Wednesday  Saints of this Day October  26 Séptimo Kaléndas Novémbris  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Make a Novena and pray the Rosary to Our Lady of Victory
Mary Mother of GOD

May we absorb the truth that God is paying attention to us,
and to each human life, personally and individually.


  15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here


Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here


40 days For Life September - November


October 26, 2015
The Rosary could very well be called the poem of human redemption. The Rosary is a poem that takes its lively but simplistic hues from the pure palette of the Gospel; while at the same time it draws its logical ties, its harmonious responses, and its entire intimate dialectic from the highest theology.
Bartolo Longo lay Dominican 'Brother Rosario'(d. 1926)
The Stuff of Saints
Saints are people who don't put themselves at the center of life but rather choose to go against the grain and live according to the Gospel, says Benedict XVI. The Pope said during the Mass where five people were canonized, including Father Damien, who worked with lepers in Hawaii. The Pontiff asked the question posed to Christ by a rich young man in the Gospel: “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” The Holy Father said, Jesus invites his disciples to the total giving of their lives, without calculation or personal gain, with unfailing trust in God.

Saved from the atomic bomb by reciting the Rosary
 
During the 2nd World War, the atomic bomb destroyed Hiroshima. Around the impact and 1.5 kilometers around, there were no more people alive. It was a desert of death! Incredible as it may seem, a small house near the parish church, only 8 buildings from the central point of the explosion, remained intact! It was the presbytery where 8 Jesuit fathers were living. None of them was affected at all by the bomb, and they emerged from the attack not only alive, but in perfect health.

Father Hubert Schiffer, one of the Jesuits, was 30 years old when the bomb exploded. He lived another 33 years in good health before dying in Frankfurt 1982. In 1976, at the great Eucharistic Congress in Philadelphia, he gave his testimony publicly. At that time, all of the 8 members of the Jesuit community were still alive.

Experts have searched a long time for an answer to this enigma, investigating with the best modern tools and passionately seeking the smallest clues that might explain the strength in the building’s construction. It looked like a simple everyday Japanese house. How could it resist a such cataclysm?
Moreover, the Jesuits themselves were examined by over 200 scientists. The conclusion remained the same—they do not understand how these men survived, as all other living beings perished by thousands all around them.
The only difference is that the Rosary was recited every day in that house!

The surprising survival of the Jesuits in Hiroshima is similar to that reported in Nagasaki,
where a Franciscan friary built by St. Maximilian Kolbe also went unaffected.
Since the bombs were dropped, the priests have been examined over 200 times by scientists.
Each time the priests repeated the same explanation for their survival:


We believe that we survived because we were living the message of Fatima.
We lived and prayed the rosary in that home.


I will see the hand of God in all that happens to me, attributing nothing to individual people, who are but instruments used by Him in the work of my sanctification.-- Blessed Raphaela Mary

In One Hand a Rosary, in the Other, a Pen
The entire Rosary has the beauty of reproducing the theological thoughts concerning Mary; they are reproduced in the entire dialectic of truth and deduction. Marian theology and the Rosary are two poems that are united into one, two hymns forming one hymn, two magnificent temples, and two cathedrals of thought and piety that come together as one...
Here in the Rosary, piety speaks in the language of theologians. Here meditation rises to the heights attained by scholars. Here prayer dwells where the scholars are brought to a halt. Marian theology and the Rosary are therefore similar to two temples having at the same height their pinnacles and spires.
The people of God in the Church have found the Rosary, its Book of Psalms. The clergy have the Divine Office, the people have the Rosary. Like The Divine Comedy, the Rosary is a trilogy: it recalls the joys, sorrows, and triumphs of Jesus and in perfect symmetry, for each part has five chants, and each chant in turn is an episode.
The Rosary could very well be called the poem of human redemption. The Rosary is a poem that takes its lively but simplistic hues from the pure palette of the Gospel; while at the same time it draws its logical ties, its harmonious responses, and its entire intimate dialectic from the highest theology.
Blessed Bartolo Longo (d. 1926

The Stuff of Saints
Saints are people who don't put themselves at the center of life but rather choose to go against the grain and live according to the Gospel, says Benedict XVI. The Pope said during the Mass where five people were canonized, including Father Damien, who worked with lepers in Hawaii. The Pontiff asked the question posed to Christ by a rich young man in the Gospel: “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” The Holy Father said, Jesus invites his disciples to the total giving of their lives, without calculation or personal gain, with unfailing trust in God.

Africa vs. Imperialism
The West needs to get rid of the idea that its beliefs and behaviors should be the rule of the world, says a cardinal from Senegal. Cardinal Théodore-Adrien Sarr, archbishop of Dakar, affirmed this at a press conference on the Second Special Assembly for Africa of the Synod of Bishops. Cardinal Sarr pointed to a sort of cultural imperialism,
 which puts anti-life conditions on humanitarian aid that is sent to the continent.
We want to be helped but in truth, and respected for what we are, he said.

October 26 - Beatification of Bartolo Longo: the man of the Virgin, who was for several months the slave of Satan 
Holding intimate conversations with Jesus and the Virgin 
 
Blessed Bartolo Longo said this about the Rosary:
"Just as two friends who see each other frequently end up being alike even in their way of living, so we, too, by holding intimate conversations with Jesus and the Virgin, by meditating on the Mysteries of the Rosary, and by forming one life together through Communion, we can become, to the extent permitted by our lowliness, similar to them and learn from their sublime example how to lead a humble, poor, hidden, patient and perfect life." (RVM, 15)www.saintjosephduweb.com

  107 Pope St. Evaristus succeeded St. Clement in Rome 4th successor of St. Peter
  250 St. Lucian Martyr with Florius and companions practitioners of  black arts converted when magic had no effect
on a Christian virgin and saw evil spirits banished by the Sign of the Cross
  256 St. Rogatian  Martyr priest in Carthage
 306 St Demetrius the Myrrh-gusher of Thessalonica The Great Martyr; he began to teach the Christian Faith openly to the inhabitants of the city and to overthrow pagan customs and idolatry. The compiler of his Life, St Simeon Metaphrastes (November 9), says that because of his teaching zeal he became a second Apostle Paul for Thessalonica, particularly since the Apostle to the Gentiles once founded at this city the first community of believers (1 Thess. and 2 Thess.).
3rd-4th v. Lupus The Martyr; worked many miracles at Thessalonica. He destroyed pagan idols, for which he was subjected to persecution by the pagans, but he was preserved unharmed by the power of God;  a faithful servant of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica
5th v. Alanus and Aldrus (Alorus) they enjoyed a popular and liturgical cult from early ages
  462 St. Rusticus Bishop of Narbonne gifted preacher in Rome Council of Ephesus 431
6th v. Aneurin (Gildas) and Gwinoc left Celtic poems of literary value
  590 St. Quadragesimus shepherd raising a man from the dead
7th v. Gaudiosus of Salerno B (RM)
  664 Saint Cedd spent 40 days prayer/fasting; consecrate the place to God according to custom derived from Saint Columba
  665 St. Gibitrudis Benedictine nun at Faremoutieren Brie
  675 St. Eadfrid Founder of Leominster Priory priest
  686 Saint Eata of Hexham effect a union between the Celtic and Roman Christians
 740 Constantinople, at the time of the iconoclast emperor Leo the Isaurian, there was a terrible earthquake at Constantinople. Seeing this as God's just punishment for their sins, the people repented and prayed to the Most Holy Theotokos and to St Demetrius to help them. God had mercy on them, and the earthquake stopped.
7th/ 8th v. Humbert of Fritzlar became prior of Buraburg, Hesse 740 Sahtmllt schools and abbeys OSB
 758 St. Cuthbert Benedictine archbishop of Canterbury
 760 St. Albinus Bishop Benedictine missionary companion of St. Boniface to convert Germany
814 Saint Athanasius of Medikion Monastery; companion of St Nicetas; A cypress tree grew up on his grave; from which occurred many healings, by the grace of God
October 26 - QUEEN OF ALL SAINTS (Litany of Loreto)  
Excellence of the Rosary in the Prayers that Compose It (II)
The Our Father or the Lord's Prayer derives its great value above all from its author, who is neither a man nor an angel, but the King of angels and men, our Lord Jesus Christ. Saint Cyprian said it was necessary that He who came to give us the life of grace as our Savior, should teach us how to pray, since he is our heavenly Master.  The wisdom of this Divine Master is clearly evident, in the order, the gentleness, the strength and the clarity of this divine prayer. It is short, but it is rich in instruction, intelligible to the simple and full of mysteries for scholars.  The Our Father contains all the duties we owe God, the acts of all the virtues and the petitions for all our spiritual and corporal needs. Tertullian said that the Our Father is a summary of the Gospel. Thomas à Kempis said that it surpasses surpasses all the desires of the saints.  It contains in a condensed form all the sweet sayings of the psalms and canticles. In it we ask God for everything we need, and praise him in the very best way. It lifts our souls up from earth to heaven and unites them closely to God.
Saint Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort
The Admirable Secret of the Rosary (# 35)
October 26 The Rosary of the Virgin Mary (VIII)
The Rosary is both meditation and supplication. Insistent prayer to the Mother of God is based on confidence that her maternal intercession can obtain all things from the heart of her Son. She is “all-powerful by grace,” to use the bold expression, which needs to be properly understood, of Blessed Bartolo Longo in his Supplication to Our Lady. This is a conviction which, beginning with the Gospel, has grown ever more firm in the experience of the Christian people.
The supreme poet Dante expresses it marvelously in the lines sung by Saint Bernard:
“Lady, thou art so great and so powerful, that whoever desires grace yet does not turn to thee, would have his desire fly without wings.”  When in the Rosary we plead with Mary, the sanctuary of the Holy Spirit (cf. Lk 1:35), she intercedes for us before the Father who filled her with grace, and before the Son born of her womb, praying with us and for us.   John Paul II Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, #16 (October 2002)

October 26 - Beatification of Bartolo Longo, Apostle of the Rosary
Just as two friends... tend to develop similar habits
In the spiritual journey of the Rosary, based on the constant contemplation - in Mary's company - of the face of Christ, this demanding ideal of being conformed to him is pursued through an association which could be described in terms of friendship. We are thereby enabled to enter naturally into Christ's life to share his deepest feelings.
In this regard Blessed Bartolo Longo has written:
“Just as two friends, frequently in each other's company, tend to develop similar habits, so too, by holding familiar converse with Jesus and the Blessed Virgin, by meditating on the mysteries of the Rosary and by living the same life in Holy Communion, we can become, to the extent of our lowliness, similar to them and can learn from these supreme models a life of humility, poverty, hidden-ness, patience and perfection.” 
John Paul II, Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Maria, #15

Catholic saints: holy people / human people who lived extraordinary lives.
Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.

October 26 - Beatification of Bartolo Longo, the Apostle of the Rosary,
(by John Paul II who mentioned him five times in his Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae)
What happens when the Apostle of the Rosary Prays to the Virgin?

On February 13, 1876, the Madonna was displayed for the veneration of the faithful in the old church of Pompeii. A crowd made up of poor and simple people came to implore her protection.
Bartolo Longo prayed in particular for a 12-year old orphan girl afflicted by a serious form of epilepsy:
"Mother, you wished to have a church in Pompeii. Confirm your wish and heal Clorinda…"
He prayed day and night without eating or drinking, and on the ninth day, the little girl ran to her aunt, saying: "I’m cured! The Madonna took away my illness." In just one month, eight miraculous cures had taken place…
The Mary of Nazareth Team
 899 St. Alfred the Great King of Wessex, scholar renowned Christian monarch
1020 St. Bean made bishop by Pope Benedict VIII
1031 Blessed Adalgott of Dissentis a monk of Einsiedeln OSB Abbot
1229 St. Fulk Scottish Bishop of Pavia
14th v. Saint Demetrius of Tsilibinsk; founder of the Archangel Tsilibinsk wilderness monastery in Vologda diocese, was a beloved disciple of St Stephen of Perm (April 26). The monk built a church in honor of the Archangel Michael for the newly-converted. Beneath this temple he dug out a cave and for a long time lived there in solitude.
1483 Saint Theophilus of the Kiev Caves, Far Caves and Archbishop of Novgorod
1484 Blessed Damian dei Fulcheri Hundreds of sinners repented by force of his preaching; miracles worked at his tomb
1685 Saint Demetrius of Basarbov in Bulgaria lived in the wilderness as an ascetic near the city of Ruschuk, Bulgaria. On July 8, 1779 his relics were transferred to Bucharest.
1711 Blessed Bonaventure of Potenza; Bonaventure’s devotion to our Lady was particularly directed towards her as conceived without original sin (he lived nearly two hundred years before that dogma was defined), and he would often express the wish that he were another Duns Scotus that he might as effectively defend the truth of the Immaculate Conception. died in an ecstasy singing psalms OFM (AC)
1819 Saint Joseph monk of Dionysiou Monastery on Mt. Athos, Martyr; where he shone forth with the virtues of monastic life. He was an iconographer, and he painted the icon of the holy Archangels on the iconostasis of Dionysiou's main church; arrested threatened with death, In spite of many tortures, he refused to convert to Islam.
1839 Blessed Dominic Doan (Xuyen) beheaded with Blessed Thomas Du
1902 Blessed Contardo Ferrini patron of universities

1926 Bartolo Longo lay Dominican 'Brother Rosario' in honor of the Rosary; beatified by Pope John Paul II, who would call him the "Apostle of the Rosary" and mentioned him specifically in his apostolic letter "Rosarium Virginis Mariae"
   
107 St. Evaristus succeeded St. Clement in Rome 4th successor of St. Peter
Romæ sancti Evarísti, Papæ et Mártyris, qui Dei Ecclésiam, sub Hadriáno Imperatóre, suo sánguine purpurávit.
    At Rome, St. Evaristus, pope and martyr, who enriched the Church of God with his blood under Emperor Hadrian.
98-107 Evaristus Pope St. Evaristus; Evaristus came of a Hellenic family, and was the son of a Bethlehem Jew; laid to rest in Vaticano, near the tomb of St. Peter; succeeded Clement in the episcopate of the Roman Church
Date of birth unknown; died about 107. In the Liberian Catalogue his name is given as Aristus. In papal catalogues of the second century used by Irenaeus and Hippolytus, he appears as the fourth successor of St. Peter, immediately after St Clement. The same lists allow him eight years of reign, covering the end of the first and the beginning of the second century (from about 98 or 99 to about 106 or 107).
   The earliest historical sources offer no authentic data about him. In his “Ecclesiastical History
” Eusebius says merely that he succeeded Clement in the episcopate of the Roman Church which fact was already known from St. Irenæus. This order of succession is undoubtedly correct. The Liber Pontificalis says that Evaristus came of a Hellenic family, and was the son of a Bethlehem Jew. It also attributes to him the allotment of definite churches as tituli to the Roman presbyters, and the division of the city into seven diaconias or deaconries; in this statement, however, the Liber Pontificalis arbitrarily refers to the time of Evaristus a later institution of the Roman Church.
 More trustworthy is the assertion of the
Liber Pontificalis that he was laid to rest in Vaticano, near the tomb of St. Peter. The martyrdom of Evaristus, though traditional, is not historically proven. His feast occurs 26 Oct. The two decretals ascribed to him by Pseudo-Isidore are forged.

 107 ST EVARISTUS, Pope AND MARTYR
ST EVARISTUS succeeded St Clement in the see of Rome in the reign of Trajan and governed the Church about eight years, being the fourth successor of St Peter. The Liber Pontificalis says that he was the son of a Hellenic Jew of Bethlehem, and, certainly incorrectly, that he divided Rome into several “titles” or parishes, assigning a priest to each and appointed seven deacons for the city. He is usually accorded the title of martyr, but his martyrdom is not proved; it is probable that St Evaristus was buried near St Peter’s tomb in the Vatican.

There is a notice in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xi, but the text and notes of Duchesne’s edition of the Liber Pontificalis tell us nearly all there is to be known. See, however, an interesting comment by Father von Nostiz-Rieneck on the “Brevierlektionen der Päpate Evaristos und Alexander I” in the Zeitschrift für Katholische Theologie, vol. xxix (1905), pp. 159—165.

Evaristus, Pope M (RM)

Born in Bethlehem, Palestine; died c. 105-107. Evaristus was born like his Savior in Bethlehem. A Hellenic Jew, he was converted to Christianity and eventually reached Rome. There he accepted the dangerous office of pope, after the death of the fourth pope, Saint Clement, between the years 96- 100.

Evaristus contributed to the growing organization of the Church. He is credited with the establishment of cardinal priests. He divided Rome into seven parishes, then appointed seven deacons to serve the city, just as the early apostles did to serve the poor of Jerusalem.

Evaristus conferred holy orders three times in December, when ordinations traditionally took place for moral and mystical reasons (according to Amalarius). Others say that ordinations took place during Advent because the bishops had more free time give proper attention to this important function, and because holy orders were always conferred during the seasons of fasting and prayer.

There is no direct evidence that Evaristus died a martyr's death, though most martyrologies list him as such. It is not unbelievable, however, because virtually any prominent Christian in the early centuries of the Church was likely to be brutally put to death because of his beliefs (Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).

In the reign of Trajan and governed the Church about eight years, being the fourth successor of St. Peter. The Liber Pontificalis says that he was the son of a Hellenic Jew of Bethlehem, and, certainly incorrectly, that he divided Rome into several titles or Parishes, assigning a priest to each, and appointed seven deacons for the city. He is usually accorded the title of martyr, but his martyrdom is not proved; it is probable that St. Evaristus was buried near ST. Peter's tomb in the Vatican.
250 St. Lucian Martyr with Florius and companions practitioners of  black arts converted when magic had no effect on a Christian virgin and saw evil spirits banished by the Sign of the Cross in Nicomedia, Turkey.
Nicomedíæ sanctórum Mártyrum Luciáni, Flórii et Sociórum.
    At Nicomedia, the holy martyrs Lucian, Florius, and their companions.

250 SS. LUCIAN AND MARCIAN, MARTYRS
LUCIAN and Marcian, we are told in their passio, applied themselves to the study of black magic, but were converted to the faith by finding their charms lose their power against a Christian maiden. Their eyes being thus opened, they publicly burned their magical books in the city of Nicomedia. When they had effaced their crimes by baptism they distributed their possessions among the poor and retired together into solitude, that by mortification and prayer they might strengthen in their souls that grace which they had just received.
  After a time they made frequent excursions abroad to preach Christ to the Gentiles. The edicts of Decius against the Christians being published in Bithynia, they were apprehended and brought before the proconsul Sabinus, who asked Lucian by what authority he presumed to preach Jesus Christ. “Every man”, said the martyr, “does well to endeavour to draw his brother out of a dangerous error”, and Marcian likewise gloried in the power of Christ. The judge commanded them to be tortured, whereupon they reproached him that, whilst they worshipped idols, they had committed many crimes and made open profession of practising magic, without incurring any chastisement; but when they were become Christians and good citizens they were barbarously punished. Sabinus threatened them with more torments. “We are ready to suffer”, said Marcian, “but we will not renounce the true God, lest we be cast into a fire which will never be quenched.” At this Sabinus condemned them to be burned alive, and they went joyfully to the place of execution, singing hymns of praise and thanksgiving to God. This story is a romance woven round a group of genuine martyrs at Nicomedia.
The passio of these martyrs is preserved both in Latin and in Syriac; the Greek text, which is probably the original, seems to have perished. The Latin passio is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xi; the Syriac was edited by S. E. Assemani (in his Acta ss. mart. Orientalium, vol. ii, pp. 49 seq.) from a manuscript written in the sixth or possibly even the fifth century. The Syriac breviarium of the early fifth century also commemorates these martyrs on October 26, but assigns them to Antioch, and gives the name Silvanus in place of Lucianus. They are, however, correctly named (with Florus), and attributed to Nicomedia, in the “Hieronymianum”, and the question is discussed by Delehaye in CMH., p. 572.
Lucian, Marcian, Florius & Comp. MM (RM) Died c. 250. A group of martyrs who suffered at Nicomedia under Decius. Their acta were fancifully embellished at a later date. These relate that Lucian and Marcian were practitioners of the black arts, who were converted to Christianity when their magic had no effect on a Christian virgin and they saw evil spirits banished by the Sign of the Cross. After burning their books, they were baptized, distributed their wealth to the poor, and practiced mortification to subdue their untamed passions. After thus fortifying themselves in solitude, they began to evangelize in spite of the edicts published by Decius against Christians in Bithynia. They were arrested and brought before the proconsul, Sabinus. After questioning they were racked and tortured, during which they argued their incomprehension that they went unpunished while they committed many crimes with magic, but now that they were good citizens, they are tortured. En route to the place they were to be burned to death, they sang hymns of praise and thanksgiving to God (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
256 St. Rogatian  Martyr priest in Carthage  with a layman named Felicissimus
In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Rogatiáni Presbyteri, et Felicíssimi, qui, in persecutióne Valeriáni et Galliéni, illústri martyrio coronáti sunt; de quibus étiam scribit sanctus Cypriánus in epístola ad Confessóres.
    In Africa, the holy martyrs Felicissimus and the priest Rogatian, who received the bright crown of martyrs in the persecution of Valerian and Gallienus.  They are mentioned by St. Cyprian in his Epistle to the Confessors.

he was apparently martyred with a layman named Felicissimus. He is revered as a martyr on the basis of St. Cyprian’s observation that they had “witnessed a good confession for Christ,” traditionally one of the euphemisms for martyrdom.

Rogatian and Felicissimus MM (RM). The Carthaginian priest Rogatian and Felicissimus, a layman, are mentioned by Saint Cyprian as having “witnessed a good confession for Christ. These words are usually taken as referring to their martyrdom (Benedictines).
306 Demetrius the Myrrh-gusher of Thessalonica The Great Martyr; he began to teach the Christian Faith openly to the inhabitants of the city and to overthrow pagan customs and idolatry. The compiler of his Life, St Simeon Metaphrastes (November 9), says that because of his teaching zeal he became "a second Apostle Paul" for Thessalonica, particularly since "the Apostle to the Gentiles" once founded at this city the first community of believers (1 Thess. and 2 Thess.).
The son of a Roman proconsul in Thessalonica. Three centuries had elapsed and Roman paganism, spiritually shattered and defeated by the multitude of martyrs and confessors of the Savior, intensified its persecutions. The parents of St Demetrius were secretly Christians, and he was baptized and raised in the Christian Faith in a secret church in his father's home,

By the time Demetrius had reached maturity and his father had died, the emperor Galerius Maximian had ascended the throne (305). Maximian, confident in Demetrius' education as well as his administrative and military abilities, appointed him to his father's position as proconsul of the Thessalonica district. The main tasks of this young commander were to defend the city from barbarians and to eradicate Christianity. The emperor's policy regarding Christians was expressed simply,
Put to death anyone who calls on the name of Christ. The emperor did not suspect that by appointing Demetrius he had provided a way for him to lead many people to Christ.

Accepting the appointment, Demetrius returned to Thessalonica and immediately confessed and glorified our Lord Jesus Christ. Instead of persecuting and executing Christians, he began to teach the Christian Faith openly to the inhabitants of the city and to overthrow pagan customs and idolatry. The compiler of his Life, St Simeon Metaphrastes (November 9), says that because of his teaching zeal he became
a second Apostle Paul for Thessalonica, particularly since the Apostle to the Gentiles once founded at this city the first community of believers (1 Thess. and 2 Thess.).

The Lord also destined St Demetrius to follow the holy Apostle Paul as a martyr. When Maximian learned that the newly-appointed proconsul was a Christian, and that he had converted many Roman subjects to Christianity, the rage of the emperor know no bounds. Returning from a campaign in the Black Sea region, the emperor decided to lead his army through Thessalonica, determined to massacre the Christians.

Learning of this, St Demetrius ordered his faithful servant Lupus to distribute his wealth to the poor saying, "Distribute my earthly riches among them, for we shall seek heavenly riches for ourselves." He began to pray and fast, preparing himself for martyrdom.
When the emperor came into the city, he summoned Demetrius, who boldly confessed himself a Christian and denounced the falsehood and futility of Roman polytheism. Maximian gave orders to lock up the confessor in prison. An angel appeared to him, comforting and encouraging him.
Meanwhile the emperor amused himself by staging games in the circus. His champion was a German by the name of Lyaeos. He challenged Christians to wrestle with him on a platform built over the upturned spears of the victorious soldiers. A brave Christian named Nestor went to the prison to his advisor Demetrius and requested a blessing to fight the barbarian. With the blessing and prayers of Demetrius, Nestor prevailed over the fierce German and hurled him from the platform onto the spears of the soldiers, just as the murderous pagan would have done with the Christian. The enraged commander ordered the execution of the holy Martyr Nestor (October 27) and sent a guard to the prison to kill St Demetrius.

At dawn on October 26, 306 soldiers appeared in the saint's underground prison and ran him through with lances. His faithful servant, St Lupus, gathered up the blood-soaked garment of St Demetrius, and he took the imperial ring from his finger, a symbol of his high status, and dipped it in the blood. With the ring and other holy things sanctified by the blood of St Demetrius, St Lupus began to heal the infirm. The emperor issued orders to arrest and kill him.

The body of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius was cast out for wild animals to devour, but the Christians took it and secretly buried it in the earth.

During the reign of St Constantine (306-337), a church was built over the grave of St Demetrius. A hundred years later, during the construction of a majestic new church on the old spot, the incorrupt relics of the holy martyr were uncovered. Since the seventh century a miraculous flow of fragrant myrrh has been found beneath the crypt of the Great Martyr Demetrius, so he is called
the Myrrh-gusher.

Several times, those venerating the holy wonderworker tried to bring his holy relics, or a part of them, to Constantinople. Invariably, St Demetrius made it clear that he would not permit anyone to remove even a portion of his relics.

It is interesting that among the barbarians threatening the Romans, Slavs occupied an important place, in particular those settling upon the Thessalonian peninsula. Some even believe that the parents of St Demetrius were of Slavic descent. While advancing towards the city, pagan Slavs were repeatedly turned away by the apparition of a threatening radiant youth, going around on the walls and inspiring terror in the enemy soldiers. Perhaps this is why the name of St Demetrius was particularly venerated among the Slavic nations after they were enlightened by the Gospel. On the other hand, the Greeks dismiss the notion of St Demetrius being a Slavic saint.

The very first pages of the Russian Primary Chronicle, as foreordained by God, is bound up with the name of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica. The Chronicle relates that when Oleg the Wise threatened the Greeks at Constantinople (907), the Greeks became terrified and said,
This is not Oleg, but rather St Demetrius sent upon us from God. Russian soldiers always believed that they were under the special protection of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius. Moreover, in the old Russian barracks the Great Martyr Demetrius was always depicted as Russian. Thus this image entered the soul of the Russian nation.

Church veneration of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius in Russia began shortly after the Baptism of Rus. Towards the beginning of the 1070s the Dimitriev monastery at Kiev, known afterwards as the Mikhailov-Zlatoverkh monastery, was founded, The monastery was built by the son of Yaroslav the Wise, Great Prince Izyaslav, Demetrius in Baptism (+ 1078). The mosaic icon of St Demetrius of Thessalonica from the cathedral of the Dimitriev monastery has been preserved up to the present day, and is in the Tretiakov gallery.

In the years 1194-1197 the Great Prince of Vladimir, Vsevolod III the Great-Nest (Demetrius in Baptism)
built at his court a beautiful church of the holy martyr Demetrius, and adorned it wondrously with icons and frescoes. The Dimitriev cathedral also reveals the embellishment of ancient Vladimir. The wonderworking icon of St Demetrius of Thessalonica from the cathedral iconostas is located even now in Moscow, at the Tretiakov gallery. It was painted on a piece of wood from the grave of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius, brought from Thessalonica to Vladimir in 1197.

One of the most precious depictions of the saint, a fresco on a column of the Vladimir Dormition cathedral, was painted by the holy Iconographer Andrew Rublev (July 4).

The family of St Alexander Nevsky (November 23 also venerated St Demetrius. St Alexander named his eldest son in honor of the holy Great Martyr. His younger son, Prince Daniel of Moscow (March 4), built a temple dedicated to the holy Great Martyr Demetrius in the 1280s. This was the first stone church in the Moscow Kremlin. Later in 1326, under Ivan Kalita, it was taken down and the Dormition cathedral was built in its place.

The memory of St Demetrius of Thessalonica is historically associated in Rus with the military, patriotism and the defense of the country. This is apparent by the saint's depiction on icons as a soldier in plumed armor, with a spear and sword in hand. There is a scroll (in later depictions) on which is written the prayer of St Demetrius for the salvation of the people of Thessalonica,
Lord, do not permit the city or the people perish. If You save the city and the people, I shall be saved with them. If they perish, I also perish with them.

In the particular spiritual experience of the Russian Church, veneration of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica is closely linked with the memory of the defense of the nation and Church by the Great Prince of Moscow, Demetrius of the Don (May 19) .
An Account of the Life and Repose of the Great Prince Demetrius of the Don, Tsar of Russia, written in the year 1393, already regards the Great Prince as a saint, as also do other old Russian histories. Great Prince Demetrius was a spiritual son and disciple of St Alexis, Metropolitan of Moscow (February 12), and a disciple and associate of other great figures of prayer in the Russian Land: St Sergius of Radonezh (September 25), Demetrius of Priluki (February 11), St Theodore of Rostov (November 28). The Account states:

    He [Great Prince Demetrius] worried much about the churches of God, and he held the territory of the Russian land by his bravery: he conquered many enemies who had risen against us, and he protected his glorious city Moscow with wondrous walls. ...The land of Russia prospered during the years of his reign.

From the time of the building of the white-walled Kremlin (1366) by Great Prince Demetrius, Moscow was called
White-Stoned.

By the prayers of his Heavenly patron, the holy warrior Demetrius of Thessalonica, Great Prince Demetrius, in addition to his brilliant military victories, also gained the further prominence of Russia. He repelled the onslaught of the Lithuanian armies of Olgerd (1368, 1373), he routed the Tatar army of Begich at the River Vozha (1378), and he smashed the military might of all the Golden Horde at the Battle of Kulikovo Field on September 8, 1380 (the Feast of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos), set between the Rivers Don and Nepryadva. The Battle of Kulikovo, for which the nation calls him Demetrius of the Don, became the first Russian national deed, rallying the spiritual power of the Russian nation around Moscow. The
Zadonschina, an inspiring historic poem written by the priest Sophronius of Ryazem (1381) is devoted to this event.

Prince Demetrius of the Don was greatly devoted to the holy Great Martyr Demetrius. In 1380, on the eve of the Battle of Kulikovo, he solemnly transferred from Vladimir to Moscow the most holy object in the Vladimir Dimitriev cathedral: the icon of the Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica, painted on a board from the grave of the saint. A chapel dedicated to the Great Martyr Demetrius was built at Moscow's Dormition Cathedral.

The St Demetrius Memorial Saturday was established for churchwide remembrance of the soldiers who fell in the Battle of Kulidovo. This memorial service was held for the first time at the Trinity-St Sergius monastery on October 20, 1380 by St Sergius of Radonezh, in the presence of Great Prince Demetrius of the Don. It is an annual remembrance of the heroes of the Battle of Kulikovo, among whom are the schemamonks Alexander (Peresvet) and Andrew (Oslyab).
St Demetrius is regarded as a protector of the young, and is also invoked by those struggling with lustful temptations.
3rd-4th v. Lupus The Martyr; worked many miracles at Thessalonica. He destroyed pagan idols, for which he was subjected to persecution by the pagans, but he was preserved unharmed by the power of God;  a faithful servant of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica
He lived at the end of the third century and beginning of the fourth century, and was a faithful servant of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica (October 26). Being present at the death of his master, he soaked his own clothing with his blood and took a ring from his hand. With this clothing, and with the ring and the name of the Great Martyr Demetrius, St Lupus worked many miracles at Thessalonica. He destroyed pagan idols, for which he was subjected to persecution by the pagans, but he was preserved unharmed by the power of God.

St Lupus voluntarily delivered himself into the hands of the torturers, and by order of the emperor Maximian Galerius, he was beheaded by the sword.

5th v. Alanus and Aldrus (Alorus) they enjoyed a popular and liturgical cult from early ages BB (AC)
5th century. Both Saint Alanus and Saint Aldrus were bishops of Quimper in Brittany. No reliable particulars have come down to us about them, except that they enjoyed a popular and liturgical cult from early ages (Benedictines).
462 St. Rusticus Bishop of Narbonne gifted preacher in Rome; Council of Ephesus 431
 Narbóne, in Gállia, sancti Rústici, Epíscopi et Confessóris; qui cláruit tempóribus Valentiniáni et Leónis Imperatórum.
    At Narbonne, St. Rusticus, bishop and confessor, who flourished in the reigns of Emperors Leo and Valentian.

461 ST RUSTICUS, BISHOP OF NARBONNE
RUSTICUS was a native of southern Gaul and the son of a bishop named Bonosus. A letter written by St Jerome about the year 411 is supposed to be addressed to him: the recipient is given wise counsel about the solitary life. In 427 Rusticus was elevated to the bishopric of Narbonne. His diocese was in a very unsatis­factory state: invading Goths were spreading Arianism and orthodox were quarrelling among themselves.  Eventually St Rusticus wrote to Pope St Leo I, setting forth his difficulties (which seem to have arisen out of a synod convoked by him in 458), and asking to be allowed to resign. The pope dissuaded him from this and sent him an important letter about the government of the diocese. St Rusticus built a cathedral at Narbonne and the inscription he put up recording its foundation is still in existence. His brother bishops held him in high regard, but of his activities little is known, except that he attended the synod at Arles that approved St Leo’s “tome” condemning Monophysism.

A particular interest, however, attaches to this Gaulish bishop because his name appears in four different inscriptions discovered at Narbonne or in the immediate neighbourhood. The first and most complete tells us, incidentally that not only was he the son of Bishop Bonosus, but that an uncle, his mother’s brother, was also a bishop called Arator. Another inscription, only discovered in quite recent years contains the words Orate pro me Rustico vestro (Pray for me, your Rusticus).

There is no formal life of St Rusticus, but from scattered references the Bollandists have compiled a sufficient notice in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xi. See on the inscriptions Leclercq, DAC., vol. xii (1935), cc. 828 and 847—854. Cf. also Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. i, p. 303.
Born at Narbonne or Marseille, in Gaul, he was the son of Bishop Bonosus and became a gifted preacher in Rome before entering the monastic life at Lérins, France. In 427, he was named bishop of Narbonne, enduring much upheaval in his diocese owing to the spread of Arianism and the advance of the Germanic tribes which were then besieging parts of Gaul. He asked to be permitted to resign, but Pope Leo I the Great convinced him to remain. He thus took part in the Council of Ephesus which condemned Nestorianism. He also built the cathedral at Narbonne.

Rusticus of Narbonne B (RM) Born in Marseilles, France. Rusticus, a monk of Lérins, became bishop of Narbonne. He was present at the council of Ephesus in 431 (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
6th v. Aneurin (Gildas) and Gwinoc left Celtic poems of literary value (AC)
6th century. Saint Aneurin and his son Gwinoc were Welsh monks.
The latter has left some Celtic poems of a certain literary value (Benedictines).
590 St. Quadragesimus shepherd raising a man from the dead.
Item sancti Quadragésimi Subdiáconi, qui et mórtuum resuscitávit.
    Also St. Quadragesimus, subdeacon, who raised a dead man to life.

Confessor and a shepherd known for miracles. He lived at Policastro, Italy, and served as a subdeacon. According to Pope St. Gregory I the Great, he was responsible for remarkable achievement of raising a man from the dead.
Quadragesimus of Policastro (RM). According to the testimony of Saint Gregory the Great, Saint Quadragesimus, a shepherd and subdeacon at Policastro, raised a dead man to life (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
7th v. Gaudiosus of Salerno B (RM)
Apud Salérnum sancti Gaudiósi Epíscopi.    At Salerno, St. Gaudiosus, bishop.
7th century. The relics of Bishop Gaudiosus of Salerno, Italy, are venerated at Naples (Benedictines).
664 Saint Cedd spent 40 days prayer/fasting consecrate the place to God according to custom derived from Saint Columba OSB B (AC)

664 ST CEDD, Bishop OF THE EAST SAX0NS
ST CEDD was the brother of St Chad and long served God in the monastery of Lindisfarne. When Peada, King of the Middle Angles, became a Christian at the court of his father-in-law, Oswy of Northumbria, in 653, being baptized by St Finan of Lindisfarne, four priests were sent to preach the gospel to his people. Of these St Cedd was one.

After labouring there for a time he was called to a new harvest. Sigebert, King of the East Saxons, was also persuaded to renounce heathenism and was baptized by St Finan, whereupon Cedd was called out of the midlands and sent with another priest into Essex. They travelled throughout the province to examine the situation, and then St Cedd revisited Lindisfarne to confer with Finan, who consecrated him bishop for the East Saxons. He returned among them to continue the work he had begun, building churches and ordaining priests and deacons.
St Cedd founded two monasteries, which seem to have been destroyed by the Danes later and never restored. The first, where remains of Cedd’s church still exist, was at Bradwell-on-Sea (Ythancaestir, Othona); the other was at
Tilbury. His visits to his native Northumbria were the occasion of a third founda­tion. Ethelwald, King of Deira, gave him a tract of land for a monastery in an inaccessible spot among the fells of Yorkshire. Here Cedd spent forty days in fasting and prayer, to consecrate the place to God according to the custom of Lindisfarne, derived from St Columba. This monastery, founded in 658, was called Laestingaeu, which has been identified with Lastingham in the North Riding; and it also came to be destroyed by the Danes.

In 664 St Cedd was present at the Synod of Whitby, being one of those who agreed to forsake Celtic custom and to observe Easter by the Roman computation. Very soon after this he died at Lastingham during a great pestilence. At the news of his death thirty of his religious brethren among the East Saxons came to Lasting-ham to consecrate their lives where their holy father had ended his. But they too were carried off by the same pestilence, all except one boy, who was afterwards found not to have been baptized: he lived to become a priest and zealous mission­ary. Florence of Worcester tells us that St Cedd died on October 26, 664.

Practically all that is known of St Cedd is derived from Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, bk iii, caps. 22, 23.
Born in Northumbria, England; died October 26, 664; feast day formerly celebrated on January 7. Cedd was raised together with his brother Saint Chad. He became a monk at Lindisfarne and in 653 was sent with three other priests to evangelize the Middle Angles when their King Peada was baptized by Saint Finan of Lindisfarne in 653 at the court of his father-in-law, Oswy of Northumbria.
After working in that field for a time he was called to harvest a new one in East Anglia (Essex), when King Sigebert was converted and baptized by Finan. He and another priest travelled throughout the midlands to evaluate the situation. Then Cedd returned to Lindisfarne to confer with Finan, who consecrated him bishop of the East Saxons in 654. Cedd returned to Essex and spent the rest of his life with the Saxons--building churches, founding monasteries (at Bradwell-on-the-Sea (Ythancaestir, Othona), Tilbury, and Lastingham), and ordaining priests and deacons to continue the work of evangelization.
Lastingham, originally called Laestingaeu, was built in 658 on a tract of inaccessible land in Yorkshire donated by King Ethelwald of Deira. Here Cedd spent 40 days in prayer and fasting to consecrate the place to God according to the custom of Lindisfarne, derived from Saint Columba. All three of the monasteries he built were destroyed by the Danes and never restored.

He attended the Synod of Whitby in 664, where he accepted the Roman observances, and died of the plague at Lastingham, Yorkshire. At the news of his death, 30 of his brethren among the East Saxons came to Lastingham to consecrate their lives where their holy father in faith had ended his. But they, too, were all killed by the same plague, except one unbaptized boy, who lived to become a priest and zealous missionary (Delaney, Walsh).

Saint Cedd is depicted in art as a bishop with a chalice and an abbatial staff. Sometimes he is shown with his brother Saint Chad of Lichfield, other times with Saint Diuma, bishop of the Middle English. He is venerated at Charlbury, Oxon, England (Roeder).
665 St. Gibitrudis Benedictine nun at Faremoutieren Brie
in France. She was trained by St. Fara.
Gibitrudis of Faremoûtiers, OSB V (AC)
Died c. 655. A nun at Faremoûtiers under Saint Fara (Benedictines).
675 St. Eadfrid Founder of Leominster Priory priest
of Northumbria and Mercia, England.
Eadfrid of Leominster, OSB (AC) Died c. 675. Eadfrid preached in Mercia as a Northumbrian monk- priest. He also founded, and was the first superior of, Leominster Priory (Benedictines).
686 Saint Eata of Hexham effect a union between the Celtic and Roman Christians OSB B (RM).

WHEN St Aidan came from Iona to his mission in Northumbria he selected twelve English boys to be trained under himself to work in the service of Christ, and of these twelve Eata was one. He became abbot of Melrose, and received St Cuthbert there as a novice.

When St Colman and some of his monks left Northumbria after their defeat at the Synod of Whitby, Eata was put in charge of those who remained at Lindisfarne. St Bede reports on hearsay that St Colman himself asked King Oswy to make this appointment because Eata was a personal disciple of St Aidan.

When in 678 St Wilfrid was driven from his see and Northumbria divided, St Eata was appointed bishop of the Bernicians in the north; and as he had the choice of Hexham or Lindisfarne for his see he chose Lindisfarne. Later Tunbert was consecrated for Hexham, and when he was deposed St Cuthbert was named in his place. He, however, preferred to be at Lindisfarne, whither he had gone as a monk with St Eata, and so an exchange was made, Eata going to Hexham. Here he remained for the short space of life that remained to him, and after the grateful people revered his death in 686 as a saint among whom he had laboured. Bede says of him that he was a most venerable man, meek and simple. St Eata’s feast is kept in the diocese of Lancaster.

There is a Life of St Eata, which has been printed by Raine in his Priory of Hexham and a summary by Capgrave in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xi; but there is little to add to what may be gathered from the text and notes of Plummer’s edition of Bede, bk iii, cap. 26 and iv, 12, 26, 28.

It is impossible to write about Eata, the 7th century English saint, without going back to Saint Aidan, and from Saint Aidan to Saint Paulinus of York, and from Saint Paulinus to Saint Augustine (Austin) of Canterbury, and from Saint Augustine to Saint Gregory the Great who began this chain reaction. Nor should we forget the Venerable Bede without whose Ecclesiastical History we would never have heard of Saint Eata, nor Saint Cuthbert, who was Eata's close friend.

In the 7th century, England was divided into the Heptarchy, seven independent kingdoms in none of which was Christianity firmly established. At the request of Saint Oswald, king of Northumbria, Saint Aidan had gone from Iona to Lindisfarne--the Holy Island--and from there had begun to evangelize the northern parts of England. Aidan himself and many of his monks came originally from Ireland and therefore followed the Celtic usages which differed in many ways from those of Rome.

Pope Saint Gregory's plan was to send a properly organized group to England, rather than rely on the isolated efforts of the northern missionaries. The man he chose was the prior of a monastery that he had founded in Rome, Saint Augustine of Canterbury. In 596, he landed in Kent with a group of 40 monks.

They had to start from nothing, but fortunately they quickly enlisted the support of Bertha, the wife of King Saint Ethelbert--just as Saint Paulinus won the support of Saint Ethelburga, sister of Eadbald, and Saint Remigius won that of Saint Clotilde, wife of Clovis. Augustine received the 'pallium' and became the first archbishop of England, establishing his see at Canterbury.

At the time of Augustine's death, which took place shortly after that of Gregory the Great, relations between the Roman and Celtic churches were still strained. Apart from their differences over usage and organization, the situation was complicated by the resentment felt by some of the Celts towards the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes who only a relatively short while before had driven them out of their own country and persecuted their religion. So it was left to a number of saints, among them Eata, to effect a union between the Celtic and Roman Christians, their personal saintliness persuading the ones to abate their racial pride and the others to make concessions.

The first saint who went to Northumbria was a Roman one, Saint Paulinus, who had been sent by Gregory the Great to assist Saint Augustine of Canterbury. The next one was the Celtic Saint Aidan, who had established his monastery at Lindisfarne and who also founded a monastery at Ripon. It was at Ripon that Eata, who had been born an Anglo-Saxon and was one of the 12 English boys brought to Northumbria by Saint Aidan, was educated in the Celtic observance. When Saint Wilfrid arrived at Ripon, Eata left it to become abbot at Melrose, which was attached to Lindisfarne.

As a result of the Synod of Whitby, which was held in 664, the Roman usage was extended throughout England. Eata accepted the Roman liturgical observances.

Saint Colman, who had succeeded Saint Aidan as abbot of Lindisfarne refused to accept the decision and withdrew from his position. Reportedly he requested that Saint Eata take his place. At the same time Saint Cuthbert became prior, and they both fully accepted the Roman usage and liturgy.

In 678 Theodore, who had been consecrated in Rome as the new archbishop of Canterbury by Pope Saint Vitalian, met Eata in York and at once consecrated him as bishop of Bernicia. It was a wise choice, for Eata quickly showed himself to be worthy of his office. He and Saint Cuthbert were often together, travelling from Melrose to Ripon and to Lindisfarne. Later Eata and Cuthbert exchanged sees, and Eata became bishop of Hexham, where he remained until his death.

Eata seems to have been a kind and gentle man, more so even than Cuthbert, and vastly more so than Colman or that other saint, Wilfrid, who quarreled so violently with Theodore. He died in 686 and was buried in the Benedictine Abbey of Hexham. There is a legend that when, in 1113, plans were made to disinter his body and take it to York, he appeared in a dream to the archbishop of York and told him to leave his mortal remains in peace (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).
740, at the time of the iconoclast emperor Leo the Isaurian, there was a terrible earthquake at Constantinople. Seeing this as God's just punishment for their sins, the people repented and prayed to the Most Holy Theotokos and to St Demetrius to help them. God had mercy on them, and the earthquake stopped.
7th 8th v. Humbert of Fritzlar became prior of Buraburg, Hesse OSB (AC)
7th or 8th century. The monk Saint Humbert of Fritzlar in Hesse, Germany, became prior of Buraburg, Hesse (Benedictines).
740 Saint Sigibald of Metz built schools and abbeys B (AC)
As bishop of Metz from 716 to about 740, Sigibald promoted learning, built schools and abbeys (notably Neuweiter and Saint-Avold), and ably administered his see (Benedictines).
758 St. Cuthbert Benedictine archbishop of Canterbury
He was a monk at Lyminge, in Kent, England, until about 736, when he was appointed the bishop of Hereford. About 740, he became the archbishop of Canterbury. He is remembered as one of St. Boniface’s correspondents in England.
760 St. Albinus Bishop Benedictine missionary companion of St. Boniface to convert Germany
originally called Witta. An Anglo-Saxon by birth, he became a monk, probably at the monastery of Pereum, Germany. There he was chosen to be one of the missionaries accompanying St. Boniface. Albinus became bishop of Buraburg in Hesse, Germany, in 741. He remained the head of that see until his death.

Albinus of Buraburg, OSB B (AC) (also known as Albuin, Witta, Wittan of Buraburg or Fritzlar). The Irish or Anglo-Saxon monk of Iona named Witta had his name latinized to Albinus (white) when setting out as a fellow-worker with Saint Boniface to convert Germany. In 741, Boniface consecrated Albinus bishop of Buraburg (Fritzlar) in Hesse, where he is still venerated. In Germany, he became known as Wittan (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick, Montague, O'Hanlon).
814 Saint Athanasius of Medikion Monastery; companion of St Nicetas; A cypress tree grew up on his grave; from which occurred many healings, by the grace of God
 loved the monastic life and secretly left his parental home, but was forcibly returned by his father. After a certain time Athanasius entered the Medikion monastery in Bithynia with his father's consent.

He was a companion of St Nicetas (April 3) and he died about the year 814. A cypress tree grew up on his grave; from which occurred many healings, by the grace of God.

899 St. Alfred the Great King of Wessex, scholar renowned Christian monarch born in 849
Alfred was the fifth son of the Wessex king. During a journey to Rome in 853, he was accepted as a godson by Pope Leo IV
 He was a great scholar, translating classics for his people, and early on seemed destined for a career in the Church. Instead, he became king and was forced to spend most of his reign in conflict with the Danes who were then threatening England. His work as a patron of the arts, literature, and especially the Church made him a beloved figure in England.
1020 St. Bean made bishop by Pope Benedict VIII
On December 16, there is named in the Roman Martyrology and in certain Irish calendars a Saint Bean in Ireland, who had been confused with the St. Bean whose feast is still observed in the Scottish diocese of Aberdeen, but on October 26, as founder of the bishopric of Mortlach in Banff which was the forerunner of that of Aberdeen. Nothing else is known about him. The fourteenth century chronicler Fordun, states that he was made bishop by Pope Benedict VIII, at the request of Malcolm Canmore, who is said to have founded an episcopal monastery at Mortlach. If true, this would be between 1012 and 1024; but the See of Mortlach is generally said to date from 1063. St. Bean's dwelling place is supposed to have been at Balvanie, near Mortlach (Bal-beni-mor, "the dwelling of Bean the Great").
See the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xi; and KSS., p. 277.
Bean of Aberdeen B (AC) Died after 1012. Saint Bean was the first bishop of Mortlach in Banff. In the 11th century the see became that of Aberdeen, Scotland (Benedictines, Farmer).
1031 Blessed Adalgott of Dissentis a monk of Einsiedeln OSB Abbot (AC)
Saint Adalgott, a monk of Einsiedeln, became abbot of Dissentis Monastery in Switzerland in 1012 (Benedictines).

The Lady Chapel of Einsiedeln is situated inside the abbey church and it houses the Black Madonna. It was erected in exactly the same place where St. Meinrad had built his hermitage. It was consecrated on September 14th in 948 by Konrad, bishop of Konstanz. According to the legend, Christ appeard him in his dream and consecrated the chapel himself.

Konrad therefore refused to consecrate it again. Every year the Feast of the Miraculous Consecration commerates this event on September 14th.
1229 St. Fulk Scottish Bishop of Pavia
Papíæ sancti Fulci Epíscopi.    At Pavia, Bishop St. Fulk.
Italy, born in Piacenza, of Scottish descent.
After studying in Paris, France, he became the bishop of Piacenza was then sent to Pavia by Pope Honorius III.

Fulk of Pavia B (RM) Born at Piacenza, Italy, 1164; died 1229. Fulk's parents were Scottish. He was appointed to a canonry in Piacenza. Then, after his studies in Paris, he became archpriest and bishop of Piacenza. Six years later he was transferred by Honorius III to the see of Pavia, which he occupied for 13 years (Benedictines).
14th v. Saint Demetrius of Tsilibinsk; founder of the Archangel Tsilibinsk wilderness monastery in Vologda diocese, was a beloved disciple of St Stephen of Perm (April 26). The monk built a church in honor of the Archangel Michael for the newly-converted. Beneath this temple he dug out a cave and for a long time lived there in solitude.
1483 Saint Theophilus of the Kiev Caves, Far Caves and Archbishop of Novgorod

Chosen by lot after the death of the holy hierarch Jonah (November 5). He was elevated to the dignity of Archbishop of Novgorod on December 15, 1472 at Moscow. Until his elevation, he had pursued asceticism in the Otensk monastery.

A harsh destiny was allotted the saint in the guidance of the Novgorod flock. The mayor Martha Boretskaya and her adherents stirred up and agitated the people against the Great Prince of Moscow, Ivan III. The monk Pimen, a Boretskaya partisan, roused enmity against the archbishop in the flock. Some of the Novgorod populace were inclined to go over to the side of Lithuania. Unfaithful to the Moscow principality, they were prepared to fall into apostasy.

St Theophilus stopped the rebellious Novgorodians saying, “Do not betray Orthodoxy nor become a flock of apostates. I'll go back to my humble cell, from which you drew me out to the shame of rebellion.
This letter of disavowal of the saint, written in 1479, is preserved. The short-sighted people did not heed the words of the pastor, and a fratricidal war broke out between Moscow and Novgorod. The defeated Novgorodians were compelled to beg for mercy, and many of them owed their life to the intercession of the saint. In 1480, St Theophilus was sent by Ivan III to prison in the Moscow Chudov monastery and he sat there a full three years, and died there.

By tradition, when St Theophilus lay sick at the Chudov monastery, St Niphon of Novgorod (April 8), who is buried in the Kiev Caves of St Anthony, appeared to him in a dream. The saint reminded him of his promise to venerate the Kievan wonderworkers. It is said that the holy archbishop went to Kiev, and just as he approached the Dniepr his sickness increased. He received a revelation that although he would not reach the Caves alive, his body would rest in them. This was fulfilled.

His memory is celebrated also with the Synaxis of the Saints of the Kiev Far Caves on August 28, and on the Second Sunday of the Great Fast, with the Synaxis of the Kiev Caves Fathers.

1484 Blessed Damian dei Fulcheri Hundreds of sinners repented by the force of his preaching miracles worked at his tomb OP (AC) (also known as Damian of Finario)

1484 BD DAMIAN OF FINARIO; was famous for many miracles attributed to him after death

DAMIAN FURCHERI was born towards the beginning of the fifteenth century at Perti, near Finario, which is now Finale Borgo, not far from Genoa. Writers much later than his time record that as an infant he was snatched away from his home by a lunatic, and only found after a lengthy search by the aid of a miraculous light showing where the child lay hidden.

He entered the Dominican Order in his youth, and was renowned as a preacher in every part of Lombardy and Liguria. He died in 1484 at Reggio, near Modena, and was there buried. Bd Damian was famous for many miracles attributed to him after death. His cultus was confirmed in 1848.

See the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xiii Année Dominicaine, vol. x, p. 733 Short Lives of Dominican Saints, ed. Procter, pp. 301-302 Taurisano, Catalogus hagiographicus OP., p. 45.
Born in Finario (Finale or Finarium near Genoa), Liguria, Italy; died near Modena at Reggio d'Emilia, Italy, in 1484; cultus approved in 1848.  Damian was born of rich and noble parents at the end of the 14th century. The only thing we know of his childhood was that as a baby he was kidnapped by a madman. His parents prayed to the Blessed Virgin, and Damian was returned unharmed. He took the Dominican habit at Savona, where he was a diligent student. Once ordained, Damian became famous for his preaching, which he did in nearly all the cities of Italy. Hundreds of sinners repented and returned to God by the force of his preaching. Almost immediately upon his death he became the object of pious veneration because of the miracles worked at his tomb (Benedictines, Dorcy).
1685 Saint Demetrius of Basarbov in Bulgaria lived in the wilderness as an ascetic near the city of Ruschuk, Bulgaria. On July 8, 1779 his relics were transferred to Bucharest.
1711 Blessed Bonaventure of Potenza; Bonaventure’s devotion to our Lady was particularly directed towards her as conceived without original sin (he lived nearly two hundred years before that dogma was defined), and he would often express the wish that he were another Duns Scotus that he might as effectively defend the truth of the Immaculate Conception. died in an ecstasy singing psalms OFM (AC)

HE was born at Potenza in the kingdom of Naples in 1651 and became a Conventual friar minor at Nocera. As an illustration of the exact obedience that he gave to his superiors it is related that, the key of the sacristy being lost, it was reported to be at the bottom of the cistern, and Brother Bonaventure was told to get hook and line and fish it out. This he did, and after angling for a time hauled up the key. This is recorded of him as a miracle, but whether the miracle lay in the key being transported into the cistern, or in the dexterity of Brother Bonaventure, does not appear.

The eight years, which he spent at Amalfi, was the most fruitful period of his life and he worked there with great profit to the people and his own soul. Several times it was proposed to make him guardian, but at his own earnest wish he was never given any office of authority but that of master of novices. Bonaventure’s devotion to our Lady was particularly directed towards her as conceived without original sin (he lived nearly two hundred years before that dogma was defined), and he would often express the wish that he were another Duns Scotus that he might as effectively defend the truth of the Immaculate Conception.

Bonaventure died at Ravello on October 26, 1711, and he is one of the saints of the Naples district whose blood is recorded to have flowed freely after he was dead. “It was the will of God that His servant should give an example of obedience even after death. Long after he had expired, the bishop’s vicar general asked the surgeon to bleed him in the arm, and he said, ‘Father Bonaventure, give us your arm’. The body remained motionless, so turning to the superior the vicar general said, ‘Father Guardian, command him in the name of holy obedience to give us his arm’. No sooner had the guardian given the order than the blessed man raised his right arm and presented it to the surgeon. It may be imagined with what fear and admiration the bystanders beheld this action” (Aureole Seraphique). From the fuller evidence, which was at their disposal, the Bollandists have raised a disturbing doubt as to whether Bd Bonaventure was actually dead when these things happened. He was beatified in 1775.

In the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xii, Fr V. de Buck has compiled a life from the material’s supplied in earlier biographies of this beatus, notably from the accounts published by G. M. Ruglio (1754) and G. L. Rossi (1775). See also Léon, Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. iii, pp. 423—429. In connection with the blood prodigy referred to above, it is noteworthy that Bd Bonaventure died at Ravello, a Neapolitan town, in which the annual liquefaction of the blood of St Pantaleon rouses intense popular enthusiasm. See that saint under July 27 herein. A popular account of Bd Bonaventure was published at Ravello in 1930.
Born in Potenza, Napolitano. Bonaventure became a Franciscan at Nocera and spent his life as a missioner in southern Italy, particularly in the area of Amalfi, and as a novice master. He died in an ecstasy singing psalms (Benedictines).
1819 Saint Joseph was a monk of Dionysiou Monastery on Mt. Athos, where he shone forth with the virtues of monastic life. He was an iconographer, and he painted the icon of the holy Archangels on the iconostasis of Dionysiou's main church; arrested threatened with death, In spite of many tortures, he refused to convert to Islam.

In obedience to the instructions of Igumen Stephen, St Joseph traveled to Constantinople with Eudocimus, who had apostasized from Orthodoxy to become a Moslem. Eudocimus repented, and wished to wipe out his sin through martyrdom.  When faced with torture and death, however, the unfortunate Eudocimus denied Christ again, blaming Joseph for turning him from Islam.  St Joseph was arrested and threatened with death. In spite of many tortures, he refused to convert to Islam. This holy martyr of Christ was hanged on February 17, 1819, and so he obtained an incorruptible crown of glory.
Some sources list his commemoration on February 17, while others list him on September 14 or October 26.
1839 Blessed Dominic Doan (Xuyen) beheaded with Blessed Thomas Du OP M (AC)
Born in Tonkin; beatified in 1900. Dominic, member of the Dominican order, was beheaded with Blessed Thomas Du (Benedictines).
1902 Blessed Contardo Ferrini patron of universities
Lifelong layman in the archdiocese of Milan, Italy. Civil and canon lawyer. Teacher. Secular Franciscan tertiary. Friend of Pope Pius XI.

Contardo Ferrini was the son of a teacher who went on to become a learned man himself, one acquainted with some dozen languages. Today he is known as the patron of universities. Born in Milan b. 1859, he received a doctorate in law in Italy and then earned a scholarship that enabled him to study Roman-Byzantine law in Berlin. As a renowned legal expert, he taught in various schools of higher education until he joined the faculty of the University of Pavia, where he was considered an outstanding authority on Roman law.

Contardo was learned about the faith he lived and loved. Our life, he said, must reach out toward the Infinite, and from that source we must draw whatever we can expect of merit and dignity. As a scholar he studied the ancient biblical languages and read the Scriptures in them. His speeches and papers show his understanding of the relationship of faith and science. He attended daily Mass and became a lay Franciscan, faithfully observing the Third Order rule of life. He also served through membership in the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

His death in 1902 at the age of 43 occasioned letters from his fellow professors that praised him as a saint; the people of Suna where he lived insisted that he be declared a saint. Pope Pius XII beatified Contardo in 1947.

Comment:  Thanks to people like Contardo, our Church long ago laid to rest the idea that science and faith are incompatible. We thank God for the many ways science has made our lives better. All that remains to us is to help ensure that the rest of the world, especially impoverished nations, gets to enjoy the fruits of scientific advance.
1841 1926 Bartolo Longo lay Dominican 'Brother Rosario' in honor of the Rosary; beatified by Pope John Paul II, who would call him the "Apostle of the Rosary" and mentioned him specifically in his apostolic letter "Rosarium Virginis Mariae"
Bartolo Longo was born into a wealthy family on February 10, 1841 in the small town of Latiano, near Brindisi, in southern Italy. His parents were devout Roman Catholics and taught him to pray the Rosary daily.  In 1851 Longo's mother died and he slowly began to drift from his childhood faith. As a young man he attended the University of Naples and became involved with a movement that led him into a Satanist cult. After some study and several "spiritual" experiences Longo was ordained as a satanic priest.
October 26 – Our Lady of Health (Venice, Italy, 1630) – Beatification of Bartolo Longo, Apostle of the Rosary  
 
Saved from the devil 
 
Bartolo Longo lived from 1841 to 1926 in Italy. As a student, he made the imprudent decision to explore spiritualism and progressively fell under the influence of evil powers…

During a séance, he asked a spirit if Jesus Christ was God. The medium answered "yes." So he asked, "Are the precepts of the Decalogue true?” - "Yes," replied the spirit, "except the sixth (Thou shalt not commit adultery)." And he asked another question. "Which of these two religions is true: Catholic or Protestant?" The response was that both are false.

As a follower of spiritualism, he wrote: "The evil spirit that guided me wanted to take possession of my soul. He posed as the Archangel Michael, forcing me to recite psalms and imposing rigorous fasts on me. He demanded that I write his name at the top of all my papers and wear his name on my heart."

The mind of Bartolo became increasingly lost, until he met a devout friend whom he respected and who advised him to repent and confess to a priest, which he did. Delivered by the intervention of the Blessed Virgin, he became a Dominican tertiary and dedicated his life to the apostolate of the Rosary. He was beatified in 1980 by Saint John Paul II.   apotres.amour.free.fr
 

 Conversion
In  the following years, Longo's life became one of depression, nervousness, and confusion. Bothered by diabolical visions and ill health brought on by inordinate fasting, he turned to a hometown friend, Vincenzo Pepe, for guidance. It was Pepe who convinced him to abandon Satanism and introduced him to the Dominican Father Alberto Radente - who heard his confession and guided him further throughout his life.

After a long period of repentance, Longo made his profession as a lay Dominican. He took the name Brother Rosario in honor of the Rosary. The date of his conversion was October 7, 1871.

In 1872, now as Brother Rosario, he began to do good service to make up for his time as a servant of Satan. He went to Pompeii, where he had joined a charitable group, and aided the wealthy widow Countess Mariana di Fusco. He worried, however, that he would still be condemned to hell for his having been a Satanic priest. At the point of despair he was given the grace to internally understand that those who promote the rosary will enjoy God's special blessing. He remembered what Father Alberto had told him - that the Virgin Mary had told Saint Dominic, "he who propagates my Rosary will be saved." It was these words that gave him peace of heart and the inspiration to begin evangelizing people to the Rosary.

 Shrine of Our Lady of Pompei
He started restoring a dilapidated church in October 1873 and sponsored a festival in honor of Our Lady of the Rosary. In 1875, Longo obtained a well worn painting of Our Lady of the Rosary from a convent in Naples and raised funds to get the image restored so as to place it in the church.


Miracles began to be reported and people began flocking in droves to the church. Bartolo Longo was encouraged by the Bishop of Nola to begin the construction of a larger church—the cornerstone being laid on May 8, 1876. The church was consecrated in May 1891 by Cardinal La Valetta (representing Pope Leo XIII). In 1939, the church was enlarged to a basilica, known today as the Basilica of Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary of Pompei.

 Later Life and Death
At the suggestion of Pope Leo XIII, Bartolo Longo and the Countess Mariana di Fusco were married on April 7, 1885. The couple remained continent (abstained from intercourse), and continued to do many charitable works and provided for orphaned children and the children of prisoners which for its time was revolutionary. In 1906 they donated the entire property of the Pompeii shrine to the Holy See. Longo continued promoting the Rosary until his death on October 5, 1926, at the age of 85. The piazza on which his basilica stands has since been named in memory of Longo. His body is encased in a glass tomb and he is wearing the mantle of a Knight of the Order of The Holy Sepulcher, a papal order of knighthood.

Bartolo Longo was not without his detractors. He was often accused of administrative misconduct and treated poorly by those in power. He suffered all patiently with trusting confidence in the Providence of God and the prayers of the Virgin Mary.


 Beatification
On October 26, 1980 he was beatified by Pope John Paul II, who would call him the "Apostle of the Rosary" and mentioned him specifically in his apostolic letter "Rosarium Virginis Mariae" (The Rosary of the Virgin Mary). His beatification is a triumph of God's mercy and the power of the Rosary to instruct the hearts of all in the message of the Gospel of Jesus.

On October 7, 2003 Pope John Paul II prayed for world peace at the Basilica. More than 30,000 people were waiting to greet him as he flew in by helicopter.


 Wednesday  Saints of this Day October  26 Séptimo Kaléndas Novémbris   40 days for Life Day 28
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  October 2016
Universal:   Universal: Journalists
That journalists, in carrying out their work, may always be motivated by respect for truth and a strong sense of ethics.
Evangelization:  Evangelization: World Mission Day
That World Mission Day may renew within all Christian communities the joy of the Gospel and the responsibility to announce it.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                           
       40 days for Life Day 28
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more