Mary Mother of GOD
May 29 - Our Lady of the Ardents (Arras, France, 1095)

 Sunday   Saint of the Day May 29 Quarto Kaléndas Júnii  
Our Lady of Fatima May 13, October 13, 1917 2015
  Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016

Solemnity of Pentecost, the Pope recalls the 53rd anniversary
of Servant of God Pius XII's Encyclical "Fidei donum,"
which "promoted and encouraged cooperation
 between Churches for the mission 'ad gentes
'."

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.



  275 St. Conon Two men, father and son, having the same name, martyred at Iconium in Asia Minor
  299 St. Restitutus Roman martyr first Bishop of London
 
303 St. Theodosia & Companions group of thirteen female martyrs who were supposedly slain at Caesarea, in Palestine. Theodosia was also the reputed mother of St. Procopius.
  750 St. Votus, Felix (brothers), & John Hermits in the Pyrenees Mountains Their place of seclusion became the site of the Benedictine abbey of St. John de La Pena
1242 St. William Arnaud martyred by the heretics with eleven companions Dominican inquisitor general in Southern France during the effort to extirpate the Albigensian heresy
1583 Bl. Richard Thirkeld priest English martyr receive preparation for priesthood at Reims and Douai, France educated at Queen's College, Oxford. He ministered to the Catholics of Yorkshire
1607 St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi virgin of the Order of the Carmelites famed for her holy life suffering;  mystical experiences God gave this saint  saw her ecstasies as evidence of a great fault in her, not a reward for holiness


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Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 29 - Our Lady of the Ardents (Arras, France, 1095)
Warns the People to Change Their Lives (II)

The apparition added that the four women responsible for the public disorder must do penance.
She asked John to leave his spade near the fountain where she assured him that the water would be good.
When he came back to recuperate it, he would find a "sign" on the end of the handle.
John ran quickly home to the farm and asked his brother and sister to go back and retrieve his spade.
The youngsters found it "standing straight up with three cross-shaped oak leaves coming out of the top of the handle."
The four women made reparation for their wrongs and people went in procession to the place of the miracle.

In early July, the Virgin appeared a second time to John, in his bedroom. "You did what I asked you to do well,
and the fountain will be good; the people have corrected themselves well," she told him.

A commission of inquiry has identified twenty-eight cures from the water of the fountain. In October 1686, a second inquiry mentioned seven new cases. The chapel of Pla-Rouzaud was built by the poor villagers and blessed on September 8, 1695 by Monsignor de Verthamon. The renown of the shrine Our Lady of Celles spread widely and attracted believers from the entire region and even Spain. The pilgrimage, takes place to this day at restored shrine on third Sunday of July, marked by evangelical simplicity and Marian humility.
According to Dictionnaire des Apparitions  Fr. Rene Laurentin, Fayard 2007

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 29 – Ascension - Our Lady of Peace (Italy, 1916) - Apparition to Sister Lucy of Fatima at the Convent of Tuy (1930) 
 
Where does the First Saturday devotion come from?
Sister Lucia was at the Mother House convent of Tuy. Her confessor had given her a series of questions in writing, on the topic of the Act of Reparation devotion of the first five Saturdays of the month. One of them was:
“Why five Saturdays and not nine, or seven, in honor of the sorrows of Our Lady?”
In the evening, at the chapel, a divine presence revealed to her that there are five sorts of offenses and blasphemies made against the Immaculate Heart of Mary:
Blasphemies against the Immaculate Conception;
Blasphemies against her Perpetual Virginity; 
Blasphemies against her Divine Maternity, in refusing at the same time to recognize her as the Mother of mankind; 
The blasphemies of those who publicly seek to sow in the hearts of children indifference or scorn, or even hatred of the Immaculate Mother; 
The offenses of those who outrage her directly in her holy images.  
 www.fatima.be

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Mary the Mother of God
Cameríni pássio sanctórum mille quingentórum et vigínti quinque Mártyrum.
    At Camerino, the passion of fifteen hundred and twenty-five holy martyrs.
  251? ST CYRIL OF CAESAREA, BOY MARTYR
  275 St. Conon Two men, father and son, having the same name, martyred at Iconium in Asia Minor
  299 St. Restitutus Roman martyr first Bishop of London
 
303 St. Theodosia & Companions group of thirteen female martyrs who were supposedly slain at Caesarea, in Palestine. Theodosia was also the reputed mother of St. Procopius.
  347 St. Maximinus Bishop of Trier, Germany miracle worker ardent enemy of the Arian heretics in the councils of Milan, Sardica, and Cologne apologist for orthodox Catholicism called “one of the most courageous bishops of his time” by St. Jerome
5th v. Sisinius, Martyrius, and Alexander, who were persecuted by the heathens of Anaunia
         St. Maximus 6th century bishop of Verona, Italy he governed his see in a period of political and military turmoil.
 
745 St. Theodosia and companions Nun and martyr defended icons 745 St. Theodosia
 
750 St. Votus, Felix (brothers), & John Hermits in the Pyrenees Mountains Their place of seclusion became the site of the Benedictine abbey of St. John de La Pena
 
750 St. John de Atares Spanish hermit in the Aragonese Pyrenees the Benedictine Abbey of St. John de Ia Pena.  It served as the cradle of the religious and spiritual life of Navarre and Aragon.
1242 Bl. Marytrs of Toulouse Twelve martyrs put to death by Albigensian heretics near Toulouse 4 diocesan priests, 3 Dominicans, 2 Benedictines, 2 Franciscans, and 1 layman died singing the Te Deum on the eve of the feast of the Ascension
1242 St. William Arnaud martyred by the heretics with eleven companions Dominican inquisitor general in Southern France during the effort to extirpate the Albigensian heresy
1242 SS. WILLIAM, STEPHEN, RAYMUND AND THEIR COMPANIONS, MARTYRS Many cures reported at their grave
         St. Eleutherius Patron saint of Rocca d’Arce, southern Italy brother of Sts. Grimbald and Fulk, was English
1361     BD PETER PETRONI
1583 Bl. Richard Thirkeld priest English martyr receive preparation for priesthood at Reims and Douai, France educated at Queen's College, Oxford. He ministered to the Catholics of Yorkshire
1607 St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi virgin of the Order of the Carmelites famed for her holy life suffering;  mystical experiences God gave this saint  saw her ecstasies as evidence of a great fault in her, not a reward for holiness

Paul VI_Athenagoras_05_01_1964
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:   Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).
"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique each the result of a new idea.
As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints.
Dear Lord, grant us a spirit not bound by our own ideas and preferences. Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves.
O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.
Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.


251? ST CYRIL OF CAESAREA, BOY MARTYR
OF this boy martyr we are told that without the knowledge of his pagan father he had become a Christian. The father, discovering that the child refused to pay any mark of respect to the idols, turned him out of doors. This happened at Caesarea in Cappadocia, and the governor of the city gave orders that Cyril should be brought before him. Cajoleries and threats proved equally ineffectual to shake the boy’s resolution. Then the governor ordered him off as if to execution; but he gave directions that after the youth had seen the blazing pyre into which he might be thrown, he was to be brought back to the court. On his return Cyril only complained that the sentence had not been carried out, and the governor, infuriated, had him put to death by the sword.
The so-called passio, which exists only in Latin, looks more like a fragment of a panegyric than a historical document. It is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii, and in Ruinart. The real interest of the case lies in the fact that Cyril’s name, with a mention of Caesarea in Cappadocia, was included already in the Syriac breviarium of the early fifth century under May 28, and that the same entry also appears on May 29 in the Hieronymianum, revised in Gaul a century or two later.
275 St. Conon Two men, father and son, having the same name, martyred at Iconium in Asia Minor
Apud Icónium, in Lycaónia, pássio sanctórum Conónis, et fílii annórum duódecim, qui, sub Aureliáno Imperatóre, cratículæ, prunis suppósitis et óleo superinfúso candéntis, suspensiónis in equúleo atque ignis pœnam constánter passi, ad extrémum, málleo lígneo mánibus eórum contrítis, spíritum emisérunt.
    At Iconium in Lycaonia, in the time of Emperor Aurelian, the martyrdom of the Saints Conon and his son, a child twelve years of age, who were laid on a grate over burning coals sprinkled with oil, placed on the rack, and exposed to the fire.  Finally their hands were crushed with a mallet, and they breathed their last.
The younger Conon was only twelve when he and his father were roasted over a fire and then killed on the rack.
299 St. Restitutus Roman martyr first Bishop of London
Romæ, via Aurélia, natális sancti Restitúti Mártyris.
    At Rome, on the Via Aurelia, the birthday of St. Restitutus, martyr.

He was put to death during the persecution of the Church under Emperor Diocletian.becomes the first Bishop of London. The site of his cathedral is unknown.
303 St. Theodosia & Companions group of thirteen female martyrs who were supposedly slain at Caesarea, in Palestine. Theodosia was also the reputed mother of St. Procopius.
Cæsaréæ Philíppi sanctárum Mártyrum Theodósiæ, quæ sancti Procópii Mártyris éxstitit mater, et aliárum duódecim nobílium matronárum; quæ, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, cápitis obtruncatióne consummátæ sunt.
    At Caesarea Philippi, the holy martyrs Theodosia, mother of the martyr St. Procopius, and twelve other noble women, whose lives were ended by their being beheaded in the persecution of Diocletian.
347 St. Maximinus of Trier Bishop of Trier, Germany miracle worker ardent enemy of the Arian heretics in the councils of Milan, Sardica, and Cologne apologist for orthodox Catholicism called “one of the most courageous bishops of his time” by St. Jerome
Tréviris beáti Maximíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris; a quo sanctus Athanásius Epíscopus, ob persecutiónem Arianórum éxsulans honorífice suscéptus fuit.
    At Treves, blessed Maximinus, bishop and confessor, who received with honour the patriarch St. Athanasius when he was banished by the Arian persecutors.
He was probably born at Silly, France, and succeeded St. Agritus as bishop of Trier, giving refuge to St. Athanasius in 336. St. Paul, the patriarch of Constantinople, was also given Maximinus’ protection. Maximinus was an ardent enemy of the Arian heretics, opposing them in the councils of Milan, Sardica, and Cologne. He was a known miracle worker and apologist for orthodox Catholicism and was called “one of the most courageous bishops of his time” by St. Jerome.
347 ST MAXIMINUS, BISHOP OF TRIER
ST MAXIMINUS, who was perhaps a native of Poitiers, left his home in early youth for Trier, possibly attracted thither by the reputation of its bishop, St Agritius. There he completed his education and there he was raised to the episcopate to become the successor of St Agritius. When St Athanasius went to Trier as an exile in 336, St Maximinus received him with honour, deeming it a privilege to be able to entertain so illustrious a servant of God. St Athanasius stayed with him two years; and his writings emphasize the courage, vigilance and noble qualities of his host who was, moreover, already famous for his miracles. St Paul, bishop of Constantinople, when banished by Constantius, likewise found a retreat at Trier and a powerful protector in its bishop. St Maximinus convened the synod of Cologne which condemned Euphratas as a heretic, depriving him of his see. He warned the Emperor Constans, whose favourite residence was at Trier, against the errors of the Arians and he himself opposed them on every possible occasion: so that his name was coupled with that of St Athanasius in the excommunication which the Arians afterwards launched against their opponents from Philippopolis. The date of his death is uncertain: but we are told that it cannot have been later than 347 because his successor Paulinus is known to have been in possession of the see of Trier in that same year. Although St Maximinus seems to have written much, none of his works have survived.
A life of Maximinus is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii, but the biography written by Servatus Lupus in the ninth century is probably preferable. It has been edited by B. Krusch in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. iii, pp. 71—82. The question of the Council of Cologne in 346 has been much debated. Mgr Duchesne denied the existence of any such council see Revue d’Histoire ecclésiastique, vol. iii (1902), pp. 16—29; but consult H. Quentin in Revue Bénédictine, vol. xxiii (1906), pp. 477—486, and Hefele-Leclercq, Histoire des Conciles, vol. i, pp. 830—836. On Maximinus, cf. Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. iii, p. 35, and the summary account by J. Hau, Sankt Maximinus (1935).

5th v. Sisinius, Martyrius, and Alexander, who were persecuted by the heathens of Anaunia
In agro Tridentíno natális sanctórum Mártyrum Sisínii, Martyrii et Alexándri; qui, témpore Honórii Imperatóris, in Anáuniæ pártibus (ut scribit in vita sancti Ambrósii Paulínus), persequéntibus Gentílibus, martyrii corónam adépti sunt.

In the district of Trent, in the time of Emperor Honorius, the birthday of the holy martyrs Sisinius, Martyrius, and Alexander, who were persecuted by the heathens of Anaunia, and obtained the crown of martyrdom, all of which is told by Paulinus in the Life of Ambrose.
397 SS SISINNIUS, MARTYRIUS AND ALEXANDER, MARTYRS
AMONGST the many strangers who came to sojourn in Milan during the reign of Theodosius the Great were three natives of Cappadocia, Sisinnius and the two brothers Martyrius and Alexander. St Ambrose esteemed them so highly that he commended them to St Vigilius, bishop of Trent, who was in great need of missionaries.
Sisinnius having been ordained deacon and Martyrius lector, the three were commissioned to preach the gospel in the Tyrolese Alps where Christianity had made but little way. They laboured especially in the valley of Anaunia (Val di Non). There, in spite of opposition and ill-treatment, they gained a great number of souls and Sisinnius built a church in the village of Methon or Medol, where he assembled his converts to complete their instruction. The pagans, enraged at the success of the missionaries, resolved to force the newly-baptized Christians to take part in one of their festivals. Sisinnius and his companions did their best to keep their converts away, and their opponents thereupon attacked the missionaries in their own church, beating them so severely that Sisinnius died within a few hours. Martyrius managed to creep away into a garden, but his enemies found him the following day, and dragged him by the legs over sharp stones till he died under this brutal treatment. Alexander also fell into their hands. They tried by threats to make him renounce his faith as they were burning the bodies of his companions. Finding their efforts unavailing, they cast him alive into the same fire. The ashes of the saints were collected by the faithful and taken to Trent. Afterwards St Vigilius erected a church on the spot where they had suffered.

Though the details supplied in the supposed “Acts” of Sisinnius, in the Bollandists, May, vol. vii, are of little account, the fact of the martyrdom is certain. We possess the letters written by Vigilius himself to the bishop of Milan and to St John Chrysostom. St Augustine also speaks of them, as does St Maximus of Turin. See further the references given in CMH., p. 281,.
550 St. Maximus 6th century bishop of Verona, Italy he governed his see in a period of political and military turmoil.
Verónæ sancti Máximi Epíscopi.      At Verona, St. Maximus, bishop.
745 St. Theodosia and companions Nun and martyr; defended icons
Born to a noble family, she was orphaned in her youth and eventually became a nun at Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey) at the monastery of St. Anastasia. She led a group of nuns in defense of the icon of Christ which hung over the main door of the community when soldiers were sent to enforce the decrees of the Iconoclast emperors Leo Ill the Isaurian  and Constantine V. Theodosia and twelve other nuns were arrested and tortured; Theodosia died of her grievous injuries while in prison. Theodora and companions who are venerated on the same feast day.
745 ST THEODOSIA, VIRGIN AND MARTYR
THE history of St Theodosia was written in the fourteenth century by Constantine Akropolites, who seems to have drawn upon early written records and oral tradition; he inhabited a house at Constantinople near the martyr’s tomb and was one of her great votaries. According to him she came of a noble family and lost her parents when she was still very young. She afterwards took the veil in the monastery of the Anastasis in Constantinople. She lived in the days of the Emperors Leo the Isaurian and his son, Constantine Copronymus, who strove to abolish the public veneration of sacred images. When the order had gone forth for the destruction of a greatly revered image of our Lord, Theodosia at the head of a band of women shook the ladder which supported the official who was about to cast it down. The man fell and was killed. The women then stoned the palace of the pseudo-patriarch Anastasius, obliging him to flee. Summary punishment was meted out to the women but especially to Theodosia as their ringleader. She was tortured in prison, her throat was torn out, and she died of the treatment she received. It is not difficult to suggest reasons why the name of this nun is not found in the Roman Martyrology.
A sufficient account is provided in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii. Probably the most reliable text is that of the Constantinople Synaxary (ed. Delehaye), cc. 828—829, under July 18. A translation of the “passion” will be found in Dom Leclercq, Les Martyrs, vol. iv.
750 St. Votus, Felix (brothers), & John Hermits in the Pyrenees Mountains Their place of seclusion became the site of the Benedictine abbey of St. John de Ia Pena
Votus and Felix were brothers from Saragossa, Spain, who gave up all worldly interests and embraced the eremitical life. Upon going to the Pyrenees, they became companions of John. Their place of seclusion, beneath a rock (called a pena) became the site of the Benedictine abbey of St. John de La Pena.
750 St. John de Atares Spanish hermit in the Aragonese Pyrenees the Benedictine Abbey of St. John de La Pena. It served as the cradle of the religious and spiritual life of Navarre and Aragon.
lived under a rock promontory, and a monastery was later established on the site, the Benedictine Abbey of St. John de Ia Pena. It served as the cradle of the religious and spiritual life of Navarre and Aragon.
 St. Eleutherius Patron saint of Rocca d’Arce, southern Italy brother of Sts. Grimbald and Fulk, was English
Arcáni, in Látio, sancti Eleuthérii Confessóris.    At Arcano in Lazio, St. Eleutherius, confessor.
Eleutherius, the brother of Sts. Grimbald and Fulk, was English. A pilgrim, he died in Rocca d’Arce.
 1242 SS. WILLIAM, STEPHEN, RAYMUND AND THEIR COMPANIONS, MARTYRS Many cures reported at their grave
THE twelve martyrs who are commemorated together on this day were all directly or indirectly connected with the branch of the Inquisition which had been set up at Toulouse in s 1228 to combat the errors of the Albigensians and other false teachers in Languedoc. Pope Gregory IX specially commissioned the Order of Preachers to expound the faith in Toulouse and the neighbouring districts, and to deliver heretics over to the secular arm. The Dominicans encountered great hostility and drew upon themselves the bitter hatred of the Albigensians; they were driven out of Toulouse, Narbonne and other places by the mob. As they went, the friars, undaunted by the treatment they were receiving, chanted aloud the “Salve Regina” and the Apostles’ Creed. At Avignonet, to the south-west of Toulouse, they conducted a preaching mission with the assistance of other priests, and were offered hospitality in the local castle, which belonged to Count Raymund VII of Toulouse but which was then in charge of his bailiff. All unsuspecting, they accepted the invitation. As they were retiring for the night, they were set upon and butchered by a band of soldiers who had been secretly introduced into the building. They uttered no cry, but with their dying breath praised God in the words of the Te Deum. The little company included three Dominicans—William Arnaud and two others—two Friars Minor, Stephen and Raymund, two Benedictines, four other clerics and a layman. Many cures reported at their grave led to a cultus that was confirmed more than six hundred years later, in 1856.
A summary compiled from the Chronicle of Toulouse and other sources will be found in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii. See also the Monumenta 0. P. Historica, vol. i, pp. 231 seq. Mortier, Histoire des Maîtres généraux 0. P., vol. i, pp. 357 seq. Fr Léon, Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.),, vol. ii, pp. 356—374; Procter, Lives of Dominican Saints, pp. 152—155.
1242 St. William Arnaud martyred by the heretics with eleven companions Dominican inquisitor general in Southern France during the effort to extirpate the Albigensian heresy
Martyr and inquisitor. A member of the Dominicans, he held the post of inquisitor general in Southern France during the effort to extirpate the Albigensian heresy. He was martyred by the heretics with eleven companions and is counted among the Martyrs of Toulouse.
1242 Bl. Marytrs of Toulouse Twelve martyrs put to death by Albigensian heretics nearToulouse 4 diocesan priests, 3 Dominicans, 2 Benedictines, 2 Franciscans, and 1 layman died singing the Te Deum on the eve of the feast of the Ascension
Four diocesan priests, three Dominicans, two Benedictines, two Franciscans, and one layman died singing the Te Deum. They were beatified in 1866.

 1361     BD PETER PETRONI he is said to have been favoured by God with marvellous graces and with preternatural knowledge; wonders reported at his tomb threatened to disrupt the peace of the monastery so they ceased.
IN the Carthusian Order Peter Petroni of Siena is held in great veneration. Born of a distinguished family in that city, he seems to have manifested from his earliest childhood an extraordinary attraction for the things of God. He loved to go apart and pray, and sought out little ragamuffins in the streets to teach them and relieve their needs, spoiling his rich clothes, so his parents complained, by living in such company. When the Carthusian monastery of Maggiano was built near by through the munificence of one of his relatives, he was eager to enter there, and in spite of opposition he accomplished his purpose at the age of seventeen. His superiors wished him later to be ordained priest, but he so shrank from the responsibilities entailed that, after all his remonstrances had proved fruitless, he chopped off the index finger of his left hand to render himself for ever disqualified for ordination. His life was marked by what might seem an almost fanatical determination to have nothing to do with his own family; on the other hand he is said to have been favoured by God with marvellous graces and with preternatural knowledge. Shortly before his death he commissioned a devoted protégé of his, Gioacchino Ciani, to warn the famous humanist, Boccaccio, that unless he gave up his wanton literary work and mended his life, God would very soon summon him to juggernaut. The message was delivered; Boccaccio demurred, but when Ciani proceeded to remind him of secrets in his past, which were known to no human being, but which he had learnt from Pd Peter’s disclosures, the scholar was converted. Peter died on May 29, 1361, and the wonders reported at his tomb threatened to disrupt the peace of the monastery so they ceased.

There is an Italian life of Bd Peter, written at least in part by his disciple, Bd John Colombini, which has been translated into Latin in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii. See also the Annales Ordinis Cartusiensis, by Dom Le Couteulx, vols. v, vi and vii. the conversion of Boccaccio is confirmed by his correspondence with Petrarch.
1583 Bl. Richard Thirkeld priest English martyr receive preparation for the priesthood at Reims and Douai, France educated at Queen's College, Oxford. He ministered to the Catholics of Yorkshire
Also listed as Thirkild. Born in County Durham, England, he studied at Oxford and was said to be quite old when he left the isle to receive preparation for the priesthood at Reims and Douai, France. Ordained in 1579, he went back to England and served the Catholics in the area around Yorkshire until his execution for being a priest on May 29 at York. England; died at York, England, 1583; beatified 1886. Richard was educated at Queen's College, Oxford. He ministered to the Catholics of Yorkshire and was condemned and executed for his priesthood at York (Benedictines).
1583     BD RICHARD THIRKELD, MARTYR
RICHARD TH1RKELD was already an old man when he was ordained a priest in 1579, after having studied at Douai and Rheims. He had been a student, probably a “scholar”, at Queen’s College, Oxford. He was born in the diocese of Durham, and for eight years he had prayed daily to be allowed to suffer death for the faith. He was sent upon the English mission, where he exercised his ministry chiefly at York and in the neighbouring districts. A night visit to a Catholic prisoner aroused suspicion, and nine days after the execution of Bd William Hart he was arrested on the charge of being a priest. He at once acknowledged his priesthood, explaining the purpose for which he had come to England, and he was accordingly imprisoned in the Kidcote prison at York. Two months later he was tried by a jury which pronounced him guilty of treason, mainly on the score of his admission that he had absolved and had reconciled to the Church of Rome some of the Queen’s subjects. Remitted to the condemned cell, he spent the whole night instructing some of the criminals by whom he was surrounded and preparing them for death. The following day he came up again before the court, and was condemned to die with the usual barbarities: he fell upon his knees and gave thanks to God, saying, “This is the day which the Lord hath made: let us be glad and rejoice therein.” The sentence was duly carried out, but no details are available because extraordinary pains were taken by the authorities to prevent the public in general from being present, so universal was the admiration and sympathy felt for the holy and venerable-looking old priest.
An account is printed in Challoner, MMP., pp. 79—83, but more fully in Camm, LEM., vol. ii, pp. 635—653.
1607 St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi virgin of the Order of the Carmelites famed for her holy life suffering;  mystical experiences God gave this saint  saw her ecstasies as evidence of a great fault in her, not a reward for holiness
Floréntiæ natális sanctæ Maríæ-Magdalénæ de Pazzis, Vírginis, ex Ordine Carmelitárum, vita et sanctitáte illústris.  Ejus vero festívitas quarto Kaléndas Júnii celebrátur.
1607 Sanctæ Maríæ-Magdalénæ de Pazzis, ex Ordine Carmelitárum, Vírginis, cujus dies natális octávo Kaléndas Júnii recensétur.
    St. Mary Magdalene of Pazzi of the Order of Carmelites, and virgin.  Her birthday was mentioned on the 25th of May.

At Florence, the birthday of St. Mary Magdalen de Pazzi, a virgin of the Order of the Carmelites, who is famed for her holy life.

1607 ST MARY MAGDALEN DEI PAZZI, VIRGIN
THE family of the Pazzi was one of the most illustrious in Florence and was closely allied to the Medici, the ruling house it gave to the state a long line of eminent politicians, governors and soldiers; and to the world one great woman who in fame has eclipsed them all. The father of St Mary Magdalen dei Pazzi, Camillo Geri by name, had married Mary Buondelmonte, the descendant of a family as distinguished as his own. The saint was born in Florence in 1566, and in honour of St Catherine of Siena received her name in baptism. Almost from infancy she began to display an intense attraction for religion and good works, and she made her first communion with wonderful fervour when she was ten. Her father having been appointed governor of Cortona, she was placed at the age of fourteen as a boarder in the convent of St John in Florence. There she could give full scope to her devotion and learnt to love the atmosphere of a religious house.
Fifteen months later her father took her home with a view to arranging a marriage for her. Several desirable suitors were proposed, but her heart was so strongly set upon the religious life that her parents after some opposition reluctantly gave way to her desire. She chose the Carmelite convent of her native town because its members made their communion almost every day. On the eve of the Assumption, 1582, she entered the convent of St Mary of the Angels upon the understanding that she should continue to wear her secular clothes until she had had full experience of the rule. She had only been there fifteen days when her parents fetched her home—hoping, no doubt, that she would reconsider her decision. Her resolution, however, was unbroken, and three months later she re-entered the convent with their approbation and blessing.
On January 30, 1583, she received the habit, and took the name of Mary Magdalen. When the priest placed the crucifix in her hands with the words, “God forbid that I should glory save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ", her face was suffused with an almost unearthly radiance and her heart was filled with an ardent desire to suffer during the rest of her life for her Saviour. That desire was never to leave her. After a most fervent noviciate she was allowed to take her vows unusually early, because she was dangerously ill. As her sufferings were obviously very severe, one of the sisters asked her how she could bear so much pain without a murmur. The saint pointed to the crucifix and said, “See what the infinite love of God has suffered for my salvation. That same love sees my weakness and gives me courage. Those who call to mind the sufferings of Christ and who offer up their own to God through His passion find their pains sweet and pleasant.” When she was conveyed back to the infirmary after her profession she sank into an ecstasy which lasted over an hour; and for forty days she enjoyed heavenly consolations in addition to frequent raptures. It has often been noticed by writers on the spiritual life that God is wont thus to visit elect souls with special consolations after their first act of complete self-surrender. He does it in order to brace them for the trials which never fail to ensue. To crucify in them all self-seeking, to teach them to know themselves, and to prepare them to be vessels of His pure love, He refines them in the crucible of internal tribulation. Usually the higher the degree of sanctity to which they are to rise, the fiercer are the cleansing fires. This we find exemplified in the state of desolation into which this saint fell after her first transports of spiritual joy. But she did not desire spiritual consolations. Her aspiration was to suffer for her Saviour’s sake.
Fearing that she might have offended God by over-eagerness to be professed, Mary dei Pazzi asked and obtained permission to live as a novice two years after she had made her vows. At the expiration of that time she was appointed second directress of the extern girls, and three years later she was set to instruct young nuns. She was now being tried by the most severe interior trials. Although she fasted always on bread and water, except on Sundays and holidays, she was assaulted with violent temptations to gluttony and impurity. To resist them she chastised her body with disciplines, while she never ceased to implore the help of her heavenly Spouse and of our Blessed Lady. She seemed to be plunged into a state of darkness in which she saw nothing but what was horrible in herself and in all around her. For five whole years she remained in this state of desolation and spiritual dryness, and then God restored to her soul His holy peace together with the comfort of His divine presence. In 1590, on Whitsunday at Matins when the Te Deum was intoned, she fell into a rapture. On emerging from it, she pressed the hands of the prioress and the novice-mistress, exclaiming, “Rejoice with me, for my winter is at an end Help me to thank and glorify my good Creator.”
From this time onwards God was pleased to manifest His graces in her.
Mary Magdalen dei Pazzi read the thoughts of others and predicted future events. To Alexander dei Medici she foretold that he would one day be pope. Repeating the prophecy on a subsequent occasion she added that his reign would be a short one: it actually lasted twenty-six days. During her lifetime she appeared to several persons in distant places and she cured a number of sick people. As time went on, her ecstasies became more and more frequent. Sometimes in that state she would appear rigid and lifeless, sometimes she would carry on her customary duties while remaining entranced. Occasionally from her words and gestures it was evident that she was in some way participating in the passion of our Lord or conversing with her divine Spouse and the denizens of Heaven. So edifying were the words that fell from her lips that a record was kept of them by her sisters, who collected them after her death into a book. Her union with God seemed unbroken she would call upon all created things to glorify their Creator and longed for all mankind to love Him as she did. She would pray with tears for the conversion of the heathen, of unbelievers, of heretics, of sinners. She would cry out, “0 Love, love is not loved, not known by His own creatures. 0 my Jesus If I had a voice sufficiently loud and strong to be heard in every part of the world, I would cry out to make this Love known, loved and honoured by all men as the one immeasurable good.”
In 1604 St Mary Magdalen became bedridden. She was now subject to violent headaches, and she lost all power in her limbs although she suffered agonies if touched. Besides being in constant pain she experienced much spiritual dryness. Nevertheless, the greater her suffering the greater grew her desire for it. “0 Lord”, she prayed, “let me suffer or let me die—or rather—let me live on, that I may suffer more!” She even rejoiced if her prayers were not granted because it meant that God’s will was being done, not hers. When she knew that her last hour was approaching, she gave a parting injunction to the nuns assembled round her. “Reverend mother and dear sisters”, she said, “I am about to leave you and the last thing I ask of you—and I ask it in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ— is that you love Him alone, that you trust implicitly in Him and that you encourage one another continually to suffer for the love of Him.” On May 25, 1607, she went to her eternal reward at the age of forty-one years. Her body, which was untouched by corruption, still lies in a shrine in the church attached to her convent in Florence, and in 1669 she was canonized.
In the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vi, the Bollandists print a Latin translation of the two earliest lives of St Mary Magdalen del Pazzi. The first appeared in 1611, written by Vincent Puccini, the saint’s confessor in her last years. The narrative portion is comparatively brief, but it is accompanied by a supplement of some 700 pages consisting of extracts from her visions and letters. Father Cepari, who had also acted as her confessor, had likewise a biography in preparation, but he withheld it out of consideration for Puccini. It appeared, however, in 1669 with additions borrowed from the process of canonization. These two works, combined with her letters and five manuscript volumes of notes of her revelations and dialogues in ecstasy, taken down by her fellow nuns, constitute our sources. A new selection of her utterances, Extases et lettres, was presented in 1945 (in Italian, 1924) by Maurice Vaussard, who has further contributed a short life to the series “Les Saints” (1925). The life by Cepari was translated into English for the Oratorian Series and was printed in 1849, and there is a full biography in French by the Viscountess de Beausire-Seyssel (1913). See Fr E. E. Larkin’s paper on “The Ecstasies of the Forty Days of St Mary M. de’ Pazzi” in Carmelus, vol. i (1954), pp. 29—71.

It would be easy to concentrate on the mystical experiences God gave this saint, rather than on her life. In fact, it would be difficult to do differently, so overwhelming were those gifts from God. The temptation for many modern readers (including the author) would be to see little to identify with in these graces and walk away without seeing more. The other temptation would be to become so fascinated with these stories that one would neglect to dig deeper and learn the real lessons of her life.

But Mary Magdalene de Pazzi is not a saint because she received ecstasies and graces from God. Many have received visions, ecstasies, and miracles without becoming holy.
She is a saint because of her response to those gifts -- a lifelong struggle to show love and gratitude to the God who gave her those graces.

In fact Mary Magdalene saw her ecstasies as evidence of a great fault in her, not a reward for holiness. She told one fellow sister that God did not give this sister the same graces "because you don't need them in order to serve him." In her eyes, God gave these gifts to those who were too weak to become holy otherwise. That Mary Magdalene received these gifts proved, in her mind, how unworthy she was.
Born in Florence on April 2, 1566, Mary Magdalene (baptized Catherine) was taught mental prayer when she was nine years old at the request of her mother. Her introduction at this age to this form of prayer which involves half an hour of meditation did not seem to be unusual. And yet today we often believe children incapable of all but the simplest rote prayers.
At twelve years old she experienced her first ecstasy while looking at a sunset which left her trembling and speechless.
With this foundation in prayer and in mystical experience, it isn't surprising that she wanted to enter a contemplative monastery of the Carmelite Order. She chose the monastery of St. Mary's of the Angels because the nuns took daily Communion, unusual at the time.
In 1583 she had her second mystical experience when the other nuns saw her weeping before the crucifix as she said, "O Love, you are neither known nor loved."
Mary Magdalene's life is a contradiction of our instinctive thought that joy only comes from avoiding suffering. A month after being refused early religious profession, she was refused she fell deathly ill. Fearing for her life the convent had her professed from a stretcher at the altar. After that she experienced forty days of ecstasies that coexisted with her suffering. Joy from the graces God gave were mixed with agony as her illness grew worse. In one of her experiences Jesus took her heart and hid it in his own, telling her he "would not return it until it is wholly pure and filled with pure love." She didn't recover from her illness until told to ask for the intercession of Blessed Mary Bagnesi over three months later.

What her experiences and prayer had given her was a familiar, personal relationship with Jesus. Her conversations with Jesus often take on a teasing, bantering tone that shocks those who have a formal, fearful image of God. For example, at the end of her forty days of graces, Jesus offered her a crown of flowers or a crown of thorns. No matter how often she chose the crown of thorns, Jesus kept teasingly pushing the crown of flowers to her. When he accused her, "I called and you didn't care," she answered back, "You didn't call loudly enough" and told him to shout his love.
She learned to regret the insistence on the crown of thorns. We might think it is easy to be holy if God is talking to you every day but few of us could remain on the path with the five year trial that followed her first ecstasies. Before this trial, Jesus told her, "I will take away not the grace but the feeling of grace. Though I will seem to leave you I will be closer to you." This was easy for her to accept in the midst of ecstasy but, as she said later, she hadn't experienced it yet. At the age of nineteen she started five years of dryness and desolation in which she was repelled by prayer and tempted by everything. She referred to her heart as a pitch-dark room with only a feeble light shining that only made the darkness deeper. She was so depressed she was found twice close to suicide. All she could do to fight back was to hold onto prayer, penance, and serving others even when it appeared to do no good.
Her lifelong devotion to Pentecost can be easily understood because her trial ended in ecstasy in 1590. At this time she could have asked for any gifts but she wanted two in particular: to look on any neighbor as good and holy without judgment and to always have God's presence before her.
Far from enjoying the attention her mystical experiences brought her, she was embarrassed by it. For all her days, she wanted a hidden life and tried everything she could to achieve it. When God commanded her to go barefoot as part of her penance and she could not walk with shoes, she simply cut the soles out of her shoes so no one would see her as different from the other nuns. If she felt an ecstasy coming on, she would hurry to finish her work and go back to her room. She learned to see the notoriety as part of God's will. When teaching a novice to accept God's will, she told her, "I wanted a hidden life but, see, God wanted something quite different for me."
Some still might think it was easy for her to be holy with all the help from God. Yet when she was asked once why she was weeping before the cross, she answered that she had to force herself to do something right that she didn't want to do. It's true that when a sister criticized her for acting so different, she thanked her, "May God reward you! You have never spoken truer words!" but she told others it hurt her quite a bit to be nice to someone who insulted her.
Mary Magdalene was no pale, shrinking flower. Her wisdom and love led to her appointment to many important positions at the convent including mistress of novices. She did not hesitate to be blunt in guiding the women under her care when their spiritual life was at stake. When one of the novices asked permission to pretend to be impatient so the other novices would not respect her so much, Mary Magdalene's answer shook this novice out of this false humility: "What you want to pretend to be, you already are in the eyes of the novices. They don't respect you nearly as much as you like to think."
Mary Magdalene's life offers a great challenge to all those who think that the best penance comes from fasting and physical discomfort. Though she fasted and wore old clothes, she chose the most difficult penance of all by pretending to like the things she didn't like. Not only is this a penance most of us would shrink from but, by her acting like she enjoyed it, no one knew she was doing this great penance!
In 1604, headaches and paralyzation confined her to bed. Her nerves were so sensitive that she could not be touched without agonizing pain. Ever humble, she took the fact that her prayers were not granted as a sure sign that God's will was being done. For three years she suffered, before dying on May 25, 1607 at the age of forty-one.
In her footsteps: Prayer:
 Saint Mary Magdalene de Pazzi, pray that we will make a commitment to seek the presence of God in prayer the way you did. Guide us to see the graces God gives us as gifts not rewards and to respond with gratitude and humility, not pride and selfishness. Amen

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
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1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
St Leo the Great 29 September 440 to his death on 10 November 461: decided to send legates to Constantinople to urge upon the Emperor Theodosius II the calling of a general council at which the true doctrine of our Lord's two natures should be definitely and decisively enunciated. For this mission men of learning, tact and integrity were required, and the pope chose St Abundius, bishop of Como, and a distinguished priest called Senator as being suitable representatives.

Pope St Gregory, Gregory I 590-604: St Augustine (of Canterbury) wrote frequently to Pope St Gregory, consulting him in the least difficulties which occurred in his ministry. This shows the tenderness of his conscience: for in many things which he might have decided by his own learning and prudence he desired to render his conscience more secure by the advice and decision of the chief pastor. On one occasion Gregory wrote exhorting Augustine to beware of pride and vainglory in the miracles God wrought through him:
 “You must needs rejoice with fear, and fear with joy concerning that heavenly gift. You will rejoice because the souls of the English are by outward miracles drawn to inward grace: but you will fear lest, amidst the wonders that are done, the weak mind may be puffed up by self-esteem; and so the thing whereby it is outwardly raised to honour cause it to fall through vainglory. . . All the elect do not work miracles, and yet the names of all are written in Heaven. Those who are the disciples of truth ought not to rejoice save for that good thing which all enjoy as well as they, in which their joy shall be without end.”
As apostolic delegate in Turkey and Greece after 1935 Father Roncalli engaged peaceably with the worlds of Orthodoxy and Islam.
When World War II erupted Angelo risked his position and security to provide thousands of Turkish transit visas, "temporary" baptismal and immigration certificates, authorizing Hungarian Jews persecuted by the Nazis to escape to Palestine.
He aided Jews of France, Slovakia, Croatia, Bulgaria, Romania and Italy.
Catholic sources note that he issued 80,000 protective certificates.
Testimonies at the Nuremberg trials credit him with saving tens of thousands of lives.


The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
  Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew




Hail, Holy Mother of God -- Pope Francis
Jesus Christ is the blessing for every man and woman ... The Church, in giving us Jesus, offers us the fullness of the Lord’s blessing. This is precisely the mission of the people of God: to spread to all peoples God’s blessing made flesh in Jesus Christ. And Mary, the first and most perfect disciple of Jesus, the first and most perfect believer, the model of the pilgrim Church, is the one who opens the way to the Church’s motherhood and constantly sustains her maternal mission to all mankind. Mary’s tactful maternal witness has accompanied the Church from the beginning. She, the Mother of God, is also the Mother of the Church, and through the Church, the mother of all men and women, and of every people. …

Let us look to Mary, let us contemplate the Holy Mother of God. I suggest that you all greet her together, just like those courageous people of Ephesus, who cried out before their pastors when they entered Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!” What a beautiful greeting for our Mother. There is a story – I do not know if it is true – that some among those people had clubs in their hands, perhaps to make the Bishops understand what would happen if they did not have the courage to proclaim Mary “Mother of God”! I invite all of you, without clubs, to stand up and to greet her three times with this greeting of the early Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!”  Pope Francis; Homily, Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Chinese Catholics Celebrate Pentecost, World Day of Prayer for Church in China
Sacraments of Initiation Administered During Course of Celebrations

By Staff Reporter
Rome, May 27, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Many Chinese Catholic communities celebrated the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China last Sunday, reported Fides. Pope Benedict XVI instituted this day of prayer in 2007.

The May 24 prayer day coincides with the Marian feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians, and this year it coincided with the feast of Pentecost.  At the end of last Wednesday's General Audience in the Vatican, Pope Francis remembered the prayer day for the Asian nation.

In China on the prayer day, the sacraments of Christian initiation were administered to seven catechumans, 13 infants, and 38 adults in the He Bei province's parishes of Yan Jiao and of Bao Ding, as well as in the Zhe Jiang province's parish of Long Gang in the diocese of Wen Zhou.

The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians is celebrated at the Shrine of Our Lady of Sheshan in Shanghai and on the day, the parish of Chang Shu in the diocese of Su Zhou, along with many other communities, prayed: "Let us pray for the Church in China, that faces major challenges in the life of the Church and society. Let us pray so that the Holy Spirit guides us ... and may Our Lady Help of Christians protect us."  Four infants were also baptized during Mass in Chang Shu.

Also to celebrate, the parish of Yi Shan in the Diocese of Wen Zhou in the province of Zhe Jiang held a solemn Marian procession, so that, as observers noted, "the Church is one and united and a witness of love."

Moreover, religious and some lay people of the diocese of Nan Chong, located in the southern province of Sichuan, went on a pilgrimage not only to celebrate the special feasts of Sunday, but also to celebrate the Year of Consecrated Life. During it, those partaking exchanged their experiences of vocation, faith, mission and pastoral activity.

Pope Francis called for the Year of Consecrated Life at the end of his meeting with 120 superior generals of male institutes last November. The year started on the First Sunday of Advent, the weekend of Nov. 29, 2014, and ends on Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated Life. (D.C.L.)


  Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.
By Deborah Castellano Lubov VATICAN CITY, March 04, 2015 (Zenit.org) –

“Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.”
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is  very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding
.

 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

  Pope Francis: The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (Video)
He explained that it can also be found in day to day life By Staff

ROME, November 13, 2014 (Rome Reports) - To view the video click here.
     
At the end of its Constitution on the Church, the Second Vatican Council left us a very beautiful meditation on Mary Most Holy.
Let me (Pope Francis) just recall the words referring to the mystery we celebrate today: “The immaculate Virgin preserved free from all stain of original sin, was taken up body and soul into heavenly glory, when her earthly life was over, and exalted by the Lord as Queen over all things” (no. 59).
Then towards the end, there is: “The Mother of Jesus in the glory which she possesses in body and soul in heaven is the image and the beginning of the Church as it is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise, she shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come” (no. 68). Pope Francis
 
 
"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

January 5 – Our Lady of Good Counsel (Bergamo, Italy)  
Pope Francis: "Place your vocation in her hands"
At the opening of the seminarians’ pilgrimage in France, which was held at Lourdes through Monday, November 10, 2014, Pope Francis sent a special message in the form of three pieces of advice:
"Mary accompanied Jesus in his mission. She was present at Pentecost when the disciples received the Holy Spirit. She accompanied the first steps of the Church in a maternal way. During these days in Lourdes, confide in her, place your vocation in her hands, and ask her to make you pastors according to God’s own heart.  Let her strengthen you on these three key points that I mentioned: brotherhood, prayer, and mission.
I wholeheartedly give you my Apostolic Blessing and I ask you to pray for me. Thank you."
www.aleteia.org


Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

"Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"
Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand?