Thursday  Saints of this Day October  27 Sexto Kaléndas Novémbris  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
40 days For Life September - November
40 days for Life Day 29
We are the defenders of true freedom.
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.


Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

  Novena and pray the Rosary to Our Lady of Victory

We are the defenders of true freedom.
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

October 27
563 St. Odhran Irish abbot monk 1/of 12 who accompanied Saint Columba to Iona
“Noble and without sin”, was an abbot from Meath and one of the twelve who sailed with St Columba out of Loch Foyle to Iona; Odhran felt death to be upon him, and he said, “I would be the first to die under the covenant of the kingdom of God in this place”. “I will give you that kingdom”, replied Saint Columba, “and moreover this also, that whoever makes a request at my burial-place shall not get it until he prays to you as well.”  Saint Columba unwilling to see his friend die, blessed him and went out of the house, and as he was walking in the yard he stopped, looking amazedly up to the heavens. Asked at what he gazed, Saint Columba answered that he saw strife in the upper air between good and evil spirits, and angels carrying the soul of Odhran in triumph to Heaven.
  15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
October 27 - Our Lady of Charity (Cuba) The Rosary of the Virgin Mary (IX)  O Blessed Rosary of Mary, Sweet chain which unites us to God, Bond of love which unites us to the angels, Tower of salvation against the assaults of Hell, Safe port in our universal shipwreck, We will never abandon you. You will be our comfort in the hour of death:  Yours our final kiss as life ebbs away, And the last word from our lips Will be your sweet name, O Queen of the Rosary of Pompeii, O dearest Mother, O Refuge of Sinners, O Sovereign Consoler of the Afflicted.  May you be everywhere blessed, Today and always, On earth and in heaven.  John Paul II Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, #43 (October 2002)

However great the work that God may achieve by an individual, he must not indulge in self-satisfaction. He ought rather to be all the more humbled, seeing himself merely as a tool which God has made use of. -- St Vincent de Paul

October 27 - Our Lady of Charity (Cuba)
  When Our Lady traverses Cuba…
If there is one single symbol capable of uniting Cubans, it is the Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre (Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre, also known as Cachita). According to tradition, the Virgin venerated today at the Shrine of El Cobre, in the province of Santiago in southwest Cuba, was found in the early 17th century by some native fishermen from the mining town of El Cobre (cobre means "copper" in Spanish).

Around 1608 two brothers, Rodrigo and Juan de Hoyos, and a 10-year-old boy named Juan Moreno, were gathering salt from a small boat in the Bay of Nipe, when they saw something floating in the water. They picked up a small wooden object, which turned out to be a statue of Our Lady holding the Child Jesus in her arms, fastened to a small plank that read: “I am the Virgin of Charity.”

A shrine was built on the spot and immediately became a pilgrimage destination. In August 2010, the Conference of Catholic Bishops of Cuba organized a pilgrimage of approximately 30,000 km across the island as a prelude to the celebration of the 400th anniversary of discovering the miraculous statue.
Benedict XV declared Our Lady of Charity patroness of Cuba in 1916. The statue has been solemnly crowned twice; first in 1936 during the Eucharistic Congress at Santiago de Cuba and then by Blessed John Paul II in 1998. The MDN Team


October 27 - Dedication of the Basilica of Mary Our Lady, Help of Christians (Turin, Italy)
Take Mary as a model and source of help
Saint John Bosco had the Basilica of Mary Our Lady, Help of Christians, built as a monument to the Virgin Mary, as the Mother Church and spiritual center of the Salesian Congregation.  A true pilgrimage to this or any other Marian shrine should entail listening to the Word of God, prayer, Reconciliation, the Eucharist, and last but surely not least trust in Mary.  With the Eucharist, we unite with Jesus, our Savior, the meaning and guiding light of our lives. On the Cross, Jesus gave us Mary as our Mother. We trust her as our guide, taking her as a model and source of help on our path towards Christ and the Father.
Adapted from www.donbosco-torino.it source of help on our path towards Christ and the Father

Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel
Vigília sanctórum Apostolórum Simónis et Judæ.    The vigil of the holy apostles Simon and Jude.
October is the Month of the Rosary.
Our Lady of the Rosary Pope St. Pius V established this feast in 1573. The purpose was to thank God for the victory of Christians over the Turks at Lepanto—a victory attributed to the praying of the rosary. Clement XI extended the feast to the universal Church in 1716.

 
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  October 2016
Universal:   Universal: Journalists
That journalists, in carrying out their work, may always be motivated by respect for truth and a strong sense of ethics.
Evangelization:  Evangelization: World Mission Day
That World Mission Day may renew within all Christian communities the joy of the Gospel and the responsibility to announce it.

Vigília sanctórum Apostolórum Simónis et Judæ.    The vigil of the holy apostles Simon and Jude.
3rd v.St. Florentius Martyr who suffered at Trois-Chateaux, Burgundy
  303 St. Vincent, Sabina, & Christeta Three martyrs executed at Avila
  304 St. Capitolina martyred woman of Cappadocia distributed her entire wealth to the poor
 
306 St Nestor of Thessalonica The Holy Martyr suffered in the city of Thessalonica together with the Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica (October 26).
  367 St. Abraham the Poor Egypt holy hermit purity of heart simplicity of lifestyle
        St. Abban of Murnevin Abbot and missionary
  380 St. Frumentius Called “Abuna” or “the fa­ther”of Ethiopia
  455 St. Gaudiosus Bishop called “the African.”
  462 Saint Namatius 9th bishop of Clermont built the cathedral there
  555 St. Elesbaan Christian king of Ethiopia probably a Monophysite
  563 St. Odhran Irish abbot monk 1/of 12 who accompanied Saint Columba to Iona
  606 Saint Cyriacus patriarch of Constantinople B
  625 St. Desiderius Bishop of Auxerre  succeeded Saint Aunarius
  632 Saint Colman of Senboth-Fola associated with Bishop Saint Maidoc Abbot
        St. Namatius Bishop of Clermont
1114 Saint Nestor the Chronicler, of the Kiev Caves, Near Caves "Great is the benefit of book learning, for books point out and teach us the way to repentance, since from the words of books we discover wisdom and temperance. This is the stream, watering the universe, from which springs wisdom. In books is a boundless depth, by them we are comforted in sorrows, and they are a bridle for moderation. If you enter diligently into the books of wisdom, then you shall discover great benefit for your soul. Therefore, the one who reads books converses with God or the saints." The chief work in the life of St Nestor was compiling in the years 1112-1113 The Russian Primary Chronicle. "Here is the account of years past, how the Russian land came to be, who was the first prince at Kiev and how the Russian land is arrayed."
1203 Blessed Goswin of Chemnion Cistercian monk OSB
1271 Blessed Bartholomew of Vicenza Dominican Cyprus bishop: 
See also Butlers October 23
1507 Blessed Antonia of Brescia trials with patience and humility  OP V
1539 Saint Andrew, Prince of Smolensk The Uncovering of the relics of at Pereslavl occurred through the involvement of St Daniel of Pereslavl (April 7).
1902 Bd Contardo Ferrini; Ferrini was concerned with the whole vast field of law, but it was above all in Roman law (and especially its Byzantine aspect) that he made his mark.  When Professor von Ligenthal died in 1894 Ferrini, his favourite pupil, inherited not only his master’s manuscripts but also his acknowledged leadership in these studies. Among those who in one way or another contributed to the success of his work were Don Achille Ratti, afterwards Pope Pius XI, and Dr John Mercati, later cardinal and librarian and archivist of the Holy Roman Church.

1907 Alexander The holy hierarch; tonsured a monk at the Tbilisi Monastery of the Transfiguration; traveled to Kazan theological academy graduated with honors returned home; taught the Holy Scriptures, Latin, moral theology, and archaeology at Tbilisi Seminary until July 27, 1851; appointed dean of the Abkhazeti theological school; active as a pedagogue, then as an archimandrite, and a bishop; beloved throughout all of Georgian society as he was by the local population--many called him the “Second Apostle to Abkhazeti.”; through his efforts alone 2 Sokhumi churches restored, renewed the magnificent monasteries of Shio-Mgvime, Zedazeni, Davit-Gareji, and Shemokmedi, restored Jvari Church, Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, Disevi Church, and many other churches in Guria-Samegrelo, Atchara, and Imereti; devoted special attention to the Shio-Mgvime Monastery and the surrounding area, which had been devastated by that time, & founded diocesan school for women in Tbilisi;
October 27 - Our Lady of Charity (Cuba)  The Rose Garden of Our Mother
While nature itself made the name of mother the sweetest of all names and has made motherhood the very model of tender and solicitous love, no tongue is eloquent enough to put in words what every devout soul feels, namely how intense is the flame of affectionate and active charity which glows in Mary, in her who is truly our mother not in a human way but through Christ. Nobody knows and comprehends so well as she everything that concerns us: what help we need in life; what dangers, public or private, threaten our welfare; what difficulties and evils surround us; above all, how fierce is the fight we wage with ruthless enemies of our salvation. In these and in all other troubles of life her power is most far-reaching. Her desire to use it is most ardent to bring consolation, strength, and help of every kind to the children who are dear to her.
Accordingly, let us approach Mary confidently, wholeheartedly beseeching her by the bonds of her motherhood which unite her so closely to Jesus and at the same time to us. Let us with deepest devotion invoke her constant aid in the prayer which she herself has indicated and which is most acceptable to her.
Then with good reason shall we rest with an easy and joyous mind under the protection of the best of mothers.
MAGNAE DEI MATRIS - On the Rosary, articles 12-13 
Encyclical of Pope Saint Leo XIII (1810-1903) promulgated on September 8, 1892.

October 27 - OUR LADY OF THE BASILICA (Turin, Italy, built by St John Bosco between 1863 and 1868)
Excellence of the Rosary in the Prayers that Compose It (III)
The Angelic Salutation, or Hail Mary, is so sublime and so beyond us in the depth of its meaning,
that Blessed Alan de la Roche thought that no mere creature could ever understand it,
and that only our Lord Jesus Christ, born of the Virgin Mary, could explain it.
Its enormous value is due to Our Lady to whom it was addressed, for the purpose of the Incarnation of the Word, for which reason this prayer was brought from heaven, and also to the archangel Gabriel who was the first ever to say it.

The Angelic Salutation is a most concise summary of all that Catholic theology teaches about the Blessed Virgin. It is divided into two parts, that of praise and that of petition. The first shows everything that goes to make up Mary's greatness; and the second, all we need to ask, and all that we can expect from her goodness.

The Most Holy Trinity revealed the first part; Saint Elizabeth, inspired by the Holy Spirit, gave the second; and the Church added the conclusion in the year 430 when she condemned the Nestorian heresy at the Council of Ephesus and defined that the Blessed Virgin is truly the Mother of God. The council commanded us to invoke the Holy Virgin under this glorious title with these words: "Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death."

Saint Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort  The Admirable Secret of the Rosary (# 35)



3rd v. St. Florentius Martyr who suffered at Trois-Chateaux, Burgundy
 Apud castrum Tyle, in Gállia, sancti Floréntii Mártyris.    At Tilchatel in France, St. Florentius, martyr.
Florentius of Burgundy M (RM) 3rd century. Saint Florentius suffered martyrdom at Trois- Châteaux in Burgundy (Benedictines).
303 St. Vincent, Sabina, & Christeta Three martyrs executed at Avila
Abulæ, in Hispánia, pássio sanctórum Vincéntii, Sabínæ et Christétæ.  Hi primum in equúleo ádeo sunt exténti, ut omnes membrórum compáges laxaréntur; deínde cápita eórum, lapídibus superpósita, usque ad cérebri excussiónem válidis véctibus sunt contúsa, atque ita ipsi martyrium complevérunt, sub Præside Daciáno.
    At Avila in Spain, under the governor Dacian, the Saints Vincent, Sabina, and Christeta.  They were first stretched on the rack in such a manner that all their limbs were dislocated; then stones being laid on their heads, and their brains beaten out with heavy bars, their martyrdom was fulfilled.
Spain, during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian (r. 284-305). Their Acts are considered dubious.

Vincent, Sabina & Christeta MM (RM). Untrustworthy acta record that Vincent was a young Christian in Ávila, Spain, when Governor Dacian ordered the suppression of all Christians during the break up of the Roman Empire. Today there are some countries where the Christians are so inoffensive that nobody bothers with them, and there are other countries where they are persecuted because they are true Christians. We should ask ourselves which of the two most deserves our pity.

Vincent's crime was his freedom and independence. He felt that he was in the right, and so risked upsetting all the old traditional obsolete beliefs. He was dangerous, but he was right to be dangerous as are all other Christians of every place and every age.

They tried to set him on the "right" path: the path of apathy, tradition, numbness, and idolatry. But in his eyes Jupiter was a scoundrel deserving blows, not worship. He preferred the man who had been crucified in Jerusalem and, brushing away the dust and mold of the old religion, he let in the fresh air of the new. And even if the particular details of Vincent's story are not absolutely authentic, his story is true in a wider sense, for the powerful empire was crumbling and the new light of Christianity was inspiring Vincent and many others--feebly at first but shining ever more brightly.

Vincent was condemned to death. We know from legends what happened to him, but not what happened inside him, for only he and Jesus Christ know that. It is the most essential part of a person's life, and yet one which is only rarely mentioned by historians, critics, or writers. We cannot blame them, for no one on earth can tell you about your life with Jesus Christ, and that is as it should be. Therefore what we have to say about a person is relatively unimportant; and if none of the things which are recorded of Vincent ever actually happened, that would in no way alter the essential and only truth, which is his life with Jesus Christ.

It is said that Vincent left the imprint of his foot on a stone and that was enough to convert his guards. His guards, however, were no more simple-minded than we are, and if they were converted it was because they saw more in Vincent than a foot which could leave its imprint on a stone: it was because they saw in him the imprint of Jesus Christ. Wherever Vincent went he left the imprint of Jesus, his "odor" as the old books used to call it. There are few of us today who leave an imprint likely to inspire those around us to convert. Dacian has nothing to worry about and can stay at home.

For a while everything went well for Vincent. His guards were converted and with the help of his sisters Sabina and Christeta he was able to escape. But Christ is not especially fond of those who win too easily. They had barely arrived at Alba when all three were arrested. They were scourged, beaten, quartered, and crushed between stones. This time they left no imprint on the stones, but an enormous imprint on the whole of Spain (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

In art they are identified as a man and two women broken on wheels. They are venerated at Ávila, Spain, where they were martyred (Roeder).
304 St. Capitolina martyred woman of Cappadocia distributed her entire wealth to the poor with her handmaid, Erotheis.
 In Cappadócia sanctárum Mártyrum Capitolínæ, ejúsque ancíllæ Erothéidis, quæ sub Diocletiáno sunt passæ.
    In Cappadocia, the holy martyrs Capitolina, and Erotheides, her handmaid, who suffered under Diocletian.

They died in the persecutions conducted by Emperor Diocletian.
Capitolina and Erotheis MM (RM). Capitolina, a wealthy Cappadocian lady, and her handmaid, were martyred under Diocletian, after Capitolina distributed her entire wealth to the poor (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

306 Nestor of Thessalonica The Holy Martyr suffered in the city of Thessalonica together with the Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica (October 26).
The name of St Nestor (not the Chronicler) is mentioned in the General Service to the Monastics of the Far Caves: “The Word of God, understood by man, instructed you not by written wisdom, O holy Nestor, but from on high; you beheld it through the prayers of the angel, and you foresaw your death. May we also be made partakers with you, we pray, in honoring your memory. His memory is celebrated also on August 28 and on the second Sunday of Great Lent.
367 St. Abraham the Poor, Egypt holy hermit, purity of heart, simplicity of lifestyle.
listed in some records as
the Poor or the Child, allusions to his purity of heart and to the simplicity of his lifestyle ways. He was born in Menuf or Minuf, Egypt, a site northwest of Cairo in the Delta region of the Nile.
He became a disciple of St. Pachomius, the founder of cenobitic monasticism.
Abraham spent almost two decades in a cave near Pachomius' foundations in the Delta.
Abraham the Child, Hermit (RM) (also known as Abraham the Poor) Born at Menuf, Egypt; died 366-377; feast day formerly on March 16. Abraham became a disciple of Saint Pachomius. After 23 years he retired to a cave where he spent 17 years. His cultus is widespread among the Copts (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). Abraham is shown as an old man with a blowing beard clothed in skins. Sometimes he is in his cell with his niece Mary in the adjoining cell (Roeder).
380 St. Frumentius Called “Abuna” or “the fa­ther ”of Ethiopia venerated as the first evangelizer of  Etheopia.
Apud Indos sancti Fruménti Epíscopi, qui, primum ibi captívus, deínde, Epíscopus a sancto Athanásio ordinátus, Evangélium in ea província propagávit.
    In India, St. Frumentius, bishop.  While he was a captive there he was consecrated bishop by St. Athanasius, and propagated the Gospel in that country. Etheopia
380 ST FRUMENTIUS, Bishop of Axsum
SOMEWHERE about the year 330 a philosopher of Tyre, named Meropius, out of curiosity and a wish to see the world and improve his knowledge, undertook a voyage to the coasts of Arabia. He took with him two young men, Frumentius and Aedesius, with whose education he was entrusted. In the course of their voyage homeward the vessel touched at a certain port of Ethiopia, or as it is now often called, Abyssinia. The natives fell out with some of the sailors, attacked them, and put the whole crew and all the passengers to the sword, except the two boys, who were studying their lessons under a tree at some distance. When they were found they were carried to the king, who resided at Aksum in the Tigre country. He was attracted by the bearing and knowledge of the young Christians, and not long after made Aedesius his cupbearer and Frumentius, who was the elder, his secretary. This prince on his deathbed thanked them for their services and, in recompense, gave them their liberty. The queen, who was left regent for her eldest son, entreated them to remain and assist her, which they did.

   Frumentius had the principal management of affairs and induced several Christian merchants who traded there to settle in the country. He procured them privileges and all conveniences for religious worship, and by his own fervour and example strongly recommended the true religion to the infidels. When the young king came of age and, with his brother, took the reins of government into his own hands, the Tyrians resigned their posts, though he urged them to stay.

  Aedesius went back to Tyre, where he was ordained priest and told his adventures to Rufinus, who incorporated them in his Church History. But Frumentius, having nothing so much at heart as the conversion of the whole nation, took the route to Alexandria, and entreated the bishop, St Athanasius, to send some pastor to that country. Whereupon Athanasius ordained Frumentius himself bishop of the Ethiopians, judging no one more proper to finish the work which he had begun. Thus began the association of the Christians of Abyssinia with the church of Alexandria which has continued to this day.

The consecration of St Frumentius took place probably just before the year 340 or just after 346 (or perhaps c. 355—356). He went back to Aksum and gained numbers to the faith by his preaching and miracles the two royal brothers are said to have themselves received baptism, and as Abreha and Asbeha are venerated as saints in the Ethiopic calendar. But the Arian emperor Constantius conceived an implacable suspicion against St Frumentius, because he was linked in faith and affection with St Athanasius; and when he found that he was not even to be tempted, much less seduced by him, he wrote a letter to the two kings, in which he urged them to send Frumentius to George, the intruded bishop of Alexandria, who would be responsible for his “welfare”. The emperor also warned them against Athanasius as guilty “of many crimes”. The only result was that this letter was communicated to St Athanasius, who has inserted it in his apologia against the Arians.

Conversion even of the Aksumite kingdom was far from completed during the lifetime of St Frumentius. After his death he was called Abuna, Our father”, and Aba salama, “Father of peace”, and abuna is still the title of the primate of the dissident Church of Ethiopia.

The story told by Rufinus maybe read with other matter in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xii. This other matter includes a copy of a long Greek inscription found at Aksum, commemorating the exploits of Aïzanas, King of the Homeritae, and his brother Saïzanas. Now it was precisely to Aïzanas and Saïzanas that Constantius addressed his letter, of which St Athanasius has preserved the text, demanding the surrender of Frumentius. There can consequently be no doubt that the last-named really was at Aksum preaching the Christian faith. Although the earlier adventures of Frumentius, as Rufinus recounts them, may have been misunderstood or disfigured with legendary additions, his presence in Aksum, as a bishop, consecrated for this mission by St Athanasius, is a certain fact. See Professor Guidi in the Enciclopedia italiana, vol. xiv, pp. 480—481, and in DHG., vol. i, cc. 210—212 Leclercq in DAC., vol. v, cc. 586—594 Duchesne, Histoire ancienne de l’Église, vol. iii, pp. 576—578 and cf. the account given of St Frumentius in the Ethiopic Synaxarium (ed. Budge, 1928), vol. iv, pp. 1164—1165. According to F. G. Holweck, the old diocese of Louisiana, U.S.A. (erected 1787) observed the feast of St Frumentius: was this a gesture towards the slaves of African origin in America ?

Frumentius was born in Tyre, Lebanon. While on a voyage in the Red Sea with St. Aedesius, possibly his brother, only Frumentius and Aedesius survived the shipwreck.
Taken to the Ethiopian royal court at Aksum, they soon attained high positions. Aedesius was royal cup bearer, and Fruementius was a secretary. They introduced Christianity to that land. When Abreha and Asbeha inherited the Ethiopian throne from their father, Frumentius went to Alexandria, Egypt, to ask St. Athanasius to send a missionary to Ethiopia. He was consecrated a bishop and converted many more upon his return to Aksum. Frumentius and Aedesius are considered the apostles of Ethiopia.
Frumentius of Ethiopia B (RM) (also known as Fremonat) . According to their contemporary Rufinus, two young Christian brothers named Frumentius and Aedesius (Aedisius) were studying philosophy in Tyre under Meropius (or Metrodorus), who decided around the year 330 that he would like to take a voyage along the coasts of Arabia. To the young men's overwhelming delight, he offered to take them with him.
The journey went well, but on their homeward trip the ship docked at Adulis, Abyssinia (Ethiopia), to take on fresh supplies. The sailors got into a fight with the locals, leading to the murder of Meropius and everyone on ship. The boys escaped because they were studying their lessons under a tree a distance from the ship. When they were discovered, they were taken as slaves to the court of the king of Aksum (Axum) in Tigre.
The king was impressed by their bearing and learning and the fortunes of the young Christians prospered. Frumentius, the elder brother, was made the king's chief secretary. Aedesius became his cup-bearer. They gained permission even for Greek merchants to open some churches in Ethiopia and to try to convert the people. And when the king died, he gave the two men their freedom. They remained for a time at the request of the widowed queen to help rule the country.
Eventually the two princes, named Abreha and Asbeha, came to the throne. The Tyrian brothers resigned their posts although their new king urged them to stay. Aedesius returned to Tyre where he was ordained and met Rufinus, who incorporated their story into his Church History.
Frumentius, desiring to convert the whole of his adopted country, made his way to Alexandria and explained the Ethiopian situation to Saint Athanasius. He urgently asked Athanasius to send a bishop to Aksum to consolidate all that had been done there for Christ. Either Athanasius or a synod unanimously chose Frumentius for the work, ordained him bishop, and sent him back to plant the Christian church in Ethiopia, which he did in Aksum.
"Apostolic signs accompanied his ministry, and great numbers of heathen were won to the faith" (Rufinus). Among those converted were Abreha and Asbeha, the two royal brothers, despite the attempts of the Arian Emperor Constantius to discredit him because of his connection with Athanasius.
Whatever the exact details of the Tyrian youths' adventures, there is strong confirmation of the presence in Ethiopia of a bishop named Frumentius, consecrated by Saint Athanasius about the middle of the fourth century.  After his death the Abyssinians dubbed him Abuna (which means 'Our Father') and Aba salama (which means 'Father of peace'). Abuna is still the title of the primate of the Church of Ethiopia (Attwater, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Walsh).
In art Frumentius is represented as a bishop elevating a Host, sometimes with Saint Athanasius, sometimes shipwrecked with his brother Saint Aedesius. Saint Frumentius is venerated as the first evangelizer of Ethiopia (Roeder).
455 St. Gaudiosus Bishop called “the African.”
Neápoli, in Campánia, sancti Gaudiósi, Epíscopi Africáni, qui ob Wandalórum persecutiónem venit in Campániam, et, in monastério apud eam urbem, sancto fine quiévit.
    At Naples, St. Gaudiosus, an African bishop who came to Campania because of the Vandal persecution, and died a holy death in a monastery in that city.
He was the bishop of Abitina in North Africa, exiled by Geiseric, the Vandal king, in 440. Gaudiosus went to Naples, Italy, where he founded a monastery.

Gaudiosus of Naples B (RM) (also known as Gaudiosus the African). Saint Gaudiosus, bishop of Abitina in northern Africa, was exiled by the Arian Vandal king Genseric about 440. He took refuge at Naples where he founded a monastery, which was later governed by Saint Agnellus (Benedictines).
462 Saint Namatius ninth bishop of Clermont built the cathedral there B (AC).
(also known as Namace) Saint Namatius, ninth bishop of Clermont, France, built the cathedral there (Benedictines).
5th v. St. Abban of Murnevin Abbot and missionary.
called Ewin, Evin, Neville, or Nevin. He is listed as a nephew of St. Kevin and is confused with St. Abban of Magh-Armuidhe. Abban is best known for his association with the monastery of Rosmic-Treoin of New Ross.
Abban of Wexford, Abbot (AC)
Born in Ireland, 6th century. Saint Abban, nephew of Saint Kevin, founded many monasteries, mostly in southern Ireland. His name is especially connected with that of Magh-Armuidhe, now Adamstown, Wexford. The lives of this saint are hopelessly confused with that of Saint Abban of Leinster and others of the same name (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

555 St. Elesbaan Christian king of Ethiopia probably a Monophysite.
In Æthiópia sancti Elésbaan Regis, qui, Christi hóstibus expugnátis, ac, témpore Justíni Imperatóris, misso régio diadémate Hierosólymam, monásticam vitam, ut vóverat agens, migrávit ad Dóminum.
    In Ethiopia, in the time of Emperor Justin, St. Elesbaan, king.  After having defeated the enemies of Christ and sent his royal diadem to Jerusalem, he led a monastic life, as he had vowed, and went to his reward.
called Calam-Negus by the Abyssinians. He fought the Jewish usurper Dunaan, who had committed atrocities against Christians. Elesbaan was also guilty of dreadful revenges against Dunaan’s followers. He resigned, leaving the throne to his son, and ended his life as an eremite.
563 St. Odhran Irish abbot monk 1/of 12 who accompanied Saint Columba to Iona.

OTTERAN, “noble and without sin”, was an abbot from Meath and one of the twelve who sailed with St Columba out of Loch Foyle to Iona; Adamnan says he was a Briton. Soon after their arrival St Otteran felt death to be upon him, and he said, “I would be the first to die under the covenant of the kingdom of God in this place”. “I will give you that kingdom”, replied Columba, “and moreover this also, that whoever makes a request at my burial-place shall not get it until he prays to you as well.”

   Columba, unwilling to see his friend die, blessed him and went out of the house, and as he was walking in the yard he stopped, looking amazedly up to the heavens. Asked at what he gazed, Columba answered that he saw strife in the upper air between good and evil spirits, and angels carrying the soul of Otteran in triumph to Heaven.
So he was the first by his death and burial there to seal Iona to the Irish monks, and the place of his burying, the only cemetery on the island, is still called Reilig Orain. This is said to be the Otteran who founded the monastery at Leitrioch Odrain (Latteragh in Tipperary). Although this is all that is known of St Otteran his feast (as a bishop) is kept today throughout Ireland.

How little is known concerning St Odhran appears clearly from the glosses to the Filire of Oengus, which suggest more than one alternative as to Odhran’s identity. A notice in very vague terms is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, October, vol. xii. See also Forbes, KSS., p. 426. In the Annals of Ulster we are told that he died in the year 548. Odhran is the correct form of the name.
Also Otteran and Oran. After serving as abbot of Meath, he journeyed to Scotland with St. Columba to promote the faith and died at Lona. Odhran was the first Irish monk to die at Lona. He may have founded Latteragh Abbey in Tipperary He is considered the principal patron saint of Waterford, Ireland.
Otteran of Iona, Abbot (RM) (also known as Odhran, Oran) Born in Britain. Otteran, abbot of Meath, was one of the 12 who accompanied Saint Columba to Iona. Other historians say that Otteran was at Iona before Columba, based on the fact that the ancient cemetery there is called Reilig Oran. He died soon after their arrival, the first of the monks from Ireland to die at Iona. Soon thereafter, Columba saw Otteran's soul ascending to heaven following a battle between angels and devils. Otteran may have founded the monastery at Leitrioch Odrain (Latteragh, Tipperary). He has given his name to Oronsay. His feast is kept throughout Ireland (Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Montague).
606 Saint Cyriacus patriarch of Constantinople B (AC).
feast day in the Greek Church is celebrated on October 29. Cyriacus was administrator and, later, patriarch of Constantinople (Benedictines).
625 St. Desiderius Bishop of Auxerre  succeeded Saint Aunarius.
France, the successor of St. Anacharius.
Desiderius of Auxerre B (AC). Saint Desiderius succeeded Saint Aunarius (Aunaire) in the see of Auxerre, France. He has often been confused with Saint Desiderius of Vienne (Benedictines).
St. Namatius Bishop of Clermont.
sometimes listed as Namace. He founded the local cathedral.
632 Colman of Senboth-Fola associated with Bishop Saint Maidoc Abbot (AC).
Born in Ireland. Abbot Saint Colman of Senboth-Fola, in the diocese of Ferns, was associated with Bishop Saint Maidoc of Ferns (January 31) (Benedictines).
1114 Saint Nestor the Chronicler, of the Kiev Caves, Near Caves
 
Great is the benefit of book learning, for books point out and teach us the way to repentance, since from the words of books we discover wisdom and temperance. This is the stream, watering the universe, from which springs wisdom. In books is a boundless depth, by them we are comforted in sorrows, and they are a bridle for moderation. If you enter diligently into the books of wisdom, then you shall discover great benefit for your soul. Therefore, the one who reads books converses with God or the saints."

The chief work in the life of St Nestor was compiling in the years 1112-1113 The Russian Primary Chronicle. "Here is the account of years past, how the Russian land came to be, who was the first prince at Kiev and how the Russian land is arrayed.

Nestor was born at Kiev in 1050. He came to St Theodosius (May 3) as a young man, and became a novice. St Nestor took monastic tonsure under the successor to St Theodosius, the igumen Stephen, and under him was ordained a hierodeacon.

Concerning his lofty spiritual life it says that, with a number of other monastic Fathers he participated in the casting out of a devil from Nikita the Hermit (January 31), who had become fascinated by the Hebrew wisdom of the Old Testament. St Nestor deeply appreciated true knowledge, along with humility and penitence.
Great is the benefit of book learning, he said, for books point out and teach us the way to repentance, since from the words of books we discover wisdom and temperance. This is the stream, watering the universe, from which springs wisdom. In books is a boundless depth, by them we are comforted in sorrows, and they are a bridle for moderation. If you enter diligently into the books of wisdom, then you shall discover great benefit for your soul. Therefore, the one who reads books converses with God or the saints.

In the monastery St Nestor had the obedience of being the chronicler. In the 1080s he wrote the
Account about the Life and Martyrdom of the Blessed Passion Bearers Boris and Gleb in connection with the transfer of the relics of the saints to Vyshgorod in the year 1072 (May 2). In the 1080s St Nestor also compiled the Life of the Monk Theodosius of the Kiev Caves. And in 1091, on the eve of the patronal Feast of the Kiev Caves Monastery, he was entrusted by Igumen John to dig up the holy relics of St Theodosius (August 14) for transfer to the church.

The chief work in the life of St Nestor was compiling in the years 1112-1113 The Russian Primary Chronicle.
Here is the account of years past, how the Russian land came to be, who was the first prince at Kiev and how the Russian land is arrayed. The very first line written by St Nestor set forth his purpose. St Nestor used an extraordinarily wide circle of sources: prior Russian chronicles and sayings, monastery records, the Byzantine Chronicles of John Malalos and George Amartolos, various historical collections, the accounts of the boyar-Elder Ivan Vyshatich and of tradesmen and soldiers, of journeymen and of those who knew. He drew them together with a unified and strict ecclesiastical point of view. This permitted him to write his history of Russia as an inclusive part of world history, the history of the salvation of the human race.

The monk-patriot describes the history of the Russian Church in its significant moments. He speaks about the first mention of the Russian nation in historical sources in the year 866, in the time of St Photius, Patriarch of Constantinople. He tells of the creation of the Slavonic alphabet and writing by Sts Cyril and Methodius; and of the Baptism of St Olga at Constantinople. The Chronicle of St Nestor has preserved for us an account of the first Orthodox church in Kiev (under the year 945), and of the holy Varangian Martyrs (under the year 983), of the "testing of the faiths" by St Vladimir (in 986) and the Baptism of Rus (in 988).

We are indebted to the first Russian Church historian for details about the first Metropolitans of the Russian Church, about the emergence of the Kiev Caves monastery, and about its founders and ascetics. The times in which St Nestor lived were not easy for the Russian land and the Russian Church. Rus lay torn asunder by princely feuds; the Polovetsian nomads of the steppes lay waste to both city and village with plundering raids. They led many Russian people into slavery, and burned churches and monasteries. St Nestor was an eyewitness to the devastation of the Kiev Caves monastery in the year 1096. In the Chronicle a theologically thought out patriotic history is presented. The spiritual depth, historical fidelity and patriotism of the The Russian Primary Chronicle establish it in the ranks of the significant creations of world literature.
St Nestor died around the year 1114, having left to the other monastic chroniclers of the Kiev Caves the continuation of his great work. His successors in the writing of the Chronicles were: Igumen Sylvester, who added contemporary accounts to the The Russian Primary Chronicle; Igumen Moses Vydubitsky brought it up to the year 1200; and finally, Igumen Laurence, who in the year 1377 wrote the most ancient of the surviving manuscripts that preserve the Chronicle of St Nestor (this copy is known as the Lavrentian Chronicle). The hagiographic tradition of the Kiev Caves ascetics was continued by St Simon, Bishop of Vladimir (May 10), the compiler of the Kiev Caves Paterikon. Narrating the events connected with the lives of the holy saints of God, St Simon often quotes, among other sources, from the Chronicle of St Nestor.
St Nestor was buried in the Near Caves of St Anthony. The Church also honors his memory in the Synaxis of the holy Fathers of the Near Caves commemorated September 28 and on the second Sunday of Great Lent when is celebrated the Synaxis of all the Fathers of the Kiev Caves. His works have been published many times, including in English as The Russian Primary Chronicle.
1203 Blessed Goswin of Chemnion Cistercian monk OSB Cist. (AC).
Goswin was a Cistercian monk, first at Clairvaux and then at Chemnion (Benedictines).
1271 Blessed Bartholomew of Vicenza Dominican Cyprus bishop  see also Butlers October 23 .
Dominicans honor one of their own today, Blessed Bartholomew of Vicenza. This was a man who used his skills as a preacher to challenge the heresies of his day. Bartholomew was born in Vicenza around 1200. At 20 he entered the Dominicans. Following his ordination he served in various leadership positions. As a young priest he founded a military order whose purpose was to keep civil peace in towns throughout Italy.
In 1248, Bartholomew was appointed a bishop. For most men, such an appointment is an honor and a tribute to their holiness and their demonstrated leadership skills. But for Bartholomew, it was a form of exile that had been urged by an antipapal group that was only too happy to see him leave for Cyprus. Not many years later, however, Bartholomew was transferred back to Vicenza. Despite the antipapal feelings that were still evident, he worked diligently—especially through his preaching—to rebuild his diocese and strengthen the people’s loyalty to Rome.
During his years as bishop in Cyprus, Bartholomew befriended King Louis the Ninth of France, who is said to have given the holy bishop a relic of Christ’s Crown of Thorns. Bartholomew died in 1271. He was beatified in 1793.

October 27, 2009 Blessed Bartholomew of Vicenza (c. 1200-1271) 
Dominicans honor one of their own today, Blessed Bartholomew of Vicenza. This was a man who used his skills as a preacher to challenge the heresies of his day.

Bartholomew was born in Vicenza around 1200. At 20 he entered the Dominicans. Following his ordination he served in various leadership positions. As a young priest he founded a military order whose purpose was to keep civil peace in towns throughout Italy. In 1248, Bartholomew was appointed a bishop. For most men, such an appointment is an honor and a tribute to their holiness and their demonstrated leadership skills. But for Bartholomew, it was a form of exile that had been urged by an antipapal group that was only too happy to see him leave for Cyprus. Not many years later, however, Bartholomew was transferred back to Vicenza. Despite the antipapal feelings that were still evident, he worked diligently—especially through his preaching—to rebuild his diocese and strengthen the people’s loy alty to Rome.

During his years as bishop in Cyprus, Bartholomew befriended King Louis the Ninth of France, who is said to have given the holy bishop a relic of Christ’s Crown of Thorns.  Bartholomew died in 1271. He was beatified in 1793.
1507 Blessed Antonia of Brescia trials with patience and humility  OP V (PC).
Born 1407. Although Antonia entered the Dominican convent at Brescia as a young girl, she was not chosen prioress until she was 66. She governed Saint Catherine's Convent at Ferrara, Italy, rigorously but with justice. She underwent deposition and other trials with patience and humility (Benedictines).
1539 Saint Andrew, Prince of Smolensk The Uncovering of the relics of at Pereslavl occurred through the involvement of St Daniel of Pereslavl (April 7).
The holy Prince Andrew was the son of the Smolensk prince Theodore Fominsky. While still in his youth, he was grieved by the disputes of his brothers, and he left his native city going as a simple wanderer to Pereslavl Zalessk. In humility and meekness he spent thirty years as church warden at the church of St Nicholas, near which he is buried. After his death they discovered a princely ring, a gold chain and an inscription with the words,
I am Andrew, one of the Smolensk princes.
1902 Bd Contardo Ferrini; Ferrini was concerned with the whole vast field of law, but it was above all in Roman law (and especially its Byzantine aspect) that he made his mark.  When Professor von Ligenthal died in 1894 Ferrini, his favourite pupil, inherited not only his master’s manuscripts but also his acknowledged leadership in these studies. Among those who in one way or another contributed to the success of his work were Don Achille Ratti, afterwards Pope Pius XI, and Dr John Mercati, later cardinal and librarian and archivist of the Holy Roman Church.

Addressing an audience of professors, lecturers and other pilgrims at this time, Pope Pius XII referred to Bd Contardo as a man who “gave an emphatic ‘Yes’ to the possibility of holiness in these days”. “The history and development of law and law-making”, he declared, “were for Ferrini simply an application of the moral and divine law, without which human legislation is useless for if they are separated from God, it is only a matter of time before social organization and its juridical enactments degenerate into tyranny and despotism…It should give us comfort that in Bd Contardo the Lord has given the Church a beatus who was a master in the field of law and at the same time a man of God, one whose exalted spirit and supremely righteous life is a model for us all.”

Giving evidence in the course of the process, the previous pope, Pius XI, had said, “My relations with him were purely scientific or were concerned with the beauties of high mountains. For him these were an inspiration to holiness and almost a natural revelation of God.”

Ferrini’s appreciation of the material creation was indeed a salient characteristic, and it was not confined to nature in her gentler aspects. “God also speaks to man in the clouds on the mountain tops”, he wrote, “in the roaring of the torrents, in the stark awfulness of the cliffs, in the dazzling splendour of the unmelting snow, in the sun that splashes the west with blood, in the wind that strips the trees bare. Nature lives by the breath of His omnipotence, smiles in its joy of Him, hides from His wrath—yet greets Him, eternally young, with the smile of its own youth. For the spirit of God by which nature lives is a spirit for ever young, incessantly renewing itself, happy in its snow and rain and mist, for out of these come birth and life, spring ever renewed and undaunted hope, and all the blessed prerogatives of youth a thousand times reborn.”
Bd Contardo Ferrini was in the true line of St Francis of Assisi.


Contardo Ferrini was born in 1859 in a modest apartment in the Via Passerella at Milan. His father, Rinaldo Ferrini, was a teacher of mathematics and physics, who had married Louisa Buccellati in the previous year. Rinaldo had also graduated in civil engineering and architecture, and his son inherited both his intellectual ability and scientific spirit.
Contardo indeed was a precocious lively child, and though he first went to school when he was six years old, his schooling had already begun with his father. According to a school-fellow, study and his religion were the only things that young Contardo was interested in.  As he grew up he was not free from the emotional disturbances common to adolescence—an echo of this can be detected in some verses he wrote for his mother’s name day when he was sixteen. But he weathered the storm, with the help of a wise and learned priest, Don Adalbert Catena, a friend of Manzoni and of Verdi.  While Don Catena guided him spiritually, another priest was watching over him intellectually: this was Mgr Antony Ceriani, prefect of the Ambrosian Library at Milan.

Contardo wanted to read the Bible in its original languages, and it was to Mgr Ceriani that he turned to teach him Hebrew. Here, too, he found his father’s insistence on a scientific approach reinforced: “Don’t trust too much in second-hand information, even from the learned”, Mgr Ceriani would say. “Go directly to the sources of the truth.”
   A third priest to whom Contardo owed much was a colleague of his father’s, Don Antony Stoppani, whose geological and other learning chimed with that love of nature that distinguished Contardo throughout his life.

In 1876 Contardo entered the law school of the Borromeo College at Pavia. He was a very serious young man, and one gets the impression that at this time he was not altogether free from what in England is called “priggishness”. This might in a measure account for some of the ill treatment he experienced at the hands of his fellow students. The patience with which he bore his trials and his general bearing gained him the nickname of “St Aloysius of the Borromeo”, used by some in respect and by others in derision.  And an apostolic flame was kindled in him: “To preach by example is good”, he wrote, “and to preach by the word is good. But what is more effective than to preach by prayer?”

He became enthusiastic for the formation of a university-students’ society, a thing then unheard of in Italy and of which he was a veritable pioneer. Nothing actually came of it till the year in which he left Pavia for Berlin; the society was then given the name of St Severinus Boethius and it exists to this day. But the greater part of Ferrini’s youthful apostolic ideals seem to have borne no fruit, at any rate visibly; only the results of certain personal contacts were seen to be lasting. There was Ettore Cappa, who never forgot that it was Ferrini who introduced him to the writings of Cardinal Newman, and the life-long friendships with Count Paul Mapelli and his brother, Count Victor. The letters that he wrote to the last-named are one of the primary sources for Ferrini’s life and thought.
    Contardo Ferrini gained his doctorate in 1880 and was awarded a bursary for a year (later extended to two) in the University of Berlin. Before setting out for this centre of Protestantism he drew up a “Programme of Life” in the form of a letter to Victor Mapelli; the document is a valuable testimony to his humble faith and the mystical trend of his spirit. He was somewhat depressed at leaving home, but his first impressions of Berlin cheered him: he found the Catholics there serious and observant, and the Catholic students of the university were organized and active. In his little book Un po’ d’infinito he notes how vividly the universality of the Church was brought home to him when he first went to confession in a foreign land. At the local conference of the St Vincent de Paul Society (of which he had long been a member) he became friendly with Professor Maximilian Westermaier, the botanist, and he was in close contact with Alfred Pernice, Maurice Voigt and Zachary von Ligenthal. It was the last-named he had in mind when he wrote, “Protestantism makes a man a very worthy person where our religion would make him a saint”. As was to be expected, Ferrini was not among Theodore Mommsen’s intimates, but over twenty years later, talking with Bartholomew Nogara, then director of the Etruscan Museum of the Vatican, Mommsen spoke of Ferrini with the greatest respect, saying that he had removed the primacy in Roman legal studies from Germany to Italy. “Nor are we jealous”, he added. But there was another side to Berlin, and Ferrini was “nauseated by the sad sight of so corrupt a city”. The proximity of wickedness deepened his own asceticism.
   Ferrini was then twenty-two, and concerned about what was his vocation in life. Marriage? The priesthood? The monastic state?  He heard no call to any of them; and towards the end of 1881 he made a vow of lifelong celibacy.*{ *He spoke to none, even of his intimates, about this vow. This led to occasional embarrassments, from which Ferrini extricated himself by his wit, which could be mordant. On one occasion a woman was recommending a girl to his notice as a suitable wife, emphasizing her expectations: “When her father dies, she will have so much. When her mother dies, so much. And when her uncle dies
Oh dear”, interrupted Ferrini, What a lot of corpses!”}

Ferrini returned to Italy in the summer of 1883. He was now engaged on a critical edition of the Greek paraphrase of the Institutes of Justinian. In furtherance of this work he visited libraries at Copenhagen, Paris, Rome and Florence, and perfected that remarkable knowledge of languages that was so valuable to him in his studies. German, Latin and Greek he spoke and wrote fluently, and with varying degrees of facility he knew French, Spanish, English, Dutch, Hebrew, Syriac, with a smattering of Coptic and Sanskrit. Such qualifications could not be overlooked, and a year after returning home he was appointed to a readership in Roman criminal law at the University of Pavia. Eighteen months later he was promoted to the chair of exegesis of the sources of Roman law. One of his pupils remembers that the new professor was very strict but friendly, kind and encouraging with them, witty in private conversation and never sarcastic. There was a distinction in his manner and bearing, quite free from hauteur, which well became the dignity of his position. His life was indeed entirely devoted to his Maker, but in the natural order his work, as he used to tell his friends, was his wife; Roman law was his passion, and he made of his research, his teaching and his erudition “a hymn of praise to the Lord of all learning”. It was during this period that Ferrini became a Franciscan tertiary.
In 1887 he was appointed to the professorship of Roman law in the University of Messina, and for the next seven years he was teaching there and at Modena, always working with unremitting application and growing in reputation with each successive publication. But though he was very happy in Sicily he wanted to get back permanently to the north, to be near his home and the Ambrosian Library. When therefore he was invited in 1894 to return to Pavia as successor to Professor Mariani, he accepted with joy. Thus began the last and most fruitful period of his career.

Ferrini was concerned with the whole vast field of law, but it was above all in Roman law (and especially its Byzantine aspect) that he made his mark.  When Professor von Ligenthal died in 1894 Ferrini, his favourite pupil, inherited not only his master’s manuscripts but also his acknowledged leadership in these studies. Among those who in one way or another contributed to the success of his work were Don Achille Ratti, afterwards Pope Pius XI, and Dr John Mercati, later cardinal and librarian and archivist of the Holy Roman Church.  

 His output was very large during his short life he was responsible for over two hundred monographs, which make five stout volumes, as well as several text books.

 But he found time to interest himself in public affairs too. After the Pied­montese occupied Rome in 1870 the Holy See had decided that it was inexpedient for faithful Catholics to associate themselves publicly with the new régime, e.g. by voting in elections of deputies. Ferrini loyally observed this ruling, while deploring that “our abstention from the legislative assembly leaves our legislation unprotected from the most deplorable influences.”  This may have encouraged his own activity in social matters. He was delighted when Pope Leo XIII published his encyclical letter “Rerum Novarum”, on the condition of the working classes. In 1895 he allowed himself to be elected to the municipal council of Milan; * his duties upon which he took most seriously. {* A member of the council drew caricatures of all his fellow members. That of Ferrini he adorned with a halo of sainthood. It would be interesting to know if the drawing is still in existence, for caricatures of saints must be rare—unless Bellarmine jugs can be con­sidered such, (Literary caricatures—unintended——are of course another matter they are only too common.)}
In the following years he continued his charitable and public work, doing all he could to combat the errors of material­istic socialism, to defend the Italian legal tradition of the indissolubility of marriage, and to uphold the religion of Christ wherever it was threatened.

 Bd Contardo used to spend his vacations at Suna, on Lake Maggiore, where his father had a small house. He was prostrated by his work in the heat of the summer of 1902, and in the early autumn sought to refresh himself with his favourite recreation, mountaineering. {There has been argument among the experts about whether Ferrini was “an alpinist in the true sense of the word “—whatever that may be. He certainly loved mountains and climbed them.}With a friend he climbed San Martino in Valle Anzasca, and came back to Suna feeling worse rather than better. On October 5, a very wet Sunday, he went to Mass, and on his return he collapsed. The doctor’s report was grave, but not alarmingly so but Bd Contardo got worse, and after some days of delirium he died, of typhus, on October 27. He was only forty-three years old. At his bedside was his father, the first and greatest of his friends. {They used to work at Suns both in the same bare room, their desks facing one another.}

 Dr Oggioni has recollected that he was once walking in Pavia with Ludovic Necchi when they passed Professor Ferrini, a wide browed, bearded man in a frock coat. He returned their greeting with his usual courtesy and characteristic sweet smile. Necchi stopped and exclaimed to his companion, “What is it about that man? He’s a saint!”
  Father Augustine Gemelli records that many students frequented Ferrini’s lectures not simply because of his reputation as a jurist but also because here, at the dawn of the twentieth century, was a professor who still believed in God. “Learning is not the road to God”, he wrote in Un po’ d’infinito
, and “his letters and private papers all show a single purpose, the search for perfection, which he pursued with a serenity and simplicity of heart that was echoed by all and sundry after his quiet spirit was carried away”.
  Don Achille Ratti was one of the first publicly to eulogize the dead professor, and he was one of the promoters of the movement for introducing the cause of Contardo Ferrini, of which the moving spirit was his old friend Professor Olivi. In 1947 the beatification took place, and his feast day has been assigned to October 27.

Addressing an audience of professors, lecturers and other pilgrims at this time, Pope Pius XII referred to Bd Contardo as a man who “gave an emphatic ‘Yes’ to the possibility of holiness in these days”. “The history and development of law and law-making”, he declared, “were for Ferrini simply an application of the moral and divine law, without which human legislation is useless for if they are separated from God, it is only a matter of time before social organization and its juridical enactments degenerate into tyranny and despotism…It should give us comfort that in Bd Contardo the Lord has given the Church a beatus who was a master in the field of law and at the same time a man of God, one whose exalted spirit and supremely righteous life is a model for us all.”

Giving evidence in the course of the process, the previous pope, Pius XI, had said, “My relations with him were purely scientific or were concerned with the beauties of high mountains. For him these were an inspiration to holiness and almost a natural revelation of God.”

Ferrini’s appreciation of the material creation was indeed a salient characteristic, and it was not confined to nature in her gentler aspects. “God also speaks to man in the clouds on the mountain tops”, he wrote, “in the roaring of the torrents, in the stark awfulness of the cliffs, in the dazzling splendour of the unmelting snow, in the sun that splashes the west with blood, in the wind that strips the trees bare. Nature lives by the breath of His omnipotence, smiles in its joy of Him, hides from His wrath—yet greets Him, eternally young, with the smile of its own youth. For the spirit of God by which nature lives is a spirit for ever young, incessantly renewing itself, happy in its snow and rain and mist, for out of these come birth and life, spring ever renewed and undaunted hope, and all the blessed prerogatives of youth a thousand times reborn.”
Bd Contardo Ferrini was in the true line of St Francis of Assisi.

A biography of Contardo Ferrini by J. Fanciulli was published in 1931, and another, Contardo Ferrini Santo d’Oggi, by C. Caminada, in 1947. But the standard life is by Mgr C. Pellegrini (1928), of which Father Bede Jarrett says, “The only criticism to be made of it is that it is too monumental. Still, the book is a perfect quarry from which to hew stones for erecting a shrine to build in his memory.” And such a small shrine Father Jarrett himself built in his short biographical study of Ferrini (1933).  Bd Contardo’s own Pensieri e Preghiere has been edited by Father Gemelli, himself  “one of the most striking examples of the influence of Ferrini in Milan and in Italy generally”. See also the Miscellanea Contardo Ferrini, published at Rome in 1947 and 1948.

1907 Alexander The holy hierarch; tonsured a monk at the Tbilisi Monastery of the Transfiguration; traveled to Kazan theological academy graduated with honors returned home; taught the Holy Scriptures, Latin, moral theology, and archaeology at Tbilisi Seminary until July 27, 1851; appointed dean of the Abkhazeti theological school; active as a pedagogue, then as an archimandrite, and a bishop; beloved throughout all of Georgian society as he was by the local population--many called him the “Second Apostle to Abkhazeti.”; hrough his efforts alone 2 Sokhumi churches restored, renewed the magnificent monasteries of Shio-Mgvime, Zedazeni, Davit-Gareji, and Shemokmedi, restored Jvari Church, Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, Disevi Church, and many other churches in Guria-Samegrelo, Atchara, and Imereti; devoted special attention to the Shio-Mgvime Monastery and the surrounding area, which had been devastated by that time, & founded diocesan school for women in Tbilisi;

Alexi Okropiridze in the world was born in 1824, in the village of Disevi in the Gori district, to the family of the village priest. Growing up around the church, he received his primary education at Gori Theological School and later continued his education at Tbilisi Seminary.

Having completed his course of study at the seminary in 1845, he was tonsured a monk at the Tbilisi Monastery of the Transfiguration and given the new name Alexander. From Tbilisi the young monk Alexander traveled to the theological academy in Kazan to continue his studies. He graduated with honors and returned to his homeland. Hieromonk Alexander taught the Holy Scriptures, Latin, moral theology, and archaeology at Tbilisi Seminary until July 27, 1851.

Then, at the order of the Holy Synod, he was appointed dean of the theological school in Abkhazeti on September 21, 1851. He was also entrusted with overseeing monastic life in the Abkhazeti diocese and with supervising the instruction at Kutaisi Theological School.

Alexander considered a broadening of the network of theological institutions most essential to the strengthening of the Christian Faith in his country. From the very beginning of his labors in Abkhazeti, he exerted an enormous amount of effort to improve the Ilori Theological School in Ochamchire. At first Alexander was active as a pedagogue, then from February 29, 1856, as an archimandrite, and from March 4, 1862, as a bishop. He was as beloved throughout all of Georgian society as he was by the local population, and many called him the “Second Apostle to Abkhazeti.”

Alexander’s pastoral activity coincided with a difficult period in Georgian history. The divine services were no longer being celebrated in the Georgian language, and as a result many of the people began to drift away from the Church. Many Georgian churches and monasteries, considered cultural and academic centers from ancient times, were deserted. (By this time Georgia had been incorporated into the Russian Empire, and the tsarist government had initiated a policy of forced Russification.) The Georgian language was no longer being taught in schools, and the poorest families could not afford to educate their children.

The learned and erudite Bishop Alexander considered the revival of spiritual life and learning, firmly rooted in the national consciousness, the principle means by which to reinvigorate the national spirit and encourage cultural advance.

Alexander’s efforts on behalf of the revival of the churches and monasteries in Abkhazeti are, among his many labors, most worthy of note. Through his efforts alone two churches were restored in Sokhumi. Outside of Abkhazeti, Alexander renewed the magnificent monasteries of Shio-Mgvime, Zedazeni, Davit-Gareji, and Shemokmedi. He restored Jvari Church, Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, Disevi Church, and many other churches in Guria-Samegrelo, Atchara, and Imereti. He devoted special attention to the Shio-Mgvime Monastery and the surrounding area, which had been devastated by that time.

Owing to St. Alexander’s generous financial contributions, a diocesan school for women was founded in Tbilisi in 1878.

By his initiative and personal contributions, a great number of spiritual and historical books, textbooks and collections of sacred hymns were published. Not a single God-pleasing project was undertaken without Alexander’s support.

St. Alexander spent the remainder of his days at the Shio-Mgvime Monastery, which he himself had restored. Only once—on September 9, 1907, the day his spiritual son St. Ilia the Righteous was buried— did he step outside the monastery walls. The eighty-three year-old Alexander outlived the great son of Georgia by two months and fell asleep in the Lord on October 27 of the same year. St. Alexander is buried at Shio-Mgvime Monastery.


 Thursday  Saints of this Day October  27 Sexto Kaléndas Novémbris   40 days for Life Day 29
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  October 2016
Universal:   Universal: Journalists
That journalists, in carrying out their work, may always be motivated by respect for truth and a strong sense of ethics.
Evangelization:  Evangelization: World Mission Day
That World Mission Day may renew within all Christian communities the joy of the Gospel and the responsibility to announce it.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                           
       40 days for Life Day 29
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all