Mary the Mother of Jesus
Mary Mother of GOD
Day 19 intention 40 Days for Life
  15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
 Saints John XXIII October 11th

 Sunday  Saints of  October  11  Quinto Idus Octóbris   

Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs,
confessors, and holy virgins.

Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


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How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary


October 11, 2015
The Motherhood of Our Lady
Festum Maternitátis beátæ Maríæ Vírginis. The Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
Pope Pius XI enjoined the celebration on this day throughout the Western church of a feast in honour of the Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, in the encyclical “Lux veritatis”, published on December 25, 1931, in view of the fifteenth centenary of the Council of Ephesus.
In the third lesson of the second nocturne of the office of the new feast mention is made of the arch in the basilica of St Mary Major, which Pope St Sixtus III (432-440) decorated with mosaics shortly after the council, and which has been restored in modern times by the care of Pius XI himself. This, we are taught, remains as a striking monument of the proclamation of our Lady’s incomparable honour as Mother of God. But in the institution of the present festival, the pope, as his encyclical explains, had also other objects in view.

October 11 - Feast of the Divine Maternity of Our Lady
Festum Maternitátis beátæ Maríæ Vírginis.
    The Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

  Nuestra Senora del Pilar (I)
Tradition tells us that in the early day of the Church, Saint James the Greater journeyed to Spain to spread the Gospel
but made very little progress. He was sad and dejected, and questioning his mission, he knelt down to pray beside the River Ebro with seven of his disciples. Our Lady, who was still living in Jerusalem at the time, bi-located and appeared to Saint James in a vision.
After words of encouragement and a request for a chapel, the Blessed Mother gave him the small jasper column or pillar on which she stood as evidence of her appearance. Adapted from www.catholic-forum.com

Supported by the vision and the tangible evidence of its authenticity, St James spread the Faith throughout Spain which is now under his patronage. After his martyrdom, he was buried at Santiago de Compostela, where his shrine attracted far more pilgrimages than did those of the other Apostles. Adapted from www.catholictradition.org
 
        The Motherhood of Our Lady
Festum Maternitátis beátæ Maríæ Vírginis. The Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
Pope Pius XI enjoined the celebration on this day throughout the Western church of a feast in honour of the Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, in the encyclical “Lux veritatis”, published on December 25, 1931, in view of the fifteenth centenary of the Council of Ephesus.
In the third lesson of the second nocturne of the office of the new feast mention is made of the arch in the basilica of St Mary Major, which Pope St Sixtus III (432-440) decorated with mosaics shortly after the council, and which has been restored in modern times by the care of Pius XI himself. This, we are taught, remains as a striking monument of the proclamation of our Lady’s incomparable honour as Mother of God. But in the institution of the present festival, the pope, as his encyclical explains, had also other objects in view.
1st v. Zenais (Zenaida) and Philonilla cure children and possessed by demons sisters relatives of Saint Paul MM (RM)
  285 SS Nicasius, Quirinus, Scubiculus (Egobille), and Pientia MM (RM)
  304 St. Tharacus Roman officer martyr with Andronicus and Probus Hermit
  357 St. Sarmata Martyr of Egypt disciple of St. Anthony
  397 St. Nectarius Bishop of Constantinople modern Istanbul from 381 succeeded St Gregory Nazianzen and preceded St John Chrysostom
  460 St. Placidia Virgin vow of perpetual virginity
  506 SS Gratus of Oloron episcopacy in the ancient see of Oloron B (AC)
  553 St. Firminus of Uzes Bishop of Uzes, France
  600 St. Canice  also written Kenny and Kenneth; monk under St. Cadoc at Llancarfan, Wales
7th v. St. Eufridus of Alba monk OSB (AC); local cultus at Albi in the Piedmont, monk of Asti (Benedictines).
7th v. St. Ansillo monk; His relics are in the Benedictine abbey of Lagny, near Meaux, France.
  685 St. Agilbert (Aglibert) of Paris nephew Eleutherius active missionary ordained Saint Wilfrid replaced Celtic customs with Roman at Synod of Whitby
  750 St. Juliana of Pavilly  Benedictine abbess
  774 St. Gummarus son of lord Emblem, near Lierre
 965 ST BRUNO THE GREAT, ARCHBISHOP OF Cologne; he set a high example of personal goodness and devotion, and kept clergy and laity on their mettle by frequent visitations. Sound learning and the monastic spirit were the means by which a high standard of pastoral care and spiritual life were to be maintained; his cathedral-school was staffed by the best professors he could find, and he founded the abbey of St Pantaleon at Cologne. Nor was St Bruno’s solicitude confined to his own diocese: he used his influence and authority to spread his reforms throughout the kingdom, and at the same time as he became archbishop this authority was further notably extended by the action of the emperor.
1379 St. John of Bridlington; Augustinian prior
1491 Blessed James Griesinger soldier turned Dominican, OP (AC)
1592 St. Alexander Sauli The Apostle of Corsica; bishop; miracles of prophecy healing calming of storms; during his life and death; spiritual advisor to St. Charles Borromeo to Cardinal Sfondrato -- Pope Gregory XIV
The order the congregation of Clerks Regular of Saint Paul became known as the Barnabites
        St. Anastasius priest Martyr with St. Placi Genesius
1833 St. Peter Tuy Vietnamese martyr native priest
1867 St Francis Xavier Seelos No mission preaching
Miracle worker
1887 SS Maria- Desolata (Emmanuela) Torres Acosta Handmaids of Mary V (RM)
1899 Blessed Angela Truszkowska the Felician Sisters
October 11 - Feast of the Divine Maternity of Our Lady -
Memory of the Seventh Ecumenical Council
September 24, 787
The Seventh Ecumenical Council Approves the Veneration of Icons
The Seventh Ecumenical Council which opened in Nicea, Bithynia, on September 24, 787, was attended by 350 bishops, and soon joined by 17 other hierarchs, who abjured the Iconoclast heresy. Next to the papal delegates and those sent by the Patriarchs of Antioch and Jerusalem, the monks, who had been relentlessly persecuted under the Iconoclast emperors Leo III the Isaurian (717-741) and Constantine V Copronymus (741-775), were well-represented with a count of 136.  In this last great council recognized by all the Apostolic Churches, the holy fathers proclaimed the eternal memory of the defenders of Orthodoxy: Patriarch Germanus (715-730), Saint John Damascene, George of Cyprus, and all who subjected to exile and torture in their defense of Holy Icons.  The council fathers decreed: "We define with all certitude and accuracy that just as the figure of the precious and life-giving Cross, so also the venerable and holy images, as well in painting and mosaic as of other fit materials, should be set forth in the holy churches of God, and on the sacred vessels and on the vestments and on hangings and in pictures both in houses and by the wayside, to wit, the figure of our Lord God and Savior Jesus Christ, of our spotless Lady, the Mother of God, of the honorable Angels, and of all Saints and pious people."

"That which God commands seems difficult and a burden. . . .
The way is rough; you draw back;
you have no desire to follow it. Yet do so and you will attain glory." St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria - Barnabite

Saints Tharacus Roman officer martyr with Andronicus (patrician) and Probus (plebeian)
The night was very dark, and a violent storm of thunder and rain dispersed the guards. The faithful { Marcian, Felix, and Verus} distinguished the three bodies by a miraculous star or ray of light which streamed on each of them. They carried off the precious treasures on their backs, and hid them in a hollow cave in the neighboring mountains, where the governor was not able, by any search he could make, to find them. He severely chastised the guards." 
Thus, the three witnesses pledged to guard the precious relics for the balance of their days

“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith
Day 19 intention 40 Days for Life
Dear readers

The Holy Spirit has grown 40 Days for Life from a single one-city effort with 1,000 participants ... to 579 cities in 30 countries ... with more than 650,000 people taking part since 2007. As a result, prayers are being offered for an end to abortion 24 hours a day around the world from San Diego to London to Adelaide. In all, there are 307 communities in 16 countries taking part right now … so find one near you!
A few of those cities are doing their first-ever campaigns – like Christchurch, New Zealand for instance. It may be autumn across North America and Europe, but the volunteers in Christchurch are enjoying early spring weather!

Christchurch, New Zealand
The 40 Days for Life vigil in Christchurch takes place across the road from the main entrance to a hospital.
“We had an encouraging conversation with a group of longboarders,” wrote Daniel, the local coordinator. “It was an assuring sign that our presence is being felt. Although they left not in full agreement, it was a chance to witness to Christ and his love on behalf of the unborn and in support of their mothers and families.”
The volunteers spoke to a young nurse, who was quite excited about 40 Days for Life. She said a group of nurses pray every day inside the hospital and they really wish they could join the vigil. “It was a huge blessing and source of encouragement,” Daniel said.
One lady stopped on her bicycle and shouted, “What about helping people in poverty?” The group pointed out how ministries such as the John Paul II Centre help all those who come through their doors, including those who say another child would be a financial burden. The prayer continued and the lady moved off on her bike with food for thought.
“We’ve been getting good little comments here and there,” he said, “and although these little things might seems like drops in the ocean, they are all signs of light in our community and the more we bring our prayers into places of darkness, the more that darkness will be dispelled and all things can be revealed for what they really are.”

Cluj-Napoca, Romania
 The 40 Days for Life volunteers in Romania also find some of their greatest joys in being able to talk to passersby on the street – especially those who don’t agree with the vigil’s message. “Some even approach us with indignation,” said one of the team members.
But after a bit of discussion, the indignation can go away. Conversations often end with a smile and a handshake. “I had that happen twice today,” he said.
In one particular instance, three young men who were stopped at the ATM were saying that the prayer vigil makes no difference. But after hearing what the vigil was all about, their attitudes changed. “They said they admire what we do,” said the volunteer.

Cape Town, South Africa
40 Days for Life is back in Cape Town for the sixth time. And part of the story here is an increase in media outreach opportunities for the campaign.
In addition to several interviews in Christian media, the team has been running daily radio announcements featuring scripture and a brief reflection, encouraging prayer for an end to abortion … and participation in the local campaign.

Today’s devotional is from Rev. Rob Schenck, president of Faith and Action.
Day 19 intention
We pray for a renewal of our zeal to offer generous help to the unborn and their families.

Scripture
If I have despised the cause of my male or female servant when they complained against me, what then shall I do when God rises up? When He punishes, how shall I answer Him? Did not He who made me in the womb make them? Did not the same One fashion us in the womb? — Job 31:13-15

Reflection from Rev. Rob Schenck
The ground is level as we stand before God.
Job lived with an awe provoking sense of God's expectation of him, particularly regarding his obligation to care for the weak and needy.
He knew that in God's economy everyone stands on level ground when it comes to our status as God's creatures. Because of that central truth, we must take care of each other.
Job also knew that he didn't deserve any of the good things God gave to him. Instead, those blessings came to Job from God's benevolent heart.
As an extension of that knowledge, Job instinctively linked his obligation to be generous to others to God's kindness toward him.
As in Jesus’ parable of the unmerciful servant (Matthew 18:23-35), Job knew that it is an egregious sin to deny to others what we enjoy ourselves.
He actually calls down on his own head severe condemnation and even punishment should he fail to share with others out of his own abundance (see verses 16-23).
Proverbs 3:27 reads, “Withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of your hand to do so.” Some things are so obvious that we don't even need to pray except to ask of God forgiveness and the power to do what so obviously needs doing.

Prayer
God, forgive us when we try to explain away the obligation we have to help others who need help.
Enable us to not devalue them because they are in the circumstance that they are in, but to see them for what they are, those, who like us, were formed by your hand in their mother's womb. Amen.

Printable devotional
To download today’s devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day19.pdf

The Motherhood of Our Lady

Festum Maternitátis beátæ Maríæ Vírginis.
    The Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The Motherhood Of Our Lady
Pope Pius XI enjoined the celebration on this day throughout the Western church of a feast in honour of the Motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, in the encyclical “Lux veritatis”, published on December 25, 1931, in view of the fifteenth centenary of the Council of Ephesus.
In the third lesson of the second nocturne of the office of the new feast mention is made of the arch in the basilica of St Mary Major, which Pope St Sixtus III (432-440) decorated with mosaics shortly after the council, and which has been restored in modern times by the care of Pius XI himself. This, we are taught, remains as a striking monument of the proclamation of our Lady’s incomparable honour as Mother of God. But in the institution of the present festival, the pope, as his encyclical explains, had also other objects in view.

“One thing in particular”, he says, “and that indeed one of great importance, we specially desire that all should pray for, under the auspices of our heavenly Queen. That is, that she, who is loved and venerated with such ardent piety by the separated Christians of the East, would not suffer them to wander and be un­happily led further away from the unity of the Church, and therefore from her Son, whose vicar on earth We are. May they return to the common Father, whose judgement all the fathers of the synod of Ephesus most dutifully received, and whom they all saluted with concordant acclamations as the guardian of the faith may they all return to Us, who have indeed a fatherly affection for them all, and who gladly make our own those most loving words which Cyril used, when he earnestly exhorted Nestorius that ‘the peace of the churches may be preserved, and that the bond of love and of concord among the priests of God may remain indissoluble.”

The text of the encyclical, Lux veritatis, is printed in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xxiii (1931), pp. 493—557. Celebrations in honour of the motherhood of the Blessed Virgin were observed locally in many countries long before the present century, but there was no general usage and the dates selected for this commemoration differed widely. The earliest records of such a feast seem to be connected with Portugal and with the Portuguese overseas domin­ions. It was conceded to Portugal in 1751 but rapidly spread to other countries, e.g. to Venice and to Poland. See F. 0. Holweck, Calendarium festorum Dei et Del Matrix (1925), pp. 368, 148, etc.

When Mary of Nazareth conceived in Her womb the Word of God, that conception was the effect of the fullness of Her grace, and of an action of the Holy Spirit which occurred in Her soul first of all, thereby making of Her flesh a tabernacle and a sanctuary. The dignity of the Mother of God is Her great sanctity, it is the incomparable grace that raises Her above all the Angels, the grace in which She was predestined and created for this glorious purpose. By the acts of Her blessed Maternity, She bordered on divinity while remaining entirely human. In this way She seems to exhaust, as it were, the power of God - the fullness of the grace accorded Her cannot be surpassed. It is easier for us to conceive of the greatness of Mary, however, when we consider Her maternity of the Mystical Body, the Church, which like Herself is entirely human, and composed of persons who are very far indeed from being what our Saviour was, a Divine Person incarnate.

We understand better what Mary is for the Church by listening to Saint Louis Mary de Montfort, Apostle of the Cross-and of the Rosary of Our Lady. As Mary was necessary for God in the Incarnation of the Word, so She is necessary for Him to sanctify souls and bring about their likeness to Christ, and She is much needed by us, in our great infirmity:

“The Holy Ghost gives no heavenly gift to men which He does not have pass through Her virginal hands...; such is the sentiment of the Church and its holy Fathers. Mary, being altogether transformed into God by grace and by the glory, which transforms all the Saints into Him, asks nothing, wishes nothing, and does nothing contrary to the eternal and immutable Will of God. When we read then in the writings of Saints Bernard, Bernardine, Bonaventure and others, that in heaven and on earth everything, even God Himself, is subject to the Blessed Virgin, they mean that the authority which God has been well pleased to give Her is so great that it seems as if She had the same power as God; and that Her prayers and petitions are so powerful with God that they always pass for commandments with His Majesty, who never resists the prayer of His dear Mother, because She is always humble and conformed to His Will. If Moses, by the force of his prayer, stayed the anger of God against the Israelites in a manner so powerful that the most high and infinitely merciful Lord, being unable to resist him, told him to let Him alone that He might be angry with and punish that rebellious people, what must we not, with much greater reason, think of the prayer of the humble Mary, the worthy Mother of God, which is more powerful with His Majesty than the prayers and intercessions of all the Angels and Saints both in heaven and on earth?”

“The sin of our first father has spoiled us all, soured us, puffed us up and corrupted us... The actual sins which we have committed, whether mortal or venial, pardoned though they may be, have nevertheless increased our concupiscence, our weakness, our inconstancy and our corruption, and have left evil remains in our souls... We have nothing for our portion but pride and blindness of spirit, hardness of heart, weakness and inconstancy of soul, revolted passions, and sicknesses in the body... Let us say boldly with Saint Bernard that we have need of a mediator with the Mediator Himself, and that it is the divine Mary who is most capable of filling that charitable office. It was through Her that Jesus Christ came to us, and it is through Her that we must go to Him. If we fear to go directly to Jesus Christ, our God, whether because of His infinite greatness or because of our vileness, or because of our sins, let us boldly implore the aid and intercession of Mary, our Mother. She is good, She is tender, She has nothing in Her that is austere and forbidding, nothing too sublime and too brilliant... She is so charitable that She repels none of those who ask Her intercession, no matter how great sinners they have been; for, as the Saints say, never has it been heard, since the world was the world, that anyone has confidently and perseveringly had recourse to our Blessed Lady and yet been repelled.” (True Devotion to Mary)

Sources: True Devotion to Mary, by Saint Louis Mary de Montfort (Montfort Publications: Bay Shore, 1960); Les Petits Bollandistes: Vies des Saints, by Msgr. Paul Guérin (Bloud et Barral: Paris, 1882), Vol. 12.

1st v. Zenais (Zenaida) and Philonilla cure children and those possessed by demons sisters relatives of Saint Paul MM (RM)
Tarsi, in Cilícia, sanctárum mulíerum Zenáidis et Philoníllæ sorórum, quæ beáti Pauli Apóstoli consanguíneæ et in fide fuérunt discípulæ.
    At Tarsus in Cilicia, the holy women Zenaides and Philonilla, sisters, who were relatives of the blessed apostle Paul and his disciples in the faith.
1st century. Two women of Tarsus, probably sisters, who were related to Saint Paul. Zenaida lived as a recluse and had a special power to cure children and those possessed by demons (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). Zenais is painted as a woman with a thorn in her foot. Generally, she is shown with her sister Philonilla and Saint Paul, to whom they were related (Roeder).
St. Anastasius "bright"  priest Martyr with St. Placi Genesius
Item pássio sanctórum Anastásii Presbyteri, Plácidi, Genésii et Sociórum.
    Also, the martyrdom of the Saints Anastasius, a priest, Placidus, Genesius, and their companions.
 and others. Meaning: Latin "bright" Nothing is known about the martyrs except that Anastasius was a priest.
Anastasius, Placid, Genesius and Companions MM (RM)
Date unknown. In fact, little is known about this group of martyrs, except what the Roman Martyrology tells us: Their names and that Anastasius was a priest (Benedictines).
285 Nicasius, Quirinus, Scubiculus (Egobille), and Pientia MM (RM)
In pago Vilcassíno, in Gállia, pássio sanctórum Mártyrum Nicásii, qui erat Rotomagénsis Epíscopus, Quiríni Presbyteri, Scubículi Diáconi, et Piéntiæ Vírginis, sub Præside Fescénnio.
    In the neighbourhood of Vexin in France, in the time of the governor Fescennius, the passion of the holy martyrs Nicasius, bishop of Rouen, the priest Quirinus, the deacon Scubiculus, and Pientia, a virgin.
Legend relates that Saint Nicasius was one of the first missionaries sent from Rome to evangelize Gaul in the first century. While this legend has been denounced, it is believed that he was a regionary bishop who was killed for the faith during a journey from Paris to Rouen. Among his companions martyred with him were his priest, Quirinus, and his deacon, Scubiculus. Others have suggested that Saint Nicasius is a duplicate of Saint Nicasius of Rheims (Benedictines).
304 St. Tharacus Roman officer martyr with Andronicus (patrician) and Probus (plebeian) and Andronicus
Tarsi, in Cilícia, natális sanctórum Mártyrum Tháraci, Probi et Andrónici; qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, longo témpore cárceris squalóre afflícti, et tértio divérsis torméntis et supplíciis examináti, tandem, in confessióne Christi, abscíssis cervícibus, triúmphum glóriæ sunt adépti.
    At Tarsus in Cilicia, the birthday of the holy martyrs Tharacus, Probus, and Andronicus, who endured a long and painful imprisonment during the persecution of Diocletian.  They were three times subjected to diverse punishments and tortures, and finally obtained a glorious triumph for the confession of Christ by having their heads struck off.

Also called Taracus, during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian (r. 284-305). Tharachus was born about 239 and was a one-time officer in the Roman army, Probus was a Roman citizen from Pamphilia (modern Turkey), and Andronicus was a young man. They were tried by Numerian Maximus (r. 283-284) and cruelly tortured. Thrown to wild beasts but unharmed, the martyrs were slain by sword in Anazarbus or Tarsus, Cilicia

Andronicus, Tarachus (Tharacus), and Probus MM (RM)
These three martyrs were considerably different from one another, except in their love for Jesus and willingness to put sell everything to purchase the pearl of great price. Tarachus (c. 239- 304) was a Roman born at Claudiopolis, Isauria. He became a soldier in the Roman army but left he army when he became a Christian, because he feared he might be required to act contrary to the law of God. When he was 65, Tarachus was arrested with Andronicus, a patrician from one of the leading families of Ephesus, and Probus, a plebeian born at Side in Pamphylia of a Thracian father who gave up a considerable fortune to follow Christ, at Pompeiopolis in Cilicia during the persecutions of Diocletian and Maximian.
They were tried before Numerian Maximus, the governor, subjected to three interrogations (at Tarsus, Mopsuestia, and Anazarbus), and cruelly tortured. They remained steadfast in their faith and were ordered thrown to wild beasts in the arena near Anazarbus in Cilicia; when the beasts did not harm them, gladiators killed them by sword.

Their authentic acta come from the proconsular register, which some Christians purchased from the public notaries for 200 denarii. (Though this is disputed.) An epilogue was added by three eyewitnesses of the martyrdom: Marcian, Felix, and Verus. These same witnesses later retrieved the bodies from the guards, interred them, and kept watch over them the rest of their lives. They also asked that they be buried in the same vault as the martyrs.

The acta begin at Tarsus with Maximus addressing himself to the elderly Tarachus and asking his name.

Tarachus: I am Christian. Maximus: Speak not of your impiety, but tell me your name. Tarachus: I am a Christian. Maximus: Strike him upon the mouth, and bid him not answer one thing for another.  Tarachus was buffeted on his jaws.  Tarachus: I tell you my true name. If you would know that which my parents gave me, it is Tarachus; when I bore arms I went by the name of Victor.

Maximus: What is your profession, and from what country do you come?  Tarachus: I am of a Roman family, and was born at Claudiopolis, in Isauria. I am by profession a soldier, but quit the service because of my religion.  Maximus: Your impiety rendered you unworthy to bear arms; but how did you procure your discharge?"  Tarachus: I asked it of my captain, Publio, and he gave it to me.   Maximus: In consideration of your gray hairs, I will procure you the favor and friendship of the emperors, if you will obey their orders. Draw near, and sacrifice to the gods, as the emperors themselves do all the world over.

Tarachus: They are deceived by the devil in so doing.  Maximus: Break his jaws for saying the emperors are deceived. Tarachus: I repeat it, as men they are deluded. Maximus: Sacrifice our gods, and renounce your folly. Tarachus: I cannot renounce the law of God.  Maximus: Is there any law, wretch, but that which we obey?  Tarachus: There is, and you transgress it by adoring stocks and stones, the works of men's hands.  Maximus: Strike him on the face, saying, 'Abandon your folly.'  Tarachus: What you call folly is the salvation of my soul, and I will never leave it.

Maximus: But I will make you leave it, and force you to be wise. Tarachus: Do with my body what you please, it is entirely in your power. Maximus: Strip him, and beat him with rods.  And the old man was beaten.  Tarachus: You have now made me truly wise. I am strengthened by your blows, and my confidence in God and in Jesus Christ is increased.  Maximus: Wretch, how can you deny a plurality of gods, when, according to your own confession, you serve two gods? Did you not give the name of God to a certain person, named Christ?  Tarachus: Right; for this is the Son of the living God; he is the hope of the Christians, and the author of salvation to such as suffer for his sake.

Maximus: Forbear this idle talk; draw near, and sacrifice. Tarachus: I am no idle talker; I am sixty-five years old; thus have I been brought up, and I cannot forsake the truth.  Demetrius, the centurion, said: "Poor man, I pity you; be advised by me, sacrifice; and save yourself. Tarachus: "Away, you minister of Satan, and keep your advice for your own use.  Maximus: Let him be loaded with large chains, and carried back to prison. Bring forth he next in years.

Demetrius: He is here, my lord. Maximus: What is your name?  Probus: MY chief and most honorable name is Christian; but the name I go by in the world is Probus. Maximus: From what country do you come, and of what family?  Probus: My father was of Thrace: I am a plebeian, born a Sida, in Pamphylia, and profess Christianity.  Maximus: That will do you no service. Be advised by me, sacrifice the gods, that you may be honored by the emperors, and enjoy my friendship.  Probus: I want nothing of that kind. Formerly, I was possessed of a considerable estate; but I relinquished it to serve the living God through Jesus Christ. Maximus: Take off his garments, gird him, lay him at his full length, and lash him with ox's sinews.  Demetrius, the centurion, said to him, while they were beating him: "Spare thyself, my friend; see how your blood runs in streams on the ground." Probus: Do what you will with my body, your torments are sweet perfumes to me.

Maximus: Is this your obstinate folly incurable? What can you hope for? Probus: I am wiser than you are, because I do not worship devils. Maximus: Turn him, and strike him on the belly. Probus: My Lord, assist your servant. Maximus: Ask him, at every stripe, Where is your helper?  Probus: He helps me, and will help me; for I take so little notice of your torments, that I do not obey you.  Maximus: Look, wretch, upon your mangled body; the ground is covered with your blood.  Probus: The more my body suffers for Jesus Christ, the more is my soul refreshed.

Maximus: Put fetters on his hands and feet, with his legs distended in the stocks to the fourth hole, and let nobody come to dress his wounds. Bring the third to the bar.

Demetrius: Here he stands, my lord. Maximus: What is your name? Andronicus: My true name is Christian, and the name by which I am commonly known among men, is Andronicus.  Maximus: What is your family?  Andronicus: My father is one of the first rank in Ephesus.  Maximus: Adore the gods, and obey the emperors, who are our fathers and masters.  Andronicus: The devil is your father while you do his works.  Maximus: Youth makes you insolent; I have torments ready.  Andronicus: I am prepared for whatever may happen.  Maximus: Strip him naked, gird him, and stretch him on the rack.

Demetrius: Obey, my friend, before your body is torn and mangled.  Andronicus: It is better for me to have my body tormented, than to lose my soul. Maximus: Sacrifice before I put you to the most cruel death.  Andronicus: I have never sacrificed to demons from my infancy, and I will not now begin.  Athanasius, the cornicularius, or clerk to the army, said to him: "I am old enough to be your father, and therefore take the liberty to advise you: obey the governor."   Andronicus: You give me admirable advice, indeed, to sacrifice to devils.  Maximus: Wretch, are you insensible to torments? You don't yet know what it is to suffer fire and razors When you has felt them, you wilt perhaps, give over your folly.

Andronicus: This folly is expedient for us who hope in Jesus Christ. Earthly wisdom leads to eternal death. Maximus: Tear his limbs with the utmost violence.  Andronicus: I have done no evil, like a murderer. I contend for that piety which is due.  Maximus: If you had but the least sense of piety, you would sacrifice to the gods whom the emperors so religiously worship.  Andronicus: That is not piety, but impiety to abandon the true God, and worship marble.  Maximus: Execrable villain, are then the emperors guilty of impieties? Hoist him again, and gore his sides.  Andronicus: I am in your hands; do with my body what you please.  Maximus: Lay salt upon his wounds, and rub his sides with broken tiles.  Andronicus: Your torments have refreshed my body.

Maximus: I will cause you to die gradually.
Andronicus: Your menaces do not terrify me; my courage is above all that your malice can invent.  Maximus: Put heavy chain about his neck, and another upon his legs, and keep him in close prison. 

Thus ended the first examination; the second was held at Mopsuestia, where Flavius Clemens Numerianus Maximus sat before his tribunal and issued a command to his centurion Demetrius.  Maximus: Bring forth the impious wretches who follow the religion of the Christians.  Demetrius: Here they are, my lord.
Maximus: Old age is respected in many, on account of the good sense and prudence that generally attend it; wherefore, if you have made a proper use of the time allowed you for reflection, I presume your own discretion has wrought in you a change of sentiments; as a proof of which, it is required that you sacrifice to the gods, which cannot fail of recommending you to the esteem of your superiors.

Tarachus: I am a Christian, and I wish you and the emperors would leave your blindness, and embrace the truth which leads to life.  Maximus: Break his jaws with a stone, and bid him leave off his folly.  Tarachus: This folly is true wisdom.  Maximus: Now they have loosened all your teeth, wretch, take pity on yourself, come to the altar, and sacrifice to the gods, to prevent severer treatment.  Tarachus: Though you cut my body into a thousand pieces, you will not be able to shake my resolution; because it is Christ who gives me strength to stand my ground.  Maximus: Wretch, accursed by the gods, I will find means to drive out your folly. Bring in a pan of burning coals, and hold his hands in the fire till they are burnt.

Tarachus: I fear not your temporal fire, which soon passes; but I dread eternal flames.  Maximus: See, your hands are well baked, they are consumed by the fire; is it not time for you to grow wise? Sacrifice.  Tarachus: If you have any other torments in store for me, employ them; I hope I shall be able to withstand all your attacks.  Maximus: Hang him by the feet, with his head over a great smoke.  Tarachus: "After having proved an overmatch for your fire, I am not afraid of your smoke.   Maximus: Bring vinegar and salt, and force them up his nostrils.  Tarachus: Your vinegar is sweet to me, and your salt insipid.  Maximus: Put mustard into the vinegar, and thrust it up his nose.  Tarachus: Your ministers impose upon you; they have given me honey instead of mustard.  Maximus: Enough for the present; I will make it my business to invent fresh tortures to bring you to your senses; I will not be baffled.
Tarachus: You will find me prepared for the attack.

Maximus: Away with him to the dungeon. Bring in another. Demetrius: My lord, here is Probus.  Maximus: Well, Probus, have you considered the matter; and are you disposed to sacrifice to the gods, after the example of the emperors?  Probus: I appear here again with fresh vigor. The torments I have endured have hardened my body; and my soul is strengthened in her courage, and proof against all you can inflict. I have a living God in heaven: him I serve and adore, and no other.

Maximus: What! villain, are not ours living gods? Probus: Can stones and wood, the workmanship of a statuary be living gods? You know not what you do when you sacrifice to them.  Maximus: What insolence! At least sacrifice to the great god Jupiter. I will excuse you as to the rest. Probus: Do not you blush to call him god who was guilty of adulteries, incests, and other most enormous crimes?  Maximus: Beat his mouth with a stone, and bid him not blaspheme.  Probus: Why this evil treatment? I have spoken no worse of Jupiter than they do who serve him. I utter no lie; I speak the truth, as you yourself well know.  Maximus: Heat bars of iron, and apply then to his foot.  Probus: This fire is without heat; at least, I feel none.

Maximus: Hoist him on the rack, and let him be scourged with thongs of raw leather till his shoulders are flayed. Probus: All this does me no harm: invent something new, and you will see the power of God who is in me and strengthens me.  Maximus: Shave his head, and lay burning coals upon it.  Probus: You have burnt my head and my feet. You see, notwithstanding, that I still continue God's servant, and disregard your torments. He will save me; your gods can only destroy.

Maximus: Do you not see all those that worship them standing about my tribunal, honored by the gods and the emperors? They look upon you and your companions with contempt.  Probus: Believe me, unless they repent and serve the living God, they will all perish, because against the voice of their own conscience they adore idols.  Maximus: Beat his face, that he may learn to say the gods, and not God.  Probus: You unjustly destroy my mouth, and disfigure my face because I speak the truth.  Maximus: I will also cause your blasphemous tongue to be plucked out to make you comply.  Probus: Besides the tongue which serves me for utterance, I have an internal, an immortal tongue, which is out of your reach.

Maximus: Take him to prison. Let the third come in.
Demetrius: He is here.

Maximus: Your companions, Andronicus, were at first obstinate; but gained nothing thereby but torments and disgrace, and have been at last compelled to obey. They shall receive considerable recompenses. Therefore, to escape the like torments, sacrifice to the gods, and you shall be honored accordingly. But if you refuse, I swear by the immortal gods, and by the invincible emperors that you shall not escape out of my hands with your life.

Andronicus: Why do you endeavor to deceive me with lies? They have not renounced the true God. And had that been so, you should never find me guilty of such an impiety. God, whom I adore, has clothed me with the arms of faith; and Jesus Christ, my Savior, is my strength; so that I either fear your power, nor that of your masters, nor of your gods. For a trial, cause all your engines and instruments to be displayed before my eyes, and employed on my body.

Maximus: Bind him to the stakes, and scourge him with raw thongs.  Andronicus: There is nothing new or extraordinary in this torment.  Athanasius: Your whole body is but one wound from head to foot, and cost you count this nothing?  Andronicus: They who love the living God, make very small account of all this.  Maximus: Rub his back with salt.  Andronicus: Give orders, I pray you, that they do not spare me, that being well seasoned I may be in no danger of putrefaction, and may be the better able to withstand your torments.  Maximus: Turn him, and beat him upon the belly, to open afresh his first wounds.  Andronicus: You saw when I was brought last before your tribunal, how I was perfectly cured of the wounds I received by the first day's tortures: he that cured me then, can cure me a second time.  Maximus, addressing himself to the guards of the prison: "Villains and traitors," said he, "did I not strictly forbid you to suffer any one to see them, or dress their wounds? Yet, see here!"

Pegasus, the jailer, said, "I swear by your greatness that no one has applied anything whatever to his wounds, or had admittance to him; and he has been kept in chains in the most retired part of the prison on purpose. If you catch me in a lie I'll forfeit my head."

Maximus: How comes it, then, that there is nothing to be seen of his wounds?  Pegasus: I swear by your high birth that I know not how they have been healed.  Andronicus: Senseless man, the physician that has healed me is no less powerful than he is tender and charitable. You know him not. He cures not by the application of medicines, but by his word alone. Though he dwells in heaven, he is present everywhere, but you know him not.

Maximus: Your idle prattling will do you no service; sacrifice, or you art a lost man.  Andronicus: I do not change my answers. I am not a child, to be wheedled or frightened.  Maximus: Do not flatter yourself that you shall get the better of me.  Andronicus: Nor shall you ever make us yield to your threats.  Maximus: My authority shall not be baffled by you.  Andronicus: Nor shall it ever be said that the cause of Jesus Christ is vanquished by your authority.  Maximus: Let me have several kinds of tortures in readiness against my next sitting. Put this man in prison loaded with chains, and let no one be admitted to visit them in the dungeon. 

The third examination was held at Anazarbus.
In it Tarachus answered first with his usual constancy, saying to all threats that a speedy death would finish his victory and complete his happiness; and that long torments would procure him the greater recompense. Then Maximus had him bound and stretched on the rack. 

Tarachus: I could allege the rescript of Diocletian, which forbids judges to put military men to the rack. But waive my privilege, lest you should suspect me of cowardice.  Maximus: You flatter yourself with the hopes of having your body embalmed by Christian women, and wrapped up in perfumes after you art dead, but I will take care to dispose of your remains.  Tarachus: Do what you please with my body, not only while it is living, but also after my death.  Maximus ordered his lips, cheeks, and whole face, to be slashed and cut.  Tarachus: You have disfigured my face, but have added new beauty to my soul. I don't fear any of your inventions, for I am clothed with the divine armor.  The tyrant ordered spits to be heated and applied red hot to his armpits, then his ears to be cut off.   Tarachus: My heart will not be less attentive to the word of God.  Maximus: Tear the skin off his head, then cover it with burning coals.  Tarachus: Though you should order my whole body to be flayed, you will not be able to separate me from my God.  Maximus: Apply the red-hot spits once more to his armpits and sides.  Tarachus: O God of heaven, look down upon me, and be my judge.

The governor then sent him back to prison to be reserved for the public shows the day following, and called for the next.

Probus being brought forth, Maximus again exhorted him to sacrifice; but after many words ordered him to be bound and hung up by the feet: then red-hot spits to be applied to his sides and back.  Probus: My body is in your power. May the Lord of heaven and earth vouchsafe to consider my patience, and the humility of my heart.  Maximus: The God whom you implore has delivered you into my hands.  Probus: He loves men.  Maximus: Open his mouth, and pour in some of the wine which has been offered upon the altars, and thrust some of the sanctified meat into his mouth.  Probus: See, O Lord, the violence they offer me, and judge my cause.  Maximus: Now you see that after suffering a thousand torments rather than to sacrifice, you have nevertheless partaken of a sacrifice.  Probus: You have done no great feat in making me taste these abominable offerings against my will.  Maximus: No matter; it is now done: promise now to do it voluntarily and you shall be released.

Probus: God forbid that I should yield; but know that if you should force into me all the abominable offerings of your whole altars, I should be no ways defiled: for God sees the violence which I suffer.  Maximus: Heat the spits again, and burn the calves of his legs with them.  To Probus: There is not a sound part in your whole body, and still you persistent in your folly. Wretch, what can you hope for?  Probus: I have handed my body over to you that my soul may remain whole and sound.  Maximus: Make some sharp nails red hot, and pierce his hands with them.  Probus: O my Savior, I return you most hearty thanks that you have been pleased to make me share in your own sufferings. 

Maximus: The great number of your torments make you more foolish. Probus: Would to God your soul was not blind, and in darkness.  Maximus: Now that you have lost the use of all your members, you complain to me for not having deprived you of your sight. Prick him in the eyes, but by little and little, till you have bored out the organs of his sight. 
Probus: Behold I am now blind. you have destroyed the eyes of my body, but cannot take away those of my soul.  Maximus: You continue still to argue, but you are condemned to eternal darkness.  Probus: If you knew the darkness in which your soul is plunged, you would see yourself much more miserable than I am.  Maximus: You have no more use of your body than a dead man, yet you continue to talk.  Probus: So long as any vital heat continues to animate the remains which you have left me of this body, I will never cease to speak of my God, to praise and to thank him.

Maximus: What! Do you hope to survive these torments? Can you flatter yourself that I shall allow you one moment's respite?  Probus: I expect nothing from you but a cruel death, and I ask of God only the grace to persevere in the confession of his holy name to the end.  Maximus: I will leave you to languish, as such an impious wretch deserves. Take him hence. Let the prisoners be closely guarded that none of their friends who would congratulate with them, may find access. I desire them for the shows. Let Andronicus be brought in. He is the most resolute of the three. 

The answers and behavior of these saints were usually respectful towards their judges; this is a duty, and the spirit of the Gospel. Nevertheless, by an extraordinary impulse of the Holy Spirit, some on certain occasions have deviated from this rule, e.g., Saint Paul called his judge a "whited wall" and threatened him with the angel of God. Like him, Andronicus answers harshly. The governor pressed Andronicus again to comply, adding, that his two companions had at length sacrificed to the gods, and to the emperors themselves.

Andronicus: This is truly the part of an adorer of the god of lies; and by this imposture I know that the men are like the gods whom they serve. May God judge you, O worker of iniquity.

Maximus ordered rolls of paper to be made, and set on fire upon the belly of the martyr; then bodkins to be heated, and laid red hot between his fingers. Even after all this, Andronicus was still unshaken.  Maximus: Do not expect to die at once. I will keep you alive till the time of the shows, that you may see your limbs devoured one after another by cruel beasts.  Andronicus: You are more inhuman than the tigers, and more insatiable with blood than the most barbarous murderers.

Maximus: Open his mouth, and put some of the sanctified meat into it, and pour some of the wine into it which has been offered to the gods.  Andronicus: Behold, O Lord, the violence which is offered me.  Maximus: What will you do now? You have tasted the offerings taken from the altar. You are now initiated in the mysteries of the gods.  Andronicus: Know, tyrant, that the soul is not defiled when she suffers involuntarily what she condemns. God, who sees the secrets of hearts, knows that mine has not consented to this abomination.  Maximus: How long will this frenzy delude your imagination? It will not deliver you out of my hands.  Andronicus: God will deliver me when he pleases.  Maximus: This is a fresh extravagance: I will cause that your tongue to be cut out to put an end to your prating.  Andronicus: I ask it as a favor that those lips and tongue with which you imagine I have concurred in partaking of the meats and wine offered to idols, may be cut off.

Maximus: Pluck out his teeth, and cut out his blasphemous tongue to the very root; burn them, and then scatter the ashes in the air, that none of his impious companions or of the women may be able to gather them up to keep as something precious or holy. Let him be carried to his dungeon to serve for food to the wild beasts in the amphitheater.

Thus, the trial of the three martyrs concluded.

Maximus sent for the pontiff and the first magistrate of Cilicia, and ordered that public games be produced the following day. Crowds flocked to the amphitheater near the town of Anazarbus. The governor arrived there about noon. The three eyewitnesses who wrote this epilogue watched from the hillside, afraid to enter the amphitheater. The governor had the tortured bodies of the three brought into the arena. Their bodies were so mangled that they had to be carried in on the backs of porters and thrown in the pit before the governor.

“We advanced, say the authors, as near as we could on an eminence behind, and concealed ourselves by piling stones before us as high as our breasts, that we might not be known or observed. The sight of our brethren in so dismal a condition, made us shed abundance of tears: even many of the infidel spectators could not contain themselves. For no sooner were the martyrs laid down, but an almost universal deep silence followed at the sight of such dismal objects, and the people began openly to murmur against the governor for his barbarous cruelty.
Many even left the shows, and returned to the city: which provoked the governor, and he ordered more soldiers to guard all the avenues to stop any from departing, and to take notice of all who attempted it, that they might be afterwards called to their trial by him. At the same time, he commanded a great number of beasts to be let loose out of their dens into the pit. These fierce creatures rushed out, but all stopped near the doors of their lodges, and would not advance to hurt the martyrs.
Maximus, in a fury, called for the keepers, and caused one hundred strokes with cudgels to be given them, making them responsible for the tameness of their lions and tigers, because they were less cruel than himself. He threatened even to crucify them unless they let out the most ravenous of their beasts.
They turned out a great bear which that very day had killed three men. He walked up slowly towards the martyrs, and began to lick the wounds of Andronicus. That martyr leaned his head on the bear, and endeavored to provoke him, but in vain. Maximus possessed himself no longer, but ordered the beast to be immediately killed. The bear received the strokes, and fell quietly before the feet of Andronicus.
The pontiff Terentianus seeing the rage of the governor, and trembling for himself, immediately ordered a most furious lioness to be let out. At the sight of her, all the spectators turned pale, and her terrible roarings made the bravest men tremble on their safe seats. Yet when she came up to the saints, who lay stretched on the sand, she laid her self down at the feet of Saint Tarachus, and licked them, quite forgetting her natural ferocity. Maximus, foaming with rage, commanded her to be pricked with goads. She then arose, and raged about in a furious manner, roaring terribly, and frightening all the spectators; who, seeing that she had broke down part of the door of her lodge, which the governor had ordered to be shut, cried out earnestly that she might be again driven into her lodge.
The governor, therefore, called for the confectors or gladiators to dispatch the martyrs with their swords; which they did. Maximus commanded the bodies to be intermixed with those of the gladiators who had been slain, and also to be guarded that night by six soldiers, lest the Christians should carry them off. The night was very dark, and a violent storm of thunder and rain dispersed the guards. The faithful distinguished the three bodies by a miraculous star or ray of light which streamed on each of them. They carried off the precious treasures on their backs, and hid them in a hollow cave in the neighboring mountains, where the governor was not able, by any search he could make, to find them. He severely chastised the guards. Thus, the three witnesses pledged to guard the precious relics for the balance of their days (Benedictines, Delaney, Husenbeth).

The Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. v, with Ruinart, furnish Latin and Greek texts of the passio. Other recensions exist, and Bedjan has edited a Syriac version. There is also a panegyric by Severus of Antioch printed in the Patrologia Orientali, vol. n, pp. 277—295. Harnack (Die Chronologie der altchrist. Litteratur, vol. ii, 1904, pp. 479—480) in noticing these acta, gives reason for thinking that they cannot be regarded as a transcript of any official document, but he seems to form a slightly better opinion of them than Delehaye expresses in Les légendes hagiographiques (1927), p. 514.
Saint Emilian of Rennes {may be Bishop Melanius} Hermit (RM)
Apud Rhédones, in Gállia, sancti Æmiliáni Confessóris.
    At Rennes in France, St. Emilian, confessor.
The Roman Martyrology states that Saint Emilian was a recluse at Rennes in Brittany; however, no saint of this name is recorded locally. It is suggested there may be some confusion and the saint may be Bishop Melanius of Rennes (Benedictines).
357 St. Sarmata Martyr of Egypt disciple of St. Anthony
In Thebáide sancti Sarmátæ, qui fuit discípulus beáti Antónii Abbátis, et a Saracénis pro Christo necátus est.
    In Thebais, St. Sarmata, disciple of the blessed abbot Anthony, who was put to death for Christ by the Saracens.
in the deserts of Egypt, murdered by a band of Bedouins. A monastic pioneer, he was follower of the Desert Fathers.
Sarmata the Hermit M (RM) This disciple of the Saint Antony was martyred in his monastery by a band of marauding Bedouins. He is venerated as an Egyptian saint (Benedictines)

390 Germanus of Besançon  successor to Saint Desideratus in the see of Besançon, BM (RM)
Vesontióne, in Gálliis, sancti Germáni, Epíscopi et Mártyris.
    At Besançon in France, St. Germanus, bishop and martyr.

Saint Germanus, successor to Saint Desideratus in the see of Besançon, may have been martyred by the Arians (Benedictines).
397 St. Nectarius Bishop of Constantinople modern Istanbul from 381 succeeded Saint Gregory Nazianzen and preceded Saint John Chrysostom
He was born in Tarsus, in Cilicia, the son of a senator of Constantinople. Nectarius succeeded St. Gregory Nazianzus upon the latter’s resignation. His elevation came about after his name found its way onto a list submitted to the emperor, who picked Nectarius, despite the fact that Nectarius was married and had not yet even been baptized. Nevertheless, once installed properly, he proved a most able prelate, struggling against the Arians and prohibiting public penance. He was bishop for sixteen years.
Nectarius of Constantinople B (AC). The eminence of Saint Nectarius pales because of his placement in history between two of the greatest saints of the East. He succeeded Saint Gregory Nazianzen and preceded Saint John Chrysostom as bishop of Constantinople from 381 until his death (Benedictines)
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397 ST NECTARIUS, ARCHBISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE 

WHEN St Gregory Nazianzen resigned the see of Constantinople almost as soon as he was appointed in the year 381 he was succeeded by this Nectarius, a native of Tarsus in Cilicia and praetor of the imperial city. The peculiar and perhaps doubtful story of his election is as follows. While the second oecumenical council was in progress at Constantinople Nectarius, who was about to visit his home, called on Diodorus, Bishop of Tarsus, to ask if he could carry any letters for him. Greatly impressed by his looks and manner, Diodorus recommended him to the archbishop of Antioch as successor to St Gregory. Meletius laughed at the idea, but the name of Nectarius was nevertheless added to the list of candidates presented to the emperor. Theodosius chose Nectarius, much to everybody’s astonishment, for he was not yet even baptized (he is also said to have been married, with one son). However, the council ratified the choice and Nectarius was duly baptized and ordained.

   On leaving Constantinople St Gregory Nazianzen wrote to the bishops: “You may have a throne and a lordly place then since you think that is the important thing. Rejoice, lift yourselves up, claim the title of patriarch, let broad lands be subject to you”, and the council gave some justification for the rebuke: for soon after the appointment of Nectarius it passed a canon giving Constantinople rank next after Rome. For this reason St Nectarius is often called the first patriarch of the city, though it was long before the Holy See recognized the precedence accorded against its judgement.

   His episcopate lasted for sixteen years, but little is known of it or him. He consistently opposed the Arian heretics, with the result that, when in 388 there was a rumour that the emperor died in Italy, they burnt his house over his head. St Nectarius is principally remembered for having abolished in his diocese the office of priest-penitentiary and the discipline of public penance, on account of an open scandal that had occurred. He died on September 27, 397, and was followed in his see by St John Chrysostom. St Nectarius figures in the Greek Menaion but not in the Roman Martyrology.

The more important passages of the church historians which bear upon the life and activities of Nectarius have been brought together in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. v. Regarding the abolition of the office of priest-penitentiary a convenient summary will be found in DTC., vol. xii, cc. 796-198.

460 St. Placidia Virgin vow of perpetual virginity
Verónæ sanctæ Placídiæ Vírginis.    At Verona, St. Placidia, virgin.
Placidia lived in Verona and was renowned for her sanctity and her vow of perpetual virginity. She should not be confused with the contemporary Placidia, the daughter of Roman Emperor Valentinian III.
Placida of Verona V (RM). Little is known about this virgin who is venerated at Verona and often confused with the daughter of Emperor Valentinian III (Benedictines, Encyclopedia)
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506 Gratus of Oloron episcopacy in the ancient see of Oloron B (AC)
Saint Gratus was the first to hold the episcopacy in the ancient see of Oloron in southern France. The diocese was suppressed long ago (Benedictines)
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553 St. Firminus of Uzes Bishop of Uzes, France
Ucétiæ, in Gállia Narbonénsi, sancti Firmíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
    At Uzea in France, St. Firmin, bishop and confessor.
He was born in Narbonne, France, and educated by an uncle whom he succeeded in Uzes. Firminus became bishop at twenty-two and died fifteen years later.
Firminus of Uzès B (RM) Born in Narbonne, France. Saint Firminus succeeded his uncle as bishop of Uzès at the tender age of 22 and governed the see until his death fifteen years later. He was a friend of Saint Caesarius (Benedictines, Encyclopedia)
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600 St. Canice also written Kenny and Kenneth; pupil of Saint Finnian monk under St. Cadoc at Llancarfan, Wales
In monastério Achadh-boénsi, in Hibérnia, sancti Cánici, Presbyteri et Abbátis.
    In the monastery of Aghaboe in Ireland, St. Kenny, priest and abbot.
599 St Canice, Or Kenneth, Abbot
Cainnech, also written Canice, Kenny and Kenneth, is a famous saint both in Ireland and Scotland, but in the traditions about him there is little upon which much reliance can be placed. He was an Irishman by birth, the son of a bard, born at Glengiven in Derry. It is said that when a youth he went over into Wales and became a monk under St Cadoc at Llancarfan, where he was ordained. His master’s particular affection and the favour that he showed him earned for Canice the jealousy of some of his brethren. After an alleged visit to Rome St Canice went back to Ireland and came to study at the school of St Finnian at Clonard, whence he went with St Kieran, St Comgall and St Columba to St Mobhi at Glasnevin. For some time he preached in Ireland and made several monastic foundations, and then made his first visit to Scotland. There are many traces of him in place-name and legend in that country, notably at Cambuskenneth below
Stirling and at Kilchainnech on Iona itself. He went with St Columba on his mission to the Pictish King Brude at Inverness, and with the sign of the cross paralysed Brude’s hand when he threatened the monks with his sword. He converted numerous pagans and was bound in close friendship with St Columba, who on one occasion when he was in great danger at sea said to his companions,

“Don’t be afraid! God will listen to Kenneth, who is running to church with only one shoe on to pray for us.” At the same time Canice in Ireland was aware of his friend’s peril and jumped up from a meal to go to the church.

The best known of St Canice’s foundations in Ireland was the monastery at Aghaboe in Ossory, but he probably also had an establishment at Kilkenny, whose old cathedral was dedicated in his honour. His zeal in preaching the gospel and practising Christian perfection have ranked him amongst the most glorious saints whose virtue has enlightened both Ireland and Scotland, and his feast is observed in both countries; throughout the land in one and in the dioceses of Saint Andrews and of Argyll in the other.

There is a Latin biography which has been edited by C. Plummer in his VSH., vol. i, pp. 152—169, from a text in the Marsh Library in Dublin. Another text, from the Codex Salmanticensis, was printed by FE. De Smedt and De Backer. Consult also KSS., pp. 295—297.  St Cainnech’s intercourse with other Irish saints is noted in Kenney, Sources for the Early History of Ireland, vol. i, pp. 409, etc., and see the gloss on the Félire of Oengus, p. 323. The name Kenny usually corresponds, not with Cainnech, but with the old name contained in the patronymic Cinnéide (Kennedy).

All we know about St. Canice is from unreliable legend, according to which he was born at Glengiven Ireland. He became a monk under St. Cadoc at Llancarfan, Wales, and was ordained there. After a trip to Rome, he studied under St. Finnian at Clonard, Ireland, accompanied by Ss. Kieran, Columba, and Comgall to St. Mobhi at Glasnevin. He preached for a time in Ireland, and then went to Scotland. A close friend of Columba's whom he accompanied on a visit to King Brude of the Picts. He was a most successful missionary, building a monastery at Aghaboe, Ireland, and probably one at Kilkenny. He is known as Kenneth and Cainnech.


Canice, of Kilkenny, Abbot (RM) (also known as Caimnech, Cainnic, Canicus, Cainnech, Kenneth, Kenny)
Born at Glengiven (Derry), Ireland, c. 515-527; died at Aghaboe (the ox's field) in Laois, c. 599. All we know about Canice is from unreliable legend, according to which he was the son of a scholar-poet, who became a pupil of Saint Finnian at Clonard. He may have gone with Saints Kieran, Columba, Comgall on mission to Saint Mobhi at Glasnevin, preached for a time in Ireland. When plague scattered the community, Canice became a monk under Saint Cadoc at Llancarfan, Wales, where he was ordained.
Canice was a close friend of Saint Columba whom he accompanied on a visit to King Brude of the Picts at Inverness, because he was of the Pictish race and spoke the language. Thus, he assisted Columba in establishing his base at Iona, where there was once a Killchainnech. He served similarly in introducing Comgall at Lismore.

For a time Canice worked in the Western Isles and on the mainland of Scotland, where he is known as Kenneth. A number of place names and old dedications confirm his presence in Scotland, notably the islet called Inch Kenneth in Mull. He founded churches on Tiree, South Uist, Coll, and Kintyre. He was the first person to build a church at Saint Andrews, then known as Rigmond. As Aengus records, "Aghaboe was his principal church and he has a Recles (monastery) at Kill-Rigmonaig in Alba." At the Reformation, the Irish abbot of Rigmond, Riaghail or Regulus, was transformed by a fanciful legend into a 4th-century Greek monk named Rule, who carried the relics of the apostle Saint Andrew to Rigmond. But the relics were not acquired until 736, at which time the name was changed to Saint Andrews.

When he returned to Ireland he founded the monastery of Aghaboe in Ossory, c. 577. Other foundations included Drumahose in Derry and Cluain Bronig in Offaly. Saint Canice is said also to have had a foundation at Kilkenny. That city is named after Canice, who was the titular patron of the Brethren of Saint Kenneth.
Canice copied a manuscript of the four Gospels. He was known as an effective preachers, when, according to the saint, he was divinely illuminated by God.
Until the Reformation, the society maintained the abbey at Maiden Castle. Canice is one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland and patron of Kennoway in Fife (Attwater, Benedictines, D'Arcy, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth, Montague, Montalembert, Mould, Moran, Ryan, Skene).
Like other Irish monastics saints, Canice periodically lived as a hermit and enjoyed the close communion such a life afforded with nature. These three short tales tell us a little about the legends of Saint Canice, called Cainnic by Plummer:  One Sunday Saint Cainnic was lodged on the island of Inish Ubdain; but the mice of that place gnawed his shoes and nibbled them and ate them. And the holy man, when he was aware of their naughtiness, cursed the mice, and cast them out of that island forever. For all the mice, assembling in a body, according to the word of Saint Cainnic, precipitated themselves into the depths of the sea, and mice on that island have not been seen unto this day (Plummer).  Another time Saint Cainnic was lodged one Sunday on another island, called En inish, the Isle of Birds. but the birds on it were garrulous and extremely loquacious, and gave annoyance to the saint of God. So he rebuked their loquacity, and they obeyed his command, for all the birds got together and set their breasts against the ground, and held their peace, and until the hour of Matins on Monday morning they stayed without a movement, and without a sound, until the Saint released them by his word (Plummer).  Another time when Saint Cainnic was in hidden retreat in solitude, a stag came to him, and would hold the book steady on his antlers as the Saint read on. But one day, startled by a sudden fear, he dashed into flight without the abbot's leave, carrying the book still open on his antlers; but thereafter, like a fugitive monk to his abbot, the book safe and unharmed still open on his antlers, he returned (Plummer).

St. Kenneth monk under St. Cadoc at Llancarfan
Kenneth is a derivative of Canice. All we know about Canice is from unreliable legend, according to which he was born at Glengiven, Ireland. He became a monk under St. Cadoc at Llancarfan, Wales, and was ordained there. After a trip to Rome, he studied under St. Finnian at Clonard, Ireland, accompanied Ss. Kieran, Columba, and Comgall to St. Mobhi at Glasnevin. He preached for a time in Ireland, and then went to Scotland. A close friend of Columba's whom he accompanied on a visit to King Brude of the Picts, he was a most successful missionary. He built a monastery at Aghaboe, Ireland, and probably one at Kilkenny. He is also known as Kenneth and Cainnech
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7th v. Eufridus of Alba monk OSB (AC); local cultus at Albi in the Piedmont, monk of Asti (Benedictines).
7th v. St. Ansillo monk life is obscure. His relics are in the Benedictine abbey of Lagny, near Meaux, France.
685 Agilbert (Aglibert) of Paris nephew Eleutherius active missionary ordained Saint Wilfrid replaced Celtic customs with Roman at Synod of Whitby OSB B (PC)

685 St Agilbert, Bishop Of Paris
When Coenwalh, King of the West Saxons, had received the Christian faith and baptism at the court of Anna, King of the East Angles, and been restored to his dominions, there came into Wessex a certain bishop called Agilbert. He was a Frank, but had been living in Ireland engaged in study. Coenwalh, impressed by his learning and zeal, asked him to stay there as bishop. To this St Agilbert agreed, and he showed himself an indefatigable pastor and missionary.
   When in Northumbria he ordained St Wilfrid priest; and when it was decided to hold a council to decide the controversy between Roman and Celtic customs, he stayed on to assist at the Synod of Whitby. At this assembly he was looked on as leader of the “Roman” party and was called on by King Oswy to be the first to reply to St Colman of Lindisfarne. St Agilbert asked to be excused and named St Wilfrid to answer, because “he can explain our opinion better in English than I can by an interpreter”.  This language difficulty had already been a cause of serious trouble to Agilbert. After he had been bishop of the West Saxons for some years, King Coenwalh, “who”, says St Bede, “understood no tongue but that of the Saxons, grew weary of that bishop’s barbarous speech”. He therefore divided his kingdom into two dioceses, and appointed to that which included the royal city of Winchester an English bishop named Wine. Agilbert was very vexed that the king should have done this without first consulting him (as he well might be) and, resigning his see, he eventually retuned to France. In 668 he was made bishop of Paris. Wine in the meantime had become bishop of London by simony, Wessex was without a bishop again, and so Coenwalh asked St Agilbert to come back. He replied that he could not leave the see and flock of his own city, but sent instead his nephew Eleutherius, “whom he thought worthy to be made a bishop”; he was consecrated by St Theodore of Canterbury. During St Agilbert’s French episcopate he con­secrated St Wilfrid bishop, as is narrated when treating of that saint. St Agilbert died before the year 691.
Here again Bede (see Plummer’s text and notes) is our main authority, but we hear of Agilbert also in the Liber Historiae Francorum and in the continuation of Fredegarius.
Saint Agilbert, a Frank, studied under abbot Ado at Jouarre monastery in Ireland. He studied scripture in France and then crossed over to England and preached in Wessex.
King Coenwalh (Coinwalch) of the West Saxons invited him to remain in Wessex as bishop. He was active in missionary activities, ordained Saint Wilfrid, and with him led the group seeking to replace the Celtic customs with Roman at the Synod of Whitby.

He resigned his see when Coenwalh, growing impatient with a foreign prelate, divided his diocese. Agilbert returned to France, where he was consecrated bishop of Paris in 668. Coenwalh later invited him back but he refused and sent his nephew Eleutherius in his place. Agilbert is buried at Jouarre (Benedictines, Delaney)
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750 St. Juliana of Pavilly  Benedictine abbess
 also called “the Little Sister of Jesus.” A servant girl, she entered the Benedictines at Pavilly, France, under St. Benedicta.
Juliana of Pavilly, OSB Abbess (AC)
Saint Juliana entered the convent of Pavilly, Normandy, during the abbacy of Saint Benedicta. This former servant girl became abbess of the same convent, and earned the title "the Little Sister of Jesus" (Benedictines)
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774 St. Gummarus son of lord Emblem, near Lierre in Brabant.
Lyræ, in Bélgio, deposítio sancti Gummári Confessóris,
    At Lier in Belgium, the death of St. Gummarus, confessor.

774 St Gummarus, or Gommaire
Gummarus was a son of the lord of Emblem, near Lierre in Brabant. He grew up without learning to read or write, but served at the court of Pepin, where from a spirit of religion he was faithful in every duty and liberal in works of mercy.  Pepin raised him to a high post, and proposed a match between him and a lady of good birth named Gummarus, and the marriage was solemnized with their mutual consent. This marriage, which seemed unhappy in the eyes of the world, was directed by God to perfect the virtue of His servant and exalt him to the glory of the saints: for Gummarus was extravagant and perverse in her ways, cruel, capricious and altogether unteachable. Life became from that time a train of continual trials for Gummarus.
  St Gummarus for several years endeavoured by all means which prudence and charity could suggest to encourage his wife to ways more agreeable to reason and religion. Then he was called upon by King Pepin to attend him in his wars, and he was absent eight years. Returning home, he found his wife had thrown all things into disorder, and that few among his servants, vassals or tenants had escaped her oppression. She was so mean that she even refused beer to the reapers at harvest. Gummarus made to every one of them full restitution and satisfaction; and Gummarus was so far overcome by his patience and kindness as to be ashamed of her past conduct, and to seem penitent. This change, however, was only exterior, and her willfulness broke out again worse than ever. Gummarus tried to reclaim her but at length he gave up the attempt and lived a retired life. With St Rumold he is said to have founded the abbey at Lierre, which afterwards bore his name.
There is both a prose Latin Life of Gummarus and a metrical synopsis, for which see the Acta Sanctorum, October. vol. v. A very full discussion of the subject has also been printed in Flemish by P. G. Deckers, Leven en eerdienst van den h. ridder Gummarus (1872); and see T. Paaps, De hl. Gummarus,... critische studie (1944).
He grew up without learning to read or write, but served at the court of Pepin, where from a spirit of religion he was faithful in every duty and liberal in owrks of mercy. Pepin raised hinm to a high post, and proposed a match between him and a lady of good birth named Guinimaria, and the marriage was solemnized with their mutual consent. This marriage, which seemed unhappy in the eyes of the world, was directed by God to perfect the virtue of His servant and exalt him to the glory of saints: for Guinimaria was extravagant and perverse in her ways, cruel, capricious and altogether unteachable. Life became from that time a train of continual trials for Gummarus. St. Gummarus for several years endeavoured by all means which prudence and charity could suggest to encourage his wife to ways more agreeable to reason and religion. Then he was called upon by King Pepin to attend him in his wars, and he was absent eight years. Returning home, he found his wife had thrown all things into disorder, and that few among his servants, vassals or tenants had escaped her oppression. She was so mean that she even refused beer to the reapers at harvest. Gummarus made to every one of them full restitution and satisfaction; and Guinimaria was so far overcome by his patience and kindness as to be ashamed of her past conduct, and to seem penitent. This change, however, was only exterior, and her wilfulness broke out again worse than ever. Gummarus tried to reclaim her: but at length he gave up the attempt and lived a retired life. With St. Romuold he is said to have founded the abbey at Lierre which afterwards bore his name.

Gummarus (Gomer, Gommaire) of Lier, Hermit (RM)  Born at Emblehem (diocese of Malines), Brabant, c. 717; died October 11, c. 774. Like Saint Gengou, Saint Gomer served under Pepin the Short in his wars, and on his return home had to face the same domestic troubles. Though their stories end differently, Gomer and Gengou, are the patrons of those who married badly.
Gomer was born into a rich and influential family. Before long Gomer had an important position at the court of Pepin the Short. The young man had all the virtues--gentility, piety, innocence, and simplicity. He preferred religious devotions to court socials, and spent his time with wise old men instead of pretty young girls.
Eventually he married a woman called Gwinmarie. She was rich, beautiful, and was personally recommended by Pepin the Short. At first it was a blissful marriage. Gwinmarie, who had thought that men were rough and crude creatures, was charmed by Gomer's delicate manners. But she had barely unpacked her trousseau, when Gomer was called off to the wars.

She dried her tears and busied herself with running their estate. She did it very well, so well in fact that when Gomer came home on leave he found everything just a little too neat and well-ordered. Gwinmarie had got used to the exercise of authority and made no secret of it. Gomer put on his slippers, scratched his head and realized that he was no longer master in his own house. So he went back to the wars.
For the next eight years he was fighting away in Lombardy, Saxony, and Aquitaine, and since he saw his wife only very rarely the wall between them grew steadily higher. Knowing and understanding each other less and less, they both remained on their separate sides and became set in their ways. Gwinmarie became harsh, severe, and doubtless because she was afraid of not being obeyed, made her farmers and laborers feel the full weight of her privileges. She threatened, punished, and scrutinized them closely.
By the time Gomer came home for good he had seen enough chaos and injustice in the wars, and had no intention of letting his wife continue to run things in her autocratic way. In next to no time he had redressed all the wrongs she had committed, restored the people she had dispossessed from their property, and given generously to the poor.

Gwinmarie cried, scratched, sulked, threatened, but it was no good: Gomer was not the man to set his wife above the honor of God. However, since there was no peace at home, Gomer gathered a few friends together and set off on a pilgrimage to Rome until the storm had blown over.

He didn't get very far. A miracle (a tree fell down and he set it up again) and a revelation (from an angel) obliged him to build a monastery and a church on his own estate. And so he became half- husband, half-monk. (The town of Lierre (Lier) has arisen around his hermitage.)
But he continued to visit Gwinmarie. She was becoming more and more sour-tempered, but although she didn't want to listen to Gomer's lectures and homilies she had to do as he told her, for he was always putting her in her place with a convenient miracle.
However the story has a happy ending: Old, sick, and lonely, Gwinmarie was afraid of dying and called Gomer to her. He came at once, calmed and comforted her, and treated her with such gentleness that all her sourness disappeared. She died peacefully, and Gomer followed her. Before they died a large number of children were miraculously born to them, according to legend.

In art, Gomer is sometimes represented carrying in his hand a stick which is covered with flowers. This is in memory of the stick that he planted to mark the site of his meeting with another saint-- Rumold, the Irish monk who was evangelizing the Low Countries. So much ivy grew there that the name of Lierre (French for 'ivy') was given to the town that was later built there (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). Usually he is depicted as a richly dressed pilgrim with water springing where he strikes with his staff. There is an axe at the root of the tree behind him and he holds a glove.
Gomer is venerated at Lierre, Flanders. He is the patron of cabinet-makers, glovers, printers, and woodsmen. He is invoked against bad wives and rupture (Roeder) .
965 ST BRUNO THE GREAT, ARCHBISHOP OF Cologne; he set a high example of personal goodness and devotion, and kept clergy and laity on their mettle by frequent visitations. Sound learning and the monastic spirit were the means by which a high standard of pastoral care and spiritual life were to be maintained; his cathedral-school was staffed by the best professors he could find, and he founded the abbey of St Pantaleon at Cologne. Nor was St Bruno’s solicitude confined to his own diocese: he used his influence and authority to spread his reforms throughout the kingdom, and at the same time as he became archbishop this authority was further notably extended by the action of the emperor.
Of the saints bearing the name of Bruno the founder of the Carthusians would seem most to deserve the epithet “the Great”, but traditionally it is given to the powerful prince-bishop who, eighty years before his namesake was born in his episcopal city of Cologne, co-operated so conspicuously with his own brother, the Emperor Otto I (also called “the Great”), in the religious and social building-up of Germany and the Empire.
   This Bruno was the youngest son of the Emperor Henry the Fowler and his wife St Matilda; he was born in 925 and from early years showed that he shared the good dispositions of his parents. When only four he was sent to the cathedral-school at Utrecht, where he acquired a keen love of learning. Prudentius was said to be his favourite bedside book, and later on he learned Greek from some Byzantines at the imperial court. He was called thither  by his brother Otto when he was fourteen, and in spite of his extreme youth he was given rapid preferment. In 940 he was made the emperor’s confidential secretary, and soon after was ordained deacon and given the abbeys of Lorsch and Corvey. This irregular proceeding had a happy result in that he restored a stricter observance in both of them.
   Bruno was ordained priest when he was twenty-five, and went with Otto into Italy as chancellor, in which office he used all his power to bring about the emperor’s ideal of a close union between church and state. The time was at hand when he would be in an even more favourable position to forward this unity. In the year 953 the archbishopric of Cologne became vacant, and Bruno was appointed to it.
   Throughout the twelve years of his episcopate St Bruno played a leading part in imperial politics, in which ecclesiastical affairs were inextricably mixed up, but not for a moment did he slacken his attention to the spiritual requirements of the people and the purely religious responsibilities of his office. In the first place he set a high example of personal goodness and devotion, and kept clergy and laity on their mettle by frequent visitations. Sound learning and the monastic spirit were the means by which a high standard of pastoral care and spiritual life were to be maintained; his cathedral-school was staffed by the best professors he could find, and he founded the abbey of St Pantaleon at Cologne. Nor was St Bruno’s solicitude confined to his own diocese: he used his influence and authority to spread his reforms throughout the kingdom, and at the same time as he became archbishop this authority was further notably extended by the action of the emperor. While Otto was absent in Italy the duke of Lorraine, his son-in-law Conrad the Red, had risen in rebellion; whereupon Otto deposed Conrad and put St Bruno in his place. The duchy was not made appurtenant to the bishopric, but this appointment of Bruno was the beginning of the temporal power formerly exercised by the archbishops of Cologne; they were princes of the Holy Roman Empire. St Bruno was as capable a statesman as he was a good man. He had peculiar aptitude in settling the numerous political disputes of the Lorrainers, and he made German influence supreme over them. In this unifying task his highly trained and apostolic clergy played a large part, and such was the number and quality of the bishops that he appointed that St Bruno was called “the bishop-maker”. The recognition of his worth and ability reached its climax in 961 when, the emperor going to Rome to be crowned, Bruno was appointed with his half-brother William, archbishop of Mainz, co-regent of the empire and guardian of their nephew, the infant king of the Romans, during his father’s absence.
Four years later, on October 11, 965, Bruno the Great died at Rheims; he was only forty years old. His cultus in the diocese of Cologne was confirmed in 1870.
The Life of St Bruno by his devoted disciple Ruotger is reckoned one of the most reliable and satisfactory of medieval biographies. It may be read in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. v, or in MGH., Scriptores, new series, ed. Irene Ott (1951); there was a previous edition in vol. iv, pp. 224—275. It was written within three or four years of Bruno’s death. For a careful study of this work see H. Schörs’s series of papers in the Annalen d. histor. Vereins f. d. Niederrhein, 1910, 1911, 1917. Cf. also Hauck, Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands, vol. iii, pp. 45 seq.
1379 John of Bridlington (John Thwing), OSA (AC)
Born at Thwing, Yorkshire, England, in 1319; died October 10, 1379; canonized by Pope Boniface IX in 1401 or 1403. At the age of 19, while still a student at Oxford, John joined the community of Augustinian canons at Bridlington near his hometown. He filled various offices until he was elected its prior and held that position for 17 years--until his death. Saint John is the patron of women in difficult labor (Benedictines, Delaney).
1379 St. John of Bridlington  Augustinian prior and patron of women who face difficult labors. He was born John Thwing in Bridlington, Yorkshire, England, in 1319, and became a student at Oxford. Joining the Augustinians at Bridlington, he served as prior for seventeen years until his death. He was canonized in 1401.
1491 Blessed James Griesinger soldier turned Dominican, OP (AC)
Born at Ulm, Swabia, Germany, in 1407; beatified in 1825. James Griesinger was a soldier until he donned the Dominican habit as a lay brother at Bologna, Italy, in 1441. For the rest of his life he praised God through his craft at which he excelled: painting on glass (Benedictines)
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1491  BD JAMES OF ULM
THE Griesingers were a respectable family of Ulm in Germany, where Bd James was born in the year 1407. He left home when he was twenty-five and went to  Italy. He was first a soldier at Naples, but the licence of military life shocked and frightened him, and when he found that his comrades took no notice of his better example and words he left the army and became secretary to a lawyer at Capua. He did his work so well that when, at the end of five years, he wanted to leave his master refused to let him go. So James slipped away and made for Germany, but when he got so far as Bologna he was induced again to enlist as a soldier. In that city he used often to go to the shrine of St Dominic, and presently he was moved to offer himself as a lay brother to the friars there. He was accepted, and for fifty years he was a model of regular observance and virtue. His prior on one occasion wished to display the lay brother’s prompt obedience for the edification of a visiting prelate. He called for Brother James and gave him a letter, saying it was to be taken to Paris at once. The journey ordered was a long, toilsome and dangerous one, but James just pocketed the letter and asked permission first to go to his cell to get his hat and stick.
The works of the Friars Preachers hold a remarkable place in the history of Christian art, and Bd James, like his fellow Dominican William of Marcillat, was a master of the art of painting on glass. On such work he was principally engaged, and he prepared himself for it by assiduous prayer, whereat he was often rapt in ecstasy; a number of miracles were attributed to him both before and after death. Bd James died on October 11 1491, being eighty-four years old to a day, and was beatified in 1825.

A biographical memoir written by Fr Ambrosino of Saracino, a contemporary, has been translated from Italian into Latin in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. v. See also H Wilma, Jakob Griesinger (1922) in German, and Procter, Dominican I, pp. 287—291.
1592 St. Alexander Sauli The Apostle of Corsica bishop  performed miracles of prophecy, healing, and calming of storms both during his life and after his death The order the congregation of Clerks Regular of Saint Paul became known as the Barnabites
Calótii, in diœcési Asténsi, olim Papiénsi, sancti Alexándri Sauli, e Clericórum Regulárium sancti Pauli Congregatióne, Epíscopi et Confessóris; quem, génere, virtútibus, doctrína et miráculis clarum, Pius Décimus, Póntifex Máximus, Sanctórum fastis adscrípsit. 
At Calozzo, in the diocese of Asti, formerly that of Pavia, St. Alexander Sauli, bishop and confessor of the Clerics Regular of St. Paul.  He was of noble birth and renowned for virtues, learning, and miracles.  Pope Pius X placed him in the canon of the saints.

He came from a prominent family of Lombard, Italy, born in Milan in 1533. At an early age he entered the Barnabite Congregation {Anthony Mary Zaccaria, Priest Born in Cremona, Italy, 1502; died there, July 15, 1539; canonized by Pope Leo XIII in 1897.
“That which God commands seems difficult and a burden...The way is rough;
you draw back; you have no desire to follow it. Yet do so and you will attain glory.

1592 St Alexander Sauli, Bishop of Pavia
It is recorded of Alexander Sauli that when he was a youth he one day burst into a crowd of people who were watching the antics of some acrobats and tumblers, and, waving a crucifix before the astonished eyes of audience and performers, he warned them solemnly against the dangers of frivolous amusements and pleasure-seeking. After allowance due to youth for the lack of proportion, this incident may be seen as prophetic of Alexander’s career, of which the chief business was the restoration to order of Christians who had grown slack, feeble and worse in the enervating atmosphere of the mid-sixteenth century.
   He was born at Milan of a Genoese family in 1534, and after a good education became a Barnabite clerk regular at the age of seventeen. He was sent for his studies to their college at Pavia, to which he presented a library and for the enlargement of which he paid out of his own pocket. After his ordination to the priesthood in 1556 he taught philosophy and theology at the university, and was soon made theologian to the bishop, at the same time rapidly making a reputation as a preacher.
   He was so successful at Pavia that St Charles Borromeo invited him to preach in the cathedral of Milan, and St Charles and Cardinal Sfondrati (afterwards Pope Gregory XIV) were present. The burning words of the young Barnabite moved them to tears, and both became his penitents, Father Sauli continuing to direct and advise the archbishop for many years. In 1567 he was elected provost general of his congregation and, though only thirty-three years old, was sufficiently self-confident to withstand both Pope St Pius V and St Charles. Cardinal Borromeo was the protector of the small remnant of Humiliati friars and had a commission to reform them, for they had become both wealthy and, in some individual cases, wicked. It seemed to him, and the pope agreed, that it would be a good thing if these friars were united to the newly founded and zealous Barnabite congregation. But St Alexander, though willing to do all he might for the improvement of the Humiliati, did not feel called on to agree to any proceeding that might have a detrimental effect on his own spiritual children, and St Charles had to withdraw his proposal.
   St Alexander had now shown himself unmistakably to be the firm and zealous sort of priest required by St Pius’s reforming activities, and in 1570 he was appointed bishop of Aleria in Corsica. He protested, in vain this time, was consecrated by St Charles, and proceeded to his diocese. It presented a formidable task. The clergy were ignorant and debased, the people barbarous and with hardly the rudiments of religion; the island was overrun with brigands and family vendette were continual and ruthless. He took three clerks regular to help him and, when he had established himself at Tallona (his see city was a ruin), he summoned a synod at which he announced the reforms he proposed to carry out. He then proceeded to a visitation of the diocese, during which the new ways were inaugurated with considerable and necessary severity. He governed the unruly diocese for twenty years, and brought it to such a flourishing state that he was called the apostle of Corsica. In his third synod he promulgated the decrees of the Council of Trent, and his insistence on the observance of these did more than anything else for the restoration of religion. He had to cope not only with sullen opposition from within but with violence from without, from the raids of corsairs from the Barbary coast: three times on their account he had to move his residence and seminary, but eventually established his cathedral and chapter at Cervione.
   During his episcopate Alexander Sauli had frequent occasion to visit Rome, where he became a close friend of St Philip Neri, who held him up as an example of a model bishop. He wrote a number of pastoral and catechetical works, and was a capable canonist. His success in Corsica caused him to be offered the sees of Tortona and Genoa, but he refused all preferment until Gregory XIV insisted on transferring him to Pavia. This was in 1591, but he died in the following year while on a visitation at Calozza in that diocese.
   During his life St Alexander had displayed the gift of prophecy, the calming of storms and other miracles were attributed to his intercession. These were continued after his death, and his canonization took place in 1904.

A Latin life by J. A. Gabutius, who was a contemporary, is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. v. The canonization gave rise to the publication of much important material in the Rivista di Scienze Storiche for 1905 1907 And 1908; Fr 0. Premoli was responsible for the more valuable part of these contributions, and he is also the author of an excellent work on the Barnabites, Storia dei Barnabiti (2 vols., 1914, 1922). Another full but less well documented account of St Alexander Sauli is that of F. T. Moltedo (1904), and there is a French life by A. Dubois (1904). On the saint’s writings consult G. Boffito, Scrittori Barnabiti (1933—34).
Antony studied medicine at the University of Padua. In 1524, at the age of 25, he set up his practice in his hometown. As a medical man he found himself ministering not only to the sick but also to the dying and the bereaved. He found man and women sick not only in the body but spiritually, and so he turned to the study of theology to learn more about the comfort and ways of God. By 1528, it seemed natural that the young doctor should be ordained as a secular priest who pursued a spiritual and corporeal ministry. Soon he moved to work in Metan near Milan. His zeal, molded on that of Saint Paul, knew no bounds.  In 1530, he and a few other priests, including Venerable Bartholomew Ferrari and Venerable James Morigia, founded the congregation of Clerks Regular of Saint Paul, the members of which were neither monks nor friars but lived under a rule to revive the love of divine worship and a true Christian way of life by continual preaching and faithfully administering the sacraments. 
They worked among the plague-stricken Milanese, in the midst of wars, and during Luther's reforms. The group so invigorated the city's spiritual life that it was approved by Pope Clement VI in 1533 with Antony as its first provost general. The order became known as the Barnabites when, in the last year of Antony's life, the church of Saint Barnabas in Milan became the order's headquarters. Antony resigned in 1536, helped spread the community, and worked ceaselessly to reform the Church. Under his direction, Louisa Torelli founded the congregation of women called Angelicals, who protected and rescued girls who had fallen into disreputable lives. Antony was only 37 when he died as a result of his unceasing apostolic toil (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, White).}
, and became a teacher at the University of Pavia and superior general of the congregation. In 1571 he was appointed by Pope Pius V to Aleria on Corsica.
Taking three companions, Alexander rebuilt churches, founded seminaries and colleges, and stood off the pirate raids in the area. He became the bishop of Pavia after refusing other sees, serving only a year before his death. Alexander was a noted miracle worker. He was also spiritual advisor to St. Charles Borromeo and to Cardinal Sfondrato, who became Pope Gregory XIV. He was canonized in 1904 by Pope St. Pius X.
Alexander Sauli, Barnabite B (RM)
Born at Milan, Italy, in 1534; died at Colozza (near Pavia) on October 11, 1593; beatified in 1741 or 1742; canonized by Pope Saint Pius X in 1904. At the age of 17, Saint Alexander, son of an important Genoese family, joined the Barnabites, which had been recently founded by Saint Antony Zaccharia, studied at the order's college at Pavia, endowed the college with a library, and was ordained in 1556. He was the confessor of Saint Charles Borromeo and Cardinal Sfondrati (later Pope Gregory XIV). Alexander earned the reputation as a zealous preacher during the time he was teaching at the university in Pavia.
In 1567, he was elected general of his congregation. About this time, Borromeo was given the mandate to reform the Humiliati. With the support of Pope Saint Pius V, Borromeo favored merging the group into the lively Barnabites. As provost general Sauli resisted Borromeo's efforts to incorporate the Humiliati friars into the Barnabites because he feared that they would reduce the discipline of his congregation. The assassination attempt on the life of Charles Borromeo in 1571, led to the complete suppression of the order soon afterwards.

Later (1570) he began his 20 years of service to the Church as a bishop of the Corsican diocese of Aleria. There he carried out religious reforms that were as unwelcome as they were necessary and overdue. The saint found that the clergy were ignorant and the people irreligious, engaging in frequent vendettas and brigandage. The bishop moved his cathedral from Aleria to Cervione and began a systematic visitation. He promulgated the decrees of the Council of Trent assiduously.

Sauli refused translation to the see of Tortona and then Genoa, but just before his death in 1592, Bishop Sauli was transferred to the Italian see of Pavia at the command of Pope Gregory XIV. His friend, Saint Philip Neri, considered that Sauli's reforms had transformed the disreputable Corsican diocese into a model for others. He died during a visitation of his new diocese.

The bishop was reputed to have performed miracles of prophecy, healing, and calming of storms both during his life and after his death. He was a learned man with a special aptitude for canon law, preaching, and catechesis. Although he is not as charismatic as some of the saints of the Counter-Reformation, Saint Alexander Sauli was an exemplary pastor in an age of abuse and corruption (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Orsenigo, Yeo).
1833 St. Peter Tuy Vietnamese martyr native priest
he was beheaded by Vietnamese authorities. Peter was canonized in 1988 by Pope John Paul II. 
Blessed Peter Tuy M (AC) beatified in 1900. At the age of 70, Blessed Peter Tuy, a native priest, was beheaded for the faith by King Minh-Menh of Tonkin (Benedictines)
.
1867 St Francis Xavier Seelos New Orleans mission preaching
was born in Fussen, Germany, in 1819. Expressing his desire for the priesthood since an early age, he entered the diocesan seminary of Augsburg after completing his studies in philosophy. Upon learning of the charism and missionary activity of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, he decided to join and go to North America. He arrived in the United States on April 20, 1843, entered the Redemptorist novitiate and completed his theological studies, being ordained a priest on December 22, 1844. He began his pastoral ministry in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he remained nine years, working closely as assistant pastor of his confrere St. John Neumann, while at the same time serving as Master of Novices and dedicating himself to mission preaching. In 1854, he returned to Baltimore, later being transferred to Cumberland and then Annapolis, where he served in parochial ministry and in the formation of the Redemptorist seminarians. He was considered an expert confessor, a watchful and prudent spiritual director and a pastor always joyfully available and attentive to the needs of the poor and the abandoned. In 1860, he was a candidate for the office of Bishop of Pittsburgh. Having been excused from this responsibility by Pope Pius IX, from 1863 until 1866 he became a full-time itinerant missionary preacher. He preached in English and German in the states of Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. He was named pastor of the Church of St. Mary of the Assumption in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he died of the yellow fever epidemic caring for the sick and the poor of New Orleans on October 4, 1867, at the age of 48 years and nine months. The enduring renown for his holiness which the Servant of God enjoyed occasioned his Cause for Canonization to be introduced in 1900 with the initiation of the Processo Informativo . On January 27, Your Holiness declared him Venerable, decreeing the heroism of his virtues
.
1887 Maria- Desolata (Emmanuela) Torres Acosta Handmaids of Mary V (RM) Miracle worker
(also known as Mary Soledad)
   Born at Madrid, Spain, in 1826; died there in 1887; beatified in 1950; canonized in 1970. Emmanuela, a truly great woman who overcame many obstacles, was the daughter of Francis Torres and Antonia Acosta, who earned their living by running a little business in Madrid. Born into poverty, she tried unsuccessfully to become a Dominican in the convent she frequented. But she did not despair. Instead she waited patiently for God to demonstrate his will for her.
His will became apparent in 1848, and she responded to the call of a Servite tertiary priest, Michael Martinez y Sanz, to found an institute for the care of the neglected sick of his parish in their own homes. In 1851, he gathered together seven women for agreed to devote themselves to service in a religious community. Among them was the 25-year-old Emmanuela, who took the name Maria-Desolata (after Our Lady of Sorrows) together with the religious habit. In 1856, Father Martinez took half the members with him to found a new house in Fernando Po, while leaving Maria-Desolata as superioress in Madrid.

    The subsequent priest-director of the young institute (Handmaids of Mary) removed her and appointed another as superior. The substitution nearly spelled the death of the organization and was threatened by the bishop with dissolution. After an examination by the bishop, Maria-Desolata was reappointed, and with the help of the Augustinian Father Gabino Sanchez, the new director, they struggled on. Mother Maria was able to enlist the financial and moral support of the queen and the local authorities.

   In 1861, the rule of the Handmaids of Mary received diocesan approval, and another Augustinian, Father Angelo Barra, was appointed as its director. The mission of the Handmaids expanded to encompass care for the young delinquents of Madrid. The work of the community was invaluable during the cholera epidemic in 1865. Although some of her nuns migrated to another congregation acrimoniously, the Handmaids continued to expand--this time overseas in Santiago de Cuba (1875). From that time the congregation infiltrated every part of Spain, including, in 1878, the ancient hospital of Saint Charles in the Escorial. Before her happy death 46 houses were founded (Benedictines, Walsh)
.

1887 Bd Mary Soledad, Virgin, Foundress Of The Handmaids Of Mary Serving The Sick

Bd Mary Soledad Torres-Acosta belongs to the company of St Mary Michaela Desmaisières, Bd Joachima de Mas and Bd Vincentia Lopez, nineteenth-century Spanish women who attained heroic sanctity in the service of their sick, suffering and needy neighbours. The parents of Mary Soledad were Francis Torres and Antonia Acosta, an exemplary couple living obscurely by a little business in Madrid; she was the second of five children, born in 1826, and was christened Emanuela. She was a quiet child, who would hide food to give to her hungry playmates, and would rather teach them their prayers than play games. For a time it looked as if she would join the Dominican nuns, whose convent she frequented, but she was content to wait for a more clear indication of what was required of her.

   This eventually came from the Chamberi quarter of Madrid, where the vicar was a Servite tertiary named Michael Martinez y Sanz, who had long been worried by the neglected state of so many of the sick in his parish. In 1851 he gathered together seven women, young and not so young, to devote themselves to their service in a religious community. The last of them was twenty-five-year-old Emanuela Torres-Acosta, who in the event was to become the real foundress of the new congregation. She took at her clothing the name Mary Soledad, Spanish for Desolata, “alone and grief-stricken”, a token of her love for our Lady of Sorrows.

   The enterprise was beset with difficulties within and without-but not, it would seem, overwhelming difficulties; nevertheless its early growth was very slow. Five years after the foundation Don Michael took half of the members with him to make a separate foundation in Fernando Po; six were left in Madrid, with Sister Mary Soledad as superioress. For a moment the little group was threatened with dissolution by episcopal authority. But with the help of a new director, Father Gabino Sanchez, an Augustinian friar, it was able to struggle on; and through the enterprise of Mother Mary support was obtained from the queen and from the local authorities.

The turning point came in 1861, when the rule of the Handmaids of Mary received diocesan approval and another Augustinian, Father Angelo Barra, was appointed director. Beginning with the taking-over of an institution for young delinquents in Madrid, several new foundations were made, and in the cholera epidemic of 1865 all eyes were turned to the selfless work of Mother Mary Soledad and her nuns. A few years later there was a secession of some members to another congregation, with the usual complaints and accusations from which mother ­foundresses have to suffer-as one of her nuns said, Mary Soledad was an anvil, something that was being continually hit. Heaven's reply to this was to bring about, in 1875, the first foundation overseas, at Santiago in Cuba. From that time on there was an accelerated spreading of the houses and hospitals of the congregation in every province of Spain, culminating in 1878 in the taking-over of the ancient hospital of St Charles in the Escorial itself.

   The work involved and the increasing commitments continued to the end of Mother Mary's life, the last ten years of which were happily serene. Towards the end of September 1887 she was taken ill, and by October 8 the end was at hand.  “Mother”, said her daughters “bless us, like St Francis did.”  She shook her head. But one lifted her up in bed, and she raised her hand, saying slowly, “Children, live together in peace and unity”. She died tranquilly on October 11. For thirty-five years Mary Soledad had been the leader, the guide, the human inspiration of the Handmaids of Mary, fostering them from half-a-dozen aspirants to a flourishing, well-ordered, technically efficient body of devoted religious; and since her death she has seen them spread to Italy, France, England, Portugal, the Americas. How much humbleness, how much charity, how much prudence and self-effacement is required for such a work of love it is given to few to know. But the Church knows: and in 1950 Mother Mary Soledad was declared Blessed.

The apostolic letter of beatification, with a biographical note, is in Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xlii (1950), pp. 182-197. There is a life of the beata in Italian, by E. Federici (1950), reliable but very “long-winded”; and at least one in Spanish, by. J. A. Zugasti.
1899 Blessed Angela Truszkowska the Felician Sisters
Today we honor a woman who submitted to God's will throughout her life—a life filled with pain and suffering.
Born in 1825 in central Poland and baptized Sophia, she contracted tuberculosis as a young girl. The forced period of convalescence gave her ample time for reflection. Sophia felt called to serve God by working with the poor, including street children and the elderly homeless in Warsaw's slums. In time, her cousin joined her in the work.
In 1855, the two women made private vows and consecrated themselves to the Blessed Mother. New followers joined them. Within two years they formed a new congregation, which came to be known as the Felician Sisters. As their numbers grew, so did their work, and so did the pressures on Mother Angela (the new name Sophia took in religious life).
Mother Angela served as superior for many years until ill health forced her to resign at the age of 44. She watched the order grow and expand, including missions to the United States among the sons and daughters of Polish immigrants.
Pope John Paul II beatified her in 1993

Blessed Angela Truszkowska (1825-1899)  
Today we honor a woman who submitted to God's will throughout her life—a life filled with pain and suffering.
Born in 1825 in central Poland and baptized Sophia, she contracted tuberculosis as a young girl. The forced period of convalescence gave her ample time for reflection. Sophia felt called to serve God by working with the poor, including street children and the elderly homeless in Warsaw's slums. In time, her cousin joined her in the work.

In 1855, the two women made private vows and consecrated themselves to the Blessed Mother. New followers joined them. Within two years they formed a new congregation, which came to be known as the Felician Sisters. As their numbers grew, so did their work, and so did the pressures on Mother Angela (the new name Sophia took in religious life).

Mother Angela served as superior for many years until ill health forced her to resign at the age of 44. She watched the order grow and expand, including missions to the United States among the sons and daughters of Polish immigrants. Pope John Paul II beatified her in 1993
.

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
Pope John XXIII convenes the 2nd Vatican Council in 1962
St Paulinus A Roman monk, in 600 he was named by Pope St. Gregory I the Great to accompany Sts. Justus and Mellitus on their mission to England to advance the cause of evangelization undertaken by St. Augustine of Canterbury Paulinus labored for some twenty four years in Kent and, in 625, was ordained bishop of Kent. He was also responsible for bringing Christianity to Northumbria, baptizing the pagan king Edwin of Northumbria on Easter 627, and then converting thousands of other Northumbrians. Following the defeat and death of Edwin by pagan Mercians at the Battle of Hatfield in 633, Paulinus was driven from his see, and he returned to Kent with Edwin’s widow Ethelburga, her two children, and Edwin’s grandson Osfrid. Paulinus then took up the see of Rochester, which he headed until his death. 

Pope Honorius I sent the pallium to St Paulinus as the northern metropolitan in England, and in his letter of congratulation to King Edwin upon his conversion he wrote, “We send pallia to the metropolitans Honorius and Paulinus, that whenever it shall please God to call either of them out of this world the other may ordain a successor for him by virtue of this letter”.

The pontificate of Pius V and the generalship of St Francis Borgia began within an interval of a few months and ended at almost the same time. The saintly pope had entire confidence in the saintly general, who conformed with intelligent devotion to every desire of the pontiff. It was he who inspired the pope with the idea of demanding from the Universities of Perugia and Bologna, and eventually from all the Catholic universities, a profession of the Catholic faith. It was also he who, in 1568, desired the pope to appoint a commission of cardinals charged with promoting the conversion of infidels and heretics, which was the germ of the Congregation for the Propogation of the Faith, established later by Gregory XV in 1622. A pestilential fever invaded Rome in 1566, and Borgia organized methods of relief, established ambulances, and distributed forty of his religious to such purpose that the same fever having broken out two years later it was to Borgia that the pope at once confided.


Pope Leo XIII

The best way to make our pleas heard 
The Rosary, a kind of prayer that seems to contain, as it were, a final pledge of affection and to sum up in itself the honor due to Our Lady… There has seemed to be no better means of conducting sacred solemnities or of obtaining protection and favors. (Encyclical Octobri Mense).

There are, of course, more ways than one to win her protection by prayer, but as for Us, We think that the best and most effective way to her favor lies in the Rosary. (Encyclical Adjutricem populi, 1895).

So that our pleas have the greatest effect… let us has recourse to Mary… through the Rosary (1891).


Mrs Adjoubei’s Rosary        Bishop Roncalli, the future Pope John XXIII
As he left Bulgaria in 1934, Bishop Roncalli, the future Pope John XXIII, stated,
"If a Slavic, catholic or not, knocks on my door, it will be opened and he will be greeted like a true friend." Later, a Slavic arrived one day at the airport of Fiumicino who asked to see Pope John XXIII. His reply was immediate, "Let him come!"
The meeting was set for March 7th.

After the general audience, the Pope called for Mr. Adjoubei and his wife, Rada, a young woman from Khrushchev. He received them in his library and asked them to be seated.
They spoke about many things including the Saints of Russia and the beauty of Orthodox liturgy.

Then John XXIII picked up a string of rosary beads that was laid on his table.
"Madam, this is for you. My entourage taught me that I should give currencies or stamps to a non-Catholic princess; but I still give you a Rosary because priests, in addition to the biblical prayer of the psalms, also have this popular form of prayer. For me, the Pope, it is like fifteen open windows - fifteen mysteries - through which I contemplate, in the light of the Lord, the events of the world. I say a rosary in the morning, another at the beginning of the afternoon, and another in the evening.
Look, I made a great impression by telling the journalists that in the fifth joyful mystery - "he listened and questioned them" - I was really praying for... I made an impression on those people when I said that, in the third joyful mystery - the Birth of Jesus - I prayed for all the babies who are born in the past twenty-four hours, because, Catholics or not, they will find the wishes of the Pope upon their entry into life.
When I recite the third mystery, I will also remember your children, Madam."

Mrs Adjoubei, who held the Rosary in her hands, answered,
"Thank you, Holy Father, how grateful I am to you! I will tell my children what you said...

" The Pope looked at her smiling, "I know the name of your sons... the third is called Yan, or John like me...
When you are back home, give him a special hug from me... " 
Rosary for the Church, #14 - 1973

Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
APOSTLES: COLLABORATORS IN TRUE JOY
VATICAN CITY, 10 SEP 2008 (VIS) - At his general audience this morning, celebrated in the Paul VI Hall, the Pope dedicated his catechesis to St. Paul's view of the meaning of apostolate.
  The Pauline concept of apostleship went "beyond that of the group of Twelve" explained the Holy Father. "It was characterised by three elements: the first was the fact of having seen the Lord, in other words of having encountered Him in a way that marked his life. ... Definitively then, it is the Lord Who confers the apostolate, not individual presumption. Apostles do not make themselves but are created so by the Lord".
  The second characteristic is that of "having been sent. In fact, the Greek term 'apostolos' means envoy, ... the representative of a principal. ... Once again the idea emerges of an initiative arising from someone else, from God in Jesus Christ, to Whom one is duty-bound", of "a mission to be accomplished in His name, putting all personal interests aside".
  "Announcing the Gospel and the consequent founding of Churches" is the third requisite. "The tile of apostle", said Pope Benedict, "is not and cannot be a merely honorary title. It truly, even dramatically, involves the entire existence of the person concerned".
  St. Paul also defined apostles as "servants of God, Whose grace acts in them", said the Pope. "A typical element of the true apostle ... is a form of identification between the Gospel and the evangeliser, both share the same destiny. Indeed no-one so much as Paul highlighted how announcing the cross of Christ is a 'stumbling block and foolishness' to which many react with misunderstanding and refusal. That happened then and it should be no surprise that the same thing happens today".
  "With the stoical philosophy of his time, Paul shared the idea of tenacious perseverance in all the difficulties he had to face; but he went beyond the merely human perspective by recalling ... God's love and Christ's. ... This is the certainty, the profound joy that guided the Apostle though all those events: nothing can separate us from the love of God, and this love is the real treasure of human life".
  "As we may see, St. Paul gave himself to the Gospel with all his life", said the Holy Father in conclusion. "He undertook his ministry with faithfulness and joy that he 'might by all means save some'. And though aware of his own relationship of paternity - even, indeed, of maternity - towards the Churches, his attitude to them was one of complete service, declaring: "I do not mean to imply that we lord it over your faith; rather, we are workers with you for your joy'. This remains the mission of all the apostles of Christ in all times: to be collaborators of true joy".
AG/ST. PAUL/...VIS 080910 (480)

JOHN PAUL I  ANGELUS  Sunday, 10 September 1978
At Camp David, in America, Presidents Carter and Sadat and Prime Minister Begin are working for peace in the Middle East. All men are hungry and thirsty for peace, especially the poor, who pay more and suffer more in troubled times and in wars; for this reason they look to the Camp David meeting with interest and great hope. The Pope, too, has prayed, had prayers said, and is praying the Lord may deign to help the efforts of these politicians.

I was very favourably impressed by the fact that the three Presidents wished to express their hope in the Lord publicly in prayer. President Sadat's brothers in religion are accustomed to say as follows:
 "there is pitch darkness, a black stone and on the stone a little ant; but God sees it, and does not forget it".
President Carter, who is a fervent Christian, reads in the Gospel;
 "Knock, and it will be opened to you; ask, and it will be given you. Even the hairs of your head are all numbered."
And Premier Begin recalls that the Jewish people once passed difficult moments and addressed the Lord complaining and saying:
 "You have forsaken us, you have forgotten us!" "No!"—He replied through Isaiah the Prophet—"can a mother forget her own child? But even if it should happen, God will never forget his people".

Also we who are here have the same sentiments; we are the objects of undying love on the part of God. We know: he has always his eyes open on us, even when it seems to be dark. He is our father; even more he is our mother. He does not want to hurt us, He wants only to do good to us, to all of us.  If children are ill, they have additional claim to be loved by their mother. And we too, if by chance we are sick with badness, on the wrong track, have yet another claim to be loved by the Lord.

With these sentiments I invite you to pray together with the Pope for each of us, for the Middle East, for Iran, and for the whole world.  © Copyright 1978 - Libreria Editrice Vaticana