Mary the Mother of Jesus
Day 9 of 40 Days for Life
Pray that as young couples or single moms choose life for their child, the church will
come alongside them physically, emotionally, and spiritually to help bear their burdens.


Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
 
 Wednesday  Saints of this Day October  07 Nonis Octóbris  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins. Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Acts of the Apostles
October 7, 2015
Our Lady of the Rosary (Memorial).html
Acts 1:12-14
;  Luke 1:46-55;  Luke 1:26-38;
Our Lady of the Rosary Pope St. Pius V established this feast in 1573. The purpose was to thank God for the victory of Christians over the Turks at Lepanto—a victory attributed to the praying of the rosary. Clement XI extended the feast to the universal Church in 1716.

Mary was raised to the dignity of Mother of God rather for sinners than for the just, since Jesus Christ declares that he came to call not the just, but sinners.  -- St. Anselm
 
October 7 - Our Lady of the Rosary
The Victory of Lepanto and the Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary
In the 15th century, the expanding Ottoman Empire continued to threaten all Christianity in the West. Pope Pius V finally succeeded in uniting the forces of Venice, Spain and the Holy See.  An important fleet was entrusted to Don John of Austria, and the Pope recommended that his commander-in-chief leave behind all soldiers of ill repute, promising victory if he did so. He ordered public prayers, and increased his own supplications to heaven. The decisive battle took place on October 7, 1571, in the Gulf of Lepanto, off the Strait of Corinth.  A good number of the enemy ships were taken over. The Turkish admiral Ali Pasha was decapitated.  Fifteen thousand Christian prisoners were released. Less than a third of the Turkish fleet was able to set out again, dealing the Turkish power a blow from which it never recovered. On the evening of the battle, Pope Pius V went to the window of his office and looking up at the sky, he cried out, “our great task at present is to thank God for the victory which he has just given the Christian army.”  It was the 7th of October, a little before 5 PM, but the news of the victory did not reach Rome until 19 days later on October 26th, confirming the sovereign pontiff's revelation.
October 7 – Our Lady of the Holy Rosary
Put the Rosary in the Hands of the Poorest First
To put the Rosary in the hands of all, the best thing is to aim at putting it in the hands of those who need it the most, either because they do not pray very much, or, as they are overwhelmed by life itself, because they cannot do much else.
This is the answer to the deepest wish of the Gospel, to a certain secret it contains and offers to all who want to be, inside the Kingdom, men of action. This secret is to go to the poorest, to the most ill, the most destitute.
If the Rosary is the treasure the Church says it is, we must put it first in the hands of the most needy!
Fr. Joseph Eyquem, Founder of the Rosary Teams

In memory of this triumph Pope Pius V instituted for the first Sunday of October the Feast of the Rosary, and added to the Litany of Loreto the supplication “Help of Christians.” Among the Catholic faithful, the Lepanto victory contributed extensively to the rapid popularity of the devotion of the Rosary.

Taken from Fr. J. Olivier - www.salveregina.com and www.newadvent.com
October 7 - OUR LADY OF THE HOLY ROSARY (1571)

October 7 - Feast of the Holy Rosary (Rome, 1573)
  Queen of the Most Holy Rosary
On the first Sunday of October in 1571, it is believed that Heaven rewarded the faith of those who had recourse to the Rosary to stop the advance of the Turks, and the naval victory of Lepanto gained by Don John of Austria over the Turkish fleet corresponded wonderfully to the processions made in Rome on that same day by the members of the Rosary confraternity. St Pius V thereupon ordered that a commemoration of the Rosary should be made upon that day, and in 1573, Pope Gregory XIII instituted this feast in all churches which possessed an altar dedicated to the Holy Rosary.
In 1671 the observance of this feast was extended by Clement X to the whole of Spain, and somewhat later, Clement XI, after the important victory over the Turks gained by Prince Eugene on 6 August, 1716 (the feast of Our Lady of the Snows), in Hungary, commanded the feast of the Rosary to be celebrated by the universal Church.
Leo XIII has added to the Litany of Loreto the invocation "Queen of the Most Holy Rosary". On this feast, in every church in which the Rosary confraternity has been duly erected, a plenary indulgence toties quoties is granted upon certain conditions to all who visit therein the Rosary chapel or statue of Our Lady.
This has been called the "Portiuncula" of the Rosary.    Adapted from www.newadvent.org

 
Our Lady of the Rosary Pope St. Pius V established this feast in 1573. The purpose was to thank God for the victory of Christians over the Turks at Lepanto—a victory attributed to the praying of the rosary. Clement XI extended the feast to the universal Church in 1716.
1st v. St. Apuleius Martyr w/Sts. Marcellus, Sergius, Bacchus; The emperor commanded they be sent to the governor of the eastern part of Syria, Antiochus, a fierce hater of Christians. Antiochus had received his position with the help of Sergius and Bacchus. “My fathers and benefactors!” he said. “Have pity on yourselves, and also on me. I do not want to condemn my benefactors to cruel tortures.” The holy martyrs replied, “For us life is Christ, and to die is gain.” He murded them.
1st v. Julian the Presbyter The Martyr suffered martyrdom for Christ with St Caesarius the Deacon at Terracina, Italy in the first century.  St Caesarius was thrown into prison for insulting the pagan gods. They later took him in bonds to the temple of Apollo, but before they got him near the pagan temple it collapsed, killing pagan priests and many people.
3rd v. Saint Pelagia Martyr of Tarsus in Cilicia (southeastern Asia Minor); St Pelagia, by the grace of God, met Bishop Linus. Pelagia immediately recognized the bishop who had appeared to her in a dream. She fell at his feet, requesting Baptism. At the bishop's prayer a spring of water flowed from the ground; Bishop Linus made the Sign of the Cross over St Pelagia, and during the Mystery of Baptism, angels appeared and covered the chosen one of God with a bright mantle. After giving the pious virgin Holy Communion, Bishop Linus offered a prayer of thanksgiving to the Lord with her, and then sent her to continue her journey. She then exchanged her expensive clothing for a simple white garment, and distributed her possessions to the poor. Returning to her servants, St Pelagia told them about Christ, and many of them were converted and believed.

Item apud Augústam Euphratésiam sanctæ Júliæ Vírginis, quæ, sub Marciáno Præside, martyrium consummávit.
    Also in the province of the Euphrates, St. Julia, virgin, who suffered martyrdom under the governor Marcian.
Patávii sanctæ Justínæ, Vírginis et Mártyris; quæ, a beáto Prosdócimo, sancti Petri discípulo, baptizáta, et, cum in fide Christi constánter persísteret, Máximi Præsidis jussu, transverberáta gládio, migrávit ad Dóminum.
    At Padua, St. Justina, virgin and martyr, who was baptized by blessed Prosdocimus, a disciple of St. Peter.  Because she remained firm in the faith of Christ, she was put to the sword by order of the governor Maximus, and thus went to God.

336 Pope Mark successor to St. Sylvester I; elected January 18, 336; During pontificate erected two
         basilicas on land donated by Emperor Constantine I. He died in Rome on October 7 after only eight months.
4th v. St. Polychronius the Presbyter Martyr; For his fine work the saint received much money, with which he built a
        church; ordained priest; participated in 1st. Ecumenical Council; martyred by Arian heretics at the
church altar
 492 St. Canog Martyr and eldest son of the local king of Brecknock
6th v. St. Augustus Abbot of Bourges, in France friend of St. Germanus of Paris.
 513 St. Dubtach The arch-bishop of Armagh Ireland, from 497 until his death.
 570 St. Augustus Abbot of Bourges, in France
 590 St. Palladius Bishop of Saintes from 570
6th v. St. Helanus Irish hermit who went to France with six brothers and three sisters. They settled in Reims, where Helanus became a priest.
 
675 St. Osyth  Martyred nun
 850 St. Adalgis Bishop and influential churchman also served Emperor Lothair I of the Franks
1101-1206 St. Artaldus; cultus of St. Artaldus, called simply “Blessed by the Carthusians”, was confirmed for the diocese of Belley in 1134;  like his master St. Bruno, he was consulted by the Pope, and when he was well over eighty, he was called from his monastery to be bishop of Belley, in spite of his vehement and reasonable protest. However, after less than two years of episcopate, his resignation was accepted, and he thankfully returned to Arvieres, where he lived in peace for the rest of his days. During his last years, he was visited by St. Hugh of Lincoln, who had come into France, and who, while he was prior of the charterhouse of Witham, had induced Henry II to become a benefactor of Arvieres.
1373 In Suécia Translátio córporis sanctæ Birgíttæ Víduæ.
1412 Saint Sergius the Obedient of the Kiev Caves, Near Caves, was a Greek who began his monastic life on Mount Athos. Later, he came to Russia and settled in the monastery of the Life-Giving Trinity under the guidance of St Sergius of Radonezh (July 5) and (September 25). After several years, with the blessing of the igumen, St Sergius went into the Vologda forests and settled at the bank of the River Nurma. There he set up a cross and built a chapel with a cell, in which he lived an ascetical life in deep silence, “going forth in angelic life,” and patiently enduring temptation from demons and malevolent people.
1412  Saint Sergius of Nurma was originally from Greece, and traveled from Mt. Athos in order to converse with St Sergius of Radonezh (September 25) and to ask his advice on spiritual matters, even though he himself was already an experienced Elder.
1455 Saint Martinian of White Lake; with blessing of St Cyril, he occupied himself copying of books; ordained deacon then hieromonk; After death St Cyril (+ 1427), Martinian withdrew to deserted island on Lake Vozha; Several monks gradually gathered; St Martinian established for them church of the Transfiguration of the Lord introduced a general Rule for the inhabitants. consented to become igumen of the monastery and brought it into an improved condition.
Feast of the "Tenderness" Icon
1470 BD MATTHEW OF MANTUA; OP successful preacher, preparing himself for that ministry by long periods of recollection, and an upholder of strict observance in his order; pirates set free the friar but when he saw that among the other prisoners were a woman and her young daughter, he went back to the pirate captain and offered himself in their place. The ruffian was so astonished at the request that he let all three of them go; Bd Matthew died (after having asked his prior’s permission to do so)
1763 St. Joseph of Khevi; a native of Khevi (northern Georgia) served as a priest. In addition to being great warriors, the people of Khevi throughout history been remarkably steadfast in Christian Faith; churches and monasteries in Khevi are extraordinary beauty and inaccessibility deliberately built in mountainous places; reaching them demands greatest zeal.
1812 The October 7 Feast of the “Tenderness” Icon (May 21) was established in memory of the deliverance of Pskov from the invasion of Napoleon in 1812.
99 martyrs were from Crete.
       St. Justina of Padua Bartolo Longo: from Spiritualism to the Apostolate of the Rosary (III)
Bartolo Longo journeyed through the entire valley of Pompeii, evangelizing the peasants, encouraging them to pray and recite the rosary. In order to go further in his project to establish a society of the Holy Rosary, he needed a painting of Our Lady, as the liturgy demanded.  He went to Naples to make the purchase, and there he unexpectedly met Father Radente who offered him an old painting of Our Lady of the Rosary that he had left in a nun's keeping ten years before. When Bartolo saw the poor state of the painting he was about the turn down the offer, but the nun's insistence convinced him.  So he returned to Pompeii with this painting hauled in a cart which normally transported manure.
While, at the local bishop's suggestion, he was looking for funds to build a new church, the painting was displayed on February 13, 1876, in the Church of the Holy Savior, after undergoing an initial and very necessary restoration. That same day a girl of twelve, for whose healing her aunt had just left an offering, was miraculously cured of a disease that doctors had considered incurable. This was the first of a long series of miracles and graces in the history of the Shrine of Pompeii. Upon the abundance of graces granted through the intercession of Our Lady of the Rosary of Pompeii, throngs of pilgrims and donations arrived first from Naples and its region, then from all of Italy, finally from the entire world, prompting Pope Leo XIII to say: “God uses this image to grant countless graces that have moved the universe.”


Day 9 of 40 Days for Life
We knew that driving the 40 Days for Life UNITED bus for 18,000 miles from coast to coast would mean stopping for maintenance. But this stop was unexpected! Thankfully, the mechanic worked on it. The unexpected -- a rock -- took out the muffler and tailpipe. We do have a backup plan -- and a backup vehicle. The tour will continue! "Expect the unexpected" is also something to keep in mind when you're praying outside the abortion center ... like when volunteers hear about a baby spared from abortion -- but only years after the fact.

Moms and dads will sometimes stop and show the vigil participants a photo of the child that was saved. Occasionally, they even get to meet the child in person. This experience puts a face on what abortion is all about - a living, breathing, beautiful child who was in imminent danger of becoming yet another abortion statistic. It's why we show up and pray.

Enjoy today's report ... and find the 40 Days for Life location nearest you.
A little trouble with a rock, a muffler and a tailpipe is not enough to stop the UNITED tour! After $1,030 in repairs, the UNITED bus will be back on the road

It's not uncommon to have a heckler ask 40 Days for Life volunteers "How many unwanted babies have you adopted?" It's not a serious argument, but in York, Pennsylvania, we met an expectant mother who had saved three babies by offering to adopt them. Ultimately, all three mothers chose to parent their children, but our faithful volunteer continues to support them. After our visit, she left to bring baby supplies and gifts to one of the families that chose life.
Our vigil team even rents a house across the street from Planned Parenthood to have a base for supporting expectant mothers going through challenging pregnancies.

We pressed on in our backup van ... and headed to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where Maggie from Silent No More offered her testimony and shared how her story helped save another mother from making the same mistake.

In Pittsburgh, more than 100 turned out at rush hour for our western Pennsylvania rally. In this UNITED 40 Days for Life campaign, we have experienced great Christian unity. This event's speakers included clergy from several different Christian faith communities.

As the sun set, we said goodbye to this beautiful city ... and now it's on to West Virginia.
TODAY! Thursday, October 6
12:00 PM -- Vienna, WV
5:00 PM -- Sharonville, OH
7:00 PM -- Cincinnati, OH (United rally)
Friday, October 7
9:30 AM -- Dayton, OH
12:00 PM -- Columbus, OH
3:15 PM -- Canton, OH
6:30 PM -- Cleveland, OH (United rally)
Saturday, October 8
9:30 AM -- Southfield, MI
11:00 AM -- Ann Arbor, MI (United rally)
1:00 PM -- Toledo, OH
6:00 PM -- Indianapolis, IN (United rally)
See all upcoming tour stops at: 40daysunited.com

Falls Church, Virginia
Ken was praying at the 40 Days for Life vigil when a man parked his car and asked if he could tell him a story ... [more]

Metkovic, Croatia
Ever since 40 Days for Life began, it's become fairly common for people to look for vigils to visit while they're traveling ... [more]

And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth. --John 1:14

Heavenly Father, I thank you for your love and saving grace in Christ Jesus. Help us to realize every day the great blessing we have in our Savior. I pray that we will rise every morning with excitement and zeal, looking forward to walking another day in your footsteps fully knowing that you continue to dwell among us.
 Our Lady of the Rosary Pope St. Pius V established this feast in 1573. The purpose was to thank God for the victory of Christians over the Turks at Lepanto—a victory attributed to the praying of the rosary. Clement XI extended the feast to the universal Church in 1716.
Festum sacratíssimi Rosárii beátæ Maríæ Vírginis; itémque sanctæ Maríæ de Victória commemorátio, quam sanctus Pius Quintus, Póntifex Máximus, ob insígnem victóriam a Christiánis bello naváli, ejúsdem sanctíssimæ Dei Genitrícis auxílio, hac ipsa die de Turcis reportátam, quotánnis fíeri instítuit.
    The Feast of the Most Holy Rosary of the blessed Virgin Mary, and the commemoration of St. Mary of Victory, which Pope Pius V instituted to be kept yearly in memory of the great victory granted on this day in a naval battle to the Christians over the Turks, by the help of the Mother of God.

The development of the rosary has a long history. First, a practice developed of praying 150 Our Fathers in imitation of the 150 Psalms. Then there was a parallel practice of praying 150 Hail Marys. Soon a mystery of Jesus' life was attached to each Hail Mary. Though Mary's giving the rosary to St. Dominic is recognized as unhistorical, the development of this prayer form owes much to the followers of St. Dominic. One of them, Alan de la Roche, was known as “the apostle of the rosary.” He founded the first Confraternity of the Rosary in the 15th century. In the 16th century the rosary was developed to its present form—with the 15 mysteries (joyful, sorrowful and glorious). In 2002, Pope John Paul II added the Mysteries of Light to this devotion.
Comment: The purpose of the rosary is to help us meditate on the great mysteries of our salvation. Pius XII called it a compendium of the gospel. The main focus is on Jesus—his birth, life, death and resurrection. The Our Fathers remind us that Jesus' Father is the initiator of salvation. The Hail Marys remind us to join with Mary in contemplating these mysteries. They also make us aware that Mary was and is intimately joined with her Son in all the mysteries of his earthly and heavenly existence. The Glorys remind us that the purpose of all life is the glory of the Trinity.
The rosary appeals to many. It is simple. The constant repetition of words helps create an atmosphere in which to contemplate the mysteries of God. We sense that Jesus and Mary are with us in the joys and sorrows of life. We grow in hope that God will bring us to share in the glory of Jesus and Mary forever.
Quote: “[The rosary] sets forth the mystery of Christ in the very way in which it is seen by St. Paul in the celebrated ‘hymn’ of the Epistle to the Philippians—kenosis [self-emptying], death and exaltation (2:6-11).... By its nature the recitation of the rosary calls for a quiet rhythm and a lingering pace, helping the individual to meditate on the mysteries of the Lord’s life as grasped by the heart of her who was closer to the Lord than all others” (Paul VI, Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, 45, 47).

OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY
THE rosary is a prayer, or series of prayers, in which, during the recitation of the Lord’s Prayer and “Glory be to the Father”…fifteen times each, and of the Angelical Salutation one hundred and fifty times, divided into ones and tens, the faithful are taught to honour our divine Redeemer by meditating on the fifteen principal mysteries of His life and of His Mother. It is therefore an epitome of the gospel, a history of the life, sufferings and triumphant victory of Jesus Christ, and an exposition of what He did in the flesh for our salvation.
   The principal object of the devotion of every Christian ought to be always to bear in mind these mysteries, to return to God a perpetual homage of love, praise and thanksgiving for them, to implore His mercy through them, to make them the subject of meditation, and to mould his affections, regulate his life and form his spirit by the impressions which they make on his soul. The rosary as a method of doing this is easy in itself and adapted to the slowest or feeblest capacity and at the same time sublime and faithful in the exercise of all the highest acts of prayer, contemplation and interior virtues. These are best comprised in the prayer which our Lord Himself vouchsafed to teach us, which those who penetrate the spirit of each word can never weary in repeating and as well as the “Our Father”, the “Hail Mary” is often repeated in the rosary because, as it contains praise of the Incarnation, it best suits a devotion instituted to honour that mystery. Though it be addressed to the Mother of God, with an invocation of her intercession, it is chiefly a praise and thanksgiving to the Son for the divine mercy therein.
   As the Roman Martyrology today reminds us, Pope St Pius V in 1572 ordered an annual commemoration of our Lady of Victory to be made to implore God’s mercy on His Church and all the faithful, and to thank Him for His protection and numberless benefits, particularly for His having delivered Christendom from the arms of the infidel Turks by the sea victory of Lepanto in the previous year, a victory which seemed a direct answer to the prayers and processions of the rosary confraternities at Rome made while the battle was actually being fought. A year later Gregory XIII changed the name of the observance to that of the Rosary, fixing it for the first Sunday in October (the day of Lepanto). On August 5, the feast of the dedication of St Mary Major, in the year 1716, again while Marian processions were taking place, the Turks were again signally defeated, by Prince Eugene at Peterwardein in Hungary. In thanksgiving therefor, Pope Clement XI decreed that the feast of the Holy Rosary should be observed throughout the Western church. The feast is now kept on the date of the battle of Lepanto, October 7 (except by the Dominicans, who observe the original first Sunday of the month).
   According to the tradition of the Order of Preachers, recognized by many popes and accepted in the Roman Breviary, the rosary, just as we know it, was devised by St Dominic himself, and used by him in his missionary work among the Albigensians, in consequence of a vision in which our Lady revealed it to him. No tradition of the kind has been more passionately supported and few have been more devastatingly attacked. Its truth was first questioned some two hundred years ago, and the resulting controversy has been carried on at intervals ever since. It is well known that the use of beads or similar objects as a device for aiding the memory and keeping count is not only pre-Dominican but pre-Christian; and the monks of the Eastern church use a rosary of ancient origin, having 100 or more beads, on a different plan from and entirely independent of the Western devotion. Nor is it now disputed that the custom of saying a number of Paters or Aves (often 150, corresponding to the number of the psalms), and keeping count of them by means of a string of beads, etc., was widespread in the West before the thirteenth century. The famous Lady Godiva of Coventry, who died about 1075, left by will to a certain statue of our Lady “the circlet of precious stones which she had threaded on a cord in order that by fingering them one after another she might count her prayers exactly” (William of Malmesbury). Moreover there seems to he no doubt that such strings of beads were used for long only for the counting of Paters. In the thirteenth century and throughout the middle ages such articles were called “paternosters”; their makers were “paternosterers”; and in London they worked in the street we still call Paternoster Row.
   A learned Dominican bishop, Thomas Esser, maintained that meditation while reciting numerous Aves was first practised by certain Carthusians in the fourteenth century. None of the stories about the origin of the rosary current before the fifteenth century mention St Dominic, and for another hundred years there was no uniformity in the way it was said, even among the Friars, Preachers themselves. None of the early accounts of St Dominic make any mention of the rosary, either in referring to his methods of, prayer or to anything else; the early constitutions of his order are quite silent about it; and there is little trace of a rosary in early Dominican iconography, from Fra Angelico’s paintings down to St Dominic’s sumptuous tomb at Bologna (finished in 1532).
   Under stress of the facts just summarized recent opinion regarding the origin of the rosary has diverged considerably from the views that prevailed at the close of the sixteenth century. Writing in 1922, Dom Louis Gougaud states that
“the various elements which enter into the composition of that Catholic devotion commonly called the rosary are the product of a long and gradual development which began before St Dominic’s time, which continued without his having any share in it and which only attained its final shape several centuries after his death”.
Father Getino, O.P., considers that St Dominic was the originator of the devotion on the ground that he presumably popularized the practice of reciting multiplied Aves, without, however, any special direction as to the number of repetitions or the systematic insertion of Paters. Father Bede Jarrett, O.P., on the other hand, considers that St Dominic’s special contribution was the breaking up of the Aves into groups of ten by the insertion of Paters; while Father Mortier, O.P., asserts with all the emphasis of italics that the rosary as conceived by St Dominic was not properly speaking a devotion, a formula of prayer; it was a method of preaching. Father Petitot, O.P., regards the story of the vision of our Lady as true symbolically but not historically.
If it be necessary to abandon the idea of its invention and even the propagation of its use by St Dominic himself, the Western rosary is none the less properly distinguished as the Dominican rosary; the friars of his order gave it the form it now has and for centuries have zealously spread its use throughout the world, bringing thereby unnumbered blessings to countless souls and sending up a ceaseless paean of worship before God.
  No Christian is too simple or unlettered to make use of the rosary; it may be the vehicle of high contemplation as well as of the simplest petition or aspiration; as a form of private prayer it comes only after the biblical psalms and those prayers with which the Church as Church praises almighty God and His Christ. The idea is familiar to us that so great a means of good should be publicly celebrated in her liturgy; nevertheless, such was the over-crowding of the calendar even in those days, this was one of the feasts that Pope Benedict XIV’s commission wished to dispense with.
As to the origin of this feast consult Benedict XIV, De festis, bk ii, ch. 12, n. 16 and Esser, Unseres Lieben Frauen Rosenkranz, p. 354. The case against the claim made for St Dominic in the matter of the institution of the rosary will be found most fully presented in the Acta Sanctorum, August, vol. i, pp. 422 seq. in The Month, October 1900 to April 1901 (by Fr Thurston; summarized by him in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. xiii) and in Father Holzapfel, S. Dominikus und der Rosenkranz (1903). There have, of course, been many attempted vindications of the Dominican tradition, but it is instructive to contrast the uncompromising tone of such books as that of Father Mézard, O.P., Étude sur les Origines du Rosaire (1912), or that of Father W. Lescher, O.P., St Dominic and the Rosary (1902), with the attitude of Father Mortier, O.P., Histoire des Maïtres Genéraux O.P., vol. i (1903), pp. 15—16 and vol. vii, p. 189 n., or of Father Bede Jarrett, O.P., Life of St Dominic (1924), p. 110. See also The Month, October 1924; L. Gougaud in La vie et les arts liturgiques, October 1922, and July 1924 J. Guiraud in his Life of St Dominic, p. 11, and his Cartulaire de Prouille, pp. 328—330 F. M. Willam, The Rosary, its History and Meaning (1953); and Y. Gourdel in vol. ii of Maria: Etude sur La Ste Vierge (1951).
1st v. St. Apuleius Martyr w/Sts. Marcellus, Sergius, Bacchus; The emperor commanded that they be sent to the governor of the eastern part of Syria, Antiochus, a fierce hater of Christians. Antiochus had received his position with the help of Sergius and Bacchus. My fathers and benefactors! he said. Have pity on yourselves, and also on me. I do not want to condemn my benefactors to cruel tortures. The holy martyrs replied, For us life is Christ, and to die is gain.
Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum Marcélli et Apuléji, qui prius quidem Simóni mago adhæsérunt; sed, vidéntes mirabília quæ per Apóstolum Petrum Dóminus operabátur, ambo, relícto Simóne, se doctrínæ Apostólicæ tradidérunt, ac, post passiónem Apostolórum, sub Aureliáno Consulári, corónam martyrii reportárunt, sepultíque sunt non longe ab Urbe.
    At Rome, the holy martyrs Marcellus and Apulcius, who at first were followers of Simon Magus, but seeing the wonders which the Lord performed through the apostle Peter, they abandoned Simon and embraced the apostolic doctrine.  After the death of the apostles, under the proconsul Aurelian, they won the crown of martyrdom and were buried near the city.
 
They were followers of Simon Magus, the Roman magician who tried to confront St. Peter and to overthrow Christianity. St. Peter converted Apuleius and his companions. They are believed to have been martyred in Rome shortly after St. Peter. They are venerated as martyrs in Capua, Italy
.
The Martyrs Sergius and Bacchus in Syria were appointed to high positions in the army by the emperor Maximian (284-305), who did not know that they were Christians. Envious people informed Maximian that his two trusted counsellors did not honor the pagan gods. This was considered to be a crime against the state. The emperor, wanting to convince himself of the truth of the accusation, ordered Sergius and Bacchus to offer sacrifice to the idols, but they replied that they honored the One God and worshiped only Him.
Maximian commanded that the martyrs be stripped of the insignia of military rank (their belts, gold pendants, and rings), and then dressed them in feminine clothing. They were led through the city with an iron chains around their necks, and the people mocked them. Then he summoned Sergius and Bacchus to him again and in a friendly manner advised them not to be swayed by Christian fables, but to return to the Roman gods. The saints refuted the emperor's words, and demonstrated the folly of worshiping the pagan gods.
The emperor commanded that they be sent to the governor of the eastern part of Syria, Antiochus, a fierce hater of Christians. Antiochus had received his position with the help of Sergius and Bacchus. “My fathers and benefactors!” he said. “Have pity on yourselves, and also on me. I do not want to condemn my benefactors to cruel tortures.
”  The holy martyrs replied, “For us life is Christ, and to die is gain.” The enraged Antiochus ordered Bacchus to be mercilessly beaten, and the holy martyr surrendered his soul to the Lord. They shod Sergius with iron sandals with nails in their soles and sent him to another city, where he was beheaded with the sword.
1st v. Julian the Presbyter The Martyr suffered martyrdom for Christ with St Caesarius the Deacon at Terracina, Italy in the first century.  St Caesarius was thrown into prison for insulting the pagan gods. They later took him in bonds to the temple of Apollo, but before they got him near the pagan temple it collapsed, killing the pagan priests and many of the people.

About the same time the idolators arrested the Christian priest Julian. At the empreor's orders, the holy martyrs were cast into the sea, but their bodies floated to the surface, and Christians buried the sufferers.  The relics of St Caesarius are kept in Rome.

St. Justina of Padua
All that is known of Justina of Padua is from an apparent twelfth-century forgery that says she was baptized by St. Prosdocimus, a disciple of St. Peter and reputed first bishop of Padua, and was then martyred for her faith
.

ST JUSTINA, VIRGIN AND MARTYR
ST VENANTIUS FORTUNATUS, bishop of Poitiers early in the seventh century, ranks this Justina among the most illustrious virgins whose sanctity and triumph have adorned the Church, saying that her name makes Padua famous, as Euphemia does Chalcedon and Eulalia the city of Mérida. And in his poem on the life of St Martin he bids those who visit Padua kiss the sacred sepulchre of the blessed Justina. A church was built at Padua in her honour early in the sixth century, and herein in 1117 her alleged relics were found. About the same time appeared a clumsily forged account of her passion, which pretends that St Justina was baptized by St Prosdocimus, “a disciple of the blessed Peter”, who gave this information to the writer. This Prosdocimus, we are told, was the first bishop of Padua and a martyr under Nero, and St Justina was slain by the sword for her faithfulness to Christ, with a number of particulars for the truth of which there is no evidence.
The fifteenth-century Benedictine “reform” of St Justina (now the Italian Cassinese congregation) took its name from the abbey of this name at Padua, where it was inaugurated.
See the Acta Sanctorum,, October, vol. iii, but there is an older text of the Passio printed in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. x (1891), pp. 467—470; and ibid., vol. xi (1892), pp. 354— 358, an account of the alleged discovery of her relics in 1117. See also Allard, Histoire des persecutions, vol. iv, pp. 430 seq., and Trifone’s three articles in the Rivista Stories Bene­dettina, 1910 and 1911. As for Prosdocimus, of whom the first indication of cultus is in 860, his spurious twelfth-century biography has been printed in the Acta Sanctorum (Novem­ber, vol. iii) with all necessary comments and cautions. See also Lanzoni, Le diocesi d’Italia, vol. ii, pp. 911—915, and Leclercq in DAC., vol. xiii, cc. 238—239.
3rd v. Saint Pelagia Martyr of Tarsus in Cilicia (southeastern Asia Minor); St Pelagia, by the grace of God, met Bishop Linus. Pelagia immediately recognized the bishop who had appeared to her in a dream. She fell at his feet, requesting Baptism. At the bishop's prayer a spring of water flowed from the ground; Bishop Linus made the Sign of the Cross over St Pelagia, and during the Mystery of Baptism, angels appeared and covered the chosen one of God with a bright mantle. After giving the pious virgin Holy Communion, Bishop Linus offered a prayer of thanksgiving to the Lord with her, and then sent her to continue her journey. She then exchanged her expensive clothing for a simple white garment, and distributed her possessions to the poor. Returning to her servants, St Pelagia told them about Christ, and many of them were converted and believed.

She lived in the third century, during the reign of Diocletian (284-305), daughter of illustrious pagans. When she heard about Jesus Christ from her Christian friends, she believed in Him and desired to preserve her virginity, dedicating her whole life to the Lord.  Emperor Diocletian's heir (a boy he adopted), saw the maiden Pelagia, was captivated by her beauty and wanted her to be his wife. The holy virgin told the youth that she was betrothed to Christ the Immortal Bridegroom, and had renounced earthly marriage.
Pelagia's reply greatly angered the young man, but he decided to leave her in peace for awhile, hoping that she would change her mind. At the same time, Pelagia convinced her mother to let her visit the nurse who had raised her in childhood. She secretly hoped to find Bishop Linus of Tarsus, who had fled to a mountain during a persecution against Christians, and to be baptized by him. She had seen the face of Bishop Linus in a dream, which made a profound impression upon her. The holy bishop told her to be baptized. St Pelagia traveled in a chariot to visit her nurse, dressed in rich clothes and accompanied by a whole retinue of servants, as her mother wished.
Along the way St Pelagia, by the grace of God, met Bishop Linus. Pelagia immediately recognized the bishop who had appeared to her in the dream. She fell at his feet, requesting Baptism. At the bishop's prayer a spring of water flowed from the ground.
Bishop Linus made the Sign of the Cross over St Pelagia, and during the Mystery of Baptism, angels appeared and covered the chosen one of God with a bright mantle. After giving the pious virgin Holy Communion, Bishop Linus offered a prayer of thanksgiving to the Lord with her, and then sent her to continue her journey. She then exchanged her expensive clothing for a simple white garment, and distributed her possessions to the poor. Returning to her servants, St Pelagia told them about Christ, and many of them were converted and believed.
She tried to convert her own mother to Christ, but the obdurate woman sent a message to Diocletian's son that Pelagia was a Christian and did not wish to be his wife. The youth realized that Pelagia was lost to him, and he fell upon his sword in his despair. Pelagia's mother feared the emperor's wrath, so she tied her daughter up and led her to Diocletian's court as a Christian who was also responsible for the death of the heir to the throne. The emperor was captivated by the unusual beauty of the virgin and tried to turn her from her faith in Christ, promising her every earthly blessing if she would become his wife.
The holy virgin refused the emperor's offer with contempt and said, “You are insane, Emperor, saying such things to me. I will not do your bidding, and I loathe your vile marriage, since I have Christ, the King of Heaven, as my Bridegroom. I do not desire your worldly crowns which last only a short while. The Lord in His heavenly Kingdom has prepared three imperishable crowns for me. The first is for faith, since I have believed in the true God with all my heart; the second is for purity, because I have dedicated my virginity to Him; the third is for martyrdom, since I want to accept every suffering for Him and offer up my soul because of my love for Him.”
Diocletian sentenced Pelagia to be burned in a red-hot bronze bull. Not permitting the executioners to touch her body, the holy martyr signed herself with the Sign of the Cross, and went into the brazen bull and her flesh melted like myrrh, filling the whole city with fragrance. St Pelagia's bones remained unharmed and were removed by the pagans to a place outside the city. Four lions then came out of the wilderness and sat around the bones letting neither bird nor wild beast get at them. The lions protected the relics of the saint until Bishop Linus came to that place. He gathered them up and buried them with honor. Later, a church was built over her holy relics.
The Service to the holy Virgin Martyr Pelagia of Tarsus says that she was “deemed worthy of most strange and divine visions.” She is also commemorated on May 4.

336 Pope St Mark successor to St. Sylvester I; elected January 18, 336. He was the son of Priscus and a priest of Rome. During his pontificate he erected two basilicas on land donated by Emperor Constantine I. He died in Rome on October 7 after only eight months.
Romæ, via Ardeatína, sancti Marci, Papæ et Confessóris.
    At Rome, on the Ardeatine Way, the death of St. Mark, pope and confessor.
   His cult is now confined to local calendars.

336 ST MARK, POPE
ST MARK was by birth a Roman and served God among the clergy of that church.  He was the first pope to be elected after the freeing of Christianity by Constantine.  He did not let the new conditions relax his watchfulness, but endeavoured rather to redouble his zeal during the peace of the Church; knowing that, if men cease openly to persecute the faithful, the Devil never allows them any truce. The saint contributed to advance the service of God during the pontificate of St Silvester after whose death he was himself placed in the apostolic chair on January 18, 336. He held the dignity only eight months and twenty days, dying on October 7 following. St Mark perhaps founded the church that bears his name and built another at the cemetery of Balbina, and he possibly granted or confirmed the right of the bishop of Ostia to consecrate the bishop of Rome. A fragmentary poem on St Mark by Pope St Damasus is referred to this pope by some: it extols Mark’s disinterestedness and spirit of prayer.
In the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. iii, will be found what little is known of St Mark. See also the Liber Pontificalis (ed. Duchesne), vol. i, pp. 202—204.

336 Pope St. Mark; Constantine the Great's letter, which summoned a conference of bishops for the investigation of the Donatist dispute, is directed to Pope Miltiades and one Mark (Eusebius, Church History X.5). This Mark was evidently a member of the Roman clergy, either priest or first deacon, and is perhaps identical with the pope. The date of Mark's election (18 Jan., 336) is given in the Liberian Catalogue of popes (Duchesne, “Liber Pontificalis”, I, 9), and is historically certain; so is the day of his death (7 Oct.), which is specified in the same way in the “Depositio episcoporum” of Philocalus's “Chronography”, the first edition of which appeared also in 336.
Date of birth unknown; consecrated 18 Jan., 336; d. 7 Oct., 336. After the death of Pope Sylvester, Mark was raised to the Roman episcopal chair as his successor. The “Liber Pontificalis” says that he was a Roman, and that his father's name was Priscus. Constantine the Great's letter, which summoned a conference of bishops for the investigation of the Donatist dispute, is directed to Pope Miltiades and one Mark (Eusebius, Church History X.5). This Mark was evidently a member of the Roman clergy, either priest or first deacon, and is perhaps identical with the pope. The date of Mark's election (18 Jan., 336) is given in the Liberian Catalogue of popes (Duchesne, "Liber Pontificalis", I, 9), and is historically certain; so is the day of his death (7 Oct.), which is specified in the same way in the “Depositio episcoporum” of Philocalus's “Chronography”, the first edition of which appeared also in 336. Concerning an interposition of the pope in the Arian troubles, which were then so actively affecting the Church in the East, nothing has been handed down. An alleged letter of his to St. Athanasius is a later forgery. Two constitutions are attributed to Mark by the author of the “Liber Pontificalis” (ed. Duchesne, I, 20). According to the one, he invested the Bishop of Ostia with the pallium, and ordained that this bishop was to consecrate the Bishop of Rome. It is certain that, towards the end of the fourth century, the Bishop of Ostia did bestow the episcopal consecration upon the newly-elected pope; Augustine expressly bears witness to this (Breviarium Collationis, III, 16). It is indeed possible that Mark had confirmed this privilege by a constitution, which does not preclude the fact that the Bishop of Ostia before this time usually consecrated the new pope. As for the bestowal of the pallium, the account cannot be established from sources of the fourth century, since the oldest memorials which show this badge, belong to the fifth and sixth centuries, and the oldest written mention of a pope bestowing the pallium dates from the sixth century (cf. Grisar, “Das römische Pallium und die altesten liturgischen Schärpen”, in “Festschrift des deutschen Campo Santo in Rom”, Freiburg im Br., 1897, 83-114).
4th v. Polychronius the Presbyter Martyr; For his fine work the saint received much money, with which he built a church; ordained to the priesthood; participated in 1st. Ecumenical Council; martyred by Arian heretics at the altar of the church
Son of a landowner, raised with a love for work and in Christian piety. Reaching maturity, Polychronius left his parents' home for Constantinople and began to work for one of the rich vineyard owners.
The vineyard owner was amazed at the youth's love for toil and the ascetic life. For his fine work the saint received much money, with which he built a church. Soon he was ordained to the priesthood. According to Tradition, St Polychronius participated in the First Ecumenical Council. He was martyred by Arian heretics at the altar of the church (4th Century).

6th v. St. Augustus Abbot of Bourges, in France friend of St. Germanus of Paris.
Apud Bitúricas, in Aquitánia, sancti Augústi, Presbyteri et Confessóris.
    At Bourges, St. Augustus, priest and confessor.

Also called Aout, Augustus discovered the remains of St. Ursinus.

Sts. Sergius & Bacchus martyrs in the Roman army under Maximian
In Província quæ nuncupátur Augústa Euphratésia, sanctórum Mártyrum Sérgii et Bacchi, nobílium Romanórum, sub Maximiáno Imperatóre.  Ex his Bacchus támdiu nervis crudis cæsus est, quoadúsque, toto córpore discíssus, in Christi confessióne emítteret spíritum; Sérgius vero clavátis cothúrnis pedes indútus, et, cum in fide fixus manéret, data senténtia, jussus est decollári.  Beáti autem Sérgii nómine locus ubi quiéscit, Sergiópolis appellátus est, et, ob præclára mirácula, frequénti Christianórum concúrsu honorátur.
    In the province of the Euphrates, the holy martyrs Sergius and Bacchus, noble Romans, in the time of Emperor Maximian.  Bacchus was scourged with rough sinews until his body was completely mangled, and breathed his last in the confession of Christ.  Sergius had his feet forced into shoes full of sharp-pointed nails, but, remaining unshaken in the faith, he was sentenced to be beheaded.  The place where he rests is called after him Sergiopolis, and, on account of the frequent miracles wrought there, is honoured by large gatherings of Christians
This legend has Sergius an officer in the Roman army and Bacchus, an officer under him, and both were friends of Emperor Maximian. When they did not enter a temple of Jupiter with the Emperor, he ordered them to do so. When they further refused his order that they sacrifice to pagan gods, they were humiliated by being led through the streets of Arabissus in women's garb and then sent to Rosafa, Mesopotamia, where they were scourged so terribly that Bacchus died of the scourging; Sergius was then tortured further and beheaded.
492 St. Canog Martyr and eldest son of the local king of Brecknock
 in Wales. He was slain by barbarians at Merthyr-Cynog. In Brittany, France, he is called St Cenneur. Several churches in Wales honor him
.
6th century St. Helanus Irish hermit who went to France with six brothers and three sisters. They settled in Reims, where Helanus became a priest.
In pago Rheménsi sancti Heláni Presbyteri.
    In the diocese of Rheims, St. Helanus, priest.
513 St. Dubtach The arch-bishop of Armagh Ireland, from 497 until his death.
590 St. Palladius Bishop of Saintes from 570
His sainthood is questionable.

675 St. Osyth  Martyred nun
Also called Osith and Sytha. Known mainly through legends, she was supposedly the daughter of a chieftain of the Mercians in England and Wilburga, daughter of the powerful pagan king Penda of Mercia. Raised in a convent, Osyth desired to become a nun but was married against her will to King Sighere of Essex, by whom she had a son. Eventually, she won his permission to enter a convent, and she established a monastery on land at Chich, Essex, donated by Sighere, where she served as an abbess. She was reputedly slain by Danish raiders and is thus depicted in art as carrying her own head. There are historical difficulties associated with her existence, especially as no mention is made of her by Bede in his Ecclesiastical History
.

675 ST OSYTH, VIRGIN AND MARTYR
According to her legend St Osyth was the daughter of a Mercian chief, Frithwald, and his wife Wilburga, said to have been a daughter of Penda of Mercia. She was brought up in a nunnery, perhaps at Aylesbury, and wished herself to become a nun; but her parents affianced her to Sighere, king of the East Saxons. If this be the Sighere mentioned by St Bede, he apostatized from the faith during a pestilence about 665, but was, presumably, reconciled by the bishop Jaruman. This man had a passion for hunting, and when after the wedding he attempted to embrace his wife, against her will, his attention was distracted to a stray stag he went off in pursuit, and on his return he found his bride had gone. She made her way to the East Anglian bishops, Acca of Dunwich and Bedwin of Elmham, and Sighere, realizing that it was better to have no wife than an unwilling one, let them clothe her with the religious habit. He himself gave to St Osyth some land at a place called Chich, on a creek of the Collie between Brightlingsea and Clacton, and here she established her monastery. She governed it for some years with prudence and holiness, but it was situated in a dangerous place and disaster soon overtook it. In a piratical raid the marauders tried to carry St Osyth off, and when she fiercely resisted they smote off her head.
The body of St Osyth was taken to Aylesbury, but afterwards brought back to Chich, where a priory of Austin canons under her invocation was established in the twelfth century. Near it grew up the present village of Saint Osyth, and the memory of the martyred abbess is preserved in several other local place-names, St Osyth Creek, St Osyth Marsh, St Osyth Wick, and St Osyth’s Well. Saint Osyth is locally pronounced “Toosey”.

There is a notice in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. iii, but the difficulties of the case are more clearly presented in Stanton, Menology, pp. 477 and 673, and in DNB., vol. xlii, p. 337. The calendars collated by Edmund Bishop, which are noted in Stanton, point to the conclusion that there was a definite cultus in East Anglia. This, however, was of late growth, for there seems to be little or no trace of it before the Norman Conquest. In calendars and other references the name of this saint is frequently disguised under the form “Sythe” or some equivalent spelling.
850 St. Adalgis Bishop and influential churchman also served Emperor Lothair I of the Franks
From 830 to circa 850, Adalgis served the diocese of Novara, Italy. He also served Emperor Lothair I of the Franks.

1101-1206 St. Artaldus; cultus of St. Artaldus, called simply Blessed by the Carthusians, was confirmed for the diocese of Belley in 1834;  like his master St. Bruno, he was consulted by the Pope, and when he was well over eighty, he was called from his monastery to be bishop of Belley, in spite of his vehement and reasonable protest. However, after less than two years of episcopate, his resignation was accepted, and he thankfully returned to Arvières, where he lived in peace for the rest of his days. During his last years, he was visited by St. Hugh of Lincoln, who had come into France, and who, while he was prior of the charterhouse of Witham, had induced Henry II to become a benefactor of Arvieres.
   Artaldus (also called Arthaud) was born in the castle of Sothonod in Savoy. At the age of eighteen, he went to the court of Duke Amadeus III, but a year or two after, he became a Carthusian at Portes. After many years, being a priest and an experienced and holy religious, he was sent by the prior of the Grande Chartreuse to found a charterhouse near his home, in a valley in the Valromey significantly called "the cemetery". Here Artaldus established himself with six of his brethren from Portes. The community was no sooner well settled down, than there buildings were destroyed by fire, and St. Artaldus had to begin all over again. He chose a fresh site on the Arvieres River, and his second foundation was soon built and occupied.

   But a Carthusian cell could not contain the ever-increasing reputation of Artaldus: like his master St. Bruno, he was consulted by the Pope, and when he was well over eighty, he was called from his monastery to be bishop of Belley, in spite of his vehement and reasonable protest. However, after less than two years of episcopate, his resignation was accepted, and he thankfully returned to Arvieres, where he lived in peace for the rest of his days. During his last years, he was visited by St. Hugh of Lincoln, who had come into France, and who, while he was prior of the charterhouse of Witham, had induced Henry II to become a benefactor of Arvieres. The Magna vita of St. Hugh records a gentle rebuke administered by Hugh when Artaldus asked him for political news in the presence of the community who had turned their backs upon the world to give themselves entirely to God. The cultus of St. Artaldus, called simply Blessed by the Carthusians, was confirmed for the diocese of Belley in 1834. He was 105 years old when he died and his feast day is October 7th
.

1206 ST ARTALDUS, OR ARTHAUD, Bishop OF BELLEY
ARTALDTUS was born in the castle of Sothonod in Savoy. At the age of eighteen he went to the court of Duke Amadeus III, but a year or two after he became a Carthusian at Fortes. After many years, being a priest and an experienced and holy religious, he was sent by the prior of the Grande Chartreuse to found a charterhouse near his home, in a valley in the Valromey significantly called “The Cemetery”; here Artaldus established himself with six of his brethren from Fortes. The community was no sooner well settled down than their buildings were destroyed by fire, and St Artaldus had to begin all over again. He chose a fresh site, on the Arvières River, and his second foundation was soon built and occupied. But a Carthusian cell could not contain the ever-increasing reputation of Artaldus: like his master St Bruno, he was consulted by the pope, and when he was well over eighty he was called from his monastery to be bishop of Belley, in spite of his vehement and reasonable protests. However, after less than two years of episcopate his resignation was accepted, and he thankfully returned to Arvières, where he lived in peace for the rest of his days. During his last years he was visited by St Hugh of Lincoln, who had come into France, and who, while he was prior of the charterhouse of Witham, had induced Henry II to become a benefactor of Arvières. The Magna vita of St Hugh records a gentle rebuke administered by Hugh when Artaldus asked him for political news in the presence of a community who had turned their backs upon the world to give themselves entirely to God. The cultus of St Artaldus, called simply Blessed by the Carthusians, was confirmed for the diocese of Belley in 1834. He was 105 years old when he died.
There is a short medieval life in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. iii, but a fuller account is obtainable from Dom Le Couteulx, Annales Ordinis Cartusiensis, vols. ii and iii.
1373 In Suécia Translátio córporis sanctæ Birgíttæ Víduæ.
    In Sweden, the translation of the body of St. Bridget, widow.

1412 Saint Sergius the Obedient of the Kiev Caves, Near Caves, was a Greek who began his monastic life on Mount Athos. Later, he came to Russia and settled in the monastery of the Life-Giving Trinity under the guidance of St Sergius of Radonezh (July 5) and (September 25). After several years, with the blessing of the igumen, St Sergius went into the Vologda forests and settled at the bank of the River Nurma. There he set up a cross and built a chapel with a cell, in which he lived an ascetical life in deep silence, "going forth in angelic life," and patiently enduring temptation from demons and malevolent people.
It pleased the Lord to summon the saint from his solitude, so that in his wisdom and spiritual experience he should serve for the salvation of others. From various places forty men gathered around him, thirsting for the spiritual life. By their common efforts, the brethren built a large church in honor of the Procession of the Venerable Wood of the Life-Creating Cross of the Lord (August 1). The monastic cells were built around the church.
St Paul of Obnora (January 10) led an ascetical life about three miles from the Nurma monastery, and St Sergius often visited him for soul-profiting conversation. When it was time for St Sergius to go back to his monastery, St Paul would accompany him for two-thirds of the way. Later, a chapel was built to mark the place where they parted. St Sergius died on October 7, 1412. Since 1546, the Church has venerated him for his saintly life.

1412  Saint Sergius of Nurma was originally from Greece, and traveled from Mt. Athos in order to converse with St Sergius of Radonezh (September 25) and to ask his advice on spiritual matters, even though he himself was already an experienced Elder.
After spending some time with the great man, St Sergius went to the Vologda region near the river Nurma, a tributary of the river Obnora in order to live in solitude. Soon, monks and laymen came to join him, attracted by the holiness of his life. In time, about forty ascetics joined St Sergius in the wilderness. He established a monastery and built a church dedicated to the Transfiguration of the Lord.
One day, St Sergius encountered St Paul of Obnora (January 10) near his monastery, feeding birds from his hands. All creatures obeyed St Paul, just as they obeyed Adam in Paradise.
The two saints became very close and counseled one another in their spiritual endeavors. St Paul had St Sergius, who had been ordained to the holy priesthood on Mt. Athos, as his spiritual Father. St Paul would confess his thoughts to Sergius, and also received Holy Communion from him. When St Sergius would leave for his own home three miles away, St Paul walked with him two thirds of the way. A chapel was later built on the spot where the two saints parted.
St Paul told St Sergius that he heard church bells ringing one night while he was in the forest by the river Nurma, and that he had also seen a bright light. St Sergius predicted that a monastery would be founded there one day. He urged St Paul to build a church dedicated to the Holy Trinity.
St Sergius was twice attacked by bands of thieves. The first time they almost beat him to death. The second time they were driven off by the power of his prayers.
St Sergius fell asleep in the Lord on October 7, 1412 at an advanced age.
1455 Saint Martinian of White Lake; with blessing of St Cyril, he occupied himself copying of books; ordained deacon then hieromonk; After death St Cyril (+ 1427), Martinian withdrew to deserted island on Lake Vozha; Several monks gradually gathered; St Martinian established for them church of the Transfiguration of the Lord introduced a general Rule for the inhabitants. consented to become igumen of the monastery and brought it into an improved condition.
In the world Michael, was born in the year 1370 in the village of Berezniko, not far from the Cyrilov monastery. At age thirteen he left his parents and went secretly to St Cyril of White Lake (June 9), whom many described as a great ascetic.
The young Martinian began zealously to imitate his teacher, with whom he dwelt in complete obedience. At the monastery he studied reading and writing, and with the blessing of St Cyril, he occupied himself with the copying of books. In time Martinian was ordained deacon and then hieromonk.
After the death of St Cyril (+ 1427), Martinian withdrew to a deserted island on Lake Vozha. Several monks gradually gathered around him. St Martinian established for them the church of the Transfiguration of the Lord and introduced a general Rule for the inhabitants. Yielding to the persistent requests of the brethren of Therapon monastery, he consented to become igumen of the monastery and brought it into an improved condition.
St Martinian gave spiritual support to Great Prince Basil in the difficulties of his time, when his first-cousin Demetrius Shemyaka illicitly sought the Moscow throne. He was always an advocate of truth and justice. Afterwards, upon the entreaty of the Great Prince, the saint accepted the governance of the monastery of St Sergius of Radonezh.
In 1455, St Martinian returned to the Therapon monastery. In his last years he was grievously ill and not able to walk, so the brethren carried him to church. He died at age 85. His relics were uncovered in the year 1514, and this event is celebrated on October 7.

1470 BD MATTHEW OF MANTUA; OP successful preacher, preparing himself for that ministry by long periods of recollection, and an upholder of strict observance in his order; pirates set free the friar but when he saw that among the other prisoners were a woman and her young daughter, he went back to the pirate captain and offered himself in their place. The ruffian was so astonished at the request that he let all three of them go; Bd Matthew died (after having asked his prior’s permission to do so)
John Francis Carreri was a native of Mantua and received the name Matthew when he joined the Order of Preachers. He was a successful preacher, preparing himself for that ministry by long periods of recollection, and an upholder of strict observance in his order, but very few facts of external interest are recorded of his life, except the incident of his capture by pirates. This happened while on a voyage from Genoa to Pisa. The friar was set free, but when he saw that among the other prisoners were a woman and her young daughter, he went back to the pirate captain and offered himself in their place. The ruffian was so astonished at the request that he let all three of them go. Bd Matthew met Bd Stephana Quinzani, while she was still a child, and it is said that he promised her that she should be his heiress. Nobody knew what a mendicant friar could mean by this remark, but after Matthew’s death she began regularly every Friday to have pain in her bosom, in exactly the same way as he had formerly done as a testimony of his devotion to the Passion. Bd Matthew died (after having asked his prior’s permission so to do) at Vigevana on October 5, 1470, and twelve years later Pope Sixtus IV allowed his solemn translation and a liturgical commemoration.
An account of this beatus is furnished in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. iii; but see further the Monumenta O.P. Historica, vol. xiv, pp. 115 seq. A brief sketch in English will be found in Procter, Dominican Saints, pp. 281—283.
1763 St. Joseph of Khevi attained the heights of clairvoyance and miracle-working; Little is known about his life; a native of Khevi (in northern Georgia) and served as a priest in that village. In addition to being great warriors, the people of Khevi have throughout history been remarkably steadfast in the Christian Faith. The churches and monasteries in Khevi are extraordinary in both beauty and inaccessibility. They were deliberately built in mountainous places, as if reaching them should demand the greatest of zeal.
The Church is certain only that he was a native of Khevi (in northern Georgia) and served as a priest in that village. In addition to being great warriors, the people of Khevi have throughout history been remarkably steadfast in the Christian Faith. The churches and monasteries in Khevi are extraordinary in both beauty and inaccessibility. They were deliberately built in mountainous places, as if reaching them should demand the greatest of zeal.
The most important ornament and symbol of Khevi is the ice that perpetually caps the peak of Mt. Kazbegi. On the slope of this mountain stands Trinity Monastery, where at one time St. Nino’s cross was preserved (it is presently kept in Tbilisi, in the northern section of the iconostasis at Sioni Cathedral).
Located above Trinity Monastery, on the ice-covered, vertical cliff of Mt. Kazbegi, is a cave hermitage at 13,450 feet, known as the Bethlehem Cave. It is possible to reach this hermitage only by climbing chains let down from its height. According to the chronicle Life of Kartli, this cave has throughout history been used to store sacred objects and treasures of the Church.
The historian David Batonishvili records that St. Joseph was especially known for his love of holy objects, for keeping the strictest of fasts, and for his outstanding virtues. He climbed to the Bethlehem Hermitage and returned with a piece of the tent of the patriarch Abraham, (Georgian tradition relates that both the tent of the Patriarch Abraham and the manger of Christ were kept in the Bethlehem Cave for many centuries.) which he presented to King Erekle.
Having attained the heights of clairvoyance and miracle-working, St. Joseph reposed peacefully in the year 1763.
These 99 martyrs were from Crete.
The most prominent among them was called John, and he was known as a wonderworker. He knelt so much in prayer that he was not able to walk, and had to move about on his knees.

One day a woodsman saw him going about in this way. Thinking that it was some wild animal, he shot the saint with an arrow. It is said that the other ninety-eight Fathers also died on that same day.

It is not known when these holy ascetics lived.

1812 The October 7 Feast of the "Tenderness" Icon (May 21) was established in memory of the deliverance of Pskov from the invasion of Napoleon in 1812.

 Wednesday  Saints of this Day October  07 Nonis Octóbris  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  October 2016
Universal:   Universal: Journalists
That journalists, in carrying out their work, may always be motivated by respect for truth and a strong sense of ethics.
Evangelization:  Evangelization: World Mission Day
That World Mission Day may renew within all Christian communities the joy of the Gospel and the responsibility to announce it.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                             
       Day 8 40 Days for Life
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.