Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

Sixth Sunday of Easter

Acts of The Apostles
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Please help save the unborn; they are the future for the world

Virgin_of_Tenderness_from_Pskov_Caves


There are over 10,000 named saints beati from history and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources, Islam, Luthran, + others

May 21 - Our Lady of the Ardents (Arras, France, 1105)

 
Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary           
   
May 21 – Our Lady of Ergotism Victims (Arras, France, 1105) 
 
They dreamt the same dream 
Around the year 1105, the inhabitants of Seninghem (a small town in northern France) and the surrounding province were struck with the terrible disease similar to the plague, commonly called "Saint Anthony’s Fire" or "hell fire" because its victims suffered burning sensations in all parts of their body.

Around the same time, there were two jugglers, one named Itier, the other Norman, who hated each other because Norman had killed Itier’s brother. One night, they both had the same dream: the Virgin Mary appeared to them and told them to go to the Cathedral of Arras (in northern France) and speak to a certain bishop there called Lambert.

Lambert understood that Mary had sent these two men so that he could reconcile them. He spoke to each one separately and then brought them together. He asked each one to give the other the kiss of peace and to spend the night in prayer in the cathedral.

At dawn on Sunday, May 28, 1105 (the feast of Pentecost that year), Mary appeared to them, gave them a lighted candle, and asked them to pour some of its melted wax in water, which they were to give to drink to the sick and to pour on their wounds. Miraculously, all those who drank this water were healed.  seninghem.fr
  
The Cloth of Our Lady of Guadalupe
The cloth of the tilma of Our Lady of Guadalupe has been thoroughly studied. The name of the hill of the apparitions and the mystery of Christ in the symbolic language of the ancient Aztec are evoked, down to the position of the stars on Saint Juan Diego's tilma, which corresponds to a projection (and not a representation: mirror image) of the exact position of the constellations on the morning of December 12, 1531.

This symbolic language highly affected the Indians who responded massively to the message: nine million baptisms were requested in seven years, compared with only a few tens of thousands in the previous years. Catholic men and women of Mexico - but needless to say all people from both North and South America - have a profound devotion and love for Our Lady of Guadalupe.
"Let not your heart be disturbed. Do not fear that sickness, nor any other sickness or anguish. Am I not here, who am your Mother? Are you not under my protection? Am I not your health? Are you not happily within the fold of my mantel? What else do you wish? Do not grieve nor be disturbed by anything."  
Our Lady to Saint Juan Diego, December 9, 1531


Theotokos_Tenderness story.jpg






The "Umilenie-Tenderness" Pskovo-Pechersk Icon of the Mother of God was written and brought to the Pskovo-Pechersk monastery through the efforts of the Pskov merchants Vasilii and Feodor in about the year 1521. It was glorified especially by miracles of healing in the year 1524. This holy icon and also the "Uspenie-Dormition" Icon were glorified in 1581 during the time of the siege of Pskov by the Polish king Stefan Bathory.
The 7 October feastday of the "Umilenie" Icon was established in memory of the deliverance of Pskov from the invasion of Napoleon in 1812.
The Vladimir-Zaonikievsk Icon of the Mother of God takes its name from the Zaonikiev monastery. This icon came to attention in 1588 under the following circumstances: a blind man named Ilarion from the village of Obukhov, in Vologda diocese, was healed after fervent prayer before the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God, Who miraculously pointed out to him a certain place in a dream. Healed by the Mother of God, Ilarion built a church with the help of the local inhabitants. Later on at this place grew up a monastery, where Ilarion accepted monastic tonsure under the name Joseph. And from the Vladimir-Zaonikievsk Icon of the Mother of God have occurred many miracles.
The Krasnogorsk (Chernogorsk) Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God is known of from the year 1603. Hegumen Varlaam, serving at the church of the Resurrection of Christ at Keurola, had as his own this icon of the Vladimir Mother of God. In 1603 he heard a gentle feminine voice in a dream, directing him to give over the Vladimir icon to the priest Miron. And after a certain while there actually came to hegumen Varlaam for discussion a priest with news of the Urals, and named Miron. The hegumen told him about his dream and learned, that near the Urals was a desolate mountain, suitable for the forming of a monastery. Hegumen Varlaam gave over his icon to the priest Miron, who put it into a local church. This icon brought healing to a local woman there named Martha, and to her in a dream the Mother of God appeared and indicated the place, whither the priest Miron should convey Her image, which the priest then did. Having erected a cross on Black Mountain, Miron set about construction of the church, having the help of the monk Jona who had come from Moscow. The priest Miron accepted monastic tonsure from hegumen Varlaam, taking the name Makarii. He undertook a journey to Moscow, carrying back the grammota-document for the construction of the church and the forming of a monastery on Black Mountain. In 1608 the church in honour of the Praise (Pokhvala) of the Mother of God was completed, and priestmonk Makarii was elevated to the dignity of hegumen. The Vladimir icon was installed in the church. The monastery received the name Krasnogorsk.

The Oransk Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God came to attention in the year 1634 under the following circumstances: the Nizhni Novgorod landowner Petr Gladkov had a deep devotion to the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God situated in the Moscow Uspenie-Dormition cathedral. He commissioned a copy from this icon and took it back with him to his native region. After several years he received directives in a dream to build a church in honour of the Vladimir Icon on an hill indicated in the dream. Having set off in search of it, Petr in an impassable part of the forest came upon a place over which there was a radiance. Gladkov recognised this as the hill shown him in the dream. This was Mount Slovensk. Having related to Patriarch Joseph about all this, he received a grammota-document granting permission for the building of a church. Having set up a marble cross upon the hill, Petr set about the construction of the church, into which also was placed the icon of the Mother of God, which was given the title Oransk, deriving from the place-name -- Orano Pole ("Orano Field") -- where the icon had been discovered when the healings began from it.
Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich commanded a monastery be built at the church.
Saints
May
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"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"
(Psalm 21:28)

6th v. St. Barrfoin Irish missionary journeyed to spread the faith repeated his adventures on a voyage to the
Americas to St. Brendan the Navigator 
Valens and Companions bishop martyred at Auxerre, France, with three boys MM (RM) 
St. Polyeuctus Victorius Donatus Martyrs Caesarea Cappadocia
 
1521 Vladimir_Icon_Theotokos

300? Sts. Timothy, Polius, & Eutychius three deacons from
Mauretania Caesariensis martyrs in Mauretania late 3rd/early 4th
303 St. Nicostratus, Antiochus, Companions Martyrs Roman soldiers
306 St. Secundinus Spanish  martyred at Cordova, Spain 
327 Saint Helen mother of St Contantine the Great
337 St. Constantine the Great Junior Emperor and emperor called the
"13th Apostle” in East reared on court of co-Emperor Diocletian
defeated 2 emperors and Christianized the Roman Empire 
356 St. Serapion the Sindonite (comes from garment of coarse linen
he always wore) Egyptian monk part of the great birth of monasticism in the wilderness of Egypt 
357 St. Secundus priest & Companions martyrs in Alexandria by Arians the intruded Arian patriarch George
357 Martyrs of Egypt "At Alexandria, the memory of the holy
bishops and priests who were sent into exile by the Arians, merited joined to the holy confessors" (RM) 
6th v. St. Barrfoin Irish missionary journeyed to spread the faith reported his adventures on a voyage to the Americas to St. Brendan the Navigator 6th century
681 Hospitius of Cap-Saint-Hospice Hermit blessed with the gifts of prophecy and miracles
7th v. St Gollen 7th century Welsh saint 
800 Isberga (Itisberga) of Aire reputed sister of Charlemagne a nun at Aira in the Artois OSB B (AC)
888 St. Ansuinus Martyr companion of St. Ageranus Benedictine monk
1001 St. Theobald of Vienne Archbishop support of monastic renewal defended Church from royal interference
1129 Princes Constantine and sons Michael and Theodore spreading Christian Faith among pagans of Murom
1170 ST GODRIC endowed with extraordinary powers—notably with the gifts of prophecy and a knowledge of distant events. He foretold the death of Bishop William of Durham, and the exile, return and martyrdom of St Thomas Becket, whom he had never seen. He often beheld scenes that were being enacted far away, breaking off a conversation to pray for vessels in imminent danger of shipwreck. He also knew beforehand the date of his own death which occurred on May 21, 1170, after he had spent some sixty years in his hermitage. At a later period there was built at Finchale a monastery, the ruins of which survive. St Godric is the co-titular of a Catholic church in Durham.
1252 Hermann Josef Er wurde Priester und war als beliebter Prediger und Seelsorger besonders in Frauenklöstern im Rheinland tätig
1262 Sainted Kirill (Cyril), Bishop of Rostov chosen hierarchical seat whilst hegumen of the Vladimir Nativity monastery left a series of writings
1289 Blessed Benvenutus of Recanati Franciscan lay brother favored with ecstasies and visions OFM AC
1521 Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God Celebration of delivered Moscow from Tatars invasion
1577 Blessed Catherine of Cardona hermit for 20 years Carmelite V (PC
1584 Agapit of Makrushevsk  MonkMartyr founder of the Makrushevsk Nikolaev monastery healed by a vision
from Saint Nicholas icon
1657 Andrew Bobola Polish aristocrat who joined the Jesuits kindness to plague dying and care for the dead
martyred incorrupt after 150 years a specially remarkable circumstance in view of the respect for this phenomenon popularly shown among the dissident Orthodox. And the doctors were able to confirm the horrible details of his death SJ M (RM)
1730 Pachomius Our Holy Father the Martyr Many miracles were wrought by his blood and his relics, his body
being buried on the island of Patmos in the Church of St John the  Theologian  {Serbian}
1740 Theophilus of Corte priest taught theology OFM famous missioner throughout Italy Corsica zealous
worker for revival of Franciscan observance (RM))
1750 Crispin (patron of cobblers) of Viterbo the admirable quaestor (the brother who requests alms) taught
basics of the catechism, OFM Cap. (AC) 
1861 St. Eugene de Mazenod founded Oblates of Mary Immaculate Patron saint of dysfunctional families 

1915-1928  St. Cristóbal Magallanes and Companions:  These martyrs did not die as a single group but in eight Mexican states, with Jalisco and Zacatecas having the largest number. They were beatified in 1992 and canonized eight years later.


300? Sts. Timothy, Polius, & Eutychius three deacons from Mauretania Caesariensis martyrs in Mauretania late 3rd/early 4th century
In Mauritánia Cæsariénsi natális sanctórum Mártyrum Diaconórum Timóthei, Pólii et Eutychii, qui, in eádem regióne dísseminántes verbum Dei, páriter coronári meruérunt.
    In Morocco, the birthday of the holy martyrs Timothy, Polius, and Eutychius, deacons, who merited to be crowned together for spreading the word of God in that region.

Three martyrs in Mauretania, Africa, who were put to death during the persecutions under Emperor Diocletian.

Timothy, Polius and Eutychius MM (RM)
These three deacons from Mauretania Caesariensis in Africa were martyred under Diocletian (Benedictines).

303 St. Nicostratus, Antiochus, and Companions Martyrs Roman soldiers
Cæsaréæ Philíppi natális sanctórum Mártyrum Nicóstrati et Antíochi Tribunórum, cum áliis milítibus.
    At Caesarea Philippi, the holy martyrs Nicostratus and Antiochus, tribunes, with other soldiers

According to the apocryphal Acta of Procopius, Nicostratus was a tribune over a cohort of Roman soldiers. With his troops, he was executed at Caesarea, Palestine, during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian.

Nicostratus, Antiochus and Companions MM (RM)were among a cohort of Roman soldiers said to have been put to death at Caesarea Philippi, Palestine, under Diocletian. Nicostratus was their tribune. Their story is included in the apocryphal acta of Saint Procopius (Benedictines).

St. Polyeuctus, Victorius and Donatus Martyrs of Caesarea, in Cappadocia
Cæsaréæ, in Cappadócia, item natális sanctórum Mártyrum Polyéucti, Victórii et Donáti.
    At Caesarea in Cappadocia, the birthday of the holy martyrs Polyeuctus, Victorinus, and Donatus.
Beyond being listed in the martyrology, nothing is known of them beyond their sufferings.
Polyeuctus, Victorius, and Donatus MM (RM) Date unknown. Martyrs of Caesarea, Cappadocia, of whom nothing else is known, except the variously spelled names in martyrologies (Benedictines).

306 St. Secundinus Spanish  martyred at Cordova, Spain
Córdubæ, in Hispánia, sancti Secundíni Mártyris.    At Cordova, the martyr St. Secundinus.
who was put to death during the persecutions of the Church under Diocletian.
Secundinus of Cordova M (RM) Died c. 306. Secundinus was martyred at Cordova, Spain, under Diocletian (Benedictines).

Valens and Companions bishop martyred at Auxerre, France, with three boys MM (RM)
Sancti Valéntis Epíscopi, qui, una cum tribus púeris, necátus est.
    St. Valens, bishop, who was put to death along with three children.
Valens was said to have been a bishop martyred at Auxerre, France, with three boys (Benedictines).
St. Valens Bishop and martyr
Perhaps the bishop of Auxerre, France, he was martyred with three boys in an uncertain year.

327 Saint Helen mother of St Contantine the Great
Probably born at Drepanum (Helenopolis) in Asia Minor to parents of humble means. She married Constantius Chlorus, and their son Constantine was born in 274. Constantius divorced her in 294 in order to further his political ambition by marrying a woman of noble rank. After he became emperor, Constantine showed his mother great honor and respect, granting her the imperial title "Augusta."

Kaiserin Helena Orthodoxe und Anglikanische Kirche: 21. Mai
Katholische Kirche: 18. August und 21. Mai

Helena wurde um 250 geboren. In den zahlreichen Legenden werden sehr unterschiedliche Geburtsorte genannt. Vielleicht stammte sie aus Drepanom in der Westtürkei; dieser Ort wurde später in Helenopolis umbenannt. Helena war Ehefrau des Constantius und Mutter von Konstantin. Als ihr Ehemann Kaiser wurde, verstieß er sie, ihr Sohn setze sie nach seiner Wahl 306 wieder als "Augusta" ein. Helena wurde 312 Christin und setzte sich seitdem intensiv für die Verbreitung des Christentums ein. Von vielen großen Kirchen wird berichtet, daß sie durch Helena oder durch Konstantin gegründet wurden. Die Kirche im Garten Gethsemane soll sie mit 79 Jahren bei einer Wallfahrt gegründet haben. Helena soll auch in Jerusalem das Kreuz Christi gefunden haben. Sie starb am 18. August 330 in Nikomedia (Izmit). Die orthodoxe Kirche bezeichnet sie wegen ihres Einsatzes für die Kirche als "Apostelgleich".

After Constantine became the sole ruler of the Western Roman Empire, he issued the Edict of Milan in 313 which guaranteed religious tolerance for Christians. St Helen, who was a Christian, may have influenced him in this decision. In 323, when he became the sole ruler of the entire Roman Empire, he extended the provisions of the Edict of Milan to the Eastern half of the Empire. After three hundred years of persecution, Christians could finally practice their faith without fear.

The emperor deeply revered the victory-bearing Sign of the Cross of the Lord, and also wanted to find the actual Cross upon which our Lord Jesus Christ was crucified. For this purpose he sent his own mother, the holy Empress Helen, to Jerusalem, granting her both power and money. Patriarch Macarius of Jerusalem and St Helen began the search, and through the will of God, the Life-Creating Cross was miraculously discovered in 326. (The account of the finding of the Cross of the Lord is found under the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, September 14). The Orthodox Church commemorates the Uncovering of the Precious Cross and the Precious Nails by the Holy Empress Helen on March 6.

While in Palestine, the holy empress did much of benefit for the Church. She ordered that all places connected with the earthly life of the Lord and His All-Pure Mother, should be freed of all traces of paganism, and she commanded that churches should be built at these places.

The emperor Constantine ordered a magnificent church in honor of Christ's Resurrection to be built over His tomb. St Helen gave the Life-Creating Cross to the Patriarch for safe-keeping, and took part of the Cross with her for the emperor. After distributing generous alms at Jerusalem and feeding the needy (at times she even served them herself), the holy Empress Helen returned to Constantinople, where she died in the year 327.

Because of her great services to the Church and her efforts in finding the Life-Creating Cross, the empress Helen is called "the Equal of the Apostles."
337 St. Constantine the Great Junior Emperor and emperor called the “Thirteenth Apostle” in the East reared on court of co-Emperor Diocletian defeated 2 emperors and Christianized the Roman Empire

Konstantin der Große Orthodoxe, Katholische und Evangelische Kirche: 21. Mai

Konstantin, Sohn des späteren Kaisers Konstantius und der Helena, wurde um 288 geboren. 306 wurde er in York von den Soldaten seines Vaters zum römischen Kaiser ausgerufen. Sein Mitherrscher Galerius, der die Christenverfolgung des Diokletian noch verschärfte, starb 311. 312 besiegte Konstantin seinen Konkurrenten Maxentius und tolerierte danach die christliche Religion (313 Edikt von Mailand). Damit legte er den Grundstein für die Entwicklung des Christentums zur Staatsreligion. Als sein Mitregent Licinius 320 eine erneute Christenverfolgung begann, ließ ihn Konstantin 324 töten und regierte anschließend allein. Er veranlaßte den Bau der (ersten) Peterskirche in Rom, der Grabeskirche in Jerusalem, der Geburtskirche in Bethlehem und anderer Kirchen. Konstantin setzte auch den Sonntag als Feiertag fest und übertrug den Bischöfen richterliche Befugnisse. 325 berief er das erste Konzil von Nicäa ein und erklärte das Christentum zur Staatsreligion. Im Zuge einer Neuorganisation des Reiches verlegte er 330 den Regierungssitz von Rom nach Konstantinopel. Auf seinem Sterbebett wurde er von Bischof Eusebius getauft. Dabei soll er der Kirche große Ländereien geschenkt haben. Auf diese Schenkung berief sich die katholische Kirche noch im vergangenen Jahrhundert. Er starb am 22.5.337 in seinem Palast in Ankyron (heute Hereke bei Izmit).

The Church calls St Constantine (306-337) "the Equal of the Apostles," and historians call him "the Great." He was the son o the Caesar Constantius Chlorus (305-306), who governed the lands of Gaul and Britain. His mother was St Helen, a Christian of humble birth.

At this time the immense Roman Empire was divided into Western and Eastern halves, governed by two independent emperors and their corulers called "Caesars." Constantius Chlorus was Caesar in the Western Roman Empire. St Constantine was born in 274, possibly at Nish in Serbia. In 294, Constantius divorced Helen in order to further his political ambition by marrying a woman of noble rank. After he became emperor, Constantine showed his mother great honor and respect, granting her the imperial title "Augusta."

Constantine, the future ruler of all the whole Roman Empire, was raised to respect Christianity. His father did not persecute Christians in the lands he governed. This was at a time when Christians were persecuted throughout the Roman Empire by the emperors Diocletian (284-305) and his corulers Maximian Galerius (305-311) in the East, and the emperor Maximian Hercules (284-305) in the West.

After the death of Constantius Chlorus in 306, Constantine was acclaimed by the army at York as emperor of Gaul and Britain. The first act of the new emperor was to grant the freedom to practice Christianity in the lands subject to him. The pagan Maximian Galerius in the East and the fierce tyrant Maxentius in the West hated Constantine and they plotted to overthrow and kill him, but Constantine bested them in a series of battles, defeating his opponents with the help of God. He prayed to God to give him a sign which would inspire his army to fight valiantly, and the Lord showed him a radiant Sign of the Cross in the heavens with the inscription "In this Sign, conquer."

After Constantine became the sole ruler of the Western Roman Empire, he issued the Edict of Milan in 313 which guaranteed religious tolerance for Christians. St Helen, who was a Christian, may have influenced him in this decision. In 323, when he became the sole ruler of the entire Roman Empire, he extended the provisions of the Edict of Milan to the Eastern half of the Empire. After three hundred years of persecution, Christians could finally practice their faith without fear.

Renouncing paganism, the Emperor did not let his capital remain in ancient Rome, the former center of the pagan realm. He transferred his capital to the East, to the city of Byzantium, which was renamed Constantinople, the city of Constantine (May 11). Constantine was deeply convinced that only Christianity could unify the immense Roman Empire with its diverse peoples. He supported the Church in every way. He recalled Christian confessors from banishment, he built churches, and he showed concern for the clergy.

The emperor deeply revered the victory-bearing Sign of the Cross of the Lord, and also wanted to find the actual Cross upon which our Lord Jesus Christ was crucified. For this purpose he sent his own mother, the holy Empress Helen, to Jerusalem, granting her both power and money. Patriarch Macarius of Jerusalem and St Helen began the search, and through the will of God, the Life-Creating Cross was miraculously discovered in 326. (The account of the finding of the Cross of the Lord is found under the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, September 14). The Orthodox Church commemorates the Uncovering of the Precious Cross and the Precious Nails by the Holy Empress Helen on March 6.

While in Palestine, the holy empress did much of benefit for the Church. She ordered that all places connected with the earthly life of the Lord and His All-Pure Mother, should be freed of all traces of paganism, and she commanded that churches should be built at these places.

The emperor Constantine ordered a magnificent church in honor of Christ's Resurrection to be built over His tomb. St Helen gave the Life-Creating Cross to the Patriarch for safe-keeping, and took part of the Cross with her for the emperor. After distributing generous alms at Jerusalem and feeding the needy (at times she even served them herself), the holy Empress Helen returned to Constantinople, where she died in the year 327.

Because of her great services to the Church and her efforts in finding the Life-Creating Cross, the empress Helen is called "the Equal of the Apostles."

The peaceful state of the Christian Church was disturbed by quarrels, dissensions and heresies which had appeared within the Church. Already at the beginning of St Constantine's reign the heresies of the Donatists and the Novatians had arisen in the West. They demanded a second baptism for those who lapsed during the persecutions against Christians. These heresies, repudiated by two local Church councils, were finally condemned at the Council of Milan in 316.

Particularly ruinous for the Church was the rise of the Arian heresy in the East, which denied the Divine Nature of the Son of God, and taught that Jesus Christ was a mere creature. By order of the emperor, the First Ecumenical Council was convened in the city of Nicea in 325.

318 bishops attended this Council. Among its participants were confessor-bishops from the period of the persecutions and many other luminaries of the Church, among whom was St Nicholas of Myra in Lycia. (The account about the Council is found under May 29). The emperor was present at the sessions of the Council. The heresy of Arius was condemned and a Symbol of Faith (Creed) composed, in which was included the term "consubstantial with the Father," confirming the truth of the divinity of Jesus Christ, Who assumed human nature for the redemption of all the human race.

One might possibly be surprised by St Constantine's grasp of theological issues during the discussions at the Council. The term "consubstantial" was included in the Symbol of Faith at his insistence.

After the Council of Nicea, St Constantine continued with his active role in the welfare of the Church. He accepted holy Baptism on his deathbed, having prepared for it all his whole life. St Constantine died on the day of Pentecost in the year 337 and was buried in the church of the Holy Apostles, in a crypt he had prepared for himself.

Son of Constantius I Chlorus, junior emperor and St. Helena, Constantine was raised on the court of co-Emperor Diocletian. When his father died in 306, Constantine was declared junior emperor of York, England, by the local legions and earned a place as a ruler of the Empire by defeating of his main rivals at the battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312.

According to legend, he adopted the insignia of Christ, the chi-rho, and placed it upon his labarum - the military standards that held the banners his armies carried into battle to vanquish their pagan enemies. His purple banners were inscribed with the Latin for “In this sign conquer.” Constantine then shared rule of the Empire with Licinius Licinianus, exerting his considerable influence upon his colleague to secure the declaration of Christianity to be a free religion. When, however, Licinius and Constantine launched a persecution of the Christians, Constantine marched to the East and routed his opponent at the battle of Adrianople.

Constantine was the most dominating figure of his lifetime, towering over his contemporaries, including Pope Sylvester I. He presided over the Council of Nicaea, gave extensive grants of land and property to the Church, founded the Christian city of Constantinople to serve as his new capital, and undertook a long-sighted program of Christianization for the whole of the Roman Empire. While he was baptized a Christian only on his deathbed, Constantine nevertheless was a genuinely important figure in Christian history and was revered as a saint, especially in the Eastern Church.
Constantine's parents were the Emperor Constantius Chlorus and the Empress Helena. Chlorus had further children by another wife, but by Helena he had only the one, Constantine. Constantine fought two great battles when he came to the throne: one against Maxentius, a tyrant in Rome, and the other against Licinius not far from Byzantium. At the battle against Maxentius, when Constan-tine was in great anxiety and uncertainty about his chances of success, a shining cross, surrounded by stars, appeared to him in the sky in full daylight. On the cross were written the words: `In this sign, conquer!' The wondering Emperor ordered that a great cross be put together, like the one that had appeared, and be carried before the army. By the power of the Cross, he gained a glorious victory over enemies greatly superior in number. Maxentius drowned himself in the Tiber. Immediately after this, Constantine issued the famous Edict of Milan, in 313, to put an end to the persecution of Christians. Conquering Byzantium, he built a beautiful capital city on the Bosphorus, which from that time was named Constantinople.
At this time, Constantine fell ill with leprosy. The pagan priests and doctors advised him to bathe in the blood of slaughtered children, which he refused to do. Then the Apostles Peter and Paul appeared to him and told him to seek out a bishop, Sylvester, who would heal him of the disease. The bishop instructed him in the Christian faith and baptised him, and the leprosy vaniched from the Emperor's body.


When there was discord in the Church about the troublesome heretic Arius, the Emperor summoned the first Ecumenical Council in Nicaea, in 325, where the heresy was condemned and Orthodoxy confirmed.


St Helena, the Emperor's devout mother, was very zealous for the Christian faith. She visited Jerusalem and found the Precious Cross of the Lord, and built the Church of the Resurrection over Golgotha and many other churches in the Holy Land. This holy woman went to the Lord in 327, at the age of eighty. The Emperor Constantine outlived his mother by ten years and entered into rest at the age of about sixty in 337, in the city of Nicomedia. His body was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople.{Serbian}
356 St. Serapion the Sindonite (comes from garment of coarse linen he always wore) Egyptian monk part of the great birth of monasticism in the wilderness of Egypt noted for the absolute and unflinching severity of his ascetic practices.  He made a pilgrimage to Rome but returned to his hermitage. Serapion was part of the great birth of monasticism in the wilderness of Egypt.

Serapion the Sindonite (AC) Born in Egypt; Serapion's moniker, the Sindonite, comes from garment of coarse linen which he always wore. Like other desert monks, he led a life of extreme austerity. Though he traveled into several countries, he always lived in the same poverty, mortification, and recollection.

In one town, recognizing the spiritual blindness of comedian, he sold himself to the idolator for a small sum. His only sustenance in this servitude was bread and water. He accomplished every duty belonging to his servitude with the utmost diligence and fidelity, joining with his labor prayer. Having converted his master and the whole family to the faith, and induced him to quit the stage, Serapion was freed. His former master tried to return the sum he had paid, but Serapion refused it, even to distribute to the poor.

Soon after this Serapion sold himself a second time, to relieve a distressed widow. Having spent some time with his new master, in recompense of signal spiritual services, he was given his liberty, a cloak, a tunic, and a book of the Gospels.

He was scarcely out the door when he met a poor man to whom he gave his cloak. Shortly thereafter he gave his tunic to a man shivering in the cold. Thus he was again reduced to his single linen garment. A stranger asked who had stripped him and left him naked. Showing the man his book of the Gospels, he said: "This it is that hath stripped me." Not long after, he sold the book itself to relieve someone in extreme distress.

When an old acquaintance asked what had happened to the book, Serapion replied: "Could you believe it? This gospel seemed continually to cry to me: 'Go, sell all thou hast, and give it to the poor.' Wherefore I have also sold it and given the price to the indigent members of Christ." Having nothing left but his own person, he sold himself again on several other occasions, when the corporal or spiritual necessities of his neighbor called for relief. Once he became slave to a certain Manichee at Lacedaemon whom he served for two years. Again he brought the man and his whole family over to the true faith.

Saint Serapion went from Lacedaemon to Rome to study the most perfect models of virtue, but returned to Egypt where he died before Palladius visited in 388. Upon reading the story of Serapion, Saint John the Almsgiver called for his steward, and, weeping, said: "Can we flatter ourselves that we do anything great because we give our estates to the poor? Here is a man who could find means to give himself to them, and so many times over" (Benedictines, Husenbeth).
357 St. Secundus priest & Companions martyrs in Alexandria by Arians the intruded Arian patriarch George
Alexandríæ commemorátio sanctórum Mártyrum Secúndi Presbyteri, et aliórum; quos sacris diébus Pentecóstes, sub Constántio Imperatóre, Ariánus Epíscopus Geórgius sævíssime occídi præcépit.
    At Alexandria, the commemoration of the holy martyrs Secundus, a priest, and others, whom the Arian bishop George ordered to be barbarously slain during the holy days of Pentecost, under Emperor Constantius.
Egypt, who were put to death by the Arians during the bitter Arian controversy inthe Eastern Church. Secundus was a priest in the Church at Alexandria who was murdered by Arians along with most of his congregation.The Arians were zealous supporters of the usurper, George, patriarch of Alexandria, who was occupying the see during the exile of St. Athanasius.

Secundus and Companions MM (RM) Secundus, a priest of Alexandria, was martyred with many other clergy and laity, including many women, by the intruded Arian patriarch George.

Bishop George was supported in his occupation of the cathedra of Alexandria by the emperor Constantius, who drove the rightful prelate, Athanasius, into exile. These are probably the same as the "Martyrs of Egypt" above (Benedictines).
357 Martyrs of Egypt "At Alexandria, the memory of the holy bishops and priests who were sent into exile by the Arians, and merited to be joined to the holy confessors" (RM)
Alexandríæ commemorátio sanctórum Episcopórum et Presbyterórum; qui, ab Ariánis exsílio relegáti, sanctis Confessóribus sociári meruérunt.
    At Alexandria, the commemoration of the saintly bishops and priests, who were banished by the Arians, and merited to be numbered among the holy confessors.
Eódem die sanctórum Mártyrum Synésii et Theopómpi.    The same day, the holy martyrs Synesius and Theopompus.

The Roman Martyrology reads "At Alexandria, the memory of the holy bishops and priests who were sent into exile by the Arians, and merited to be joined to the holy confessors" (Benedictines).
6th v. St. Barrfoin Irish missionary journeyed to spread the faith reported his adventures on a voyage to the Americas to St. Brendan the Navigator 6th century
1. Saint Barrid tells of his visit to the Island of Paradise, which prompts Brendan to go in search of the isle.

possibly a bishop, and friend of Sts. Columba and Brendan. Barrfoin took charge of a church founded by St. Columba in Drum Cullen, Offaly. He lived at Killbarron. He also journeyed to spread the faith.
Barrfoin reported his adventures on a voyage to the Americas to St. Brendan the Navigator.

Barrfoin of Killbarron, Hermit (AC) (also known as Bairrfhionn, Barrindus) 6th century. Few details are certain about the life of Saint Barrfoin. Saint Columba is said to have put Barrfoin in charge of the church he founded at Drum Cullen Offaly. Afterwards, Barrfoin lived at Killbarron, near Ballyshannon, in Donegal.

He may have reached America on one of his missions by sea, and informed Saint Brendan of his discovery. Some say that he was a bishop (Benedictines).


In the calendar of early British saints we commemorate St Barrfoin the Missionary (6th C). From celt-saints:

St. Barrfoin of Killbarron, Hermit (also Bairrfhionn, Barrindus) 6th century. Few details are certain about the life of Saint Barrfoin. Saint Columba is said to have put Barrfoin in charge of the church he founded at Drum Cullen Offaly. Afterwards, Barrfoin lived at Killbarron, near Ballyshannon, in Donegal. He may have reached America on one of his missions by sea, and informed Saint Brendan of his discovery. Some say that he was a bishop (Benedictines).

Troparion of St Barrfoin Tone 3

O holy Barrfoin, Christ’s missionary voyager/ like thy contemporary Saint Brendan:/ pray that we may have courage/ to venture for Christ, at His call,/ that we may receive His great mercy.

681 Hospitius of Cap-Saint-Hospice Hermit blessed with the gifts of prophecy and miracle (RM)
Níciæ, apud Varum flúvium, sancti Hospítii Confessóris, abstinéntiæ virtúte ac prophetíæ spíritu insígnis.
    At Nice in France, St. Hospitius, confessor, distinguished by the virtue of abstinence and the spirit of prophecy.

Died c. 580 (or 681?). The hermit Saint Hospitius lived at a place now named after him: Cap-Saint-Hospice, between Villefranca and Banlieu. He girded himself with an iron chain, lived only on bread and dates, and was blessed with the gifts of prophecy and miracles.
His relics were translated to Lérins on May 21, the day on which his feast is now celebrated.
Saint Gregory of Tours includes Hospitius in his writings (Benedictines, Husenbeth).

7th v. St. Gollen 7th century Welsh saint
also listed as Collen or Colan. He gave his name to Llangollen, in Clwyd, Wales, and he is associated in legend with Glastonbury, England, and Rome.

Gollen (Collen, Colan) of Denbighshire (AC) 7th century. In legend Saint Gollen's name is connected with Wales, Glastonbury, and Rome. A 16th-century vita in Welsh survives, but its historicity is questionable. This account has Gollen fight a duel with a pagan Saracen in the presence of the pope, go to Cornwall and Glastonbury, and deliver the people in the valley of Llangollen by killing a fierce giantess. Gollen gave his name to Llangollen (Clwyd) in Denbighshire, the church of Colan in Cornwall, and, perhaps, founded that of Langolen in Finistère in Brittany (Benedictines, Farmer).

800 Isberga (Itisberga) of Aire reputed sister of Charlemagne a nun at Aira in the Artois OSB B (AC)

Isberga, reputed sister of Charlemagne, was a nun at Aire (Aria) in the Artois, of which she is the patroness (Benedictines).

888 St. Ansuinus Martyr companion of St. Ageranus Benedictine monk

Ansuinus remained in the Bleze, Côte-d'Or, in France, when the Normans invaded. Ageranus, Ansuinus, four other monks, and a young lad named Adalric were slain defending the altars.

Ageranus of Beze, OSB M (PC) (also known as Ayran, Ayrman)
Died 888. Ageranus was a monk of Bèze in the Côte d'Or. When the Normans invaded Burgundy (886-889) most of the monks escaped, but Ageranus remained with four other monks-- Genesius, Berard, Rodron, and Sifiard--the boy Adalaric and the priest Ansuinus. All were massacred by the invaders (Benedictines).

1001 St. Theobald of Vienne Archbishop supporter of monastic renewal, he defended the Church from royal interference

of Vienne, France, from 970 until his death. A staunch supporter of monastic renewal, he defended the Church from royal interference.
Theobald (Thibaud) of Vienne B (AC) cultus confirmed 1903. Thibaud was archbishop of Vienne, France, from 970 to 1001 (Benedictines).

1170 ST GODRIC endowed with extraordinary powers—notably with the gifts of prophecy and a knowledge of distant events. He foretold the death of Bishop William of Durham, and the exile, return and martyrdom of St Thomas Becket, whom he had never seen. He often beheld scenes that were being enacted far away, breaking off a conversation to pray for vessels in imminent danger of shipwreck. He also knew beforehand the date of his own death which occurred on May 21, 1170, after he had spent some sixty years in his hermitage. At a later period there was built at Finchale a monastery, the ruins of which survive. St Godric is the co-titular of a Catholic church in Durham.
ST GODRIC was born of very poor parents at Walpole in Norfolk, and in his youth earned a living by peddling in the neighbouring villages. As he improved his stock he was able to go farther afield to the great fairs and cities. Then the spirit of adventure seized him, and he took to a seafaring life which he pursued for sixteen years. He made voyages to Scotland, Flanders and Scandinavia, and probably traded in the ports he visited, for he was able to purchase a half-share in one merchant vessel and a quarter-share in another. The life was a rough one with many temptations, and one chronicler refers to him as a pirate but on a visit which he paid to Lindisfarne he was deeply impressed by the account given him of the life of St Cuthbert, whom he ever afterwards regarded with special veneration. He undertook a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, which had lately been captured by the Crusaders, and on the homeward journey he visited Compostela.* [* For the service rendered by “Gudericus pirata de regno Angliae” to King Baldwin I of Jerusalem, see S. Runciman, History of the Crusades, vol. ii (1953), p. 79 (Albert of Aix, Chronicon, ix).]
After his return to England he became house-steward to a wealthy Norfolk landowner, but the retainers plundered the poorer neighbours unmercifully and Godric gave up the post, partly because he could not induce the master to cheek this pillaging, partly because he himself had—knowingly or unknowingly—partaken of the booty. He then set out on two more pilgrimages, the one to the shrine of St Giles in Provence and the other to Rome in the company of his mother who, we are told, made the whole journey barefoot.
We hear of him next in Cumberland, where he acquired a psalter, which he learnt by heart and which became his most treasured possession. Having made his way eastward into the wilds of Durham, he fell in at Wolsingham with a recluse called Aelric. Godric was permitted to join this aged hermit, in whose company he spent two happy and fruitful years. Then Aelric died, and Godric made a second pilgrimage to Jerusalem. It was the last of his foreign journeys, for St Cuthbert in a vision had promised him a hermitage in England. After a sojourn at Eskdale and another in Durham, where he acted for a time as sacristan, he discovered the place of his dream in the midst of Bishop Flambard’s hunting-park on the river Wear, three miles from Durham. There, at Finchale, in a forest which teemed with big and small game, he spent the remaining years of his life, practising mortifications which would have killed any but a very robust man. Shy creatures such as stags, hares and birds were not afraid of him, nor did he fear wolves or snakes. All wild animals were his friends, disporting themselves in his company and fleeing to him from danger. He constructed first a wattle oratory and then a little church. As far as possible he lived in silence and seclusion, but he was under the direction of the prior of Durham who, besides supplying him with a priest to say Mass in his chapel, would often send strangers to be edified by his conversation. Among his visitors were St Aelred and St Robert of Newminster, and a monk called Reginald, who obtained from him, though with difficulty, the story of his early years and wrote a biography which is still extant.
St Godric was endowed with extraordinary powers—notably with the gifts of prophecy and a knowledge of distant events. He foretold the death of Bishop William of Durham, and the exile, return and martyrdom of St Thomas Becket, whom he had never seen. He often beheld scenes that were being enacted far away, breaking off a conversation to pray for vessels in imminent danger of shipwreck. He also knew beforehand the date of his own death which occurred on May 21, 1170, after he had spent some sixty years in his hermitage. At a later period there was built at Finchale a monastery, the ruins of which survive. St Godric is the co-titular of a Catholic church in Durham.
The monk Reginald records not only the words but also the airs of four sacred songs, which he took down from the hermit’s lips. Godric claimed that they had been taught him in visions, of our Lady, of his dead sister, and of others. They are in any case of great interest as being the oldest pieces of English verse of which the musical setting has survived, and among the oldest to show rhyme and measure instead of alliteration.
We have two distinct accounts of St Godric, one written by Reginald of Durham who had visited the hermit. This, which is preserved in different recensions, was printed by the Surtees Society in 1845, edited by Fr J. Stevenson. The second, by Galfrid, is also the work of one who had himself seen him, and who had before him the memoir of Prior German who had been St Godric’s confessor. This is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. v. See also DNB., vol. xxii, pp. 47—49; and for the songs, J. B. Trend in Music and Letters, vol. ix, pp. 111—128. There is a delightful essay on St Godric in Fr J. Brodrick’s Procession of Saints (1949) and cf. K. M. Wilson, The Lost Literature of Medieval England (1952).
1129 Princes Constantine and sons Michael and Theodore spreading Christian Faith among the pagans of Murom
They lived during the eleventh-twelfth centuries. Prince Constantine, a descendant of St Vladimir, asked his father, Prince Svyatoslav of Chernigov, to give him the city of Murom, which was inhabited by pagans, so he might enlighten this land with the light of the Christian Faith.

The prince sent his son Michael as emissary to the Murom people, but the pagans murdered him. When Prince Constantine arrived in the city with his retinue, the people quieted down and accepted him, but for a long time they would not give up paganism.

Once, they went to the prince's home, intending to kill him, but the prince came out to the crowd holding the Murom Icon of the Mother of God. The mutinous people unexpectedly quieted down and agreed to accept holy Baptism at the River Oka.

At the place of the murder of his son Michael, St Constantine built a church in honor of the Annunciation, and later on another church named for the holy Passion-Bearers Boris and Gleb. Prince Constantine zealously assisted his son, Prince Theodore in spreading the Christian Faith among the people of Murom.

St Constantine died in 1129, and was buried in the church of the Annunciation beside his sons, Sts Michael and Theodore.

1252 Hermann Josef;  Er wurde Priester und war als beliebter Prediger und Seelsorger besonders in Frauenklöstern im Rheinland tätig
Katholische Kirche: 21. Mai

Hermann wurde im 12. Jahrhundert in Köln geboren. Mit 12 Jahren trat er in das Prämonstratenserkloster Steinfeld ein. Er wurde Priester und war als beliebter Prediger und Seelsorger besonders in Frauenklöstern im Rheinland tätig. Grundlage seiner Beliebtheit war wohl seine große Marienverehrung. Er hatte zahlreiche mystische Offenbarungen, die er aber zunächst geheim hielt. Seine mystische Vermählung mit Maria führte zu seinem Beinamen Joseph. Aus seinem mystischen Erlebnissen entstanden zahlreiche Hymnen an Maria und das Herz Jesu. Hermann starb auf einer Seelsorgereise im Zisterzienserinnenkloster Hoven bei Bonn. Als Todesjahr werden 1241 und 1252 genannt. Als Sterbetag wird der 7.4. überliefert. An diesem Tag wurde er deshalb auch früher gefeiert.

1262 Sainted Kirill (Cyril), Bishop of Rostov chosen hierarchical seat whilst hegumen of the Vladimir Nativity monastery left a series of writings
He administered the Rostov diocese from 1231 to 1262. The chronicler of his time relates, that to hear the preachings of Saint Kirill people gathered not only from Rostov, but they came even from surrounding cities. The Ordynsk prince Peter accepted Christianity under the influence of his preaching.
Saint Kirill has left a series of writings -- "About the Fear of God", "About the Heavenly Powers", "About Evil Spirits", "About Publicans", and many others. Sainted Kirill died on 21 May 1262.

1289 Blessed Benvenutus of Recanati Franciscan lay brother favored with ecstasies and visions OFM AC
1289 BD BENVENUTO OF RECANATI
FEW incidents marked the life of Bd Benvenuto Mareni. He was born at Recanati, a hill-town in the Marches of Ancona at a short distance from Loreto, and entered as a lay-brother amongst the Franciscan Conventuals of his native city. He was remarkable for his piety and for his humility, which made him always desirous of the lowliest offices. Often during Mass, and especially when he had received holy communion, he would fall into an ecstasy, his body at such times appearing to be completely insensible. From one of these trances he awoke to realize that it was long past the hour for him to begin to prepare the brethren’s meal. Hastily he made his way to the kitchen, where he was greeted by an angelic deputy who had been doing his work. All who partook of the repast that day agreed that they had never tasted better food. Bd Benvenuto had many other supernatural experiences and was, it is said, once permitted to hold the Infant Saviour in his arms.
The saintly friar died on May 5, 1289. Pope Pius VII confirmed his cultus
In the account which Fr Léon, Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp. 175—176, gives of this beatus he remarks that the annalists of the order have left few details of his life. This observation seems to be thoroughly borne out by an inspection of such chroniclers as Mazzara or Mark of Lisbon.
Born at Recanati (near Loreto), Italy; cultus confirmed by Pope Pius VII. Scion of the Mareni family, Benvenutus joined the Franciscans as a lay brother and was mostly employed in the kitchen, where he was constantly favored with ecstasies and visions (Benedictines).
1521 Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God Celebration of delivered Moscow from Tatars invasion
Established to commemorate the deliverance of Moscow from an invasion of Tatars led by Khan Makhmet-Girei in 1521. The Tatar hordes approached Moscow, burning and destroying Russian cities and villages, and exterminating their inhabitants.

Great Prince Basil raised an army against the Tatars, while Metropolitan Barlaam and the people of Moscow prayed fervently for deliverance. At this time a certain pious blind nun had a vision. She saw Moscow's bishop-saints exiting from the Savior gates of the Kremlin, forsaking the city and taking with them the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God, the holiest object in the city of Moscow. This was God's chastisement for the sins of its inhabitants.

At the Savior gates the holy hierarchs were met by Sts Sergius of Radonezh (Sept. 25) and Barlaam of Khutyn (Nov. 6), tearfully imploring them not to leave Moscow. All of them offered intense prayer to the Lord for the forgivness of their transgressions and the deliverance of Moscow from its enemies. After this prayer the bishop-saints returned to the Kremlin, and they carried back the holy Vladimir Icon.

St Basil the Blessed (August 2) saw a similar vision. It was revealed to him that Moscow would be saved, through the intercession of the Theotokos and the prayers of the saints. The Tatar Khan also had a vision of the Mother of God with a fearsome host, contending against his forces. The Tatars fled in fear, and the capital of the Russian realm was saved.

The Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God is also commemorated on June 23 and August 26.

1577 Blessed Catherine of Cardona hermit for 20 years Carmelite V (PC)
Born in Naples, Italy, 1519; Catherine was born in Italy of a noble Spanish family. She lived for a time at the court of Philip II of Spain. Then she retired near Roda in southern Spain to live as a hermit for 20 years until she was received into a Carmelite convent, where, however, she continued to live as an anchoress. Saint Teresa of Avila speaks very highly of her (Benedictines).

1584 Agapit of Makrushevsk  MonkMartyr founder of the Makrushevsk Nikolaev monastery healed by a vision from Saint Nicholas icon
Companion of the Monk Longin of Koryazhemsk. At one point at the Sol'vychegodsk Borisoglebsk monastery, during a time of illness he was granted a vision from an icon of Saint Nicholas, through whom he was healed. Setting out to the place indicated in the vision, he at first built there a chapel, and when a monastery formed, in 1578 he erected two churches -- the one in name of Saint Nicholas and the other in honour of the Annunciation of the Most Holy Mother of God. The local inhabitants wanted to eradicate the monastery. They murdered the Monk Agapit on 21 May 1584 and threw his body in a river. But the monks found the body and gave it burial betwixt the temples, building at the place of burial a chapel, and at the crypt they put the chains of the saint. Afterwards the relics were transferred and placed beneathe a crypt in the monastery church. In the year 1712 the Kholmogorsk bishop Varnav (Barnabas) gave blessing to the brethren to gather together an account about the life of the Monk Agapit and about the miracles from the Velikoretsk Icon. And with his blessing, in 1715 was written the Vita-Life of the MonkMartyr Agapit.

1657 Andrew Bobola Polish aristocrat who joined the Jesuits kindness to plague dying and care for the dead martyred incorrupt after 150 years a specially remarkable circumstance in view of the respect for this phenomenon popularly shown among the dissident Orthodox. And the doctors were able to confirm the horrible details of his deathSJ M (RM)
1657 ST ANDREW BOBOLA, MARTYR
ST ANDREW BOBOLA came of an aristocratic Polish family and was born in the palatinate of Sandomir in 1591. He entered in 1609 the Jesuit noviciate at Vilna in Lithuania, which had become united with Poland in 1391 through the marriage of Queen Hedwig with Duke Jagiello. After he had been raised to the priesthood, Andrew was appointed preacher in the church of St Casimir at Vilna, where his apostolic zeal made a great impression upon the people. At a later date he was chosen superior of the Jesuit house at Bobrinsk and, during his term of office, distinguished himself by his devotion to the sick and dying when a terrible epidemic was raging.
As soon as he was relieved of his charge, he resumed the missionary career which he had pursued for more than twenty years, travelling the country and bringing whole villages of separated Orthodox back to communion with the Holy See, besides converting numerous lax Catholics. His success brought upon him hatred and opposition. One form of petty persecution he found particularly trying. For several years, whenever he entered a village with a sufficiently large anti-Catholic population, he was met by an organized band of children who, in accordance with instructions from their elders, followed him about, hurling abusive epithets at him and trying to shout him down. He never lost patience with them, nor was he daunted or discouraged by threats or opposition. Poland at this time had become the scene of a sanguinary conflict in which the revolted Cossacks took a prominent part. The Jesuit missionaries were driven from their churches and colleges by these relentless foes, and they took refuge in a district of swamps, lakes and marshland formed by branches of the Pripet and Berezina and known as Podlesia. Thither Prince Radziwill invited the Jesuits, to whom he offered one of his residences at Pinsk in 1652. St Andrew accepted the invitation although he fully anticipated the fate that was in store for him.
In May 1657 some Cossacks made a sudden attack on Pinsk. Father Bobola was seized near Janow, and made to run back thither at the heels of a Cossack’s horse. He was invited to abjure Catholicism, and on his refusal was mercilessly beaten. He was then interrogated, and his firm answers so infuriated the officer that he slashed at him with his sword and nearly severed one of the priest’s hands. He was then put to a slow death with the most revolting barbarity. In the public slaughterhouse he was stripped of his clothes, scorched all over like a dead pig, half flayed, his nose and lips cutoff, and his tongue torn out through his neck with pincers. His prayers to Christ and His mother seemed only to increase his tormentors’ savagery. At last his head was struck off, and the mutilated body cast on a dungheap.
When the remains of St. Andrew Bobola were medically examined in 1730 they were found inexplicably incorrupt—a specially remarkable circumstance in view of the respect for this phenomenon popularly shown among the dissident Orthodox. And the doctors were able to confirm the horrible details of his death. He was canonized in 1938.

See L. Rocci, Vita del B. Andrea Bobola (1924) H. Beylard, Vie…de St André Bobola (1938); Fr Thurston in Studies, September 1938, pp. 381—393; and the life by Mareschini, adapted into English by L. J. Gallagher and P. V. Donovan (Boston, 1939).  The extraordinary history of the conveyance to Rome in 1922 of the body of the saint, which had been carried off to Moscow by the bolsheviks, is told by Fr L. J. Gallagher in The Month, February, 1924.

Born in Sandomir, Poland, 1592; died at Janov, Lithuania, on May 10, 1657; beatified 1853; canonized 1938; feast day formerly May 16.

Andrew Bobola was a Polish aristocrat who joined the Jesuits in 1611 when he was 20. At first he worked as a parish priest at St. Casimir's Church in Vilna, Lithuania, but in 1630 he was made superior of the Jesuit house at Bobrinsk (Bobruysk) just as a dreadful plague broke out there. Andrew's kindness to the dying and his care for the dead, in spite of the great personal danger of catching the disease, impressed many.

In 1636, this brave soul set out as a missionary, travelling in Lithuania for more than 20 years. He spent his whole life reconciling Orthodox Christians with the Holy See, sometimes converting whole villages. He was so successful at converting men and women that his enemies called him Duszochwat (the "thief of souls"). Such success, of course, attracted opposition. For Bobola this took the forms of bands of children who followed him and tried to drown his words with their shouts.

Deep religious divisions were in those days made worse by intolerance and by marauding Russians, Cossacks, and Tartars who continually raided Poland and tormented the Christians there. Because of these raids, the Jesuits were forced into hiding in the marshes of Podlesia. Beginning in 1652 and continuing for five years, Andrew Bobola ran a house in Janov near Pinsk provided by Prince Radziwell, where fleeing Jesuits could be sheltered.

In 1657, he was captured in a Cossack raid on the city, tortured, partially flayed alive, and then killed by the sword. His beheaded, mutilated body was buried at Pinsk. In 1808, it was translated to Polotsk, where it was found to be incorrupt. His relics were later removed first to Moscow by Bolsheviks, then to Rome in 1922. The can now be found in the Jesuit church in Warsaw (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Farmer).

1730 Pachomius Our Holy Father the Martyr Many miracles were wrought by his blood and his relics, his body being buried on the island of Patmos in the Church of St John the Theologian
Born in Little Russia, he was taken by the Tartars as a boy and sold to a Turkish tanner as a slave. He spent twenty-seven years in slavery in Usaki in Asia Minor, and was forced to embrace Islam. He went off to the Holy Mountain, became a monk and spent twelve years near the monastery of St Paul. He resolved to suffer for Christ. His spiritual elder, Joseph, sent him off to Usaki, where he showed himself to his former owner as a Christian, wearing his monastic habit. The Turks gave him over to torture, then threw him into prison and finally beheaded him on May 8th, 1730, on Ascension Day. Many miracles were wrought by his blood and his relics, his body being buried on the island of Patmos in the Church of St John the Theologian. 
Thus this villager from Little Russia became a martyr and wears the wreath in the Kingdom of Christ.
1740 Theophilus of Corte priest taught theology OFM famous missioner throughout Italy Corsica zealous worker for revival of Franciscan observance (RM)
1740 St. Theophilus of Corte Franciscan reformer. Born Biagio Arrighi at Corte, Corsica, Italy ordained at Naples, taught at Civitella, and then embarked upon a mission to promote the faith in Corsica and Italy
Ficécli, in Etrúria, sancti Theóphili a Curte, Confessóris, Sacerdótis Ordinis Fratrum Minórum, sacrórum recéssum propagatóris, quem Pius Papa Undécimus inter Sanctos rétulit.
    At Fucecchio in Etruria, St. Theophilus of Curte, confessor and priest of the Order of Friars Minor, who was canonized by Pope Pius XI.

1740 ST THEOPHILUS OF CORTE The influence exerted by his eloquent words was enhanced by the holiness of his life and by miracles. At Civitella, of which he became guardian, he won the love and veneration of the whole community

THE little town of Corte in Corsica was the birthplace of this Theophilus, or, to give him his baptismal and family names, Blasius de’ Signori. He was the only child of aristocratic parents who fostered, up to a certain point, the boy’s early piety. They encouraged him to invite his schoolfellows on Sundays to his home, where he would say prayers with them and repeat the morning’s sermon. But when, at the age of fifteen, he ran away to enter a Capuchin monastery, he was not permitted to remain there. Nevertheless, as he continued to show a marked vocation for the religious life, his father and mother allowed him two years later to take the Fran­ciscan habit in his native town. After studying philosophy and theology at Cope, in Rome and at Naples he was ordained in 1700. In the retreat-house of Civitella, to which he was appointed lector in theology, he formed an intimate friendship with Bd Thomas of Cori in 1705, while still at Civitella, he was chosen for mission preaching and, overcoming a natural shrinking from publicity, he went forth as an evangelist among the people.

At once it became evident that St Theophilus had great oratorical gifts, which enabled him to touch the hearts not only of careless Christians but also of hardened sinners. The influence exerted by his eloquent words was enhanced by the holiness of his life and by miracles. At Civitella, of which he became guardian, he won the love and veneration of the whole community. In 1730 his superiors sent him back to Corsica in order that he might form one or more houses there on the lines of Civitella. He found himself confronted by many difficulties, but he succeeded in establishing a retreat at Luani, where the rule of Civitella was followed in all its poverty and austerity. Four years later he was recalled to Italy to do similar work in Tuscany, and at Fucecchio, some twenty English miles from Florence, he made his second foundation. That same year he was summoned to Rome to give evidence for the beatification of Thomas of Cori. So great was the impression he then made upon the bishop of Nicotera, who was in charge of the case, that the prelate afterwards exclaimed, “I have been questioning one saint about another saint”.

Theophilus died at Fucecchio on May 20, 1740. As his body lay awaiting burial in the church, immense crowds gathered round to venerate it.  They kissed his hands and feet and tore so many pieces from his clothing that it became necessary to dress the body in a new habit. St Theophilus was canonized in 1930.

The brief of beatification, which includes a biographical summary, may be read in the Analecta Ecclesiastica. vol. iv (1806) no. 57. There is an excellent account in French by the Abbé Abeau, Vie du B. Théophile de Cone (1896)—it runs to more than 400 pages—and an almost equally lengthy Italian life, in which the archives of the Franciscans of the Obser­vance have been utilized, by Father Dominichelli, Vita del B. Teofilo do Corte (1896). Another full life in Italian is by A. M. Paiotti (1930), and there is a shorter account by M. P. Anglade, Une page d’histoire franciscaine (1931).

May 19, 2010 St. Theophilus of Corte (1676-1740) 
If we expect saints to do marvelous things continually and to leave us many memorable quotes, we are bound to be disappointed with St. Theophilus. The mystery of God's grace in a person's life, however, has a beauty all its own.

Theophilus was born in Corsica of rich and noble parents. As a young man he entered the Franciscans and soon showed his love for solitude and prayer. After admirably completing his studies, he was ordained and assigned to a retreat house near Subiaco. Inspired by the austere life of the Franciscans there, he founded other such houses in Corsica and Tuscany. Over the years, he became famous for his preaching as well as his missionary efforts.

Though he was always somewhat sickly, Theophilus generously served the needs of God's people in the confessional, in the sickroom and at the graveside. Worn out by his labors, he died on June 17, 1740. He was canonized in 1930.

Comment: There is a certain dynamism in all the saints that prompts them to find ever more selfless ways of responding to God's grace. As time went on, Theophilus gave more and more singlehearted service to God and to God's sons and daughters. Honoring the saints will make no sense unless we are thus drawn to live as generously as they did. Their holiness can never substitute for our own.  Quote: Francis used to say, "Let us begin, brothers, to serve the Lord God, for up to now we have made little or no progress" (1 Celano, #193).
He entered the Franciscans and took the name Theophilus in 1693. He was ordained at Naples, taught at Civitella, and then embarked upon a mission to promote the faith in Corsica and Italy while encouraging his fellow Franciscans to observe with zeal the rules of the order. He was canonized in 1930.
Born in Corte, Corsica, 1676; canonized in 1930; feast day formerly May 19. Biagio Arrighi joined the Franciscans in 1693 and took the name Theophilus. He was ordained priest at Naples and taught theology at Civitella in the Roman Campagna. Later, Theophilus was a famous missioner throughout Italy and Corsica and a zealous worker for the revival of Franciscan observance (Benedictines).
1750 Crispin (patron of cobblers) of Viterbo the admirable quaestor (the brother who requests alms) taught basics of the catechism, then noted for his prophecies, his miracles of multiplication of food, and his wise sayings, some of which have been preserved. OFM Cap. (AC)
1750 BD CRISPIN OF VITERBO
THE Romans have a great devotion to Bd Crispin of Viterbo, whose relics rest under a side altar in the church of the Immaculate Conception in the City. At an early date he learnt from his mother the deep veneration to our Blessed Lady which characterized him throughout his life. After he had received a little schooling at the Jesuit College, Peter—as he was named in baptism—served his apprenticeship with an uncle, from whom he learnt the trade of a shoemaker. The Franciscan Order attracted him greatly, and when he was about twenty-five he obtained admission to the Capuchin convent at Viterbo, choosing the name of Crispin because of his trade. In the novice house at Paranzana the father guardian hesitated to receive him because he looked so delicate and was diminutive in stature; but the minister provincial, who had previously admitted him, overruled all objections. As it turned out, Brother Crispin proved equal to the heaviest tasks, and loved to call himself the Capuchin ass, deeming himself unfit to be regarded as anything more than a beast of burden. At Viterbo he dug the garden and acted as cook, and at Tolfa, where he was infirmarian during an epidemic, he effected some wonderful cures.
A short residence in Rome was followed by a stay at Albano and another at Bracciano, where he again nursed the sick during an epidemic and seems to have healed many of them miraculously. At Orvieto, where he was questor—charged with soliciting alms—he was so greatly beloved that the citizens were determined to keep him. When the time came for his departure the housewives with one consent decided to close their doors to his successor, and as the convent depended on the charity of the faithful, the guardian was compelled to re-appoint Brother Crispin rather than allow the brethren to starve. The holy friar’s last years, however, were spent in Rome. He was then noted for his prophecies, his miracles of multiplication of food, and his wise sayings, some of which have been preserved. He died in his eighty-second year on May 19, 1750, and was beatified in 1806.

There is an anonymous Vita del B. Crispino da Viterbo printed at the time of the beatification, and there have been many others since, notably two in French, by Ildephonsus de Bard (1889) and by Pie de Langogne (1901), and two in Italian, by P. Pacilli (1908) and by Paolo di Campello (1923). See also Léon, Auréole Séraphique
(Eng. trans.), vol. ii, pp. 280—285.

(also known as Peter Fioretti) Born in Viterbo, Italy, November 13, 1668; died at Rome on May 19, 1750; beatified in 1806; canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1982; feast day was May 23. Small, fragile Peter Fioretti was an apprentice shoemaker under his uncle's tutelage when he heard God's call to the religious life. Although joined the Capuchins at Orvieto about 1693 and took the name Crispin (patron of cobblers), he bore a resemblance to Blessed Benvenutus in that he too worked in the kitchen as a lay brother. His services in the kitchen, garden, and infirmary were used at the friaries of Viterbo, Tolfa, Bracciano, Rome, and Albano. He loved to call himself "the little beast of burden of the Capuchins."

For many years at Orvieto he was the admirable quaestor (the brother who requests alms). Those contacts allowed him to listen and help the unhappy, despairing, and discouraged. He was always joyful and so well liked that when another brother was appointed as quaestor in his place, the housewives refused to receive him or support his community. The guardian was thus obliged to restore Crispin to that role. In addition to counselling the townsfolk, Crispin taught the basics of the catechism to them and the peasants in the nearby mountains.

During his canonization, Pope John Paul II praised Crispin as a "humble brother without any history, who simply accomplished his mission and understood the true value of our earthly pilgrimage" (Benedictines, Farmer).
1861 St. Eugene de Mazenod founded Oblates of Mary Immaculate Patron saint of dysfunctional families

Eugene de Mazenod was born on August 1, 1782, at Aix-en-Provence in France. Early in life he experienced the upheaval of the French Revolution. None the less, he entered the seminary, and following ordination he returned to labor in Aix-en-Provence. That area had suffered greatly during the Revolution and was not really a safe place for a priest. Eugene directed his ministry toward the poorest of the poor. Others joined his labors, and became the nucleus of a religious community, the Missionaries of Provence. Later Eugene was named Bishop of Marseille. There he built churches, founded parishes, cared for his priests, and developed catechetics for the young. Later he founded the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, and in 1841 the Oblates sailed for missions in five continents.
Pius XI said, "the Oblates are the specialists of difficult missions." After a life dedicated to spreading the Good News, Eugene died on May 21, 1861. He was beatified by Pope Paul VI in 1975.

1915-192St. Cristóbal Magallanes and Companions:  These martyrs did not die as a single group but in eight Mexican states, with Jalisco and Zacatecas having the largest number. They were beatified in 1992 and canonized eight years later.
   
Like Blessed Miguel Agustín Pro, S.J., Cristóbal and his 24 companion martyrs lived under a very anti-Catholic government in Mexico, one determined to weaken the Catholic faith of its people. Churches, schools and seminaries were closed; foreign clergy were expelled. Cristóbal established a clandestine seminary at Totatiche, Jalisco. Magallanes and the other priests were forced to minister secretly to Catholics during the presidency of Plutarco Calles (1924-28).

All of these martyrs except three were diocesan priests. David, Manuel and Salvador were laymen who died with their parish priest, Luis Batis. All of these martyrs belonged to the Cristero movement, pledging their allegiance to Christ and to the Church that he established to spread the Good News in society—even if Mexico's leaders once made it a crime to receive Baptism or celebrate the Mass.

Comment:  Every martyr realizes how to avoid execution but refuses to pay the high price of doing so. A clear conscience was more valuable than a long life. We may be tempted to compromise our faith while telling ourselves that we are simply being realistic, dealing with situations as we find them. Is survival really the ultimate value? Do our concrete, daily choices reflect our deepest values, the ones that allow us to “tick” the way we do? Anyone can imagine situations in which being a follower of Jesus is easier than the present situation. Saints remind us that our daily choices, especially in adverse circumstances, form the pattern of our lives.
Quote: During his homily at the canonization Mass on May 21, 2000, Pope John Paul II addressed the Mexican men, women and children present in Rome and said: “After the harsh trials that the Church endured in Mexico during those turbulent years , today Mexican Christians, encouraged by the witness of these witnesses to the faith, can live in peace and harmony, contribute the wealth of gospel values to society. The Church grows and advances, since she is the crucible in which many priestly and religious vocations are born, where families are formed according to God's plan, and where young people, a substantial part of the Mexican population, can grow with the hope of a better future. May the shining example of Cristóbal Magallanes and his companion martyrs help you to make a renewed commitment of fidelity to God, which can continue to transform Mexican society so that justice, fraternity and harmony will prevail among all.”

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR MAY
Christians in Africa.
That Christians in Africa, in imitation of the Merciful Jesus,
may give prophetic witness to reconciliation, justice, and peace.


ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
  RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

Sixth Sunday of Easter

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest
and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
 
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
Saints and Popes Mentioned on May 01
600 BC Jeremiah,The Holy Prophet  one of the four great Old Testament prophets     In Egypt, St. Jeremias, prophet, who was stoned to death by the people at Taphnas, where he was buried.  St. Epiphanius tells that the faithful were accustomed to pray at his grave, and to take away from it dust to heal those who were stung by serpents.
Son of the priest Helkiah from the city of Anathoth near Jerusalem.  He lived 600 years before the Birth of Christ, under the Israelite king Josiah and four of his successors. He was called to prophetic service at the age of fifteen, when the Lord revealed to him that even before his birth the Lord had chosen him to be a prophet. Jeremiah refused, citing his youth and lack of skill at speaking, but the Lord promised to be always with him and to watch over him.
He touched the mouth of the chosen one and said, "Behold, I have put My words into your mouth. Behold, I have appointed you this day over nations and kingdoms, to root out and to pull down, to destroy and to rebuild, and to plant" (Jer. 1:9-10).
When Jeremiah prophesied that the King of Babylon would invade Egypt and annihilate the Jews living there, the Jews murdered him.  In that very same year the saint's prophecy was fulfilled.
There is a tradition that 250 years later, Alexander the Great transported the relics of the holy Prophet Jeremiah to Alexandria.

The Prophet Jeremiah wrote his Book of Prophecies and also the Book of Lamentations about the desolation of Jerusalem and the Exile.  The times in which he lived and prophesied are described in 4/2 Kings (Ch. 23-25) and in the Second Book of Chronicles (36:12) and in 2 Maccabbees (Ch. 2).

In the Gospel of Matthew it is said that the betrayal of Judas was foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah, "And they took thirty pieces of silver, the price of him on whom the sons of Israel had set a price, and they gave them for the potter's field, as the Lord directed me" (Mt. 27:9-10). Perhaps Jeremiah 32:6-15 is meant.
The birthday of the blessed apostles Philip and James.  Philip, after having converted nearly all of Scythia to the faith of Christ, went to Hieropolis, a city in Asia, where he was fastened to a cross and stoned, and thus ended his life gloriously.  James, who is also called the brother of our Lord, was the first bishop of Jerusalem.  Being hurled down from a pinnacle of the temple, his legs were broken, and being struck on the head with a dyer's staff, he expired and was buried near the temple. 
St. Joseph Feastday: March 19, May 1 Patron of the Universal Church.
We know he was a carpenter, a working man, for the skeptical Nazarenes ask about Jesus, "Is this not the carpenter's son?" (Matthew 13:55). He wasn't rich for when he took Jesus to the Temple to be circumcised and Mary to be purified he offered the sacrifice of two turtledoves or a pair of pigeons, allowed only for those who could not afford a lamb (Luke 2:24).
Despite his humble work and means, Joseph came from a royal lineage. Luke and Matthew disagree some about the details of Joseph's genealogy but they both mark his descent from David, the greatest king of Israel (Matthew 1:1-16 and Luke 3:23-38). Indeed the angel who first tells Joseph about Jesus greets him as "son of David," a royal title used also for Jesus.
We know Joseph was a compassionate, caring man. When he discovered Mary was pregnant after they had been betrothed, he knew the child was not his but was as yet unaware that she was carrying the Son of God. He planned to divorce Mary according to the law but he was concerned for her suffering and safety. He knew that women accused to adultery could be stoned to death, so he decided to divorce her quietly and not expose her to shame or cruelty (Matthew 1:19-25).
We know Joseph was man of faith, obedient to whatever God asked of him without knowing the outcome. When the angel came to Joseph in a dream and told him the truth about the child Mary was carrying, Joseph immediately and without question or concern for gossip, took Mary as his wife. When the angel came again to tell him that his family was in danger, he immediately left everything he owned, all his family and friends, and fled to a strange country with his young wife and the baby.
He waited in Egypt without question until the angel told him it was safe to go back (Matthew 2:13-23).
We know Joseph loved Jesus. His one concern was for the safety of this child entrusted to him. Not only did he leave his home to protect Jesus, but upon his return settled in the obscure town of Nazareth out of fear for his life. When Jesus stayed in the Temple we are told Joseph (along with Mary) searched with great anxiety for three days for him (Luke 2:48). We also know that Joseph treated Jesus as his own son for over and over the people of Nazareth say of Jesus, "Is this not the son of Joseph?" (Luke 4:22)
We know Joseph respected God. He followed God's commands in handling the situation with Mary and going to Jerusalem to have Jesus circumcised and Mary purified after Jesus' birth. We are told that he took his family to Jerusalem every year for Passover, something that could not have been easy for a working man.
Since Joseph does not appear in Jesus' public life, at his death, or resurrection, many historians believe Joseph probably had died before Jesus entered public ministry.
Joseph is the patron of the dying because, assuming he died before Jesus' public life, he died with Jesus and Mary close to him, the way we all would like to leave this earth.
208 St Andeolus Martyr sent to France by St Polycarp,     In France, in the Province of Vivarias, blessed Andeol, subdeacon, who was sent from the East into Gaul with others by St. Polycarp to preach the word of God.  Under Emperor Severus he was scourged with thorny sticks, and having his head split with a wooden sword into four parts, in the shape of a cross, he completed his martyrdom.
Martyr and companion of St. Polycarp. Originally from Smyrna, Andeolus was sent to France by Polycarp. There he labored until arrested and martyred at Viviers.
  604 St. Arigius Bishop 20 yrs greatest priest pastor of his era of Gap, France. He served as bishop for twenty years after earning a reputation as one of the greatest priest pastors of his era. His cult was confirmed by Pope St. Pius X.
  893 St Theodard Benedictine bishop rebuilt churches ransom captives selling treasures spending his own money to
feed poor suffering practiced severe austerities
.  The Montauban breviary describes him as “an eye to the blind, feet to the lame, a father of the poor, and the consoler of the afflicted”. Greatly beloved by all, he was unanimously chosen archbishop of Narbonne at the death of Sigebold, who had nominated him as his successor. The perils which then beset travellers did not deter the newly-elected prelate from undertaking a visit to Rome, where he received the pallium.  Born at Montauban (Monlauriol), France, he studied law at the University of Toulouse and then at the Benedictine abbey of Montauban before becoming a lawyer.
Appointed secretary to Archbishop Sigebold of Narbonne, he soon was named an archdeacon and finally succeeded Sigebold as archbishop. He devoted much of his effort to repairing the damage, physical and spiritual, caused by the raids of Saracens, including rebuilding churches, ransoming captives, selling off treasures, and spending his own money to feed the poor and suffering. His death at St. Martin's Abbey (where he received the Benedictine habit) was probably hastened by the severe austerities he practiced
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1012 St Benedict of Szkalka hermit martyr gifted mystic of Hungary.   Benedict was a recluse on Mount Zabor, near a Benedictine monastery, trained by St. Andrew Zorard.
A gifted mystic, Benedict was murdered by a mob in 1012. He was canonized in 1083
Gregory VII 1073-1085.
1200 Tamar In 1166 a daughter, Tamar, was born to King George III (1155–1184) and Queen Burdukhan of Georgia.
The king proclaimed that he would share the throne with his daughter from the day she turned twelve years of age. The royal court unanimously vowed its allegiance and service to Tamar, and father and daughter ruled the country together for five years. After King George’s death in 1184, the nobility recognized the young Tamar as the sole ruler of all Georgia. Queen Tamar was enthroned as ruler of all Georgia at the age of eighteen. She is called “King” in the Georgian language because her father had no male heir and so she ruled as a monarch and not as a consort.
At the beginning of her reign, Tamar convened a Church council and addressed the clergy with wisdom and humility: “Judge according to righteousness, affirming good and condemning evil,” she advised. “Begin with me—if I sin I should be censured, for the royal crown is sent down from above as a sign of divine service. Allow neither the wealth of the nobles nor the poverty of the masses to hinder your work. You by word and I by deed, you by preaching and I by the law, you by upbringing and I by education will care for those souls whom God has entrusted to us, and together we will abide by the la