Tuesday  Saints of  September  12 Prídie Idus Septémbris  
Our Lady of Fatima’s vision of hell    Ezekiel, chapter 33
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.

  Feast of the Most Holy Name of Mary Mother of GOD
Maryam or Mary contraction of two Hebrew words,
Mar, great lady, and Yam which means ocean


Virgin_Mary_Diego_Velazquez.jpg


The Most Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Optional Memorial)
September 12 – The Holy Name of Mary
 

   

                                                                             
       
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Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

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Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

The name of Mary alone makes all the demons flee
Celebrated in Spain since 1513, this feast was extended to the universal church in 1684, to commemorate the victory of Vienna against the Turks.
"Your name, O Mary," Saint Ambrose says, "is a delicious balm that gives off the fragrance of grace!"
Above all, the name of Mary is a name of salvation. Saint Ephrem calls it the "key to heaven.”
And Saint Bernard says that "the name of Mary alone makes all the demons flee."

This is only a weak echo of the apologia of her name made by the saints.
Father L. Jaud, Vie des Saints pour tous les jours de l’année, Tours, Mame, 1950
 O most sweet Jesus, who came into this world to give to all souls the life of your grace, and who, to preserve and increase it in them, willed to be the daily remedy of their weakness and the food for each day, we humbly beseech you, by your heart so burning with love for us, to pour your divine Spirit upon all souls in order that those who have the misfortune to be in the state of mortal sin may, returning to you, find the life of grace that they have lost.

Through this same Holy Spirit, may those who are already living by this divine life devoutly approach your divine table every day when it is possible, so that, receiving each day in Holy Communion the antidote of their daily venial sins and each day sustaining in themselves the life of your grace and thus ever purifying themselves the more, they may finaly come to a happy life with you. Amen.-- Pope St. Pius X


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.
 
"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy,  but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

Holy Name of Mary: The feast of the Most Holy Name of Mary began in Spain in 1513 and in 1671 was extended to all of Spain and the Kingdom of Naples. In 1683, John Sobieski, king of Poland, brought an army to the outskirts of Vienna to stop the advance of Muslim armies loyal to Mohammed IV in Constantinople.
After Sobieski entrusted himself to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he and his soldiers thoroughly defeated the Muslims.
Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the entire Church to commemorate victory at the Battle of Vienna in 1683.
At Pavia, St. Juventius, bishop, mentioned on the 8th of February.  The blessed Hermagoras, disciple of the evangelist St. Mark, sent him to that city along with St. Cyrus, who is mentioned on the 9th of December.  They both preached the Gospel of Christ there, and being renowned for great virtues and miracles, enlightened the neighbouring cities by divine works.  They closed their glorious careers in peace, invested with the episcopal office.
 258 St. Curomotus Martyred bishop of Iconium
 300 St. Hieronides Egyptian martyr an elderly deacon
with Leontius, Selesius, Serapion, Straton, and Valerian. They died in Alexandria, Egypt.
 300 St. Autonomous Italian bishop and martyr; a great evangelist in Bithynia in Asia Minor
 362 St. Macedonius Martyr destroying pagan idols during the restoration of paganism under Julian the Apostate
 540 St. Ailbhe travelled to Rome before Patrick's arrival
 551 St. Sacerdos bishop of Lyons; presided over the Council of Orleans in 549 and served as a chief councilor to King Childebert I of Paris.
 640 St. Eanswida Abbess foundress Benedictine convent; daughter of a king of Kent and the granddaughter of St. Ethelbert.
1012 St. Guy of Anderlecht pilgrimage on foot to Rome and Jerusalem;
patron of laborers and sacristans, and protector of sheds and stables. He is invoked to calm infantile convulsions
1161 Blessed Miro of Vich; Augustinian canon regular of Saint John de las Abadesas OSA (AC)
1604 Blessed Juvenal Ancina; bishop of Saluzzo;
met Saint Philip Neri and joined his Oratory Cong. Orat. B (AC)
1617 Blessed Mary Victoria Fornari-Strata, Foundress of the Blue Nuns due to the BVM (AC)
1622 Bl. Thomas Zumarraga; Spanish Dominican; martyr of Japan
1622 St. Francis of St. Bonaventure; catechist;
Native-born martyr of Japan
1622 Bl. Mancius of St. Thomas;  native Japanese catechist; Martyr of Japan
1622 St. Peter Paul of St. Claire;  assistant to Blessed Apollinaris Franco and as a catechist; Native Japanese martyr 
Verónæ sancti Silvíni Epíscopi.    At Verona, St. Silvinus, bishop.

Maryam, the Lady of the Oceans September 12 - HOLY NAME OF MARY
From its etymology, the name of Maryam or Mary is the contraction of two Hebrew words, Mar, great lady, and Yam which means ocean. Mary: the lady of the oceans. Mary is thus the lady of the oceans, of the great primitive waters: God, in her, creates anew.
This is why, at the Annunciation, the angel Gabriel greets her by the name of Maryam,
recognizing in her the woman of the new creation over which the Spirit hovers,
in the same way that the Spirit was flying over the waters of the first creation (Gn 2; Lk 1: 26-38).
Antoine Moussali
Judaism, Christianity and Islam: A Comparative Study Editions de Paris 2000

I Am Your Mother, My Little One (I) September 12 - The Holy Name of Mary (Austria, 1683)

On September 12, 1948, around 5 o'clock PM, Teresita Castillo, a novice at the Carmel of Lipa (Philippines), was walking in the garden of her convent. Suddenly she noticed leaves shaking on a bush, and heard a sweet voice say to her: "Don't be afraid my daughter. Kiss the ground. What I am going to tell you, you will have to repeat each day for 15 days. You will come here to visit me. Eat a little grass." On Monday, September 13, 1948, at 5 o'clock PM, Teresita returned to the same spot. She knelt down to recite an Ave Maria and she saw the leaves on the bush shaking.

Suddenly, she saw a "beautiful woman" who was smiling with her hands together in prayer, holding a golden rosary around her right hand. She was wearing a white dress, tightly belted; her bare feet rested on a small cloud 20 inches off the ground. "Be faithful and come back here, whether it's raining or not," Teresita heard her say.
"Who are you, beautiful Lady?" Our Lady answered, "I am your Mother, my little one."


On September 14, 1948, the Virgin awaited her in the same place, with her arms wide open.
"I wish to have this place blessed tomorrow," she said and blessed the nun before she disappeared again.
The next day, around 3:00 PM, the auxiliary bishop of Lipa and the chaplain of the Carmel came to bless the place. Teresita saw the Virgin again with open arms. "Kiss the ground and eat a little grass. Take a piece of paper and a pencil, and write down the following," said the apparition. "My daughters, I ask you to believe in me, and to keep this message a secret for yourselves. Love one another like true sisters. Pay me visits here regularly; keep this place sacred and respected. Pick up the rose petals. I bless you all."


After this apparition, a rain of rose petals fell and was seen by all the people present. Toward the end of the afternoon, the Virgin appeared again: "I want you to put my statue in this garden and tidy up this part of the garden to make it a suitable place of prayer. Tell the other sisters that they must believe my words so as not to lose the grace.
I will always bless the whole community, my daughter."

From the Dictionary of Apparitions By Fr. René Laurentin - Fayard 2006

The great psalm of the Passion, Chapter 22, whose first verse "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him" For kingship belongs to the LORD, the ruler over the nations.  All who sleep in the earth will bow low before God; All who have gone down into the dust will kneel in homage.  And I will live for the LORD; my descendants will serve you.  The generation to come will be told of the Lord, that they may proclaim to a people yet unborn the deliverance you have brought.


Holy Name of Mary: The feast of the Most Holy Name of Mary began in Spain in 1513 and in 1671 was extended to all of Spain and the Kingdom of Naples. In 1683, John Sobieski, king of Poland, brought an army to the outskirts of Vienna to stop the advance of Muslim armies loyal to Mohammed IV in Constantinople. After Sobieski entrusted himself to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he and his soldiers thoroughly defeated the Muslims.
Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the entire Church.
1689 Bl. Innocent XI Benedetto Odescalchi

Festum sanctíssimi Nóminis beátæ Maríæ, quod Innocéntius Undécimus, Póntifex Máximus, ob insígnem victóriam de Turcis, ipsíus Vírginis præsídio, Vindobónæ in Austria reportátam, celebrári jussit.
    The feast of the most holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary, celebrated by order of the Sovereign Pontiff, Innocent XI, on account of the signal victory gained over Turks at Vienna in Austria through her protection.
   
This feast is a counterpart to the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus (January 3); both have the possibility of uniting people easily divided on other matters.
Comment:   Mary always points us to God, reminding us of God's infinite goodness. She helps us to open our hearts to God's ways, wherever those may lead us. Honored under the title “Queen of Peace,” Mary encourages us to cooperate with Jesus in building a peace based on justice, a peace that respects the fundamental human rights (including religious rights) of all peoples.

Quote:   “Lord our God, when your Son was dying on the altar of the cross, he gave us as our mother the one he had chosen to be his own mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary; grant that we who call upon the holy name of Mary, our mother, with confidence in her protection may receive strength and comfort in all our needs” (Marian Sacramentary, Mass for the Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary)

THE HOLY NAME OF MARY
THE object of this feast is our blessed Lady bearing the name of Mary, and it was instituted that on it the faithful might in a special manner recommend to God, through the intercession of His all-holy Mother, the needs of the Church, and thank Him for His almighty protection and numberless mercies, especially those we receive on account of the graces and mediation of the Blessed Virgin.

The feast was allowed at Cuenca in Spain in 1513 it spread in that country, and in 1683 Pope Innocent XI extended it to the whole Western church, as an act of thanksgiving for the raising of the siege of Vienna and the defeat of the Turks by John Sobieski, King of Poland it was at that time assigned to the Sunday within the octave of our Lady’s birthday, but is now kept on the date of Sobieski’s triumph. Actually this special commemoration is probably somewhat older than 1513, though definite evidence does not seem to be forthcoming. All we can say is that the great devotion to the holy name of Jesus, which we identify in part with the preaching of St Bernardino of Siena, will naturally have prepared the way for a similar commemoration of the holy name of Mary. One curious point with regard to this name which deserves to be noticed is that while in the case of the other Marys who appear in the New Testament we find in the Greek text simply the form Mapia, the best manuscripts almost uniformly spell the name of our Blessed Lady as Mapiáµ. This seems to mark at least a sense of her dignity for her alone the Old Testament form of the name is preferred. There is a similar practice in Ireland, where the form Muire is reserved for our Lady, Maire or Moira being given in baptism.

Our name Mary is derived from Maria and Mariam, later forms of Miryam, which was our, Lady’s name in Hebrew, but the most learned scholars have been unable certainly to decide what was the derivation and meaning of that name. The prevalent view seems to be that it means “wished-for-child”, or, less likely, “rebellion”. It appears certain that the name of Mary has nothing to do with “bitterness”, “the sea” or a “star.” The various stages in the adoption of the feast of the Holy Name of Mary are set out in Holweck, Calendarium liturgicum festorum Del et Dei matris Mariae (1925), p. 317, and cf. Kellner, Heortology, p. 264. Cf. E. C. Withycombe, Oxford Dictionary of Christian Names (and edn.), and Fr E. Vogt in Verbum Domini, 1948. Pope Benedict XIV’s commission recommended the dropping of this feast from the general calendar.
Apud Papíam sancti Juvéntii Epíscopi, de quo ágitur sexto Idus Februárii.  Ipse, a beáto Hermágora, discípulo sancti Marci Evangelístæ, ad eam urbem, una cum sancto Syro, cujus memória recólitur quinto Idus Decémbris, diréctus est; et ambo, prædicántes illic Christi Evangélium et magnis virtútibus ac miráculis coruscántes, étiam vicínas urbes divínis opéribus illustrárunt, sicque in pontificáli honóre, glorióso fine, quievérunt in pace.
    At Pavia, St. Juventius, bishop, mentioned on the 8th of February.  The blessed Hermagoras, disciple of the evangelist St. Mark, sent him to that city along with St. Cyrus, who is mentioned on the 9th of December.  They both preached the Gospel of Christ there, and being renowned for great virtues and miracles, enlightened the neighbouring cities by divine works.  They closed their glorious careers in peace, invested with the episcopal office.

258 St. Curomotus Martyred bishop of Iconium
Icónii, in Lycaónia, sancti Curónoti Epíscopi, qui sub Perénnio Præside, cápite truncátus, martyrii palmam accépit.
    At Iconium in Lycaonia, the holy bishop Curonotus, who received the crown of martyrdom by being beheaded under the governor Perennius.
in Lycaonia, Asia Minor.
Curonotus of Iconium BM (RM) Bishop Curonotus of Iconium (Lycaonia, Asia Minor) was martyred during the reign of Valerian (Benedictines).

300 St. Hieronides Egyptian martyr an elderly deacon with Leontius, Selesius, Serapion, Straton, and Valerian. They died in Alexandria, Egypt.
Alexandríæ natális sanctórum Mártyrum Hierónidis, Leóntii, Serapiónis, Selésii, Valeriáni et Stratónis, qui, sub Maximíno Imperatóre, ob confessiónem nóminis Christi, in mare sunt demérsi.
    At Alexandria, in the time of Emperor Maximinus, the birthday of the holy martyrs Hieronides, Leontius, Serapion, Selesius, Valerian, and Strato, who were drowned in the sea for the confession of the name of Christ.
Hieronides, Leontius, & Companions (RM). Saint Hieronides was a ancient deacon, who was cast into the sea at Alexandria, Egypt, with the brothers Saints Leontius and Serapion and others, including Seleucus (Selesius), Valerian and Straton, during the reign of Diocletian (Benedictines).

300 St. Autonomous Italian bishop and martyr a great evangelist in Bithynia in Asia Minor
In Bithynia sancti Autónomi, Epíscopi et Mártyris; qui ex Itália, Diocletiáni Imperatóris persecutiónem declínans, illuc proféctus, ibi, cum plúrimos convertísset ad fidem, a furéntibus Gentílibus, dum sacra Mystéria perágeret, ad altáre mactátus est, et hóstia Christi efféctus.
    In Bithynia, St. Autonomus, bishop and martyr, who went to that country from Italy to avoid the persecution of Diocletian.  After he had converted many to the faith, he was killed at the altar by the furious heathen while celebrating the sacred mysteries, and thus he became a victim for Christ.
During the persecution instituted by Emperor Diocletian, Autonomous fled to Bithynia to escape the persecution. There, he worked tirelessly until arrested by Roman authorities and murdered for the faith.
Autonomus of Bithynia BM (RM). The Greeks say that Saint Autonomus, an Italian bishop, escaped the fury of Diocletian's persecution by migrating to Bithynia in Asia Minor. There he was a great evangelist and was martyred (Benedictines).

362 St. Macedonius Martyr destroying pagan idols during the restoration of paganism under Julian the Apostate
Meri, in Phrygia, pássio sanctórum Mártyrum Macedónii, Theodúli et Tatiáni, qui, sub Juliáno Apóstata, ab Almáchio Præside, post ália torménta, super crates férreas ignítas pósiti, exsultántes martyrium complevérunt.
    At Merum in Phrygia, the holy martyrs Macedonius, Theodulus, and Tatian, under Julian the Apostate.  After other torments, they joyfully completed their martyrdom by being laid on burning gridirons by order of the governor Almachius.
with Tatian and Theodolus in Phrygia. They were burned to death for destroying pagan idols.
Macedonius, Theodulus and Tatian MM (RM)
This trio was roasted alive on gridirons at Mevos, Phrygia, for having broken into a pagan temple and destroyed idols during the restoration of paganism under Julian the Apostate (Benedictines). In art, these martyrs are illustrated during their martyrdom on a gridiron (Roeder).

540 St. Ailbhe travelled to Rome before Patrick's arrival (Albeus, Ailbe) of Emly B (AC)
5th or 6th century (died 526-540?). Although many are under the mistaken belief that Saint Patrick was the first to bring Christianity to Ireland, Saint Ailbhe was converted by British missionaries. Some legends say that he was baptized by a priest while a boy in northern Ireland; another that he was baptized and raised in a British settlement in Ireland.

526? ST AILBHE, Bishop
A COMMEMORATION of St Ailbhe (Ailbe, Albeus) is made throughout Ireland on this date, and in the diocese of Emly his feast is kept as that of its patron and first bishop, but the recorded life of the saint is a confusion of valueless legends and contradictory traditions. One concerns his birth of a serving-girl by a chieftain, who ordered that the baby should he exposed to perish. A she-wolf found him and suckled him along with her own cubs, till a hunter found the child in the wolf’s lair and took him away. Years later Ailbhe was present at a run, when an aged she-wolf, hard pressed by hounds, ran to him for protection. The bishop recog­nized his foster-mother, gave her sanctuary, and every day thereafter fed her at his own table. When Ailbhe was a boy in the north of Ireland, he was one day considering the wonders of the natural world, and said aloud, “I pray that I may know the Creator of all things, and I will believe in Him who made the heavens and the earth. For I perceive that these things did not come into existence without a maker, and no human work could produce them.” He was overheard by a Christian priest, who thereupon instructed and baptized him. Another account says he was brought up and baptized by a British colony in Ireland. He is supposed to have gone to Rome and to have been consecrated bishop in the city.

Ailbhe preached up and down Ireland, and with such commanding authority did this apostolic man deliver the eternal wisdom to a barbarous people, such was the force with which both by words and example he set forth the divine law, and so evident were the miracles with which he confirmed the truths which he preached, that the sacred doctrine made its way to the hearts of many of his hearers; he not only brought over a multitude to the faith of Christ but infused into many the spirit of perfection, for he had a wonderful art of making men not only Christians but saints.

In his old age it was his desire to retire to Thule, the remotest country toward the northern pole that was known to the ancients (which seems to have been Shetland or Norway), but the king guarded the ports to prevent his flight. Another legend tells us that from this same king, Aengus of Munster, St Ailbhe begged the Isles of Aran for St Enda. Aengus did not know he had such islands in his dominions until they were shown to him in a dream; whereupon he handed them over, and at Killeaney on Inishmore was founded a monastery which was so famous for holiness that the island was called “Aran of the saints”. It does not detract from the sanctity of Killeaney to point out that among Celtic peoples “saint” was often used synonymously with “monk” or “recluse” on Ynys YnIli (Bardsey) were buried 2o,ooo “saints”.

It is often said on the poor authority of Ailbhe’s vita that he preached in Ireland before St Patrick, but he seems certainly to have died in the sixth century the date is variously put at 526, 531 and 541.

The life in the Codex Salmanticensis was edited in that collection by the Bollandists in 1888, cc. 235—260. A somewhat different version has been printed by C. Plummer in his VSH., vol. i, pp. 46—64; and note also what is said in the preface to the same work, pp. xxviii—xxxi. What is of more importance than the extravagant incidents of this mythical life, St Ailbhe is the reputed author of a monastic rule it was edited by J. O’Neill in Ériu, vol. iii (1907) ; and cf. L. Gougaud, Christianity in Celtic Lands (1932).
In either case, he had travelled to Rome before Patrick's arrival-- and some say that he was consecrated bishop there. Upon his return to Ireland, he became the disciple of Patrick and, according to some, was consecrated the first archbishop of Munster by him. Ailbhe fixed his see at Emly (Imlech, County Tipperary, though the cathedral is now at Cashel), which is officially listed by the Vatican as being founded in the 4th century, making it the oldest continuous see in Ireland. So even the testimony that Ailbhe was the first archbishop is unreliable.
He was known as a powerful preacher and a model of sanctity, who won many souls to the faith. Although he lived in the world in order to care for the souls of his flock, he was careful for his own soul, too. He made frequent retreats and engaged in habitual recollection. Saint Ailbhe especially loved to pray in front of the sea. King Aengus of Munster gave him Aran Island (Co. Galway) on which he founded a great monastery and established Saint Enda as abbot. He also drew up a still extant rule for the community.
When in his old age he wanted to resign and retire to the solitude of Thule (Shetland? Iceland? Greenland?) to prepare for death, the king stationed guards at the ports to prevent his flight. Thus, Saint Ailbhe died in the midst of his episcopal labors and is deemed the principal patron of Munster.
There are many legends about Saint Ailbhe: that he baptized Saint David of Wales; that an angel showed him the "place of his resurrection"--Emly; that he was in constant dialogue with the angels. Even his name points to a legend: Ailbhe, said to mean "living rock" in Gaelic, was a foundling left under a rock and suckled by a she-wolf, and thus named by his adoptive family. The story continues that later, while he was hunting with some companions, an aged female wolf ran to him for protection (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth, Montague).
 
551 St. Sacerdos bishop of Lyons; presided over the Council of Orleans in 549 and served as a chief councilor to King Childebert I of Paris
Lugdúni, in Gállia, deposítio sancti Sacerdótis Epíscopi.    At Lyons in France, the death of St. Sacerdos, bishop.
Also known as Sardot and Serdon. He presided over the Council of Orleans in 549 and served as a chief councilor to King Childebert I of Paris. 
640 St. Eanswida Abbess foundress Benedictine convent;  daughter of a king of Kent and the granddaughter of St. Ethelbert.
sometimes called Eanswith. She was the daughter of a king of Kent and the granddaughter of St. Ethelbert.

640 ST EANSWIDA, VIRGIN
ST ETHELBERT, the first Christian king among the English, was succeeded in the kingdom of Kent by his son Edbald, who, though he was at first impious and idolatrous, became afterwards a Christian. His daughter Eanswida added lustre to her birth by the sanctity of her life. She had to oppose her father’s wish that she should marry a pagan prince from Northumbria. “I will marry him”, she said, “when by prayer to his gods he has made this log of wood a foot longer.”

She obtained her father’s consent to found a monastery of nuns upon the sea-coast, hard by Folkestone in Kent. Here she sacrificed herself in penance and prayer, till she was called to rest on the last day of August about the year 640, the date on which she is named in some calendars. Her convent was destroyed by the Danes but was refounded for Benedictine monks in 1095. The sea afterwards swallowed up part of this priory and it was removed into Folkestone, and the saint’s relics were deposited in that church which had been built by her father in honour of St Peter the successor of this church is now known as SS. Mary and Eanswida’s.  September 12 is probably the day of the translation of her relics about the year 1140. Many legends about the miraculous powers of St Eanswida were current in England in the middle ages, some of which are preserved by the chronicler Capgrave.

St Eanswida (or Eanswitha) seems to have been unknown to Bede, but her connexion with Folkestone is alluded to in an Anglo-Saxon document printed by Cockayne (Leechdoms, vol. iii, p. 422). The mention of her name in certain calendars and martyrologies suggests that there was some cultus: see Stanton, Menology, p. 432. The statements made by John of Tynemouth and Capgrave can inspire little confidence.
She refused to marry a pagan Northumbrian prince and founded a convent at Folkestone in Kent, England, about 630. She remained there until her death on August 31. When the convent church that had been destroyed by Danes was restored in 1885, her relics were discovered. In liturgical art Eanswida is depicted as a nun, crowned and holding a church or a fish.
Eanswida of Folkestone, OSB Abbess (AC) (also known as Eanswith(a), Eanswide, Eanswyth)  Died August 31, c. 640; this is probably a memorial of the translation of her relics; feast day at Saint Augustine, Canterbury, and Durham is celebrated on August 31.
From her infancy Saint Eanswida, the daughter of King Eadbald of Kent and granddaughter of King Saint Ethelbert, found delight in prayer. Rejecting the world and its foolish vanities, she refused all offers of marriage, which she felt would interrupt her devotions and contemplation. King Eadbald finally consented to allowing her to found a monastery on the coast near Folkestone, Kent, where she served as its abbess and died at an early age. It seems likely that she was trained in France and that hers was the first convent in England.
The monastery was destroyed by the Danes, but restored by King Athelstan, then refounded in 1095 for the Black Benedictines. Part of it was swallowed up by the sea, and so the community was moved to Folkestone. Her relics were translated to the church built by Eadbald in honor of Saint Peter, but later known as Saints Mary and Eanswida. In 1885, a Saxon coffer was found in the north wall containing the bones of a young woman, which were assumed to be those of Saint Eanswida (Benedictines, Farmer, Husenbeth).
In art, Saint Eanswida is portrayed as a crowned abbess with a book and two fish. She is venerated at Folkestone (Roeder), where her image is incorporated on its seals (Farmer).
 
1012 St. Guy of Anderlecht; pilgrimage on foot to Rome and Jerusalem; patron of laborers and sacristans, and protector of sheds and stables. He is invoked to calm infantile convulsions
Anderláci, prope Bruxéllas, in Brabántia, sancti Guidónis Confessóris.
    At Anderlecht, near Brussels in Belgium, St. Guy, confessor.
Born near Brabant; died at Brussels, Belgium; c. 950-1012; feast day formerly on Sept. 2.

1012 ST GUY OF ANDERLECHT
ALTHOUGH the accounts of this saint derive from late and not very reliable source, and have been touched up and filled out with edifying but very doubtfully authentic miracles, it is clear that he belongs to that category of simple, hidden souls who, whether as wanderers or workmen, are familiar to us from St Alexis and St John Calybites through St Isidore of Madrid and St Walstan of Costessey down to St Benedict Joseph Labre and Matt Talbot in our own time.

St Guy (Guidon), called the Poor Man of Anderlecht, was born in the country near Brussels, of poor parents, but both virtuous and consequently content and happy. They were not able to give their son a school education nor did they let that perturb them, but instead they were diligent in instructing him early in the Christian faith and the practices of our holy religion, often repeating to him the lesson which old Tobias gave his son, “We shall have many good things if we fear God”.

St Augustine says that God ranks among the reprobate, not only those who shall have received their comfort on earth, but also those who shall have grieved to be deprived of it. This was what Guy dreaded. In order to preserve himself from it he never ceased to beg of God the grace to love the state of poverty in which divine providence had placed him, and to bear all its hardships with joy. The charity which Guy had for his neighbour was no less active. He divided his pittance with the poor, and often fed them whilst he fasted himself.

When he grew up St Guy wandered about for a time, until one day he came to the church of our Lady at Laeken, near Brussels, whose priest was struck with the piety and willingness of the man, and retained him in the service of his church as sacristan. Guy accepted the offer with pleasure; and the cleanliness and good order that appeared in everything under his direction struck all that came to that church. But Guy, like other simple folk before and since, was induced by a merchant of Brussels to invest his small savings in a commercial venture, but with the unusual motive of having more at his disposal wherewith to relieve the poor. The merchant offered to put him in a way of thus making more provision for them by admitting him into partnership with himself. It was not easy for him to throw off the importunities of the merchant: the bait was specious and he was taken by it. But the ship carrying their goods was lost in going out of harbour, and Guy, whose place in the church of Laeken had upon his leaving been given to another, was left destitute. He saw his mistake in following his own ideas and in forsaking secure and humble employment to embark, though with a good intention, on the affairs of the world, and he blamed himself for the false step, he had taken.  In reparation for his folly Guy made a pilgrimage on foot first to Rome and then on to Jerusalem, and visited all the most celebrated shrines in that part of the Christian world.

After seven years’ absence he again reached Belgium, where he made his way to Anderlecht, dying from exhaustion and illness brought on by the fatigue of his journeys and other hardships. Shortly after he was received into the hospital of Anderlecht he yielded up his soul to God. He was buried in the cemetery of the canons there who, after miracles had taken place at his grave, translated his body into a shrine. His popular cultus among workers with horses has persisted through the ages.

St Guy, who is known to the Flemings as St Wye, is honoured in a relatively long biography, printed in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. iv. A good deal of folklore is associated with his cultus; see E. H. van Heurck, Les Drapelets de pèlerinage en Belgique; F. Mortier in Folklore brabançon, vol. x (1930), pp. 46—55; and J. Lavalleye in Annales de la Soc. d’archéologie de Bruxelles, t. xxxvii (1934), pp. 221—248.
Saint Guy, commonly called The Poor Man of Anderlecht, was the son of poor, but pious, parents who were richly blessed by their faith. They were not able to give their son a formal education, but were diligent in instructing him in the faith. They taught him the counsels of Saint Augustine that Christians should be detached from earthly possessions. Guy prayed throughout his life to be preserved from greed, to love poverty, and to bear all its hardships with joy. This detachment from the need to own, endowed the saint with love for his neighbor; he gladly fed the poor while he himself fasted and divided the little he had among them.
Legend says that when Guy grew to manhood, he was a farm laborer, who prayed as he plowed the fields, sometimes replaced at the plow by his guardian angel. He then wandered for a time until he arrived at the church of Our Lady at Laeken, near Brussels, whose priest was struck with his piety and hired Guy as sacristan. Guy gladly accepted the offer; and the cleanliness and good order that appeared in everything under his direction struck all who entered the church.
Like many other simple folk of every age, Guy was enticed by a merchant of Brussels to invest his small savings in a commercial venture, with the unusual motive of having more at his disposal to relieve the poor and leisure for contemplation. Unfortunately, the ship carrying their goods was lost leaving the harbor, and Guy, who had resigned his position as sacristan and been replaced, was left destitute. He recognized his mistake in following his own ideas and in forsaking secure and humble employment to embark, though with good intention, on the affairs of the world, and he blamed himself for the loss.
In reparation, Guy made a pilgrimage on foot to Rome and Jerusalem, wandering from shrine to shrine for seven years. Finally, he made his way back to Belgium and Anderlecht, where he was received almost immediately into the public hospital of Anderlecht and he died from exhaustion and illness.
His cultus did not arise immediately. In fact, his grave was forgotten until a horse uncovered it. The horse's owner hired two local boys to enclose the site in a high, solid hedge to ensure that others would not unwittingly trample on Guy's grave. The boys ridiculed the benefactor's act of reverence for the dead and were seized by strange stomach aches. Writhing in agony, they died. For some reason, this moved the local people to make pilgrimages to his grave and to build an oratory over it.
In 1076, a church was constructed and Guy's relics translated therein. Guy's sanctity was confirmed almost immediately thereafter by miracles wrought at his intercession. On June 24, 1112, a bishop acknowledged the relics with a grand ceremony and Guy's vita was composed. In 1595, the relics were enshrined in a new reliquary. During the 17th century, they were moved from place to place to escape pillage during wars. It seems that they were captured by the Protestants in the 18th century, although there is a "last acknowledgement of the venerable treasure" that occurred on September 11, 1851.
Over time his cultus increased locally, until now much folklore has accrued around his name and shrine, particularly associated with horses. Cabdrivers of Brabant lead an annual pilgrimage to Anderlecht until the beginning of World War I in 1914. They and their horses headed the procession followed by farmers, grooms, and stable boys leading their animals to be blessed. The description of the village fair that ended the religious procession sounds like fun. There would be various games, music, and feasting, followed by a competition to ride the carthorses bareback. The winner entered the church on bareback to receive a hat made of roses from the parish pastor (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Walsh).

In art, Saint Guy is depicted as a pilgrim with hat, staff, rosary, and ox at his feet. He might also be shown as a peasant or a pilgrim with a book (Roeder). Guy is venerated at Anderlecht, where he is considered the patron of laborers and sacristans, and protector of sheds and stables. He is invoked to calm infantile convulsions (Encyclopedia).
1161 Blessed Miro of Vich Augustinian canon regular of Saint John de las Abadesas OSA (AC)
Miro was an Augustinian canon regular of Saint John de las Abadesas near Vich, Catalonia (Benedictines).

1617 Blessed Mary Victoria Fornari-Strata, Foundress of the Blue Nuns (AC)
Born at Genoa, Italy; died December 15; beatified in 1828. In 1579, at the age of 17, Victoria Fornari of Genoa married Angelo Strata. They lived together happily until Angelo died nine years later. For some time his widow was distraught. She was also deeply anxious about the future of her six children.

1617 Bd Victoria Fornari-Strata, Widow, Foundress of The Blue Nuns Of Genoa
Bd Mary Victoria
was born at Genoa in the year 1562. At the age of seventeen there was some talk of her becoming a nun, but she deferred to the wishes of her father and married Angelo Strata. They lived together very happily for nine years, Angelo joining gladly in his wife’s charitable works, and defending her from the adverse criticism of those who wished to see her take more part in social pleasures.

They had six children, four boys and two girls. When Angelo died in 1587 Victoria was for long inconsolable, both for her own sake and for the sake of the children, whom she felt she was incapable of properly looking after alone. A certain nobleman of the city wanted her to marry him and she thought she perhaps ought to for her children’s sake. But her uncertainty was ended by a happening of which she wrote down an account by the direction of her confessor.

Our Lady appeared in vision and said to her: “My child Victoria, be brave and confident, for it is my wish to take both the mother and the children under my protection; I will care for your household. Live quietly and without worrying. All I ask is that you will trust yourself to me and henceforth devote yourself to the love of God above all things.”

Victoria now saw clearly what she must do and ceased to be disquieted. She made a vow of chastity and lived in retirement, giving her whole time to God, her children and the poor. She allowed no super­fluity or luxury in her home, and set herself a standard of severe mortification:  when, for example, the Church directed a fast she would always observe it on bread and water.

After her children were all provided for, Victoria put before the archbishop of Genoa a project she had formed for a new order of nuns, who were to be devoted in a special way to our Lady. For a time the archbishop withheld his approval, for there was lack of sufficient funds to support such a foundation. But when one of her friends offered to bear the expense of providing a building, the archbishop’s consent also was forthcoming.

In the year 1604 Bd Victoria and ten others were clothed, and professed in the following year. Their object was to honour in their lives and worship our Lady in the mystery of her annunciation and hidden life at Nazareth; each nun added Maria Annunziata to her baptismal name and the rule of enclosure of their convent was particularly strict. By the enthusiasm and zeal of Mother Victoria a second house was founded in 1612, and soon after the order spread to France, but not till an attempt had been made behind the back of the foundress to affiliate the nuns to another order, on the pretence that they were notstrong enough to exist on their own. Mother Victoria learned what was happening and appealed for the help of our Lady, who in a vision assured her of her unfailing assistance, and the danger was overcome. Bd Victoria continued to govern her foundation, encouraging her sisters in their penitential life and setting them an example of complete humility and love, till her death at the age of fifty-five. This took place on December 15, 1617, but today is her feast in the order that she founded. These nuns are distinguished from those of the Annunciation (Annon­ciades) founded by St Joan of Valois by the epithet “Sky-Blue”, with reference to the colour of their mantles.
On the occasion of the beatification of Mary Victoria in 1828, an Italian life was printed with the title Vita della b. Maria Vittoria Fornari-Strata, fondatrice dell’ Ordine della Santissima Annunziata detto “Le Turchine”, in other words, called by Italians “the BlueNuns”. This life is anonymous, but official. See also a French account by Father F. Dumortier, La bse Marie- Victoire Fornari-Strata (1902).
   For their sake she was about to marry again, when she was granted a vision of the Virgin Mary. Victoria later wrote down the Virgin's words to her,
"Be brave and courageous. I shall take both you and your children under my wing.
Live in peace, without anxiety. Trust yourself to my care and above all devote yourself to the love of God."
The vision was more than fulfilled. Although Victoria still lived charitably, giving away most of her wealth, her children never felt any want. In 1604, with money provided by one of her wealthy friends, Victoria and ten other women began the practical work of setting up a religious house. All 11 were professed as nuns the following year. So successful was their venture, that a second house of "Blue Nuns" (as they were called because of the color of their cloaks) was set up in 1612, and soon the order had spread from Italy to France. Victoria remained their superior until her death (Benedictines, Bentley).
1604 Blessed Juvenal Ancina bishop of Saluzzo; met Saint Philip Neri and joined his Oratory Cong. Orat. B (AC)
Born at Fossano, Piedmont, Italy, in 1545; died 1604; beatified in 1869. Juvenal, a professor of medicine at the University of Turin, accompanied the ambassador of Savoy to Rome in 1575 to serve as his private physician. That same year in Rome he met Saint Philip Neri and joined his Oratory. Eventually Juvenal was ordained and sent to Naples to open another oratory there. In 1602, the priest who had become especially known for his work among the poor, was consecrated bishop of Saluzzo. Immediately he began a visitation of his diocese. Upon his return to his cathedral, he was poisoned by a friar whom he had reprimanded for his evil life (Benedictines). 
1622 St. Francis of St. Bonaventure; catechist; Native-born martyr of Japan
He was from Musashi, in Kwanto province, Japan, and a convert, working as a catechist with Blessed Apollinaris Franco. Francis was burned alive at Omura and was beatified in 1867.

1622 Bl. Mancius of St. Thomas;  native Japanese catechist; Martyr of Japan
He was a native Japanese catechist,  who was burned alive at Omura, Japan, with Blessed Thomas Zumarraga and companions.

1622 St. Peter Paul of St. Claire;  assistant to Blessed Apollinaris Franco and as a catechist; Native Japanese martyr
Born in Japan, he worked as an assistant to Blessed Apollinaris Franco and as a catechist prior to his arrest by Japanese authorities. Condemned to death, he was burned alive at Omura. 

1622 Bl. Thomas Zumarraga Spanish Dominican martyr of Japan
Born in Vitoria, Spain, he entered the Dominicans and was dispatched to the missions in Japan. There he worked to advance the Christian cause until his imprisonment at Omura. After three years of confinement, he was burned alive with several companions.
 

Mary's Divine Motherhood

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR SEPTEMBER
Parishes. That our parishes, animated by a missionary spirit,
may be places where faith is communicated and charity is seen.


ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque