Mary the Mother of Jesus
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!
RDeo grátias. R.  Thanks be to God.
ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
   
Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King 

CAUSES OF SAINTS

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List


We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .

September 18 – Our Lady of Meritxell (Andorra)
 
The image of Our Lady had vanished
 The Shrine of Meritxell, in the hamlet of the same name in Andorra, is dedicated to the Madonna of Meritxell, patron saint of the Principality.

The origin of the devotion to Our Lady of Meritxell is based on the following story:
Around the 12th century, on the feast of the Epiphany, some Meritxell residents traveling on foot to the village of Canillo to attend Mass unexpectedly found a wild rosebush in blossom although it was mid-January. Intrigued by the sight, they approached and discovered a painting of the Madonna beneath it. They shared their discovery with the priest, who after Mass brought the sacred image to the church of Canillo, accompanied by the entire village.

The next day, when the church was opened, the image of Our Lady was nowhere to be seen. A traveler passing by the church told the priest that he had discovered a painting of the Madonna beneath a blossoming rosebush. So the villagers went back to the original place and found the image of the Virgin Mary at the foot of the same wild rosebush that, despite the heavy snowfall of the night, was in bloom, the snow having melted around it.

It was then decided to build a church at that very place to protect and venerate the image of the Virgin Mary, now known as Our Lady of Meritxell, patron saint of Andorra.


2009 September 18 Augustinian Recollect Bishop Nicholas Shi Jin Xian, 88 Dies in China After living a life of humility and virtue.  Never having lived outside of China, he wrote in Latin, English and Spanish, and was able to translate official texts. When he made contact with the first Spanish religious, after almost 40 years without speaking, hearing or reading a word of Spanish, he had no problem writing letters and reports in this language with an astounding perfection."

Born 03.02.1921 She-Liou-Lou, Henan, member of O.A.R. 28.12.1939, priest 29.06.1948,
1958-1980 in prison, Bishop of Shangqiu, consecrated 08.05.1991, consecrator Anthony Li Duan, openly installed Bishop of Shangqiu 13.05.1999, died 16.09.2009

The Most Beautiful Adornment September 18 - Our Lady of Meritxell (Andorra)
It is before the altar of the Virgin that future knights would spend their vigil of arms, because Mary was the purest and noblest expression of their ideal:  "the chaste cult of Mary has always been the inspiration of the French knighthood and created among us traditions of loyalty, courtesy and honor which survived all the failings,and are still now the most beautiful adornment of our civilization."
Cardinal Thomas, Archbishop of Rouen, France  Quoted in "The Virgin Mary in the History of France"

Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,  showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

304 St. Ferreolus A tribune in the Roman imperial army at Vienne, France
 311 St. Methodius of Olympus Bishop and martyr, famous for his writings
       St. Eustorgius, first bishop of Milan,  highly praised by blessed Ambrose.
       Saints Sophia and Irene, martyrs
 591 St. Ferreolus Bishop of Limoges
7th v. St. Eumenius, bishop and confessor At Gortyna in Crete
 690 St. Hygbald Benedictine abbot of Lincolnshire England
 895 St. Richardis Empress and wife of Emperor Charles the Fat
1663 St. Joseph of Cupertino b.1603 levitating at prayer temptations chains
1645 St. John de Massias  Dominican monk at Lima austerities, miracles, and visions
1663 St. Joseph of Cupertino Franciscan mystic patron saint of pilots /air passengers; From time of his ordination St Joseph’s life was one long succession of ecstasies, miracles of healing and supernatural happenings on a scale not paralleled in the reasonably authenticated life of any other saint.  When Cardinal Lauria asked him what souls in ecstasy saw during their raptures he replied: “They feel as though they were taken into a wonderful gallery, shining with never-ending beauty, where in a glass, with a single look, they apprehend the marvellous vision which God is pleased to show them.”
Anything that in any way could be particularly referred to God or the mysteries of religion was liable to ravish him from his senses and make him oblivious to what was going on around him; the absent-mindedness and abstraction of his childhood now had an end and a purpose clearly seen. The sight of a lamb in the garden of Capuchins at Fossombrone caused him to be lost in contemplation of the spotless Lamb of God and, it is said, be caught up into the air with the animal in his arms.
1842 St. Dominic Trach Vietnamese martyr and a priest

15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy, but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

"Clearly, what God wants above all is our will which we received as a free gift from God in creation and possess as though our own. When a man trains himself to acts of virtue, it is with the help of grace from God from whom all good things come that he does this. The will is what man has as his unique possession" (St. Joseph of Cupertino, from the reading for his feast in the Franciscan breviary).
Monday, September 18, 2006 St. Joseph of Cupertino, Priest (Feast) 

Be firm in your resolutions; stay in the ship in which I placed you and let the storm come. Long live Jesus. You will not perish. Walk the way of the Lord in simplicity; do not torment your spirit.
Say the truth, always the truth. 
-- Saint Pio of Pietrelcina

The great psalm of the Passion, Chapter 22, whose first verse "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
Jesus pronounced on the cross, ended with the vision: "All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord; and all the families of the nations shall worship before him" For kingship belongs to the LORD, the ruler over the nations.  All who sleep in the earth will bow low before God; All who have gone down into the dust will kneel in homage.  And I will live for the LORD; my descendants will serve you.  The generation to come will be told of the Lord, that they may proclaim to a people yet unborn the deliverance you have brought.
Our Lady of La Salette, Reconciler of Sinners (I) - OUR LADY OF MERITXELL (Andorra)
The apparition took place on September 19, 1846. It was the last day of the Embers Days of September, a Saturday, which that year was the vigil of the feast of Our Lady of the Seven Sorrows, at the time of first Vespers, in other words the moment when the Church sang, in her office, this hymn (the Stabat Mater) of such grieving and deeply sad Christian sentiment! The Blessed Virgin wished to appear at the time when this cry of sorrow burst out in the Church, and this miraculous occurrence is of the kind that can strongly strike hearts and minds (...)
At the privileged hour in the history of the world, when the Queen of Heaven let the sorrowful Magnificat of her prophetic Lamentations, the 80,000 dying and 80,000 newly born infants who wail every day, towards Time or towards Eternity, must have felt in their souls something of the divine start of Saint John the Baptist in his mother's womb. The ones were carried to the foot of their Judge's altar in the irresistible flux of their Advocate's tears, the others began their earthly pilgrimage in the movement of reflux of the same salutary waves which were to crumble the walls of the prideful city. We will know some day, (...) how many desperate souls were saved on that occasion, how many supernatural vocations were determined on that day, and of how many latent and inevitable catastrophes was suddenly delivered the immense, ungrateful people of this crying Queen descended from Heaven.
Léon Bloy (1846-1917) The Symbolism of the Apparition, Lemercier, 1925
Quoted by René Laurentin and Michel Corteville in The Discovery of the La Salette's Secret, Fayard, 2002
2009 September 18 Augustinian Recollect Bishop Nicholas Shi JingXian, 88 Dies in China After living a life of humility and virtue.  Never having lived outside of China, he wrote in Latin, English and Spanish, and was able to translate official texts. When he made contact with the first Spanish religious, after almost 40 years without speaking, hearing or reading a word of Spanish, he had no problem writing letters and reports in this language with an astounding perfection."
Began Mission Before Communism ROME, SEPT. 17, 2009 Zenit.org

Bishop Nicholas Shi JingXian, 88, died Wednesday in Shangqui, the last of the Augustinian Recollects to have worked in China before the take-over of Communism.  According to a statement from his order, it was Bishop Shi who "after decades of persecution and isolation, restored religious life in his diocese, and the Catholic Church's relations with the civil authorities."

Nicholas Shi was born in 1921, just three years before the Order of Augustinian Recollects arrived at the Henan Mission (present-day Shangqiu).   He entered the Augustinian minor seminary in his native municipality, and made his profession Jan. 16, 1940. After studying philosophy and theology, he was ordained a priest on July 29, 1948.  Shortly after Father Shi's ordination, Spanish religious were expelled from China and native religious were dispersed or sent to concentration camps. His mission was thus closed.

Father Shi was soon after appointed episcopal vicar, until he was finally prohibited from exercising any pastoral action.  
He first became an oculist, but later was consigned for three years to a brick factory to be "re-educated." He was imprisoned for two years and lived in miserable conditions suffering the public contempt of the authorities.   However, behind closed doors, he did not cease his pastoral work, undertaking constant visits to Christian homes and leading underground liturgical celebrations. His human qualities were appreciated even by those who guarded him.
Deng Xiao Ping's coming to power and the 1979 Cultural Revolution enabled the priest to get a "rehabilitation letter." He was assigned to teach English, a job he held until his retirement.
Soon after, he managed to contact the Augustinian Recollects through letters written to addresses in Manila he had memorized as a young man. The contact was unexpected on both sides: Father Shi was not sure if the order still existed, having been told during his psychological torture that it was gone; the Augustinians themselves did not know if any Chinese religious were still alive.
Re-building 
Retired from his teaching tasks, he returned to Shangqui in 1980 to dedicate himself solely to pastoral work. He succeeded in having the civil authorities return to the Church all the goods confiscated since 1948. He re-opened the parish and contacted some of the Augustinian religious who were still in China after the dispersion.
He also began to receive visits from foreign religious, once permission was granted for travel within China.
For years he engaged in negotiations with civil authorities, eventually gaining permission to have communities of religious in his diocese. In 1991, he was made bishop.
"Nicholas Shi deserves a place of honor in the history of the Order and in the Catholic Church in China," the Augustinian statement affirmed. "His humility, discretion, ability to react and prudence led him to maintain a tense but respectful relationship with the authorities. His figure attracted many of his compatriots to Catholicism and the religious life.   "He was a person of profound spiritual life, deep faith and uncommon intelligence. Never having lived outside of China, he wrote in Latin, English and Spanish, and was able to translate official texts. When he made contact with the first Spanish religious, after almost 40 years without speaking, hearing or reading a word of Spanish, he had no problem writing letters and reports in this language with an astounding perfection."
"His love for the Order of Augustinian Recollects in which he was formed, to which he belonged and which he re-established in his diocese, with a great vocational flowering, was a feature that all Augustinians recognize and thank him for."



304 St. Ferreolus A tribune in the Roman imperial army at Vienne, France
In território Viennénsi sancti Ferréoli Mártyris, qui, cum esset tribuníciæ potestátis, jussu impiíssimi Præsidis Crispíni tentus, et primo crudelíssime verberátus, deínde, gravi catenárum póndere onústus, in tetérrimum cárcerem trusus est; unde, solútis Dei nutu vínculis et jánuis cárceris patefáctis, éxiens, ab insequéntibus íterum est captus, ac martyrii palmam obtruncatióne cápitis percépit.
    In the diocese of Vienne, the holy martyr Ferreol, a tribune, who was arrested by order of the impious governor Crispinus, most cruelly scourged, loaded with heavy chains, and cast into a dark dungeon.  A miracle broke his bonds and opened the doors of the prison, from which he made his escape, but he was taken again by his pursuers and received the palm of martyrdom by being beheaded.
He sheltered St. Julian of Brioude and was arrested by the local governor, Crispin. Scourged and imprisoned, Gerreoulus escaped miraculously but was recaptured and beheaded.

THIRD CENTURY ST FERREOLUS, MARTYR   
ACCORDING to his passio, St Ferreolus was a tribune who lived at Vienne in Gaul, and was secretly a Christian. St Julian of Brioude, a native of that city, lodged in his house and made public profession of the faith. When persecution began and St Julian had been put to death, Crispin, governor of that part of Gaul, had St Ferreolus apprehended for failing to arrest Christians.
   Crispin told him that, as he was paid by the state as a military officer -- it became him to set to others an example of obedience.
The martyr answered, “I do not so much overrate money. If I may be allowed to live and serve God, I am well satisfied. If even this seem too much, I am willing to resign life itself rather than abandon my religion.”
The judge commanded that he should be scourged, and then confined him in that inner pit of the prison into which the rest of the place drained. On the third day his chains fell off his hands and legs by the power of God, and he made his escape and went out of the city by the gate that led to Lyons. He swam over the river Rhône and got as far as the river Gère which falls into the Rhône just above Vienne, when he fell again into the hands of the persecutors, who bound him and led him away to death. He was beheaded on the banks of the Rhône and the Christians of Vienne interred his body with great veneration near the same river. A church was built over his burying-place, from whence his relics were removed by St Mamertus about the year 473 to a church built to shelter them within the city of Vienne.
On this same day is commemorated another ST
FERREOLUS, a bishop of Limoges who died in 591 or thereabouts.
The “acts” of St Ferreolus (printed in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. v) are, as Delehaye states, “of little worth”. But his martyrdom is authentic, and his cultus, to which both St Gregory of Tours and Venantius Fortunatus bear witness, very ancient. See CMH., pp. 517-518.
Item sanctárum Mártyrum Sophíæ et Irénes.
   
Saints Sophia and Irene, martyrs
311 St. Methodius of Olympus Bishop and martyr, famous for his writings
In Chálcide Græciæ natális sancti Methódii, qui prius Olympii, in Lycia, et póstea Tyri, in Phœnícia, éxstitit Epíscopus, sermónis nitóre ac doctrína claríssimus; atque, ad extrémum novíssimæ persecutiónis (ut scribit sanctus Hierónymus), martyrio coronátus est.
    In Chalcis of Greece, the birthday of St. Methodius, bishop of Olympius in Lycia and afterwards of Tyre in Phoenicia, most renowned for eloquence and learning.  St. Jerome says that he won the martyr's crown at the end of the last persecution.
St. Jerome wrote of his martyrdom at Chalcis, in modern Greece. Methodius was the bishop of Olympus, Lycia, in Asia Minor. He then ruled Tyre, Lebanon, or possibly Patara, in Lycia, and was the author of the treatise On the Resurrection and the Symposium.
311 ST METHODIUS OF OLYMPUS, BISHOP AND MARTYR
ST JEROME states that this Methodius was bishop first of Olympus in Lycia and then of Tyre, and that he was crowned with martyrdom at Khalkis in Greece at the very end of the last persecution. These statements are reproduced in the Roman. Martyrology, but it is practically certain that he was never bishop of Tyre.  Greek writers refer to him as bishop of Patara in Lycia. We have no particulars of his life or martyrdom and his fame rests on his writings.
   Against Origen’s teaching that man’s risen body is not the same as his earthly body he wrote a dialogue On the Resurrection. He wrote on free will against the Valentinians, and other works which caused St Jerome to refer to him as “the most eloquent Methodius”, and the Roman Martyrology to call him “most renowned for the brilliance of his preaching and his learning”.
    Methodius himself, however, gave support to the error of Millenarianism i.e. Christ’s temporal reign of a thousand years before the general resurrection, in his Symposium. The best known of his works is this Symposium or Banquet of the Ten Virgins, written in imitation of the Banquet of Plato. As an imitation it is hardly a success (Alban Butler calls his style “diffusive, swelling, and full of epithets”), but as an ascetical treatise on virginity it was formerly famous. In it a matron is introduced to tell her friend Eubulus (the surname of St Methodius himself) the conversation of ten maidens at a festive meal in the garden of Arete (Virtue). A discourse is put into the mouth of each of these in commendation of virginity. The symposium ends with a hymn to our Lord as the Bridegroom of the Church, in which the maiden Thecla sings a series of alphabetical strophes and is answered by the others with a refrain. This forms one of the earliest of Christian hymns.

The slender data available concerning the life of St Methodius of Olympus have been collected in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. v. With regard to his literary work, research in modern times has brought to light a Slavonic text of several of his writings which has been turned to profit by N. Bonwetsch in his Methodius von Olympus (1891). See also Bardenhewer, Altkirchliche Literatur (1913), vol. ii, pp. 334 seq., and DTC., vol. x, cc. 1696—1614.
591 St. Ferreolus Bishop of Limoges France, much admired by St. Gregory of Tours; assumed the role of bishop in 579.
In território Viennénsi sancti Ferréoli Mártyris, qui, cum esset tribuníciæ potestátis, jussu impiíssimi Præsidis Crispíni tentus, et primo crudelíssime verberátus, deínde, gravi catenárum póndere onústus, in tetérrimum cárcerem trusus est; unde, solútis Dei nutu vínculis et jánuis cárceris patefáctis, éxiens, ab insequéntibus íterum est captus, ac martyrii palmam obtruncatióne cápitis percépit.
    In the diocese of Vienne, the holy martyr Ferreol, a tribune, who was arrested by order of the impious governor Crispinus, most cruelly scourged, loaded with heavy chains, and cast into a dark dungeon.  A miracle broke his bonds and opened the doors of the prison, from which he made his escape, but he was taken again by his pursuers and received the palm of martyrdom by being beheaded.

Medioláni sancti Eustórgii Primi, ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopi, beáti Ambrósii testimónio célebris.
   
St. Eustorgius, first bishop of Milan,  highly praised by blessed Ambrose.
7th v. Gortynæ, in Creta, sancti Euménii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
   
St. Eumenius, bishop and confessor At Gortyna in Crete.
Saint Eumenius from the time of his youth was noted for his virtuous life. He strove to serve the One God and therefore he shunned worldly temptations. Concerned for the salvation of his soul, he distributed all his substance to the poor.
By the blessing of God St Eumenius was chosen as Bishop of Gortyna on the island of Crete. The saint, like a compassionate father, comforted his flock in their sorrows, and cared for the orphaned and indigent. He prayers were so strong before God that once, during a drought, he called forth abundant rain upon the earth.
St Eumenius wisely and zealously defended the Orthodox Faith against the Monophysite heresy. For his opposition to the heresy the saint was banished to the Thebaid, where he died in the seventh century. His body was then transferred and buried in Gortyna.

690 St. Hygbald Benedictine abbot of Lincolnshire England
also called Higbald, Hugbald, or Hybald. Several churches in the region bear his name.

895 St. Richardis Empress and wife of Emperor Charles the Fat
The daughter of the count of Alsace, she wed the future emperor and served him faithfully for nineteen years until accused of infidelity with Bishop Liutword of Vercelli. To prove her innocence, she successfully endured the painful ordeal of fire, but she left Charles and lived as a nun, first at Hohenburg, Germany, and then Andlau Abbey. She remained at Andlau until her death
.
895 ST RICHARDIS, WIDOW
WHEN she was twenty-two years old Richardis, daughter of the Count of Alsace, was married to Charles the Fat, son of King Louis the German. Nineteen years later, in 881, she accompanied him to Rome, to be crowned emperor and empress of the Holy Roman Empire by Pope John VIII. Hitherto they had lived together in amity but a few years later Charles, either because his suspicions were genuinely aroused or else in order to serve some unworthy purpose of his own, charged his wife with unfaithfulness. He named as her accomplice his chancellor, Liutward, who was bishop of Vercelli and a man greatly esteemed both for his abilities and his virtue. Richardis and Liutward appeared before the imperial assembly and solemnly denied the allegation; the bishop purged himself by an oath and the empress appealed to the judgement of God by claiming an ordeal, either by fire or (by proxy) of battle. It is said that the ordeal by fire was accepted and that St Richardis, with bare feet and wearing an inflammable smock, walked unharmed across burning embers. Liutward was nevertheless deprived of his chancellorship and, it not being decent after so public an exhibition that they should continue to live together, Richardis was allowed to separate from Charles. She went for a time to a nunnery at Hohenburg and then to the abbey of Andlau, which she had herself founded. Here she lived in peace until her death about the year 895 joining in the life, of the nuns, interesting herself on their behalf with the Holy See, caring for the poor, and writing verses. When Pope St Leo IX visited Andlau in 1049, on his way from a council at Mainz, he ordered her relics to be disinterred, enshrined, and exposed for the veneration of the faithful. This cultus has continued and the feast of St Richardis is observed in the diocese of Strasburg.

There is no formal life of St Richards, but a few breviary lessons, panegyrics, etc., have been brought together in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. v, See also the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographic, vol. xxviii, pp. 420 seq. and M. Corbet, Ste Richarde...(1948).

1645 St. John de Massias  Dominican monk at Lima austerities, miracles, and visions
Peru. He was born in Ribera, Spain, to a noble family and was orphaned at a young age. John went to Peru to work on a cattle ranch before entering the Dominicans at Lima as a lay brother, assigned to serve as a doorkeeper, or porter. He was known for his austerities, miracles, and visions. John cared for all the poor of Lima, dying there on September 16. Pope Paul VI canonized him in 1975
.
1645 BD JOHN MASSIAS
The lessons of his office state that the parents of Bd John Massias (or Masias) were representatives of noble and ancient families, who “had been deprived of rank and wealth by the various misfortunes of an unreliable world”. He was born at Ribera in Estramadura in 1585 and was left an orphan whilst still young, being looked after by an uncle, who made the boy earn his living as a shepherd. During the long hours when there was nothing particular to do except keep his eyes open John would say his rosary and meditate on the Christian mysteries, and it sometimes appeared that the holy ones were there, visible and talking to him, especially our Lady and St John the Evangelist. He attributed to an instruction of the last named his sudden decision to go to the Americas, as so many others of his countrymen were then doing. He landed in Peru and got work on a, cattle-ranch, where he stopped for over two years and saved a little money with which he made his way to Lima. Here he decided to become a religious and, having given away what was left of his savings, he was accepted as a lay-brother by the Dominicans of St Mary Magdalen’s.
   Brother John’s austerities exceeded the bounds of prudence, and his prior had to insist on moderation: for he would content himself with one hour of sleep, and that on his knees with his head on the bed, and brought on himself a disease which required a painful and dangerous operation. He was made porter and his lodge soon became the meeting-place for the poor, the sick and the wretched of the city; following the example of his friend Bd Martin de Porres, he begged alms with which to feed and physic them, and accompanied his ministrations with good advice and exhortations to good life and the love of God. Those who were too shy to beg he sought out in their homes, and to save time in begging from door to door he trained the priory donkey to go round by itself and receive in its panniers food and clothing for his beloved poor. Many and remarkable were the miracles attributed to Bd John Massias, and his death at the age of sixty was mourned by the whole city. He was beatified in 1837.
On the occasion of the beatification an Italian life, the Dominicans in Rome published Vita del Beato Giovanni Massias. See also Procter, Lives of Dominican Saints, pp. 263—274. There is a fuller bibliography in Taurisano, Catalogus Historicus OP.
1663 St. Joseph of Cupertino Franciscan mystic patron saint of pilots /air passengers; From time of his ordination St Joseph’s life was one long succession of ecstasies, miracles of healing and supernatural happenings on a scale not paralleled in the reasonably authenticated life of any other saint. When Cardinal Lauria asked him what souls in ecstasy saw during their raptures he replied: “They feel as though they were taken into a wonderful gallery, shining with never-ending beauty, where in a glass, with a single look, they apprehend the marvellous vision which God is pleased to show them.”

Anything that in any way could be particularly referred to God or the mysteries of religion was liable to ravish him from his senses and make him oblivious to what was going on around him; the absent-mindedness and abstraction of his childhood now had an end and a purpose clearly seen. The sight of a lamb in the garden of Capuchins at Fossombrone caused him to be lost in contemplation of the spotless Lamb of God and, it is said, be caught up into the air with the animal in his arms.
Auximi, in Picéno, sancti Joséphi a Cupertíno, Sacerdótis ex Ordine Minórum Conventuálium et Confessóris; quem Clemens Papa Décimus tértius in Sanctórum númerum rétulit.
    At Osimo in Piceno, St. Joseph of Cupertino, priest and confessor of the Order of Friars Minor Conventual, who was placed among the saints by Clement XIII.

1663 ST JOSEPH OF CUPERTINO
JOSEPH DESA was born June 17, 1603, at Cupertino, a small village between Brindisi and Otranto. His parents were poor and unfortunate. Joseph himself was born in a shed at the back of the house, because his father, a carpenter, was unable to pay his debts and the home was being sold up. His childhood was unhappy. His widowed mother looked on him as a nuisance and a burden, treated him with great severity, and he developed an extreme absentmindedness and inertia. He would forget his meals, and when reminded of them say simply, “I forgot”, and wander open-mouthed in an aimless way about the village so that he earned the nick-name of “Boccaperta”, the gaper.
   He had a hot temper, which made him more unpopular, but was exemplary - even precocious in his religious duties. When the time came for him to try and earn his own living, Joseph was bound apprentice to a shoemaker, a trade he applied himself to for some time, but without any success.
  When he was seventeen he presented himself to be received amongst the Conventual Franciscans, but they refused to have him. Then he went to the Capuchins, and they took him as a lay-brother; but after eight months he was dismissed as unequal to the duties of the order: his clumsiness and preoccupation made him an apparently impossible subject, for he dropped piles of plates and dishes on the refectory floor, forgot to do things he was told, and could not be trusted even to make up the kitchen fire.
   Joseph then turned for help to a wealthy uncle, who curtly refused to aid an obvious good-for-nothing, and the young man returned home in despair and misery. His mother was not at all pleased to see him on her hands again and used her influence with her brother, a Conventual Franciscan, to have him accepted by the friars of his order at Grottella as a servant. He was given a tertiary habit and put to work in the stables. Now a change seems to have come over Joseph; at any rate he was more successful in his duties, and his humility, his sweetness, his love of mortification and penance gained him so much regard that in 1623 it was resolved he should be admitted amongst the religious of the choir, that he might qualify himself for holy orders.
   Joseph therefore began his novitiate, and his virtues rendered him an object of admiration; but his lack of progress in studies was also remarked. Try as he would, the extent of his human accomplishments was to read badly and to write worse. He had no gift of eloquence or for exposition, the one text on which he had something to say being, “Blessed is the womb that bore thee”. When he came up for examination for the diaconate the bishop opened the gospels at random and his eye fell on that text: he asked Brother Joseph to expound it, which he did well. When it was a question of the priesthood, the first candidates were so satisfactory that the remainder, Joseph among them, were passed without examination. After having received the priesthood in 1628 he passed five years without tasting bread or wine, and the herbs he ate on Fridays were so distasteful that only he could use them. His fast in Lent was so rigorous that he took no nourishment except on Thursdays and Sundays, and he spent the hours devoted to manual work in those simple household and routine duties which he knew were, humanly speaking, all he was fitted to undertake.
   From the time of his ordination St Joseph’s life was one long succession of ecstasies, miracles of healing and supernatural happenings on a scale not paralleled in the reasonably authenticated life of any other saint. Anything that in any way could be particularly referred to God or the mysteries of religion was liable to ravish him from his senses and make him oblivious to what was going on around him; the absent-mindedness and abstraction of his childhood now had an end and a purpose clearly seen. The sight of a lamb in the garden of the Capuchins at Fossombrone caused him to be lost in contemplation of the spotless Lamb of God and, it is said, be caught up into the air with the animal in his arms.
   At all times he had a command over beasts surpassing that of St Francis himself; sheep were said to gather round him and listen to his prayers, a sparrow at a convent came and went at his word. Especially during Mass or the Divine Office he would be lifted off his feet in rapture.
   During the seventeen years he remained at Grottella over seventy occasions are recorded of his levitation, the most marvellous being when the friars were building a Calvary. The middle cross of the group was thirty-six feet high and correspondingly heavy, defying the efforts of ten men to lift it. St Joseph is said to have “flown” seventy yards from the door of the house to the cross, picked it up in his arms “as if it were a straw”, and deposited it in its place. This staggering feat is not attested by an eyewitness, and, in common with most of his earlier marvels, was recorded only after his death, when plenty of time had elapsed in which events could be exaggerated and legends arise.
   Whatever their exact nature and extent, the daily life of St Joseph was surrounded by such disturbing phenomena that for thirty-five years he was not allowed to celebrate Mass in public, to keep choir, to take his meals with his brethren, or to attend processions and other public functions. Sometimes when he was bereft of his senses they would try to bring him to by hitting him, burning his flesh or pricking it with needles, but nothing had any effect except, it is said, the voice of his superior. When he did come back to himself he would laughingly apologize for what he called his “fits of giddiness”.
  Levitation, the name given to the raising of the human body from the ground by no apparent physical force, is recorded in some form or other of over two hundred saints and holy persons (as well as of many others), and in their case is interpreted as a special mark of God’s favour whereby it is made evident even to the physical senses that prayer is a raising of the heart and mind to God. St Joseph of Cupertino, in both the extent and number of these experiences, provides the classical examples of levitation, for, if many of the earlier incidents are doubtful some of those recorded in his later years are very well attested. For example, one of his biqgraphers states that: “When in 1645 the Spanish amhassador to the papal court, the High Admiral of Castile, passed through [Assisi] he visited Joseph of Cupertino in his cell. After conversing with him he returned to the church and told his wife: ‘I have seen and spoken with another St Francis.’ As his wife then expressed a great desire to enjoy the same privilege, the father guardian gave Joseph an order to go down to the church and speak with her Excellency. To this he made answer: ‘I will obey, but I do not know whether I shall be able to speak with her.’ In point of fact no sooner had he entered the church than his eyes rested on a statue of Mary Immaculate which stood over the altar, and he at once flew about a dozen paces over the heads of those present to the foot of the statue. Then after paying homage there for some short space and uttering his customary shrill cry he flew back again and straightway returned to his cell, leaving the admiral, his wife, and the large retinue which attended them, speechless with astonishment.” This story is supported in two biographies by copious references to depositions, in the process of canonization, of witnesses who are expressly stated to have been present.
“Still more trustworthy”, says Father Thurston in the Month for May 1919, “is the evidence given of the saint’s levitations at Osimo, where he spent the last six years of his life. There his fellow religious saw him fly up seven or eight feet into the air to kiss the statue of the infant Jesus which stood over the altar, and they told how he carried off this wax image in his arms and floated about with it in his cell in every conceivable attitude. On one occasion during these last years of his life he caught up another friar in his flight and carried him some distance round the room, and this indeed he is stated to have done on several previous occasions. In the very last Mass which he celebrated, on the festival of the Assumption 1663, a month before his death, he was lifted up in a longer rapture than usual. For these facts we have the evidence of several eye-witnesses who made their depositions, as usual under oath, only four or five years later. It seems very difficult to believe that they could possibly be deceived as to the broad fact that the saint did float in the air, as they were convinced they had seen him do, under every possible variety of conditions and surroundings.”
   Prosper Lambertini, afterwards Pope Benedict XIV, the supreme authority on evidence and procedure in canonization causes, personally studied all the details of the case of St Joseph of Cupertino. The writer goes on: “When the cause came up for discussion before the Congregation of Rites [Lambertini] was ‘promotor Fidei’ (popularly known as the Devil’s Advocate), and his ‘animadversions’ upon the evidence submitted are said to have been of a most searching character. None the less we must believe that these criticisms were answered to his own complete satisfaction, for not only was it he himself who, when pope, published in 1753 the decree of beatification, but in his great work, De Servorum Del Beatificatione, etc., he speaks as follows: ‘Whilst I discharged the office of promoter of the Faith the cause of the venerable servant of God, Joseph of Cupertino, came up for discussion in the Congregation of Sacred Rites, which after my retirement was brought to a favourable conclusion, and in this eyewitnesses of unchallengeable integrity gave evidence of the famous upliftings from the ground and prolonged flights of the aforesaid servant of God when rapt in ecstasy.’ There can be no doubt that Benedict XIV, a critically-minded man, who knew the value of evidence and who had studied the original depositions as probably no one else had studied them, believed that the witnesses of St Joseph’s levitations had really seen what they professed to have seen.”
   There were not wanting persons to whom these manifestations were a stone of offence, and when St Joseph attracted crowds about him as he travelled in the province of Ban, he was denounced as “one who runs about these provinces and as a new Messias draws crowds after him by the prodigies wrought on some few of the ignorant people, who are ready to believe anything”.
   The vicar general carried the complaint to the inquisitors of Naples, and Joseph was ordered to appear. The heads of his accusation being examined, the inquisitors could find nothing worthy of censure, but did not discharge him; instead they sent him to Rome to his minister general, who received him at first with harshness, but he became impressed by St Joseph’s innocent and humble bearing and he took him to see the pope, Urban VIII. The saint went into ecstasy at the sight of the Vicar of Christ, and Urban declared that if Joseph should die before himself he would give evidence of the miracle to which he had been a witness.
   It was decided to send Joseph to Assisi, where again his superiors treated him with considerable severity, they at least pretending to regard him as a hypocrite. He arrived at Assisi in 1639, and remained there thirteen years. At first he suffered many trials, both interior and exterior. God seemed to have abandoned him his religious exercises were accompanied with a spiritual dryness that afflicted him exceedingly and terrible temptations cast him into so deep a melancholy that he scarce dare lift up his eyes. The minister general, being informed, called him to Rome, and having kept him there three weeks he sent him back to Assisi.
   The saint on his way to Rome experienced a return of those heavenly consolations, which had been withdrawn from him. Reports of Joseph’s holiness and miracles spread over the borders of Italy, and distinguished people, such as the Admiral of Castile mentioned above, would call at Assisi to visit him.
   Among them were John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick and Hanover. This prince, who was a Lutheran, was so struck with what he had seen that he embraced the Catholic faith.
  Joseph used to say to some scrupulous persons who came to consult him: “I like neither scruples nor melancholy; let your intention be right and fear not”, and he was always urging people to prayer. “Pray”, he would say, “pray. If you are troubled by dryness or distractions, just say an Our Father. Then you make both vocal and mental prayer.”
   When Cardinal Lauria asked him what souls in ecstasy saw during their raptures he replied: “They feel as though they were taken into a wonderful gallery, shining with never-ending beauty, where in a glass, with a single look, they apprehend the marvellous vision which God is pleased to show them.”
   In the ordinary comings and goings of daily life he was so preoccupied with heavenly things that he would genuinely suppose a passing woman to be our Lady or St Catherine or St Clare, a strange man to be one of the Apostles, a fellow friar to be St Francis or St Antony.
   In 1653, for reasons which are not known, the Inquisition of Perugia was instructed to remove St Joseph from the care of his own order and put him in charge of Capuchins at a lonely friary among the hills of Pietrarossa, where he was to live in the strictest seclusion. “Have I got to go to prison then?” he asked, and departed at once—leaving his hat, his cloak, his breviary and his spectacles behind him. To prison, in effect, he had gone. He was not allowed to leave the convent enclosure, to speak to anyone but the friars, to write or to receive letters he was completely cut off from the world. Apart from wondering why he should be sundered from his fellow Conventuals and treated like a criminal, this life must have been particularly satisfactory to St Joseph. But soon his whereabouts was discovered and pilgrims flocked to the place; whereupon he was spirited away to lead the same sort of life with the Capuchins of Fossombrone.
   The rest of his life was spent like this. When in 1655 the chapter general of the Conventual Franciscans asked for the return of their saint to Assisi, Pope Alexander VII replied that one St Francis at Assisi was enough, but in 1657 he was allowed to go to the Conventual house at Osimo. Here the seclusion was, however, even more strict, and only selected religious were allowed to visit him in his cell. But all this time, and till the end, supernatural manifestations were his daily portion: he was in effect deserted by man but God was ever more clearly with him.
  He fell sick on August lo, 1663, and knew that his end was at hand five weeks later he died, at the age of sixty. He was canonized in 1767.

There is a printed summarium prepared for the Congregation of Rites in 1688, containing an abstract of the depositions of witnesses in the process of beatification. It is stated, however, that only two copies are now known to exist, and it does not seem to have been accessible to the Bollandists. In the Acta Sanctorum, therefore (September, vol. v), they contented themselves with translating from previously published biographies such as those of Pastrovicchi (1753) and Bernino (1722). The two lives last named have been translated into French and other languages. A convenient version or adaptation of Pastrovicchi in English was brought out by Father F. S. Laing (1918). The bull of canonization, a lengthy document, containing many biographical data, is printed in the later Italian lives, and in the French translation of Bernino (1856). In this the story of St Joseph’s aerial flights, as recounted above, is told in detail and emphasized. Cf. H. Thurston, The Physical Phenomena of Mysticism (1952).
He was born in Cupertino, Italy. After several attempts to enter the religious life, he was accepted by the Conventual Franciscans at Grattela, where he received ordination in 1628. He soon demonstrated many gifts, including the ability to fly through the air. In 1639, because of the enmity of his fellow monks, Joseph was sent to Assisi. In 1653, the Inquisition sent him to a remote friary and then to another house at Pieterossa, because of the popularity and fame attached to his levitation and other gifts. Joseph was also confined to a house in Fossombrofle until 1657. He died at Osimo and was canonized in 1767. His cult is now confined to local calendars.
1663 St. Joseph of Cupertino b.1603 levitating at prayer temptations chains
Already as a child, Joseph showed a fondness for prayer. After a short career with the Capuchins, he joined the Conventuals. Following a brief assignment caring for the friary mule, Joseph began his studies for the priesthood. Though studies were very difficult for him, Joseph gained a great deal of knowledge from prayer. He was ordained in 1628.
Joseph’s tendency to levitate during prayer was sometimes a cross; some people came to see this much as they might have gone to a circus sideshow. Joseph’s gift led him to be humble, patient and obedient, even though at times he was greatly tempted and felt forsaken by God. He fasted and wore iron chains for much of his life.
The friars transferred Joseph several times for his own good and for the good of the rest of the community. He was reported to and investigated by the Inquisition; the examiners exonerated him.
Joseph was canonized in 1767. In the investigation preceding the canonization, 70 incidents of levitation are recorded.
Comment:  While levitation is an extraordinary sign of holiness, Joseph is also remembered for the ordinary signs he showed. He prayed even in times of inner darkness, and he lived out the Sermon on the Mount.
He used his "unique possession" (his free will) to praise God and to serve God’s creation.
Quote:   "Clearly, what God wants above all is our will which we received as a free gift from God in creation and possess as though our own. When a man trains himself to acts of virtue, it is with the help of grace from God from whom all good things come that he does this. The will is what man has as his unique possession"
(St. Joseph of Cupertino, from the reading for his feast in the Franciscan breviary).
1842 St. Dominic Trach Vietnamese martyr and a priest
member of the Dominican Third Order. Caught up in the persecution against Christians, Dominic was beheaded. He was canonized in 1988
.

Mary's Divine Motherhood

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR SEPTEMBER
Parishes. That our parishes, animated by a missionary spirit,
may be places where faith is communicated and charity is seen.


ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
  Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;

May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.