archbishop. He devoted much of his effort to repairing the damage, physical and spiritual, caused by the raids of Saracens, including rebuilding churches, ransoming captives, selling off treasures, and spending his own money to feed the poor and suffering. His death at St. Martin's Abbey (where he received the Benedictine habit) was probably hastened by the severe austerities he practiced
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1012 St Benedict of Szkalka hermit martyr gifted mystic of Hungary.   Benedict was a recluse on Mount Zabor, near a Benedictine monastery, trained by St. Andrew Zorard.
A gifted mystic, Benedict was murdered by a mob in 1012. He was canonized in 1083
Gregory VII 1073-1085.
1200 Tamar In 1166 a daughter, Tamar, was born to King George III (1155–1184) and Queen Burdukhan of Georgia.
The king proclaimed that he would share the throne with his daughter from the day she turned twelve years of age. The royal court unanimously vowed its allegiance and service to Tamar, and father and daughter ruled the country together for five years. After King George’s death in 1184, the nobility recognized the young Tamar as the sole ruler of all Georgia. Queen Tamar was enthroned as ruler of all Georgia at the age of eighteen. She is called “King” in the Georgian language because her father had no male heir and so she ruled as a monarch and not as a consort.
At the beginning of her reign, Tamar convened a Church council and addressed the clergy with wisdom and humility: “Judge according to righteousness, affirming good and condemning evil,” she advised. “Begin with me—if I sin I should be censured, for the royal crown is sent down from above as a sign of divine service. Allow neither the wealth of the nobles nor the poverty of the masses to hinder your work. You by word and I by deed, you by preaching and I by the law, you by upbringing and I by education will care for those souls whom God has entrusted to us, and together we will abide by the law of God, in order to escape eternal condemnation.… You as priests and I as ruler, you as stewards of good and I as the watchman of that good.”
Having encamped near Basiani, Rukn al-Din sent a messenger to Queen Tamar with an audacious demand: to surrender without a fight. In reward for her obedience, the sultan promised to marry her on the condition that she embrace Islam; if Tamar were to cleave to Christianity, he would number her among the other unfortunate concubines in his harem. When the messenger relayed the sultan’s demand, a certain nobleman, Zakaria Mkhargrdzelidze, was so outraged that he slapped him on the face, knocking him unconscious. At Queen Tamar’s command, the court generously bestowed gifts upon the ambassador and sent him away with a Georgian envoy and a letter of reply. “Your proposal takes into consideration your wealth and the vastness of your armies, but fails to account for divine judgment,” Tamar wrote, “while I place my trust not in any army or worldly thing but in the right hand of the Almighty God and the infinite aid of the Cross, which you curse. The will of God—and not your own—shall be fulfilled, and the judgment of God—and not your judgment—shall reign!”  The Georgian soldiers were summoned without delay. Queen Tamar prayed for victory before the Vardzia Icon of the Theotokos, then, barefoot, led her army to the gates of the city. Hoping in the Lord and the fervent prayers of Queen Tamar, the Georgian army marched toward Basiani. The enemy was routed. The victory at Basiani was an enormous event not only for Georgia, but for the entire Christian world.
1345 Peregrine Laziosi received a vision of Our Lady who told him to go to Siena, Italy, and there to join the Servites healed by Jesus incorrupt fervant preacher, excellent orator, and gentle confessor.  1345 St Peregrine Laziosi; he spent hours upon his knees in the chapel of our Lady in the cathedral. One day the Blessed Virgin herself appeared to him in that place, and addressed him, saying, “Go to Siena: there you will find the devout men who call themselves my servants: attach yourself to them”.  The only son of well-to-do parents, St Peregrine Laziosi was born in 1260 at Forli, in the Romagna.
After he had spent some years in Siena, his superiors sent him to Forli to found a new house for the order. By this time he had been ordained and had proved himself to be an ideal priest—fervent in the celebration of the holy mysteries, eloquent in preaching, untiring in reconciling sinners. A great affliction now befell him in the form of cancer of the foot, which, besides being excruciatingly painful, made him an object of repulsion to his neighbours. He bore this trial without a murmur. At last the surgeons decided that the only thing to do was to cut off the foot. St Peregrine spent the night before the operation in trustful prayer; he then sank into a light slumber, from which he awoke completely cured—to the amaze­ment of the doctors, who testified that they could no longer detect any trace of the disease. This miracle greatly enhanced the reputation which the holy man had already acquired by his exemplary life. He lived to the age of 80, and was canon­ized in
1726 Benedict XIV 1758.
1852 St John-Louis Bonnard priest Martyr of Vietnam.   Born at St. Christot-en-Jarret, France, he became a priest of the Paris Society of Foreign Missions and was ordained in 1850. Sent to western Vietnam, he was arrested in a persecution and beheaded. Pope John Paul II canonized him in 1988. 

Saints and Popes Mentioned on May 02
373 St. Athanasius Bishop and Doctor of the Church refusal to tolerate Arian heresy refuge among desert monks became ascetic renowned for sanctity beloved by followers volumes of writings extant.   At Alexandria, the birthday of St. Athanasius, bishop of that city, confessor and doctor of the Church, most celebrated for sanctity and learning.  Although almost all of the world had formed a conspiracy to persecute him, he courageously defended the Catholic faith, from the reign of Constantine to that of Valens, against emperors, governors, and a multitude of Arian bishops, whose underhanded attacks forced him to wander as an exile over the whole earth without finding a place of security.  At length, however, he was restored to his church, and after overcoming many trials, and winning many crowns by his patience, he departed for heaven in the forty-sixth year of his priesthood, in the time of the emperors Valentinian and Valens.
born in Spain, about 346; died at Milan, 17 January, 395), is still used in the liturgy of the Catholic Church.
Five times Athanasius had been banished; seventeen years he had spent in exile: but for the last seven years of his life he was left in the unchallenged occupation of his see. It was probably at this time that he wrote the Life of St Antony.
St Athanasius died in Alexandria on May 2, 373, and his body was subsequently translated first to Constantinople and then to Venice.
The greatest man of his age and one of the greatest religious leaders of any age, Athanasius of Alexandria rendered services to the Church the value of which can scarcely be exaggerated, for he defended the faith against almost overwhelming odds and emerged triumphant. Most aptly has he been described by Cardinal Newman as “a principal instrument after the Apostles by which the sacred truths of Christianity have been conveyed and secured to the world”. Although the writings of St Athanasius deal mainly with controversy, there is beneath this war of words a deep spiritual feeling which comes to the surface at every turn and reveals the high purpose of him who writes. Take, for example, his reply to the objections which the Arians raised from the texts: “Let this chalice pass from me”, or “Why hast thou forsaken me?”
Is it not extravagant to admire the courage of the servants of the Word, yet to say that that Word Himself was in tenor, through whom they despised death? For that most enduring purpose and courage of the holy martyrs demonstrates that the Godhead was not in terror but that the Saviour took away our terror. For as He abolished death by death, and by human means all human evils, so by this so-called terror did He remove our terror, and brought about for us that never more should men fear death. His word and deed go together. . . . For human were the sounds: “Let this chalice pass from me”, and “Why hast thou forsaken me?” and divine the action whereby He, the same being, did cause the sun to fail and the dead to rise. And so He said humanly: “Now is my soul troubled”; and He said divinely: “I have power to lay down my life and power to take it again”. For to be troubled was proper to the flesh, but to have power to lay down His life and take it again when He would, was no property of man, but of the Word’s power. For man dies not at his own arbitrament, but by necessity of nature and against his will; but the Lord being Himself immortal, not having a mortal flesh, had it at His own free will, as God, to become separate from the body and to take it again, when He would. . . . And He let His own body suffer, for therefore did He come, that in the flesh He might suffer, and thenceforth the flesh might be made impassible and immortal; and that contumely and the other troubles might fall upon Him, but come short of others after Him, being by Him annulled utterly; and that henceforth men might for ever abide incorruptible, as a temple of the Word.

The principal source of information for the life of St Athanasius is the collection of his own writings, but his activities were so interwoven with not only the religious, but the secular history of his times that the range of authorities to be consulted is very wide. For English readers Cardinal Newman in his Anglican days, both in his special work on St Athanasius and in his tract on the “Causes of the Rise and Successes of Arianism”, rendered the whole complicated situation intelligible. There is also a brilliantly written chapter on St Athanasius in Dr A. Fortescue’s volume, The Greek Fathers (1908). Two excellent little monographs have appeared in France, by F. Cavallera (1908) and by G. Bardy (1914) in the series “Les Saints”. Reference should also be made to four valuable papers by E. Schwartz in the Nachrichten of the Göttingen Akademie from 1904 to 1911. For a fuller bibliography, see Bardenhewer in the latest edition of his Patrologie, or in his larger work, Geschichte des altkirchlichen Literatur, and for a survey of more recent work, F. L. Cross, The Study of St Athanasius (1945).
Even in exile Athanasius managed to tend his flock. It was primarily for them that he wrote the most illuminating theological treatises on Catholic dogma. He authored Against the Heathen (c. 318), Contra Arianos (c. 358 ?), Apologia to Constantius, (primary historical source), History of the Arians Defense of His Flight, many letters, The Life of Antony (c. 357), and other pieces. In Against the Arians, Athanasius drew on the work of Saints Justin (Born in Flavia Neapolis, Samaria, c. 100; died 165) and St Irenaeus (115-125? 200?), who interpreted Scripture in an orthodox tradition, to insist that the Nicene term homoousios, although not Scriptural itself, was necessary to formulate correctly the truth of Christ's Scriptural revelation.
His Life of Saint Antony showed his friend as singularly devoted to combatting the powers of evil. It became a widely diffused classic. From the time of Saint Bede (Born in Northumbria, England, 673; died at Jarrow, England, on May 25, 735; named Doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII in 1899), it inspired other monastic hagiographers.
An 8th-century monk wrote, "If you find a book by Athanasius and have no paper on which to copy it, write it on your shirts."

All his thinking was soteriologically determined, {the branch of Christian theology that deals with salvation as the effect of a divine agency --  The theological doctrine of salvation as effected by Jesus.} hence 'the Word could never have divinized us if He were merely divine by participation and were not himself the essential Godhead.'
Athanasius defended the oneness of God, yet the separateness of the three Divine Persons. He also went forward to add the Holy Spirit to the Godhead to counter Tropici. His theology of the Holy Spirit is found in his letters to Serapion. In his enlightening treatises on Catholic dogma, Athanasius showed that asceticism and virginity were effective ways to restore the divine image in man.
Several of his works were addressed to monks, to whom he also gave repeated practical help.
When he returned to Alexandria after his final exile, Athanasius spent the last seven years of his life helping to build the Nicene party.

Before the outbreak of the Arian controversy, which began in 319, Athanasius had made himself known as the author of two essays addressed to a convert from heathenism, one of them entitled Against the Gentiles, and the other On the Incarnation of the Word. Both are of the nature of apologetical treatises, arguing such questions as monotheism, and the necessity of divine interposition for the salvation of the world; and already in the second may be traced that tone of thought respecting the essential divinity of Christ as the "God-man" for which he afterwards became conspicuous. There is no distinct evidence of the connection of Athanasius with the first contentions of Arius and his bishop, which ended in the exile of the former, and his entrance into Palestine under the protection of Eusebius the historian, who was bishop of Caesarea and subsequently of his namesake the bishop of Nicomedia. It can hardly be doubted, however, that Athanasius would be a cordial assistant of his friend and patron Alexander, and that the latter was strengthened in his theological position by the young enthusiastic student who had already expounded the nature of the divine Incarnation, and who seems about this time to have become archdeacon of Alexandria. At the Council of Nicaea, in the year 325, he appears prominently in connection with the dispute. He attended the council, not as one of its members (who were properly only bishops or delegates of bishops), but merely as the attendant of Alexander. In this capacity, however, he was apparently allowed to take part in its discussions, for Theodoret (i. 26) states that "he contended earnestly for the apostolic doctrines, and was applauded by their champions, while he earned the hostility of their opponents".
   Within `five months' after the return of Alexander to the scene of his episcopal labours he expired, and his friend and archdeacon was chosen to succeed him. He was elected in the sight and amidst the acclamations of the people. He was now about 30 years of age, and is spoken of as remarkable both for his physical and mental characteristics. He was small in stature, but his face was radiant with intelligence, as 'the face of an angel. This is the expression of Gregory of Nazianzus (Orat., xxii. 9), who has written an elaborate panegyric upon his friend, describing him as fit 'to keep on a level with common-place views yet also to soar high above the more aspiring,' as accessible to all, slow to anger, quick in sympathy, pleasant in conversation, and still more pleasant in temper, effective alike in discourse and in action, assiduous in devotions, helpful to Christians of every class and age, a theologian with the speculative, a comforter of the afflicted, a staff to the aged, a guide of the young."


686 St. Ultan Benedictine abbot founder chaplain to St Gertrude's nuns escaped Mercians  by supernatural revelation he knew of the death of St Foillan, who was murdered by robbers in the forest of Seneffe, and he foretold to St Gertrude, at her request, the day of her own death. He said that St Patrick was preparing to welcome her, and in point of fact she died on March 17.
ST ULTAN (or Ultain) and his more celebrated brothers, St Fursey and St Foillan, were Irish monks who crossed over to East Anglia, where they founded the abbey of Burgh Castle, near Yarmouth, on territory bestowed upon them by King Sigebert or Sigebert I. In consequence of raids by the Mercians, St Fursey went to France, where he died. When St Foillan and St Ultan visited their brother’s tomb at Péronne on their way back from a pilgrimage to Rome, they were warmly welcomed by Bd Itta and St Gertrude at Nivelles, who offered them land at Fosses on which to build a monastery and a hospice for strangers. Ultan became the abbot of Fosses. We are told that by supernatural revelation he knew of the death of St Foillan, who was murdered by robbers in the forest of Seneffe, and he foretold to St Gertrude, at her request, the day of her own death. He said that St Patrick was preparing to welcome her, and in point of fact she died on March 17. St Ultan later became abbot of, and died at, Péronne, but his relics were subsequently translated to Fosses.

 880  Departure of Pope Sinuthius (Shenouda I), 55th Pope of Alexandria (coptic).  On this day, of the year 596 A.M. (April 19th., 880 A.D.), the great father Pope Sinuthius (Shenouda I), 55th Pope of the See of St. Mark, departed. This holy father was a monk in the monastery of St. Macarius. He advanced in righteousness and worship, and was ordained archpriest for the monastery.

Shortly after, he was chosen for the Patriarchate with the recommendation of the people and bishops. He was enthroned on the 13th day of Tubah 575 A.D. (January 8th., 859 A.D.), and great tribulations and severe persecutions befell him. God performed through him many signs and healed many grievous sicknesses.

Once there was a drought in the city of Mariout for three years, the wells dried up and the farm land became barren. This father came to the church of St. Mina, celebrated the Divine Liturgy, and supplicated God to have mercy upon His creation. At the setting of the sun of that day, the rain began lightly then ceased. This father entered his room and stood up praying and he said: "O My Lord Christ, have mercy on Thy people with the riches of Thy compassion, and let them be filled with Thy good pleasure." Before he finished his prayer, mighty thunders and lightnings started, and the r