Thursday   Saints of September  15  Décimo séptimo Kaléndas Octóbris.   
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! 
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Mary the Mother of Jesus Novonikita_Theotokos

ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE

CAUSES OF SAINTS

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
Making the resolutions asked for by the Blessed Virgin
 
Every September 15th, the Catholic community in Guyana heads to Sinnamary, a shrine dedicated to world peace, for an annual diocesan pilgrimage on the feast day of Our Lady of Sorrows.

Sinnamary is a small town located 112km from Cayenne, the capital of Guyana. The name comes from the Latin motto "nihil sine Maria" - nothing without Mary.

On July 16, 1952, responding to Pope Pius XII’s call to pray for world peace, especially in Palestine, Archbishop Alfred Marie, first bishop of Guyana, instituted this diocesan pilgrimage and made the parish of Our Lady of Sorrows in Sinnamary a pilgrimage center in honor of the Blessed Virgin.

So every year on September 15th or on the nearest Sunday, Catholics go to the site and are expected to make the resolutions requested by the Blessed Virgin—to change their lives by respecting God’s law, to be generous in making sacrifices, and to have faith in the power of the Rosary and the devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

 
                                               
 

 
       
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

Acts of the Apostles

Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Prayer brings about the perfect absorption of the food of our good actions,
and distributes them into all the members of the soul.-- St Bernard


September 15 – Our Lady of Sorrows  
 The heart of Mary was pierced by seven swords
 The "obligatory memorial" of Our Lady of Sorrows observed by the Church today serves to remind us of the incredible torments endured by the Virgin Mary as Co-Redemptrix of mankind.
The Church honors her incomparable sufferings, especially those that she endured at the foot of the Cross at the time of the consummation of the mystery of our Redemption, when her pain reached its maximum intensity.
But the devotion of the faithful includes other pain that the Divine Mother bore during her lifetime. Artists have often represented her sufferings by showing her heart pierced by seven swords, symbols of her seven main sorrows:
1. The prophecy of Simeon.
2. The flight of the Holy Family into Egypt.
3. The loss of the Child Jesus in the Temple.
4. The meeting of Jesus and the Virgin Mary on the Way of the Cross.
5. The Crucifixion.
6. The Virgin Mary receiving Jesus in her arms after the descent from the Cross.
7. The burial of Jesus in the tomb.  Source: notredamedesneiges.over-blog.com


Octáva Nativitátis beátæ Maríæ Vírginis. The Octave of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
 September 15 - Feast of the 7 Sorrows of Mary

The Virgin's martyrdom
The Virgin's martyrdom is revealed in the prophecy of Simeon as well as in the narrative of Our Lord's passion.
“This child is here to be a sign of contradiction,” the holy old man says of Jesus,
“and you,” he now speaks to Mary, “a sword will pierce your soul.”

Blessed Mother, a sword has indeed pierced your soul, the only way it could penetrate into the flesh of your Son.
Of course, after Jesus gave up His spirit, the cruel spear which opened His side could not reach His soul;
but it did pierce through yours. His soul had departed, but yours could not separate from His.

Do not be surprised, brethren, if you hear that Mary is a martyr in spirit.
Whoever marvels at that forgets (and he has heard it before)
that Paul ranges lack of affection among the greatest crimes of pagans, which was far from Mary's case.
Far be it also from her little servants.
Sermon of Abbot Saint Bernard (dom. As., 14-15)

Our Lady of Sorrows
  90 St. Nicomedes of Rome priest refused to aposate M (RM)
2nd v. Saint Melitina of Marcianopolis; overthrew idol M (RM)
 177 St. Valerian massacre; martyrs of Lyons with bishop St. Pothinus
 257 Saint Acacius the Confessor; Uncovering of the relics of Bishop of Melitene, Armenia.
Theodotus The Holy Martyr suffered with Sts Maximus, Asklepiodote, at the beginning of the fourth century under the emperor Maximian Galerius (305-311). Eminent citizens of the city of Marcianopolis, Maximus and Asklepiodote led a devout Christian life. By their example they brought many to faith in Christ and to holy Baptism.
 310 Ss. Maximus, Theodore, and Scelpiodotus born in Marcianopolis (now in Bulgaria) MM (RM)
 362 Porphyrius the Actor declares Christian on stage with Julian the Apostate in audience M (RM)
 
372 The Novonikita Icon is one of the ancient icons of the Mother of God. It appeared to the holy Great Martyr Nikita. St Nikita was a former soldier and disciple of Theophilus, Bishop of the Goths. Prior to his Baptism, Nikita saw a Child in a dream, holding His Cross in His hand. He awoke and pondered the meaning of the vision for a long time.
 378 Nicetas the Goth (the Great) M (RM)
 390 Saint Albinus (Aubin, Alpin) of Lyons B  built the church of Saint Stephen (RM)
5th v. Eutropia of Auvergne, Widow first lauded by Saint Sidonius Apollinaris (RM)
 460 Saint Mamilian of Palermo: B exiled to Tuscany by the Arian king Genseric (AC)
 507 St. Aprus Bishop of Toul, France;
very successful lawyer, gave up his profession in order to receive presbyterial ordination
6th century St. Hernan; Hermit and patron saint of Loc Horn Hernan
6th v. Blessed Abba Joseph of Alaverdi; disciple and companion of St. John of Zedazeni, arrived in Georgia with twelve Syrian ascetics to spread the Christian Faith.  With the blessing of his teacher, Fr. Joseph settled in the village of Alaverdi in eastern Georgia. According to tradition, he carried with him a cross formed from the wood of the Life-giving Cross of our Savior.  Many of the faithful were so drawn to Abba Joseph’s holy life, boundless love, and miracles that they left the world to join in his labors.
556 St. Leobinus: Bishop of Chartres, France;  a hermit priest and abbot before his consecration
 590 St. Joseph Abibos: Disciple of St. John Zeda Zfleli and abbot
 620 Saint Mirin of Benchor: B contemporary of Saint Columba, disciple of Saint Comgall at Bangor (County Down)
7th century St. Ribert Benedictine abbot possibly bishop; disciple of Saint Ouen preached missions in the countryside
 687 St. Aichardus son of army officer; Benedictine; example of daily fidelity scrupulous observance of monastic rules
 
690 Saint Ritbert of Varennes, OSB Abbot; disciple of Saint Ouen preached missions in the countryside (AC)
 852 St. Emilas deacon & Jeremiah Spanish student martyrs of Cordoba, Spain
10th v. The Venerable Philotheus Presbyter and Wonderworker devoted himself to deeds of prayer and fasting, and works of charity; received from God the gift of working miracles
1095 St. Vitus Benedictine monk in the community near Bergamo Italy. He was a disciple of St. Albert.
1170 Blessed Aichardus of Clairvaux, received the Cistercian habit from the hands of Saint Bernard OSB Cist. (PC St. Hernan Hermit and patron saint of Loc Horn
1222 St. Adam of Caithness, As bishop tried to enforce canon and civil law, including the payment of tithes martyred with followers (PC) OSB Cist. B
1386 Bl. Roland de'Medici; renounced all its power, influence, and wealth to become quarter century as a hermit
1510 St. Catherine (Caterinetta) of Genoa, Widow; "He who purifies himself from his faults in the present life, satisfies with a penny a debt of a thousand ducats; and he who waits until the other life to discharge his debts, consents to pay a thousand ducats for that which he might before have paid with a penny." Saint Catherine, Treatise on purgatory. (RM)
16th v. Saint Bessarion, Archbishop of Larissa, founded the Dusika monastery in Thessaly.
1656 St Joseph the New; traveled to Mount Athos, tonsured at Pantokrator Monastery; worked many miracles attained unceasing prayer of the heart, receiving from God gift of tears, healing the sick and the crippled; relics remained incorrupt;  St Joseph the New of Partos the Metropolitan of Timishoara (Romania)
1811 The New Martyr John, murdered by Moslems; "I was born as an Orthodox Christian, and I shall die as an Orthodox Christian." "Most Holy Theotokos, help me." He also asked forgiveness of the Christians he met along the way.
The great psalm of the Passion, Chapter 22, whose first verse "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him"

For kingship belongs to the LORD, the ruler over the nations. 
All who sleep in the earth will bow low before God; All who have gone down into the dust will kneel in homage. 

And I will live for the LORD; my descendants will serve you. 
The generation to come will be told of the Lord,
that they may proclaim to a people yet unborn the deliverance you have brought.

Benedict_XIV 1740-1758; canonized Catherine of Genoa
September 15 – Our Lady of the Seven Sorrows    
The Sacrifice of the Virgin Will Never Consist in Renouncing Sin (III)

The Virgin gave to God, from the beginning, every single one of her heartbeats. She renounced unconditionally, from the very instant of the Incarnation, the ownership of her maternal love. The increasingly painful ruptures that were asked of her did not aim at purifying her of the imperfections of her love. There wasn’t the shadow of an imperfection in her. Their only reason was to associate her to her Son’s redeeming suffering. 

Jesus’ suffering wasn’t intended to purify his own Person; it was to bring salvation to the world. The suffering of the Immaculate Virgin, like the suffering of her Son, wasn’t meant to purify her either. But the Virgin could unite it to the suffering that Jesus bore for men’s salvation. In this sense it had a co-redeeming value. Cardinal Charles Journet, Mater Dolorosa, Editions Christiana, 1974


Our Lady of Sorrows
Festum Septem Dolórum ejúsdem beatíssimæ Vírginis Maríæ.
    The feast of the Seven Sorrows of the same most Blessed Virgin Mary.
For a while there were two feasts in honor of the Sorrowful Mother: one going back to the 15th century, the other to the 17th century. For a while both were celebrated by the universal Church: one on the Friday before Palm Sunday, the other in September.
The principal biblical references to Mary's sorrows are in Luke 2:35 and John 19:26-27.
The Lucan passage is Simeon's prediction about a sword piercing Mary's soul; the Johannine passage relates Jesus' words to Mary and to the beloved disciple.
Many early Church writers interpret the sword as Mary's sorrows, especially as she saw Jesus die on the cross. Thus, the two passages are brought together as prediction and fulfillment.
St. Ambrose in particular sees Mary as a sorrowful yet powerful figure at the cross.
Mary stood fearlessly at the cross while others fled.
Mary looked on her Son's wounds with pity, but saw in them the salvation of the world. As Jesus hung on the cross,
Mary did not fear to be killed but offered herself to her persecutors.
Comment:  John's account of Jesus' death is highly symbolic.
When Jesus gives the beloved disciple to Mary, we are invited to appreciate Mary's role in the Church: She symbolizes the Church; the beloved disciple represents all believers. As Mary mothered Jesus, now
mother to all his followers. Furthermore, as Jesus died, he handed over his Spirit.  Mary and the Spirit cooperate in begetting new children of God—almost an echo of Luke's account of Jesus' conception. Christians can trust that they will continue to experience the caring presence of Mary and Jesus' Spirit throughout their lives and throughout history.

Quote:  "At the cross her station keeping,     Stood the mournful mother weeping,     Close to Jesus to the last.     Through her heart, his sorrow sharing,     All his bitter anguish bearing,     Now at length the sword has passed."     (Stabat Mater)


The Seven Sorrows of The Blessed Virgin Mary
Twice during the year the Western church commemorates the sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary, on the Friday in Passion week and again on this September 14. The first is the older feast, instituted at Cologne and elsewhere during the fifteenth century. It was then called the Commemoration of the Distress and Sorrow of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and had in view specifically our Lady’s suffering during the passion of her divine Son. When the feast was extended to the whole Western church in 1727 under the title of the Seven Sorrows, the original reference of the Mass and Office to the Crucifixion was retained, and the commemoration is still called the Compassion of our Lady in some calendars e.g. those of the Benedictines and Dominicans, as it was in many places before the eighteenth century.
In the, middle ages there was a popular devotion to the five joys of Mary, and this was soon complemented by another in honour of five of her sorrows at the Passion. Later, these were fixed at seven, and extended back from Calvary to embrace her whole life. The Servite friars, who from their beginning had a particular devotion to the sufferings of Mary, were in 1668 granted a feast for the third Sunday in September on which these Seven Sorrows should be commemorated, and this feast also was extended to the Western church in 1814. For long there were several different ways of enumerating these mysteries, but since the composition of the liturgical office they have been fixed by the responsories at Matins as
(i)    The prophecy of holy Simeon. “There was a man named Simeon, and this man was just and devout; and he said unto Mary: “Thine own soul also a sword shall pierce.” (ii) The flight into Egypt. “Arise, and take the Child and His mother and fly into Egypt; and be there until I shall tell thee.” (iii) The three days’ disappearance of the boy Jesus. “Son, why hast thou done so to us? Behold thy father and I have sought thee, sorrowing.” (iv) The painful progress to Calvary. “And bearing His own cross He went forth. And there followed Him a great multitude of people, and of women who bewailed and lamented Him.” (v) The crucifixion. “And when they were come to the place which is called Calvary, they crucified Him there. Now there stood by the cross of Jesus His mother.” (vi) The taking down from the cross. “Joseph of Arimathea begged the body of Jesus. And taking it down from the cross His mother received it into her arms.” (vii) The entombment. “What a sadness of heart was thine, Mother of sorrows, when Joseph wrapped Him in fine linen and laid Him in a sepulchre.”

Much has been written about the gradual evolution of this consecrated number of our Lady’s sorrows or “Dolours”, but the subject is by no means been exhausted. One of the most valuable contributions to the history is an article in the Analecta Bollandiana (vol. xii, 1893, pp. 333—352), under the title “La Vierge aux Sept Glaives”, written in reply to a foolish attempt of the folklorist H. Gaidoz to connect the devotion with a Chaldean cylinder at the British Museum. It bears a representation of the Assyrian goddess Istar; around this is a sort of trophy of arms, which can be resolved into seven separate weapons. The coincidence is by no means striking in itself, and there is not a shadow of evidence to suggest any link between Assyria and this very late western devotion. We know for certain that in the Middle Ages recognition of five joys and then of seven preceded any specified numbering of our Lady’s sorrows. Moreover, before a settled convention was arrived at we hear occasionally of nine joys, fifteen sorrows, or twenty-seven sorrows, etc. On all this consult S. Beissel, Geschichte der Verehrung Marias in Deutschland, vol. i (1909), pp. 404-413, and, on the liturgical commemoration, vol. ii of the same work (1910), pp. 364—367. Further information as to the local observance of the feast in the past is afforded by Holweck, Calendarium liturgicum festorum…(1925). Although its general observance was then quite new, Benedict XIV’s commission advocated the removal of this feast from the general calendar.
90 Nicomedes of Rome priest refused to aposate M (RM)
Romæ, via Nomentána, natális beáti Nicomédis, Presbyteri et Mártyris, qui, cum díceret compelléntibus se sacrificáre: « Ego non sacrífico nisi Deo omnipoténti, qui regnat in cælis », plumbátis diutíssime cæsus est, atque in eo torménto migrávit ad Dóminum.
    At Rome, on the Via Nomentana, the birthday of blessed Nicomedes, priest and martyr.  Because he said to those who would compel him to sacrifice: "I offer sacrifice only to the omnipotent God who reigneth in heaven," he was for a long time scourged with leaded whips, and thus passed to the Lord.
The Emperor Constantine Copronymus thought that the relics of the saints and martyrs were worthless objects, and that anyone who collected the bones of the holy ones was a fool. He therefore set about finding as many of these sacred remains as he could and throwing them into the sea.

Pope Saint Paschal I, who was elected in 817, 32 years after the emperor's death, disagreed. Whereas Constantine Copronymus had got rid of saintly bones, Paschal I conceived it as his duty to find as many replacements as possible. The church of Santa Prassede in Rome is filled with all that he collected, their names inscribed on marble tablets close by the sanctuary.

Among them are the earthly remains of Saint Nicomedes, brought in 817 from their catacomb on the Via Nomentina. Nicomedes had been a priest, at a time when Christians had to keep their faith secret or risk death. His own beliefs came to light when he bravely obtained the bones of another martyr, Saint Felicula, to give them Christian burial.

Nicomedes was given the chance of apostatizing by offering sacrifice to heathen gods. "I sacrifice only to the almighty God who rules over us all from heaven," was Nicomedes' response. Nicomedes had signed his own death warrant. He was beaten with whips that had been made crueller by means of lead lining and, under this torture, died.

The saint's body was thrown into the Tiber, so that the Christians could not burial it.
Justus, Another Christian, boldly rescued it and placed the corpse in a tomb on the Via Nomentina, just outside the Porta Pia. And there it remained until 817 (Bentley).
In art, Saint Nicomedes is depicted as an early Christian priest with a club set with spikes (Roeder) .

St Nicomedes, Martyr
Nicomedes was a martyr of the Roman church who was buried in a catacomb on the Via Nomentana, just outside the Porta Pia. There was a church dedicated in his honour, and there is good evidence of his early cultus. The Roman Martyrology says that, on saying to those who tried to make him sacrifice, “I do not sacrifice except to the almighty God who reigns in Heaven, he was for a long time beaten with leaded whips and under this torture passed to the Lord”. But this is derived from an account of him in the worthless acta of SS. Nereus and Achilleus, wherein he is represented as a priest who buried the body of St Felicula, was arrested and put to death, and his body thrown into the Tiber whence it was recovered by the deacon Justus. Another recension of his passion makes him suffer in the third-fourth century, under the Emperor Maximian. His catacomb was discovered in 1864.

It is curious that the name of Nicomedes does not occur in the Roman list, Depositio martyrum, of 354 but the Itineraries, as well as the Sacramentaries, authenticate his early cultus in Rome. Evidence is been set out in Delehaye’s CMH, p. 510.

2nd v. Melitina of Marcianopolis overthrew idol M (RM)
Marcianópoli, in Thrácia, sanctæ Melitínæ Mártyris, quæ, sub Antoníno Imperatóre et Antíocho Præside, cum ad Gentílium fana semel et íterum ducta esset, atque idóla semper corrúerent, ídeo suspénsa et laniáta est, ac demum cápite plexa.
    At Marcianapolis in Thrace, St. Melitina, a martyr, in the time of Emperor Antoninus and the governor Antiochus.  She was twice led to the temples of the heathens, and since the idols fell to the ground each time, she was hanged and torn, and finally beheaded.
Died mid-2nd century. Marcianopolis (Bulgaria) Saint Melitina, like Saints Maximus, Theodore, and Scelpiodotus was martyred in that ancient town under Antoninus Pius. Her relics were moved to the island of Lemnos (Benedictines). In art, Saint Melitina is depicted as a maiden with a sword; the idol she overthrew lays near her. She is venerated on Lemnos (Roeder).
177 St. Valerian massacre martyrs of Lyons with bishop St. Pothinus took place during the persecutions of Marcus Aurelius in the year 177
In território Cabillonénsi sancti Valeriáni Mártyris, quem Priscus Præses, suspénsum et gravi ungulárum laceratióne cruciátum, tandem, cum in Christi confessióne vidéret immóbilem ac læto ánimo in ejus láudibus permanéntem, gládio animadvérti præcépit.
    In the diocese of Chalons, St. Valerian, martyr, who was suspended on high by the governor Priscus, and tortured with iron hooks.  Remaining immovable in the confession of Christ, and continuing joyfully to praise him, he was struck with the sword by order of the same magistrate.

Valerian of Lyons M (RM) Died 178. Saint Valerian was a companion of the ancient Bishop Saint Pothinus of Lyons. Valerian succeeded in escaping from prison, but was captured at Tournus near Autun while preaching to the people. He was beheaded (Benedictines).

Marcellus, a priest, we are told, by Divine intervention, managed to escape to Chalon-sur-Saone, where he was given shelter. His host was a pagan, and seeing him offer incense before images of Mars, Mercury, and Minerva, Marcellus remonstrated with and converted him.
While journeying toward the North, the priest fell in with the governor Priscus, who asked him to a celebration at his house. Marcellus accepted the invitation, but when he found that Priscus was preparing to fulfill religious rites, he asked to be excused on the ground that he was a Christian. This raised an outcry, and the bystanders tried to kill Marcellus there and then by tying him to the tops of two young trees in tension and then letting them fly apart. The governor ordered him to make an act of worship before an image of Saturn. He refused, whereupon he was buried up to his middle in the earth on the banks of the Saone, and died in three days of exposure and starvation. Butler mentions with St. Marcellus, the martyr St. Valerian who is named in the Roman Martyrology on September 15th. He is said to have escaped from prison at the same time as Marcellus, and was beheaded for the Faith at Tournus, near Autun.

257 Saint Acacius the Confessor Uncovering of the relics of Bishop of Melitene, Armenia.
Lived during the Decian persecution.  Arrested as a Christian, St Acacius was brought before the governor Marcianus, who ordered that he be tortured. He was not put to death, but was set free after a while, bearing the wounds of Christ on his body. He died in peace.
St Acacius the Confessor is also commemorated on March 31. He should not be confused with another St Acacius of Melitene (April 17) who lived in the fifth century.
Theodotus The Holy Martyr suffered with Sts Maximus, Asklepiodote, at the beginning of the fourth century under the emperor Maximian Galerius (305-311). Eminent citizens of the city of Marcianopolis, Maximus and Asklepiodote led a devout Christian life. By their example they brought many to faith in Christ and to holy Baptism.
Hadrianópoli, in Thrácia, sanctórum Mártyrum Máximi, Theodóri et Asclepiódoti; qui sub Maximiáno Imperatóre coronáti sunt.
    At Adrianople in Thrace, the holy martyrs Maximus, Theodore, and Asclepiodotus, who were crowned under Emperor Maximian.

During the persecution Tiris, the governor of Thrace, went around the city subject to him and persecuted those believing in Christ. He summoned Maximus and Asklepiodote before him and demanded they abandon the Christian Faith. When the martyrs refused, he ordered that they be beaten.

Then a certain pious man named Theodotus, began to reproach the governor for his inhumanity and cruelty. They seized him also, and hanging him on a tree, they tortured him with iron hooks. After this, they threw the three martyrs into prison. Tiris traveled for two weeks more and took the holy martyrs along with him.

In the city of Adrianopolis he put them to still greater tortures, commanding that their bodies be scorched with white-hot plates. In the midst of their suffering they heard a Voice from Heaven encouraging them to persevere. After several days of torture they threw the martyrs to be eaten by wild beasts in the circus, but instead the she-bear released upon Sts Maximus and Theodotus began to cuddle up to them.

St Asklepiodote was tied to a bull, but she seemed to be rooted to the spot, and did not budge. Tiris resumed the journey and stopped in the village of Saltis before reaching the city of Philippopolis. Again he urged the martyrs to renounce Christ. When they refused, he ordered them to be beheaded.
God's wrath overtook him when a bolt of lightning struck him as he sat upon the judgment seat.
310 Maximus, Theodore, and Scelpiodotus born in Marcianopolis (now in Bulgaria) MM (RM).
Hadrianópoli, in Thrácia, sanctórum Mártyrum Máximi, Theodóri et Asclepiódoti; qui sub Maximiáno Imperatóre coronáti sunt.
    At Adrianople in Thrace, the holy martyrs Maximus, Theodore, and Asclepiodotus, who were crowned under Emperor Maximian.
These three martyrs were born in Marcianopolis (now in Bulgaria) and suffered at Adrianopolis (Benedictines).
362 Porphyrius the Actor declares Christian on stage with Julian the Apostate in audience M (RM)
Item sancti Porphyrii mimi, qui, coram Juliáno Apóstata, per jocum suscípiens baptísmum, Dei virtúte derepénte mutátur, et Christiánum se esse profitétur; ac mox, ipsíus Imperatóris mandáto secúri percússus, martyrio coronátur.
    Also, St. Porphyry, a comedian, who was baptized in jest in the presence of Julian the Apostate, but was suddenly converted by the power of God and declared himself a Christian.  By order of the emperor he was thereupon struck with an axe, and thus crowned with martyrdom.
The story of Saint Porphyrius is similar to that of several other saints. He was a horse trader and an actor, who was converted to the faith while burlesquing the Sacrament of Baptism on stage. He suddenly declared himself a Christian in front of the audience, which included Julian the Apostate, and was immediately slain (Benedictines). In art, Saint Porphyrius is portrayed as he declares himself a Christian on stage with Julian the Apostate in the audience (Roeder)
.

The Holy Martyr Porphyrius suffered during the reign of Julian the Apostate (361-363). Porphyrius was an actor and on the emperor's birthday he was performing a role at the theater, where he was supposed to mock the mystery of holy Baptism.

During the play Porphyrius was immersed in water and said: "The servant of God, Porphyrius, is baptized in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." Through divine grace, he emerged from the water and confessed himself a Christian. Julian ordered him to be tortured, and after the torments, to be beheaded. This took place in the city of Ephesus in the year 361.

The Novonikita Icon is one of the ancient icons of the Mother of God. It appeared to the holy Great Martyr Nikita (+ 372). St Nikita was a former soldier and disciple of Theophilus, Bishop of the Goths. Prior to his Baptism, Nikita saw a Child in a dream, holding His Cross in His hand. He awoke and pondered the meaning of the vision for a long time.

A certain Christian girl by the name of Juliana, inspired by God, told the youth that he should look at his own chest. To his unspeakable astonishment he discovered there an icon of the Most Holy Theotokos with the Pre-eternal Christ Child, standing on His Mother's knees and holding the Cross in His hand.

"This is the same image I saw in the dream," cried St Nikita. The appearance of the icon produced such an effect on him that he quickly received holy Baptism. Soon there was a persecution against Christians, and St Nikita received a martyr's crown, together with a number of other confessors.

378 Nicetas the Goth (the Great) M (RM)
Eódem die sancti Nicétæ Gothi, qui ab Athanaríco Rege, ob cathólicam fidem, jussus est igne combúri.
    On the same day, St. Nicetas, a Goth, who was burned alive for the Catholic faith by order of King Athanaric.
Saint Sabas and Nicetas are the two most renowned martyrs among the Goths. It is interesting to note that Nicetas, an Ostrogoth born along the Danube, should rightly be considered a heretic, yet he is listed in the Roman Martyrology. Through no fault of his own, he and many of his kinsmen and neighbors were converted to Christianity by the Arian Ulphilas. In good faith, he was also ordained as an Arian priest. But doctrinal differences are often forgotten in the name of Jesus. Nicetas was martyred by King Athanaric, in his attempt to eradicate the name of Christ from his territory bordering on the Roman Empire.
    About 370, Athanaric began a systematic persecution. He caused an idol to be carried in a chariot through all the towns and villages he suspected were sheltering Christians. Those who refused to adore were put to death, usually by burning the Christians with their children in the houses or those assembled together in churches. At other times they were stabbed at the foot of the altar. Nicetas was burnt to death.
  His body was taken to Mopsuestia in Cilicia, which is why his name is especially remember in the East (Attwater, Benedictines, Husenbeth)
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St Nicetas The Goth, Martyr (Ad. 375)
Saints Sabas and Nicetas are the two most renowned martyrs among the Goths. The former is honoured on April 12, the latter, whom the Greeks place in the class of the “great martyrs”, is commemorated on this day. He was a Goth, born near the banks of the Danube, and converted to the faith in his youth by Ulfilas, a great missionary among those people, and translator of the Bible into the Gothic tongue. He ordained Nicetas priest. In the year 372 Athanaric, king of the Eastern Goths who bordered upon the Roman Empire toward Thrace, raised a persecution against the Christians, occasioned by ill treatment by the Roman authorities of a number of Goths who had taken refuge in Moldavia from the Huns. By his order an idol was carried in a chariot through all the towns and villages where it was suspected that any Christians lived, and all who refused to worship it were put to death. The usual method of the persecutors was to burn the Christians with their children in their houses or in the churches where they were assembled together. In the army of martyrs that glorified God on this occasion, St Nicetas sealed his faith and obedience with his blood, and triumphing over sin passed to eternal glory by the death of fire. His relics were taken to Mopsuestia in Cilicia and there enshrined, whence it came about that this Visigothic martyr is venerated throughout the Byzantine and Syrian churches, On September 12 the feast is observed at Venice of another ST NICETAS, a martyr under Diocletian.
The Greek text of the passio of St Nicetas, as presented by the Metaphrast, was printed with a commentary in the Acta, Sanctorum, September, vol. v. But in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxi (1912), pp. 209—215, the earlier original of this account has been critically edited, with a commentary, which occupies pp. 281—287 of the same volume.
390 Albinus (Aubin, Alpin) of Lyons B  built the church of Saint Stephen (RM)
Lugdúni, in Gállia, sancti Albíni Epíscopi.    At Lyons in France, St. Albinus, bishop.
Succeeded Saint Justus as Lyons bishop; built church of Saint Stephen and chose it as his cathedral (Benedictines).
460 Mamilian of Palermo B exiled to Tuscany by the Arian king Genseric (AC)
Bishop Mamilian of Palermo, Sicily, was exiled to Tuscany by the Arian king Genseric. His relics were returned to Palermo, where they are venerated (Benedictines)
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475 Saint Gerasimus; lived in the Thebaid, then wilderness near the Jordan river where he built a monastery and became renowned for the virtue of his life; During 5 days no cooked food was eaten only small amount of dried bread, roots and water brought from the monastery; Saturdays and Sundays all monks went to monastery attend Divine Liturgy receive Holy Communion, then served cooked food and a little wine at the refectory; work completed during week given to the abbot. On Sunday, afternoon each monk departed once again for his solitary cell in the wilderness, taking only a little bread, roots, a vessel of water and palm branches to weave baskets.
   Born in the province of Lycia in the southern part of Asia Minor. His parents were wealthy, prosperous people. From a very early age St. Gerasimus developed a great love of God and, as he grew older, he found he had little in common with other young people of his own age, whw were only interested in having fun. He realized that the world and an attachment to it only brought many needless cares and sufferings, so he yearned to serve God and to be pleasing to Him.

    Thus it was that St. Gerasimus became a monk and departed for the desert of Egypt, to the region known as the Thebaid. He spent some time there, growing in Spiritual strength and wisdom, and then he again returned to his native province of Lycia. Later, towards the end of the reign of the holy Emperor Theodosius the Younger (who ruled from 408-450), he went to Palestine, where he settled in the wilderness near the Jordan river. There he built a monastery and became renowned for the virtue of his life.

     The monastery of St. Gerasimus was built approximately 25 miles from Jerusalem and about 100 vards from the Jordan River. At that time there were more than 70 desert dwellers there and St. Gerasimus established the following rule for these strugglers. Five days a week each monk was to keep silent in a solitary cell, doing simple handiwork such as weaving mats or baskets out of palm leaves. During these five days no cooked food was eaten; the only food was a small amount of dried bread, roots and water brought from the monastery. On Saturdays and Sundays all the monks went ,to the monastery to attend the Divine Liturgy and receive Holy Communion. Afterwards they were served cooked food and a little wine at the refectory. The work that had been completed during the week was given to the abbot. On Sunday, afternoon each monk departed once again for his solitary cell in the wilderness, taking only a little bread, roots, a vessel of water and palm branches to weave baskets. Each monk had only a single old robe, a mat on which to sleep and a small vessel for water. Whenever the monks left their cells, the doors were left open so that anyone could enter and take whatever he wished of the monks' few possessions. In this way they prevented any attachment to material possessions. During Great Lent St. Gerasimus ate nothing at all until the radiant day of Pascha. His bodily and spiritual strength was sustained solely by receiving the Holy Mysteries.

    Monks of his monastery were fond of recalling how a lion came to greatly love the saint and served him obediently and with great humility. One day, as St. Gerasimus was walking through the Jordan desert, he met a lion. The lion stretched out his paw and St. Cerasimus saw that it was infected and very swollen. The lion gazed pleadingly and meekly at the elder who sat down immediately to inspect the paw. He discovered that a thorn had lodged in the lion's paw and this was the cause of his suffering. The saint carefully removed the thorn, cleansed the wound of all the pus and then wrapped it with his handkerchief. From then on the lion faithfully followed the saint like a disciple. St. Gerasimus marveled at the lion's intelligence, meekness and willingness to eat bread and whatever else could be found for him. The lion was given an obedience in the monastery. The monks had a donkey which carried water from the Jordan River for the brethren. The lion was entrusted with the task of accompanying the donkey to the river and guarding it while it grazed on the riverbank.

     One day the lion fell asleep in the sun, leaving the donkey to graze peacefully. Just then an Arabian merchant happened to pass by with his caravan of camels and saw the donkey. Thinking the animal was a stray, he tied it to his line of camels and took it with him. The lion awoke and began to search for the donkey, but it was nowhere to be found. The beast returned to the monastery and went immediately to St. Gercsimus who, seeing his dejected expression, thought he had eaten the donkey and asked, "Where is the donkey?" The lion stood in silence, hanging his head in shame. The elder praised the lion for not running away after his evil deed and instructed him to do the work of the donkey from then on. The monks loaded a large barrel on the lion's hack, as they had done before with the donkey, and sent him to the river to fetch water. One day a soldier came to the monastery to pray, and seeing the lion carrying the water, took pity on him and gave the monks three gold pieces to buy another donkey. The lion once again resumed his former obedience of guarding the donkey.

      Some time later, the Arabian merchant once again passed by the Jordan on his way to sell wheat in Jerusalem. The donkey was still with him. That day, the lion happened to be near the river and as the caravan approached he recognized the donkey. Roaring loudly, he rushed towards him, frightening the merchant and his companions who fled in great terror. The lion grasped the donkey's reins in his teeth, as he had done previously, and led it together with the string of camels to the saint. When he saw the saint he roared joyously at having found the lost donkey. St. Getanimus smiled gently and told his monks that the lion had been blamed most unfairly. The lion was given the name 'Jordan' and he continued to be a most faithful 'disciple'. He was never absent from the monastery for more than five days at a time.

     St. Gerasimus departed to the Lord in the year 475 and was buried by his sorrowing brethren there in his monastery. The lion was not in the monastery at that time. When later he arrived, he began to search for the saint. ... Father Sabbatius tried to explain why it was that the elder could not be found. “Jordan, our elder has left us orphans; he has departed to the Lord." The lion was not to be comforted; he refused the food that was offered and continued searching for his St. Gerasimus, roaring in great confusion. Fr. Sabbatius and the other monks stroked Jordan gently on the back and pleaded, "The elder has gone to the Lord; he has left us!" No words or explanations could stop the sorrowful roaring of the lion. He kept searching, now in great distress. Finally Fr. Sabbatius said, "If you do not believe us, then come with us: we will show you the place where the elder rests." Jordan was led to the tomb near the church where St. Gerasimus was buried. Fr. Sabbatius explained to the lion, "We have buried our elder here." Fr. Sabbatius then fell to his knees and with a heavy heart began to weep. The Lion now realized what had happened. He gave one last mighty roar, struck his head on the ground and died on the elder's grave.

    The lion's love and devotion for St. Gerasimus is an example of the love and obedience the animals had for Adam before his fall into sin and his expulsion from Paradise. From this account we also learn how St. Gerasimus pleased the Lord, from his youth unto old age, until he was granted to be numbered among the saints with whom he now glorifies the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.
5th v. Eutropia of Auvergne, Widow first lauded by Saint Sidonius Apollinaris (RM)
In Gállia sanctæ Eutrópiæ Víduæ.    In France, St. Eutropia, widow.
The sanctity of the widow Saint Eutropia was first lauded by Saint Sidonius Apollinaris (Benedictines).
507 St. Aprus Bishop of Toul, France; very successful lawyer, gave up his profession in order to receive presbyterial ordination
Tulli, in Gállia, sancti Apri Epíscopi.    At Toul in France, St. Aper, bishop.
called Aper, Epvre, or Evre, the brother of St. Apronia. Aprus was born near Trier, Germany, was a very successful lawyer. After entering the priesthood, Aprus was appointed bishop of Toul, France.
Aprus of Toul B (RM)
(also known as Aper, Apre, Epvre, Eyre, Evre) Born near Trèves (Trier), Germany. Saint Aprus, who gave up his profession in order to receive presbyterial ordination. Eventually selected bishop of Toul, which he pastored for seven years (Benedictines)
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6th v. Saint Hernan of Brittany (AC)
Born in Britain; During the Anglo-Saxon conquest of Britain, Saint Hernan sought refuge in Brittany. There he lived in solitude at a place now named for him, Loc-Harn. He is the patron of that village (Benedictines)
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6th v. Blessed Abba Joseph of Alaverdi; disciple and companion of St. John of Zedazeni, arrived in Georgia with twelve Syrian ascetics to spread the Christian Faith.  With the blessing of his teacher, Fr. Joseph settled in the village of Alaverdi in eastern Georgia. According to tradition, he carried with him a cross formed from the wood of the Life-giving Cross of our Savior.  Many of the faithful were so drawn to Abba Joseph’s holy life, boundless love, and miracles that they left the world to join in his labors.

At that time the region around Alaverdi was deserted and barren. One day the Lord sent a nobleman to hunt in the valley where the pious hermit dwelt among the wild animals. Seeing the saint, the nobleman guessed immediately that before him stood a holy man. He bowed before him, kissed him, and humbly asked what had brought him to this deserted place.

With the help of God, St. Joseph aroused in the nobleman a divine love and an unquenchable desire for the Truth. The nobleman vowed to erect a church in the Alaverdi Wilderness, and he laid the foundations of Alaverdi Monastery in fulfillment of this vow. Venerable Joseph was overjoyed at the accomplishment of this God-pleasing work.

Soon the people began to hear stories about the holy elder who was laboring in Alaverdi. Crowds of the faithful flocked there to see him with their own eyes and hear the blessed Joseph’s preaching. As a result of his unceasing efforts, unbelief was uprooted, and the divine services of the Church were firmly established in that region. Many of the faithful were so drawn to Abba Joseph’s holy life, boundless love, and miracles that they left the world to join in his labors.

Gradually the number of hermits increased, and a large community was formed. Fr. Joseph was the first abbot of this brotherhood. Utterly exhausted from a life of God-pleasing ascesis and labors, St. Joseph sensed the approach of death and prepared to stand before the Lord God. He gathered his disciples, blessed them, instructed them for the last time, appointed a new abbot, and peacefully departed to the Lord.

With great honor Fr. Joseph’s disciples buried him at the Alaverdi Church. Many miracles have since occurred over the grave of the venerable elder
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556 St. Leobinus Bishop of Chartres, France;  a hermit priest and abbot before his consecration
Item sancti Leobíni, Epíscopi Carnuténsis.    Also, St. Leobinus, bishop of Chartres.
He was a hermit priest and abbot before his consecration. When raiders attacked his monastery near Lyons, Leobinus was tortured and left for dead. He is sometimes called Lubin.
590 St. Joseph Abibos Disciple of St. John Zeda Zfleli and abbot
A native of Syria, he served as abbot of Alaverdi in the area of modem Georgia.
Joseph Abibos, Abbot (AC) Saint Joseph, abbot of Alaverdi, Georgia, Iberia, was on of the 13 Syriac followers of Saint John Zedazneli, who evangelized the area and introduced monasticism there (Benedictines)
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6th century St. Hernan Hermit and patron saint of Loc Horn Hernan.
Brittany, France. Hernan was a Briton who fled his homeland when the Anglo Saxons conquered the area
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620 Saint Mirin of Benchor B contemporary of Saint Columba, was a disciple of Saint Comgall at Bangor (County Down) (AC)
(also known as Merinus, Merryn, Meadhran) Saint Mirin, a contemporary of Saint Columba, was a disciple of Saint Comgall at Bangor (County Down). He had a powerful influence in the area of Strathclyde, south of Glasgow, Scotland. There he founded and was abbot of Paisley abbey, where he died and was buried. His shrine became a pilgrimage center.
   Mirin is venerated by both Protestants and Catholics in both Ireland and Scotland, where there is a chapel dedicated to him among the ruins of Inch Murryn, the largest island in Loch Lomond. He is also patron of the British football club called Saint Mirren's of Paisley (Benedictines, Farmer, Montague)
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St Mirin    (Seventh Century?)
St Mirin (Meadhran) was an Irish missionary in Scotland, who was buried at Paisley, where his shrine became a place of pilgrimage. He was co-titular of the medieval abbey there, and other churches in Scotland bore his name. According to the Aberdeen Breviary, Mirin was a disciple of St Comgall and was for a time abbot of Bangor. Characteristic of the vindictive strain in some Celtic hagiology, it is related that Mirin laid the pains of childbirth on an Irish king who had opposed him.
His feast, as a bishop, is observed in the diocese of Paisley, where the cathedral church is dedicated in his honour.
See the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. v; KSS, pp. 397, 406. Cf. M. Barrett, A Calendar of Scottish Saints (1904), p. 123, and Footprints of the Ancient Scottish Church (1914), p. 184; and LIS,, vol. ix, p. 377. Mirin is not to be confused with the eponymous saint of Saint Merryn in Cornwall, apparently a woman, and not certainly identified.
7th century St. Ribert Benedictine abbot and possibly a bishop
Best known and revered in the area of Rouen, France, he was a monk and later abbot of the monastery of Valery-sur-Some. As such, Ribert would have served as the regional bishop of Normandy and Picardy
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690 Saint Ritbert,of Varennes, OSB Abbot disciple of Saint Ouen preached missions in the countryside (AC)
Saint Ritbert, a disciple of Saint Ouen, became abbot of a small monastery and the pastor of the church of Varenne (Rouen). He preached missions in the countryside (Benedictines, Encyclopedia)
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687 St. Aichardus son of an army officer became Benedictine example of daily fidelity scrupulous observance of the monastic rules
Eódem die deposítio sancti Aichárdi Abbátis.    On the same day, the death of St. Aichard, abbot.
He was the son of an army officer and was sent to Poitiers, France, to be educated for a military career. His mother, having seen his intense piety and his scholarly leanings, intervened and arranged for him to make his own decision about his career. Aichardus chose the religious life and entered the Benedictine Order at John's Abbey in Ansion, Poitou.
   He remained as a monk for almost forty years. When a new Benedictine monastery was founded by St. Philibert in Quincay, Aichardus was appointed as prior of the new house. When St. Philibert at Jumieges died, Aichardus succeeded him as abbot of that nine-hundred-member monastery. 
Aichardus was an example of daily fidelity and scrupulous observance of the monastic rules of his order.
Aichardus of Jumièges, OSB Abbot (RM) (also known as Archard, Aicard, Achart)
Born at Poitiers; died c. 687. As the son of one of Clotaire II's officers, Auschaire, and his wife Ermina, Saint Aichardus was born into a pre-eminent family of Poitou. His mother was particularly devout and diligently trained her son in the ways of Christian perfection. She sent him to Saint Hilary's monastery at Poitiers for his education. Early in his life he was professed as a monk of Ansion in Poitou, where he spent 39 years. Thereafter, he was abbot of Saint Benedict's at Quinçay and, finally, abbot of Jumièges, where he succeeded Saint Philibert as the spiritual leader of about 1,000 monks (Benedictines).

687 St Aichardus, Or Achard, Abbot
IT is related that Aichardus at the age of ten was taken to he educated at a monastery at Poitiers. Here he remained till his father thought it was time for him to come home and be introduced to the life of court and camp hut his mother was concerned that he should become a saint, and that this end alone should be considered in it. This led to considerable disagreement between the parents, and to end it Aichardus himself was called in to give his opinion. This he expressed to his father with so much earnestness and in so dutiful a manner that he gained his consent upon the spot Aichardus went without delay to the abbey of St Jouin at Ansion in Poitou.
   St Aichardus had been at Ansion for thirty-nine years when St Philibert, who peopled it with fifteen monks from Jumièges and made Aichardus their superior, founded the priory of St Benedict at Quinçay. Under his rule the new house prospered and soon augmented its numbers. When St Philibert finally retired from Jumièges he resigned that abbacy to St Aichardus, whose nomination was accepted by the community in consequence of a vision granted to one of their number. This was not the only occasion in the career of Aichardus that, according to tradition, a vision was vouchsafed at a particularly useful moment. There were then at Jumièges nine hundred monks, among whom he promoted monastic perfection by his example, and this manner of exhorting proved most effectual for some of them. But others were not so easily led, until their abbot had a dream of the approaching death and judgement of 442 of them: this had a great effect in heightening their observance.
   St Aichardus was forewarned of the death of St Philibert very shortly before his own, and when his time came he was laid on ashes and covered with sackcloth, and said to the monks: My dear children, never forget the last advice and testament of your most loving father. “I implore you in the name of our divine Saviour always to love one another, and never to suffer the least coldness toward any brother to be for a moment in your breasts, or anything by which perfect charity may suffer any harm in your souls. You have borne the yoke of penance and are grown old in the exercise of religious duties in vain, if you do not sincerely love one another. Without this, martyrdom itself cannot make you acceptable to God. Fraternal charity is the soul of a religious house.” Having spoken these words, he happily surrendered his soul into the hands of his Creator.
The Cistercian menology on this same day commemorates a Bd Aichardus who was evidently a man whose virtues and abilities were equally above the average for he was master of novices at Clairvaux and was used by St Bernard in the work of his foundations. He died about a 170.

A full account of St Aichardus is given in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. v, but little trust can be placed in the published lives of the saint.

852 St. Emilas deacon & Jeremiah Spanish student martyrs of Cordoba, Spain
Córdubæ, in Hispánia, sanctórum Mártyrum Emilæ Diáconi, et Jeremíæ, qui, in persecutióne Arábica, post longam cárceris maceratiónem, demum, cervícibus pro Christo abscíssis, martyrium complevérunt.
    At Cordova in Spain, the holy martyrs Emilas, deacon, and Jeremias, who ended their martyrdom in the persecution of the Arabs by being beheaded after a long stay in prison.
by Caliph Abd-al-Rahman II . Emilas was a deacon. The young men were beheaded.
Emilas (Emile) and Jeremias (Jeremy) MM (RM). Emile, a deacon, and his friend Jeremy were students at Cordova, Spain. They provoked the Moorish inhabitants and were beheaded under caliph Abderrahman (Benedictines, Encyclopedia)
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10th v. The Venerable Philotheus Presbyter and Wonderworker devoted himself to deeds of prayer and fasting, and works of charity; received from God the gift of working miracles
The Holy Presbyter and Wonderworker Philotheus lived in the tenth century in the village of Mravin (or Myrmix) located in Bythnia in Asia Minor. He was a married priest, and had children. He devoted himself to deeds of prayer and fasting, and works of charity. Because of his holy life, St Philotheus received from God the gift of working miracles. The ascetic continually fed the hungry and helped the needy. St Philotheus died in peace. Myrrh flowed from his relics.

Philotheus was from the village of Myrmix or Mravin in Asia Minor. His mother had the same name, but reversed-Theophila. Philotheus was a presbyter and a great miracle-worker during his lifetime. On one occasion, he changed water into wine and, on another occasion, he miraculously increased a quantity of bread. He reposed in the Lord in the tenth century, and his relics gushed myrrh.

1170 Blessed Aichardus of Clairvaux, received the Cistercian habit from the hands of Saint Bernard OSB Cist. (PC)
Aichardus received the Cistercian habit from the hands of Saint Bernard at Clairvaux. The founder sent Aichardus to several different foundations. When he returned to Clairvaux, Saint Bernard appointed him novice-master (Benedictines)
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1095 St. Vitus  Benedictine monk in the community near Bergamo Italy. He was a disciple of St. Albert.
1222 Adam of Caithness, OSB Cist. B As bishop, Adam tried to enforce canon and civil law, including the payment of tithes martyred with followers (PC)
Saint Adam entered the Cistercians as a young man. Later he was abbot of Melrose until King William of Scotland appointed him bishop in a remote area over which he wanted to gain more power. As bishop, Adam tried to enforce canon and civil law, including the payment of tithes, which he increased gradually doubling.
   Of course, this led to a revolt. A mob forced its way into the bishop's house at Halkirke and burnt him and his followers to death. His body, although "roasted with fire and livid with bruises, was found entire under a heap of stones and buried honorably in the church." Thereafter, an unofficial cultus developed (Farmer)
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St. Mamilian Bishop of Palermo, on Sicily Italy Mamilian was exiled by the Arian ruler Geiseric. His relics are enshrined in Palermo.
1386 Bl. Roland de'Medici; renounced all its power, influence, and wealth to become quarter century as a hermit
A member of the famed House of de’Medici, he adopted a lifestyle in sharp contrast to his worldly and humanist relatives. He spent over a quarter century living as a hermit in the forest of Parma, Italy.
Blessed Roland de'Medici, Hermit (AC) Born in Florence, Italy; died at Borgone, 1386; cultus confirmed in 1852. Scion of the famous Medici family of Florence, Italy, Roland renounced all its power, influence, and wealth to become a hermit for 26 years in the forests of Parma (Benedictines)
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1510 St Catherine (Caterinetta) of Genoa, Widow; blood from her stigmata gave off exceptional heat; “He who purifies himself from his faults in the present life, satisfies with a penny a debt of a thousand ducats; and he who waits until the other life to discharge his debts, consents to pay a thousand ducats for that which he might before have paid with a penny. Saint Catherine, Treatise on purgatory. (RM)
Génuæ sanctæ Catharínæ Víduæ, contémptu mundi et caritáte in Deum insígnis.
    In Genoa, St. Catherine, a widow, renowned for her contempt of the world and her love of God.
Born in Genoa, Italy, 1447; died there, September 14, 1510; beatified in 1737 and equipollently canonized by Pope Benedict XIV a few years later (others say she was canonized in 1737); feast day formerly on March 22.
Caterina_by Tommasina Fieschi.jpg

    We should not wish for anything but what comes to us from moment to moment, Saint Catherine told her spiritual children, exercising ourselves none the less for good. For he who would not thus exercise himself, and await what God sends, would tempt God. When we have done what good we can, let us accept all that happens to us by Our Lord's ordinance, and let us unite ourselves to it by our will. Who tastes what it is to rest in union with God will seem to himself to have won to Paradise even in this life.

The biography of Saint Catherine of Genoa, who combined mysticism with practicality, was written by Baron Friedrich von Hügel. She was the fifth and youngest child of James Fieschi and his wife Francesca di Negro, members of the noble Guelph family of Fieschi, which had produced two popes (Innocent IV and Adrian V). After her birth, her father later became viceroy of Naples for King René of Anjou.

From the age of 13 Catherine sought to became a cloistered religious. Her sister was already a canoness regular and her confessor was the chaplain of that convent. When she asked to be received, they decided that she was too young. Then her father died and, for dynastic reasons, her widowed mother insisted that the 16-year-old marry the Genoese Ghibelline patrician, Guiliano Adorno. Her husband was unfaithful, violent, and a spendthrift. The first five years of their marriage, Catherine suffered in silence. In some ways it seems odd that he did not find her attractive, because Catherine was a beautiful woman of great intelligence, and deeply religious. But they were of completely different temperaments: she was intense and humorless; he had a zest for life.

Then she determined to win her husband's affection by adopting worldly airs. As it turns out, this only made her unhappy because she lost the only consolation that had previously sustained her-- her religious life. Ten years into her marriage, Catherine was a very unhappy woman; her husband had reduced them to poverty by his extravagance. On the eve of his feast in 1473, Catherine prayed, Saint Benedict, pray to God that He make me stay three months sick in bed. Two days later she was kneeling for a blessing before the chaplain at her sister's convent. She had visited her sister and revealed the secrets of her heart. Her sister advised her to go to confession.

In following her sister's advice, Catherine experienced a sort of ecstasy. She was overwhelmed by her sins and, at the very same time, by the infinite love of God for her. This experience was the foundation for an enduring awareness of the presence of God and a fixed attitude of soul. She was drawn back to the path of devotion of her childhood. Within a few days she had a vision of our Lord carrying His cross, which caused her to cry out, O Love, if it be necessary I am ready to confess my sins in public! On the Solemnity of the Annunciation she received the Eucharist, the first time with fervor for ten years.

Thus began her mystical ascent under very severe mortifications that included fasting throughout Lent and Advent almost exclusively on the Eucharist. She became a stigmatic. A group of religious people gathered around Catherine, who guided them to a spirit- filled life.

Eventually her husband was converted, became a Franciscan tertiary, and they agreed to live together in continence. Catherine and Giuliano devoted themselves to the care of the sick in the municipal hospital of Genoa, Pammatone, where they were joined by Catherine's cousin Tommasina Fieschi. In 1473, they moved from their palazzo to a small house in a poorer neighborhood than was necessary. In 1479, they went to live in the hospital and Catherine became its director in 1490. The heroism of Catherine's charity revealed itself in a special way during the plagues of 1493 and 1501. The first one killed nearly 75 percent of the inhabitants. Catherine herself contracted the disease. Although she recovered, she was forced to resign due to ill health three years later.

After Giuliano's death the following year (1497), Catherine's spiritual life became even more intense. In 1499, Catherine met don Cattaneo Marabotto, who became her spiritual director. Her religious practices were idiosyncratic; for instance, she went to communion daily when it was unusual to do so. For years she made extraordinarily long fasts without abating her charitable activities. Catherine is an outstanding example of the religious contemplative who combines the spiritual life with competence in practical affairs. Yet she was always fearful of "the contagion of the world's slow stain" that had separated her from God in the early years of her marriage.

Her last three years of life were a combination of numerous mystical experiences and ill health that remained undiagnosed by even John-Baptist Boerio, the principal doctor to King Henry VII. In addition to her body remaining undecomposed and one of her arms elongating in a peculiar manner shortly before her death, the blood from her stigmata gave off exceptional heat.

A contemporary painting of Catherine, now at the Pammatone Hospital in Genoa, possibly painted by the female artist Tomasina Fieschi, shows Catherine in middle age. It reveals a slight woman with a long, patrician nose; pronounced, cleft chin; easy smile of broad but thin lips (and, surprisingly, deep laugh lines); high cheekbones; and large dark eyes punctuated by thin, graceful eyebrows.

Dialogue between the soul and the body and Treatise on purgatory are outstanding works in the field of mysticism, which were inspired by her and contain the essence of her, but were actually composed by others under her name. She is the patron of Genoa and of Italian hospitals (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Farmer, Harrison, Schamoni, Schouppe, Walsh).
Of interest may be The Life and Doctrine of Saint Catherine of Genoa.
1510 ST CATHERINE OF GENOA, WIDOW   
The Fieschi were a great Guelf family of Liguria, with a long and distinguished history. In 1234 it gave to the Church the vigorous Pope Innocent IV, and in 1276 his nephew, who ruled for a few weeks as Adrian V. By the middle of the fifteenth century it had reached the height of its power and splendour in Liguria, Piedmont and Lombardy.  One member was a cardinal, and another, James, descended from the brother of Innocent IV, was viceroy of Naples for King René of Anjou. This James Fieschi was married to a Genoese lady, Francesca di Negro, and to them was born at Genoa in the year 1447 the fifth and last of their children, Caterinetta, now always called Catherine. Her biographers give particulars of her premising childhood which may perhaps be dismissed as common-form panegyric, but from the age of thirteen she was undoubtedly strongly attracted to the religious life. Her sister was already a canoness regular and the chaplain of her convent was Catherine’s confessor, so she asked him if she also could take the habit. In consultation with the nuns he put her off on account of her youth, and about the same time Catherine’s father died. Then, at the age of sixteen, she was married. It is alleged of many saints, both male and female, that, though wishing to enter a monastery, they married in obedience to the will of those in authority over them, and of some of them these circumstances are only doubtfully true. But about St Catherine of Genoa there is no question. The star of the Ghibelline family of the Adorni was in decline, and by an alliance with the powerful Fieschi they hoped to restore the fortunes of their house. The Fieschi were willing enough, and Catherine was their victim. Her bridegroom was Julian Adorno, a young man with too poor a character to bring any good out of his marriage as a marriage. Catherine was beautiful in person (as may be seen from her portraits), of great intelligence and sensibility, and deeply religious; of an intense temperament, without humour or wit. Julian was of very different fibre, incapable of appreciating his wife, and to that extent to be commiserated; but if he failed to win more than her dutiful submission and obedience it was either because he did not try, or because he set about it in the wrong way. He was, on his own admission, unfaithful to her; for the rest, he was pleasure-loving to an inordinate degree, undisciplined, hot-tempered and spendthrift. He was hardly ever at home, and for the first five years of her married life Catherine lived in solitude and moped amid vain regrets. Then for another five she tried what consolations could he found in the gaieties and recreations of her world, and was little less sad and desperate than before.
She had, however, never lost trust in God, or at least so much of it as was implied in the continued practice of her religion, and on the eve of the feast of St Benedict in 1473 she was praying in a church dedicated in his honour near the sea-shore outside Genoa. And she asked that saint, “St Benedict, pray to God that He make me stay three months sick in bed”. Two days later she was kneeling for a blessing before the chaplain at her sister’s convent when she was suddenly overcome by a great love of God and realization of her own unworthiness. She repeated over and over interiorly, “No more world!  No more sins!” and she felt that “had she had in her possession a thousand worlds, she would have cast them all away”. She was able to do nothing but mumble an excuse and retire, and within the next day or two she had a vision of our Lord carrying His cross which caused her to cry out, “0 Love, if it be necessary I am ready to confess my sins in public!” Then she made a general confession of her whole life with such sorrow “as to pierce her soul”. On the feast of the Annunciation she received holy communion, the first time with fervour for ten years, and shortly after became a daily communicant, so remaining for the rest of her life—a most rare thing in those days, so that she used to say she envied priests, who could receive our Lord’s body and blood daily without exciting comment.
   At about this time his luxury and extravagance had brought Julian to the verge of ruin, and his wife’s prayers, added to his misfortunes, brought about a reformation in his life. They moved from their palazzo into a small house, much more humble and in a poorer quarter than was necessary agreed to live together in continence and devoted themselves to the care of the sick in the hospital of Pammatone. Associated with them was a cousin of Catherine, Tommasina Fieschi, who after her widowhood became first a canoness and then a Dominican nun. This went on for six years without change, except in the development of St Catherine’s spiritual life, till in 1479 the couple went to live in the hospital itself, of which eleven years later she was appointed matron. She proved as capable an administrator as she was a devoted nurse, especially during the plague of 1493, when four-fifths of those who remained in the city died. Catherine caught the distemper off a dying woman whom she had impulsively kissed, and herself nearly died. During the visitation she first met the lawyer and philanthropist Hector Vernazza, who was soon to become her ardent disciple (and also the father of the Venerable Battista Vernazza) and to whom is due the preservation of many precious details of her life and conversation.
   In 1496 Catherine’s health broke down and she had to resign the control of the hospital, though still living within the building, and in the following year her husband died after a painful illness. “Messer Giuliano is gone”, she said to a friend, “and as you know well he was of a rather wayward nature, so that I suffered much interiorly. But my tender Love assured me of his salvation before he had yet passed from this life.” Julian provided in his will for his illegitimate daughter Thobia, and her unnamed mother, and St Catherine made herself responsible for seeing that Thobia should never be in want or uncared for.
   For over twenty years St Catherine lived without any spiritual direction whatever, and only rarely going to confession. Indeed, it is possible that, having no serious matter on her conscience, she did not always make even an annual confession, and she had, without fussiness, found no priest who understood her spiritual state with a view to direction. But about 1499 a secular priest, Don Cattaneo Marahotto, was made rector of the hospital, and  “they understood each other, even by just looking each other in the face without speaking. “To him
she said, “Father, I do not know where I am, either in soul or body. I should like to confess, but I am not conscious of any sin.” And Don Marabotto lays bare her state in a sentence “And as for the sins which she did mention, she was not allowed to see them as so many sins thought or said or done by herself. She was like a small boy who has committed some slight offence in ignorance, and who, if someone tells him, ‘You have done wrong’, starts and blushes, yet not because he has now an experimental knowledge of evil.”  We are also told in her life  “that Catherine did not take care to gain plenary indulgences. Not that she did not hold them in great reverence and devotion and consider them of very great value, but she wished that the selfish part of her should be rather chastised and punished as it deserved....” In pursuance of the same heroic idea she but rarely asked others, whether on earth or in Heaven, to pray for her; the invocation of St Benedict mentioned above is a very notable exception and the only one recorded as regards the saints. It is also noteworthy that throughout her widowhood St Catherine remained a laywoman. Her husband on his conversion joined the third order of St Francis (and to become a tertiary of any order was in those days a far more serious matter than it is now), but she did not do even that. These peculiarities are mentioned neither for commendation nor reprobation; those to whom they appear surprising may be reminded that those who examined the cause of her beatification were perfectly well aware of them the Universal Church does not demand of her children a uniformity of practice compatible neither with human variousness nor the freedom of the Holy Spirit to act on souls as He wills.
   From the year 1473 on St Catherine without intermission led a most intense spiritual life combined with unwearying activity on behalf of the sick and sad, not only in the hospital but throughout Genoa.
   She is one more example of the Christian universality which those who do not understand call contradictions complete “other-worldliness” and efficient “practicality”; concern for the soul and care for the body; physical austerity which is modified or dropped at the word of authority, whether ecclesiastical, medical or social; a living in the closest union with God and an “all-thereness” as regards this world and warm affection for individuals in it.
   The life of St Catherine has been taken as the text of a most searching work on the mystical element in religion—and she kept the hospital accounts without ever being a farthing out and was so concerned for the right disposition of property that she made four wills with several codicils.
   Catherine suffered from ill health for some years and had to give up not only her extraordinary fasts, but even to a certain extent those of the Church, and at length in 1507 her health gave way completely. She rapidly got worse, and for the last months of her life suffered great agony; among the physicians who attended her was John-Baptist Boerio, who had been the principal doctor of King Henry VII of England, and he with the others was unable to diagnose her complaint. They eventually decided, “it must be a supernatural and divine thing”, for she lacked all pathological symptoms, which they could recognize. On September 13, 1510, she was in a high fever and delirium, and at dawn of the 15th “this blessed soul gently breathed her last in great peace and tranquillity, and flew to her tender and much-desired Love”. She was beatified in 1737 and Benedict XIV added her name to the Roman Martyrology, with the title of saint. St Catherine left two written works, a treatise on Purgatory and a Dialogue of the soul and the body, which the Holy Office declared were alone enough to prove her sanctity. They are among the more important documents of mysticism, but Alban Butler says of them very truly that “these treatises are not writ for the common”.
Apart from a short notice by Giustiniano, Bishop of Nibio, in his Annali di Genova (1537), the earliest biographical account of St Catherine seems to be preserved in manuscripts varying considerably in their Italian text and belonging to the years 1547—1548. From these in the main was compiled the first book concerning her which was printed in any detail. It is commonly known as the Vita e Dottrina, and was issued in 1551. This work, which has been often reprinted, is our principal source of information concerning the saint, and it contains also a collection of her sayings and meditations. The many problems connected with its text have been discussed in great detail by Baron Friedrich von Hügel in his important work, The Mystical Element of Religion (2 vols., 1908); see especially vol. i, pp. 371—466. His conclusions are beyond doubt justified in the main, but there is room for some difference of opinion as to details, as noted, e.g. in The Month, June, 1923, pp. 538—543. See also the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. v. The numerous modern lives of St Catherine are based on the Vita e Dottrina; among the more recent are Lili Sertorius, Katharina von Genua (1939), and L. de Lapérouse, La vie de Ste Catherine de Gênes (1948). A new translation of the Purgatory treatise and the Dialogue was published in 1946, made by Helen Douglas Irvine and Charlotte Balfour.
1656 Saint Joseph the New traveled to Mount Athos, tonsured at Pantokrator Monastery; worked many miracles attained unceasing prayer of the heart, receiving from God gift of tears, healing the sick and the crippled; relics remained incorrupt
Born in 1568 at Raguza in Dalmatia, and was given the name Jacob at his Baptism. When he was very young, his father died, and he was raised by his mother. At the age of twelve, he was sent to Ochrid to be schooled.

The young Jacob was called to live the monastic life when he was fifteen, and entered the monastery of the Mother of God. After five years, he traveled to Mount Athos, and was tonsured at the Pantokrator Monastery with the new name of Joseph. He fulfilled his various obediences in an exemplary manner, becoming perfected in virtue and holiness. He attained unceasing prayer of the heart, receiving from God the gift of tears. He also performed many miracles, healing the sick and the crippled. Some of the monasteries of the Holy Mountain would send for him so that he could heal those monks who were afflicted with severe bodily suffering.

On July 20, 1650, at the age of eighty-two, St Joseph was elected as Metropolitan of Timishoara. He was a wise and good shepherd to his flock, healing their physical and spiritual illnesses. Once he extinguished a fire in the western part of Timishoara by his prayers, when God sent a heavy rainfall.  After three years of archpastoral labors, he retired to the Partosh Monastery, where he was often visited by many of the faithful. The monastery was an important center of church activity in those days, and even had a school for training priests.

Metropolitan Joseph fell asleep in the Lord on August 15, 1656 when he was eighty-eight years old, and he was buried in the monastery church. He is commemorated on September 15.  He worked many miracles during his lifetime, and there are reports that his relics remained incorrupt after his death.

For more than 300 years the monks reverently tended his grave, then at his glorification on October 7, 1956 St Joseph's relics were transferred into the cathedral at Timishoara. The casket containing his holy relics is adorned with carvings depicting scenes from his life.
An Akathist composed to honor St Joseph speaks of his many virtues.
1811 The New Martyr John, murdered by Moslems; "I was born as an Orthodox Christian, and I shall die as an Orthodox Christian." "Most Holy Theotokos, help me." He also asked forgiveness of the Christians he met along the way.
John was from Crete, and worked as a farmer at New Ephesus (Kusantasi) in Asia Minor. He was a young man, and was engaged to be married.

On August 29, John and two friends from Crete went to a festival to celebrate the Feast of St John the Baptist. They were stopped by the Turks, and the two visitors were ordered to pay the head tax. The Cretans refused to pay, and got into a scuffle with the aga's men. The Turks took a gun belonging to one of the Cretans, but then he grabbed it back from the Moslem. In the confusion, one of the aga's men was killed and some of the others were stabbed.

Since John was not involved in the incident, he went back to his farm. The brother of the dead Moslem, however, wanted revenge. He knew that John was present when his brother was killed, so he had him arrested. John was thrown into prison, beaten, and was not allowed to have any visitors.

St John remained in prison for sixteen days. Then he was given the choice of saving his life by converting to Islam, or to remain a Christian and die. John stated, "I was born as an Orthodox Christian, and I shall die as an Orthodox Christian."

Since John was an attractive young man, the kadi's daughter became interested in him. If he were willing to convert, he could marry the girl and enjoy both wealth and position as a member of the kadi's family. Even this was not enough to make him deny Christ.

Finally the Hagarenes grew tired of trying to convert John, and he was sentenced to death by hanging. As he was led to the place of execution, he kept saying, "Most Holy Theotokos, help me." He also asked forgiveness of the Christians he met along the way.

St John suffered for Christ on September 15, 1811, and received the incorruptible crown of martyrdom. That night the martyr's body shone with a bright light. After three days, permission was granted to bury his holy relics in the courtyard of the church of St George.


 Thursday   Saints of September  15  Décimo séptimo Kaléndas Octóbris.   

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  September 2016
Universal:   Centrality of the Human Person
That each may contribute to the common good and to the building of a society that places the human person at the center
.
Evangelization:   Mission to Evangelize
That by participating in the Sacraments and meditating on Scripture, Christians may become more aware of their mission to evangelize
.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                   
 

                                                                             
       
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.