Saturday Saints of this Day March 26 Séptimo Kaléndas Aprílis       
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)



40 days for Life Campaign saves lives
Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com

Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world
It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Former abortion worker finds mercy

 
40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

Holy Saturday Night: The Easter Vigil

Jesus brings us many Blessings
Sixth Week of Lent Holy Week

Festum sancti Gabriélis Archángeli,
qui ad annuntiándum Incarnatiónis divíni Verbi mystérium a Deo missus est.
The Feast of St. Gabriel Archangel, who was sent by God
to announce the Incarnation of the Divine Word.
Annunciation of the Lord
 Annuntiátio beatíssimæ Vírginis Genitrícis Dei Maríæ.       The Annunciation of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God.
Annunciation Novena March 25
I greet you, Ever-blessed Virgin, Mother of God, Throne of Grace, Miracle of Almighty Power! 
I greet you, Sanctuary of the Most Holy Trinity and Queen of the Universe, Mother of Mercy and Refuge of Sinners! 
Most loving Mother, attracted by your beauty and sweetness, and by your tender compassion,  I confidently turn to you, miserable as I am, and beg of you to obtain for me from your dear Son the favor I request in this novena: (mention your request).
Obtain for me also, Queen of Heaven, the most lively contrition for my many sins and the grace to imitatBookcliff Engineering Inc.e closely those virtues which you practiced so faithfully, especially humility, purity and obedience. Above all,  I beg you to be my Mother and Protectress, to receive me into the number of your devoted children, and to guide me from your high throne of glory.  


Cheerfulness strengthens the heart and makes us persevere in a good life.
Therefore the servant of God ought always to be in good spirits. -- St. Philip Neri


"Time is not our own and we must give a strict accounting of it."
1606 St. Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo Bishop defender of the native Indians in Peru's rights


SCRIPTURE
My power is made perfect in weakness. -- 2 Corinthians 12:9

Do not reject my petitions, Mother of Mercy! Have pity on me, and do not abandon me during life or at the moment of my death. Amen.

Saturday, March 26, 2016
the Sixth Week of Lent
Holy Saturday Night: The Easter Vigil
Genesis 1:1--2:2 ; Psalms 104:1-2, 5-6, 10, 12-14, 24, 35 ; Genesis 22:1-18 ; Psalms 16:5, 8-11;  Exodus 14:15--15 - 1 ;  
Exodus 15:1-6, 17-18 ;
I
saiah 54:5-14 ;  Psalms 30:2, 4-6, 11-13 ;  Isaiah 55:1-11 ; Isaiah 12:2-6 ;  Baruch 3:9-15, 32--4:4 ;
Psalms 19:8-11 ; Ezekiel 36:16-28 ;  
 
Blessed are they who have kept the word with a generous heart
and yield a harvest through perseverance.


Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.

Now there is a great difference between believing in Christ, and in believing that Jesus is the Christ. For that he was the Christ even the devils believed;
but he believes in Christ who both loves Christ, and hopes in Christ.  -- St. Augustine



Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  March
2016
Universal:    
That families in need may receive the necessary support and that children may grow up in healthy and peaceful environments.

Evangelization: That those Christians who, on account of their faith, are discriminated against or are being persecuted,
may remain strong and faithful to the Gospel, thanks to the incessant prayer of the Church

The Virgin Mary of Nazareth
The First Moment of Christian Tradition Began in Mary's Heart (III)
Today her intercession has proved to be amazingly powerful...
 
When faith is strong it works wonders ( Mk 16:17 ).
 
Mary's heart is not a document, it's a source. "She stored up all these things in her heart"
(Lk 2:19 & 51), and that was the Word of God.
Excerpt from "Follow the Lamb" (Suivre l'Agneau)  Father Marie-Dominique Philippe Saint Paul Ed. 2005

THE HOLY NAME OF JESUS
Departure of Lazarus beloved of the Lord {Coptic}
Commemoration of the Sts. George the ascetic, Belasius the martyr, and Anba Joseph the bishop.{Coptic}
      St. Peter with Cassian Marcian Thecla Joyinus
Roman martyrs
260-268 St. Theodore bishop of Pentapolis, Libya Martyr with Irenacus deacon Serapion Ammonius 2 lectors
  286 St. Castulus martyr Chamberlain of Emperor Diocletian he sheltered Christians
  304 St. Quadratus Martyred bishop in Anatolia w/42 others including Emmanuel and Theodosius
  304 St. Montanus priest & Maxima martyred husband and wife at Singidunum, Pannonia
  356 Eutychius of Alexandria subdeacon
& Comps against Arianism martyred  MM (RM)
  370 St. Bathus and Companions Martyrs of the Gothic people
  370 Saint Bercus the priest
  400 Felix of Trier generosity to the poor virtuous (Trèves)
miracles reported at his tomb
5th v. Sincheall of Killeigh Abbot early Roman convert of Saint Patrick abbot-founder (AC)
  505 Saint Macartin of Clogher miracle-worker early disciple companion of Saint Patrick B (AC)
  639 St. Mochelloc Patron saint of Kilmallock, Limerick
7th v. St. Garbhan monastic efforts to preserve knowledge & culture in Ireland
  651 St. Braulio Saragossa Bishop teach encourage people extirpate Arian heresy; hagiographer of Spanish saints
     Felicitas of Padua nun relics now at Saint Justina in Padua
  809 Saint Ludger Benedictine bishop missionary founded Munster Germany counselor of Charlemagne His gentleness did more to attract Saxons to Christ than armies of Charlemagne
  878-888 Blessed Bertillo of Dijon abbot martyred by Normans, OSB (AC)
  944 Saint Basil the New many miracles healer gift of discernment
1058 St. Alfwold Bishop and ascetic companion of St. Swithin devotee of St. Cuthbert
1198 Blessed Melior of Vallumbrosa many years as a priest and monk Hermit (AC)
1435 Blessed Peter Marginet Cistercian monk  rest of his life doing penance OSB Cist. (AC)
1586 St. Margaret of Clitherow convert harbored fugitive priests
1565 Martyrdom of St. Sedhom Bishay in Domiat endured the torture for the Name of the Lord Christ and his
        martyrdom made the rising of the Cross during the Christian funeral processions openly, it was forbidden before

1615 A.M.  { 1899} Departure of St. Basilius, Bishop of Jerusalem {Coptic}
1801 Blessed Didacus of Cadiz Capuchin priest difficulty with his studies able to touch minds hearts of young  old rich poor students professors levitated while tireless preaching on love of God Children could see Dove on his shoulder
1908 Blessed Maddalena Caterina Morano Daughters of Mary Help of Christians coordinated catechetical instruction


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible

 Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here

When the Lord prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane before His Passion, the Archangel Gabriel, whose very name signifies "Man of God" (Luke. 22:43 And to strengthen him an angel from heaven appeared to him { [43-44] These verses, though very ancient, were probably not part of the original text of Luke. They are absent from the oldest papyrus manuscripts of Luke and from manuscripts of wide geographical distribution. vatican.va/archive }).

The Myrrh-Bearing Women heard from the Archangel the joyous news of Christ's Resurrection (Mt.28:1-7, Mark 16:1-8).
Mindful of the manifold appearances of the holy Archangel Gabriel and of his zealous fulfilling of God's will, and confessing his intercession for Christians before the Lord, the Orthodox Church calls upon its children to pray to the great Archangel with faith and love.
The Synaxis of the Holy Archangel Gabriel is also celebrated on July 13.
All the angels are commemorated on November 8.


Remember the devil never sleeps, but seeks our ruin in a thousand ways. -- St. Angela Merici

March 26 – Synaxis of the Archangel Gabriel
 
Gabriel also announced the birth of the Virgin Mary to her parents
We celebrate the Archangel Gabriel above all for his role in the Annunciation and in other New Testament events that Tradition assigns to him.

First, in Luke 1, Gabriel appeared to Zechariah, the father of Saint John the Baptist. In the beginning, Zechariah refused to believe that his barren wife Elizabeth and he were going to have a child, because of their advanced age. Then, Gabriel said, "I am Gabriel, who stands before God. I was sent to speak to you and to bring you this good news" (Luke 1:19). Subsequently, Zechariah was made mute until the birth of his son, because of his refusal to believe in the Angel Gabriel’s announcement.

Gabriel is also identified as the angel who announced the birth of the Virgin Theotokos to her parents Joachim and Anne; the one who appeared to Joseph in a dream and told him that Mary had conceived in a miraculous way and that he should protect and take care of her.

He then appeared to the shepherds to tell them about the Nativity. He is therefore the main figure who revealed to humanity the Incarnation of Our Lord Jesus Christ.   fr.orthodoxwiki.org



Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

March 26 – Our Lady of the Palace (Italy, 1776)
As though the Holy Rosary and contemplation were incompatible 
 Similarly, not a few clever people and learned scholars may occasionally try to dissuade you from saying the Rosary (but they are, of course, proud and self willed). They would rather encourage you to say the Seven Penitential Psalms or some other prayers. If a good confessor has given you a Rosary for your penance and has told you to say it every day for a fortnight or a month, all you have to do to get your penance changed to prayers, fasts, Masses or alms, is to go to confession to one of these others.

If you consult certain people in the world who lead lives of prayer, but who have never tried the Rosary, they will not only not encourage it but will turn people away from it to get them to learn contemplation—just as though the Holy Rosary and contemplation were incompatible, just as if all the Saints who have been devoted to the Rosary had not enjoyed the heights of sublime contemplation.

Your nearest enemies will attack you all the more cruelly because you are so close to them. I am speaking of the powers of your soul and your bodily senses—these are distractions of the mind, distress and uncertainty of the will, dryness of the heart, exhaustion and illnesses of the body—all these will combine with the devil to say to you: “Stop saying your Rosary; that is what is giving you such a headache! Give it up; there is no obligation under pain of sin. If you must say it, say only part of it; the difficulties that you are having over it are a sign that Almighty God does not want you to say it. You can finish it tomorrow when you are more in the mood, etc. … etc.

Finally, my dear Brother, the daily Rosary has so many enemies that I look upon the grace of persevering in it until death as one of the greatest favors Almighty God can give us.

Persevere in it and if you are faithful you will eventually have the wonderful crown which is waiting for you in Heaven: “Be thou faithful until death: and I will give thee the crown of life.”
 Saint Louis de Montfort
The Secret of the Rosary, Fortieth Rose: Perseverance

 
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

March 26 - Sinaxis of the Archangel Gabriel, Byzantine 
On Mary's Virginity and Giving Birth  People are sometimes troubled by the silence of St Mark's Gospel and the New Testament Epistles about Jesus' virginal conception. Some might wonder if we were merely dealing with legends or theological constructs not claiming to be history.  To this we must respond:  Faith in the virginal conception of Jesus met with the lively opposition, mockery or incomprehension of non-believers, Jews and pagans alike; so it could hardly have been motivated by pagan mythology or by some adaptation to the ideas of the age. The meaning of this event is accessible only to faith, which understands in it the "connection of these mysteries with one another" in the totality of Christ's mysteries, from His Incarnation to His Passover.  St Ignatius of Antioch already bears witness to this connection: "Mary's virginity and giving birth, and even the Lord's death escaped the notice of the prince of this world: these three mysteries worthy of proclamation were accomplished in God's silence." 
Catechism of the Catholic Church # 498  February 6 - Our Lady of Louvain (Belgium, 1444) 
 The Archangel Gabriel On the Leavetaking of the Feast of the Annunciation, the Church commemorates who announced the great mystery of the Incarnation of Christ to the Virgin Mary. There is no period of Afterfeast due to Great Lent

Synaxis of the Holy Archangel Gabriel: The Archangel Gabriel was chosen by the Lord to announce to the Virgin Mary about the Incarnation of the Son of God from Her, to the great rejoicing of all mankind. Therefore, on the day after the Feast of t
he Annunciation, the day on which the All-Pure Virgin is glorified, we give thanks to the Lord and we venerate His messenger Gabriel, who contributed to the mystery of our salvation.

Gabriel, the holy Archistrategos (Leader of the Heavenly Hosts), is a faithful servant of the Almighty God. He announced the future Incarnation of the Son of God to those of the Old Testament; he inspired the Prophet Moses to write the Pentateuch (first five books of the Old Testament), he announced the coming tribulations of the Chosen People to the Prophet Daniel (Dan. 8:16, 9:21-24); he appeared to St Anna (July 25) with the news that she would give birth to the Virgin Mary.

The holy Archangel Gabriel remained with the Holy Virgin Mary when She was a child in the Temple of Jerusalem, and watched over Her throughout Her earthly life. He appeared to the Priest Zachariah, foretelling the birth of the Forerunner of the Lord, St John the Baptist.

The Lord sent him to St Joseph the Betrothed in a dream, to reveal to him the mystery of the Incarnation of the Son of God from the All-Pure Virgin Mary, and warned him of the wicked intentions of Herod, ordering him to flee into Egypt with the divine Infant and His Mother.


1801 Blessed Didacus of Cadiz Capuchin priest difficulty with his studies able to touch minds hearts of young  old rich poor students professors levitated while tirelessly preaching on love of God:  Children could see Dove on his shoulder.
As we often do, Didacus’s contemporaries expected little from someone with a slow mind. Didacus proved to them that intelligence is not the only measure.
The person who has a loving heart, a listening ear and a wealth of compassion is, in the long run, much wiser. 
505 Saint Macartin of Clogher miracle-worker early disciple companion of Saint Patrick B (AC)
The Cloch-Oir (Golden Stone), from which this ancient diocese takes its name, was a sacred ceremonial stone to the druids, It was given to Macartin by an old pagan noble, who had harassed Macartin in every possible way until the saint's patient love won the local ruler to the faith.
The stone is still preserved and the noble's son, Tighernach of Clones, succeed Macartin as bishop

Departure of Lazarus beloved of the Lord {Coptic}
Commemoration of the Sts. George the ascetic, Belasius the martyr, and Anba Joseph the bishop.{Coptic}
      St. Peter with Cassian Marcian Thecla Joyinus
Roman martyrs
260-268 St. Theodore bishop of Pentapolis, Libya Martyr with Irenacus deacon Serapion Ammonius 2 lectors
  286 St. Castulus martyr Chamberlain of Emperor Diocletian he sheltered Christians
  304 St. Quadratus Martyred bishop in Anatolia w/42 others including Emmanuel and Theodosius
  304 St. Montanus priest & Maxima martyred husband and wife at Singidunum, Pannonia
  356 Eutychius of Alexandria subdeacon
& Comps against Arianism martyred  MM (RM)
  370 St. Bathus and Companions Martyrs of the Gothic people
  370 Saint Bercus the priest
  400 Felix of Trier generosity to the poor virtuous (Trèves)
miracles reported at his tomb
5th v. Sincheall of Killeigh Abbot early Roman convert of Saint Patrick abbot-founder (AC)
  505 Saint Macartin of Clogher miracle-worker early disciple companion of Saint Patrick B (AC)
  639 St. Mochelloc Patron saint of Kilmallock, Limerick
7th v. St. Garbhan monastic efforts to preserve knowledge & culture in Ireland
  651 St. Braulio Saragossa Bishop teach encourage people extirpate Arian heresy; hagiographer of Spanish saints
     Felicitas of Padua nun relics now at Saint Justina in Padua
  809 Saint Ludger Benedictine bishop missionary founded Munster Germany counselor of Charlemagne
         
His gentleness did more to attract Saxons to Christ than armies of Charlemagne
  878-888 Blessed Bertillo of Dijon abbot martyred by Normans, OSB (AC)
  944 Saint Basil the New many miracles healer gift of discernment
1058 St. Alfwold Bishop and ascetic companion of St. Swithin devotee of St. Cuthbert
1198 Blessed Melior of Vallumbrosa many years as a priest and monk Hermit (AC)
1435 Blessed Peter Marginet Cistercian monk  rest of his life doing penance OSB Cist. (AC)
1586 St. Margaret of Clitherow convert harbored fugitive priests
1565 Martyrdom of St. Sedhom Bishay in Domiat endured the torture for the Name of the Lord Christ and his
        martyrdom made the rising of the Cross during the Christian funeral processions openly, it was forbidden before

1615 A.M.  { 1899} Departure of St. Basilius, Bishop of Jerusalem {Coptic}
1801 Blessed Didacus of Cadiz Capuchin priest difficulty with his studies able to touch minds hearts of young  old rich poor students professors levitated while tireless preaching on love of God Children could see Dove on his shoulder
1908 Blessed Maddalena Caterina Morano Daughters of Mary Help of Christians coordinated catechetical instruction
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way,
to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

Departure of Lazarus beloved of the Lord
On this day the righteous Lazarus, the beloved of the Lord Christ, departed. He was the brother of Martha and Mary who anointed the Lord with fragrant oil and wiped His feet with her hair. When Lazarus fell sick the sisters sent to the Lord Christ saying: "Lord, behold, he whom You love is sick." When Jesus heard that, He said, "This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of God, that the Son of God may be glorified through it." Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus. So, when He heard that he was sick, He stayed two more days in the place where He was " to magnify the miracle."

Then after this He said to the disciples, "Let us go to Judea again." The disciples told Him, "Rabbi, lately the Jews sought to stone You, and are You going there again?" Jesus answered, "Are there not twelve hours in the day? If anyone walks in the day, he does not stumble, because he sees the light of this world. "But if one walks in the night, he stumbles, because the light is not in him." These things He said, and after that He said to them, "Our friend Lazarus sleeps, but I go that I may wake him up." Then His disciples said, "Lord, if he sleeps he will get well." However, Jesus spoke of his death, but they thought that He was speaking about taking rest in sleep. Then Jesus said to them plainly, "Lazarus is dead. And I am glad for your sakes that I was not there, that you may believe. Nevertheless let us go to him."

When the Lord came to Bethany which is nearby Jerusalem He stood before the tomb and said: "Take away the stone." Martha, the sister of him who was dead, said to Him, "Lord, by this time there is a stench, for he has been dead four days." Jesus said to her, "Did I not say to you that if you would believe you would see the glory of God?" Then they took away the stone from the place where the dead man was lying. And Jesus lifted up His eyes and prayed then he cried with a loud voice, "Lazarus, come forth!" And he who had died came out bound hand and foot with graveclothes, and his face was wrapped with a cloth. Jesus said to them, "Loose him, and let him go." (John 11:1-45)

That was to manifest the reality of his death, so no one would think that this was deception with previous arrangement, for that the miracle was magnified and many believed.  The prayers of this righteous be with us. Amen.
Commemoration of the Sts. George the ascetic, Belasius the martyr, and Anba Joseph the bishop.
On this day also the church celebrates the commemoration of the Sts. George the ascetic, Belasius the martyr, and Anba Joseph the bishop.
May their prayers be with us. Amen.
1899 {1615 A.M.} Departure of St. Basilius, Bishop of Jerusalem.
On this day also of the year 1615 A.M. (March 26th., 1899 A.D.) the great father Anba Basilius, Metropolitan of Jerusalem, departed. This father was born in the village of El-Dabah, Farshout county, the province of Quena, for righteous parents. They nursed him with the milk of righteousness since his young age, as they taught him reading and writing, so he grew on loving perfection and moral excellence.

When he was twenty-five years old he went to the monastery of St. Antonios and put on the monastic garb in the year 1559 A.M. He persevered in worshipping and ascetism and because he was adorned with righteousness and piety they ordained him priest in the year 1565 A.M. and archpriest (Hegumen) in the year 1568 A.M., then they appointed him an Abott for the monastery. He managed the monastery well with gentleness, wisdom and meekness that made the blessed Anba Kyrellos IV to ordain him Metropolitan for Jerusalem and the parishes that were attached to him: El-Kaliobia, El-Sharkia, El-Dakahlia, El-Gharbia, Suez, Domiat, and Port-Said.

He had shown prudence in managing the affairs of these parishes that made him the center of admiration and pride to the Copts. All his efforts were dedicated for the building of churches all over his parish, buying and renovating properties in Jaffa and Jerusalem. He was loved by all the people of Syria and Palestine, regardless of their religion or political persuasion, especially the rulers of Jerusalem, for his wise policy and straight morals.

During his days a dispute aroused from the Ethiopians where they claimed their ownership for the monastery of El-Sultan in Jerusalem. Because of this father and his vigilance they could not establish an ownership for the monastery. He attended the enthronement of Pope Demetrius II, the hundred eleventh, and Pope Kyrellos V, the hundred twelfth. He spent his days in continuous effort for what was good for his people and departed in peace.
May his prayers be with us. Amen. 
1565 Martyrdom of St. Sedhom Bishay in Domiat endured the torture for the Name of the Lord Christ and his martyrdom made the rising of the Cross during the Christian funeral processions openly, for it was forbidden before

On this day also the church commemorates the martyrdom of Sedhom Bishay in Domiat on the 17th. of Baramhat year 1565 A.D. (March 25th., 1844 A.D.). He endured the torture for the Name of the Lord Christ and his martyrdom made the rising of the Cross during the Christian funeral processions openly, for it was forbidden before.

This martyr was a clerical employee in the government of the port of Domiat during the days of Mohammed Ali Basha the Governor of Egypt. A revolt of mobs in the port arose, they seized Sidhom Bishay and accused him falsely that he cursed Islam and witnessed against him before the religious judge a low uncivilized person and a donkey driver. The judge decided either he would forsake his faith or be killed, he whipped him and then sent him to the Governor of the city. After the Governor had examined his case he issued the same judgement against him as the judge did. Sidhom was steadfast in his Christian faith, not caring to be killed. They whipped, dragged him on his face down the stairs in the Governor palace, then they put him on a buffalo facing the tail and went around with him in the streets of the city insulting and degrading him. The Christians in the city became afraid and locked themselves in their houses.

The mob continued to insult him and tortured him in different ways until he was about to deliver his soul; so they brought him to the door of his house and left him there. His family went out and brought him inside and five days later he departed to heaven.

His departure was a great martyrdom, and the Christians counted him among the holy martyrs. They gathered regardless of their denomination and joined in his funeral in a celebration that there was nothing like it before. The Christians carried their arms and the priest put on their vestments headed by the Archpriest Yousef Michael who was the head of the Coptic congregation in Domiat and accompanied by the priests of the other denominations. They marched in his funeral in the streets of the city and in front of him the deacons carrying the banners of the Cross, and they arrived to the church where they prayed the funeral rites. The people went on objecting this reprehensible and painful incident and talking about the patience and endurance of the different kinds of torture in silence and the steadfastness of Sidhom the martyr.

The prominent people of the Christian community in Domiat deliberated as how to avoid these incidents in the future. They decided to ask the consuls of the foreign countries to mediate with the ruler of the country and the Pope the Patriarch of the Copts and sent to them detailed reports.
Mr Michail Sorour the official representative of seven countries in Domiat was in charge of this mediation.
The ruler of Egypt was concerned about this incident and sent two official representatives to examine the case. So they reopened the inquiry and they realized the injustice and the ill-treatment that befell the great martyr and convicted the judge and the governor for their wrong doing, stripped them from their honor then exiled them. They asked, as a good will and to comfort the people, to allow the raising of the Cross publicly before the Christian funerals, and the ruler allowed that in Domiat. This was allowed later on all over the country during the Papacy of Pope Kyrellos IV.
The blessings of this great martyr be with us and glory be to God forever. Ame
St. Peter Roman martyr with Cassian Marcian Thecla Joyinus.
Item Romæ corónæ sanctórum Mártyrum Petri, Marciáni, Jovíni, Theclæ, Cassiáni et aliórum.
 Also at Rome, the crowning of the holy martyrs Peter, Marcian, Jovinus, Thecla, Cassian, and others.
These Romans were put to death at some unknown date by Roman authorities.

Peter, Marcian, Jovinus, Thecla, Cassian & Comp. MM (RM) Date unknown. Roman martyrs, of whom nothing certain is known.
Some registers have Theodula rather than Thecla (Benedictines).
260-268 St. Theodore bishop of Pentapolis, Libya Martyr with Irenacus deacon Serapion and Ammonius two lectors
Pentápoli, in Libya, natális sanctórum Mártyrum Theodóri Epíscopi, Irenǽi Diáconi, Serapiónis et Ammónii Lectórum.
At Pentopolis in Libya, the birthday of the holy martyrs Theodore, bishop, the deacon Irenæus, and the lectors Serapion and Ammonius.
Hieromartyr Irenaeus suffered during the persecution against Christians under the Roman emperors Diocletian and Maximian (284-305). He was a presbyter, and he and his wife raised their children in Christian piety. St Irenaeus was greatly respected for his education and strict manner of life. He was later made Bishop of Sirmium in Pannonia (modern Hungary). Because of his fervent preaching of the Gospel he was arrested and brought before an official named Probus. Refusing to deny Christ and offer sacrifice to the pagan gods, the saint was handed over for torture. Witnessing his torments were the saint's parents, relatives and friends, who attempted to persuade him to submit, but the martyr remained steadfast.

After cruel tortures, the holy confessor spent a long time in prison. Probus tried to persuade the martyr, urging him to spare his life for the sake of his sons. St Irenaeus replied, "My sons believe in God, Who will care for them. As for me, nothing will force me to renounce my Christ."
The governor ordered the saint to be thrown into a river. They led the martyr on the bridge crossing the River Sava, where he knelt and prayed to the Lord for his flock. Then they beheaded the Hieromartyr Irenaeus, and threw his body into the river.

St. Theodore bishop of Pentapolis, Libya Suffered during the persecutions of Emperor Gallienus, (260-268) also known as Theuderius. Irenaeus was his deacon, and Serapion and Ammonius, two lectors. They all had their tongues cut out but survived the ordeal, dying in peace during the lapse in persecutions.

Theodore, Irenaeus, Serapion & Armonius MM (RM) Died 310 (?). Bishop Theodore of Pentapolis, Libya, Irenaeus, his deacon, and Serapion and Ammonius, his two lectors, suffered under Gallienus by having their tongues cut out.
They are venerated as martyrs, however, they survived and died in peace (Benedictines).
286 St. Castulus martyr Chamberlain of Emperor Diocletian he sheltered Christians
Romæ, via Lavicána, sancti Cástuli Mártyris, qui, cum esset zetárius Palátii et hospes Sanctórum, a persecutóribus tértio appénsus, tértio audítus, et, in confessióne Dómini persevérans, missus est in fóveam, ac, dimíssa super eum massa arenária, martyrio coronátus est.
 At Rome, on the Via Lavicana, St. Castulus, martyr, chamberlain in the palace of the emperor.  For harbouring Christians, he was three times suspended by the hands, three times cited before the tribunals.  As he persevered in the confession of the Lord, he was thrown into a pit, covered with a mass of sand, and thus obtained the crown of martyrdom.

286 ST CASTULUS, MARTYR
DURING the reign of Diocletian, Pope St Caius was greatly concerned for the safety of the Christians in Rome. Certain legendary acts tell us that Castulus, a zealous Christian, who was the emperor’s chamberlain, offered to arrange for religious services to be held actually in the palace itself, because no search was likely to be made there and moreover, that he sheltered Christians in his own house, which adjoined the palace, and showed them the place of rendezvous. Not satisfied with thus serving the Church, he and his friend Tiburtius went about Rome converting men and women to Christianity and bringing them to the pope to be baptized. Eventually he was betrayed by an apostate Christian called Torquatus, and brought before Fabian, prefect of the city. He was cruelly tortured and then cast into a pit and smothered with sand. A cemetery and a church on the Via Labicana were named after St Castulus.
While the Acts of St Castulus, printed in the Acta Sanctorum (March, vol. iii), are historically valueless and are partly plagiarized from those of St Sebastian, there is no reason to doubt the historical existence of the martyr or that his remains were interred in the catacomb which bears his name. The friable nature of the sandstone in this cemetery, which easily crumbles, may have some relation to what is said of the manner of the martyr’s death. See Leclercq in DAC., vol. ii, cc. 2372—2375.

In his own home he arranged for religious services inside the imperial palace. Because of his activity in bringing converts to Pope St. Caius to be baptized he was captured, tortured and put to death.

Castulus of Rome M (RM) Died c. 286-288. Saint Castulus was an officer of Diocletian's palace in Roman. He housed some of his fellow Christians, was denounced, questioned, tortured, and thrown into a pit that then was filled with sand to bury him alive.
A cemetery was named after his burial place on the Via Labicana (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
304 St. Quadratus Martyred bishop in Anatolia w/42 others including Emmanuel and Theodosius.
Item sanctórum Mártyrum Quadráti, Theodósii, Emmanuélis et aliórum quadragínta.
 Likewise, the holy martyrs Quadratus, Theodosius, Emmanuel, and forty others.
Quadratus was a bishop in Anatolia who was arrested and put to death with forty two fellow martyrs, including Emmanuel and Theodosius, during the persecution of the Church under Emperor Diocletian.

Quadratus (Codratus), Theodosius, Emmanuel & Comp. MM (RM). A group of 43 martyrs under leadership of Saint Quadratus, bishop of Anatolia, put to death under Diocletian (Benedictines).
304 St. Montanus priest & Maxima martyred husband and wife at Singidunum, Pannonia.
Sírmii sanctórum Mártyrum Montáni Presbyteri, et Máximæ, qui, ob Christi fidem, in flumen demérsi sunt.
 At Sirmio, the holy martyrs Montanus, priest, and Maxima, who were drowned in a river for the faith of Christ.
Montanus was a priest and was arrested for being a Christian. Maxima shared his sufferings.
They were drowned in the Save River, in Sirmium, Dalmatia, or at Singidunum, Pannonia.
Montanus & Maxima MM (RM). Montanus, a priest, and Maxima, said to have been his wife, were drowned as Christians in the Save River at Sirmium, Dalmatia, or Singidunum, Pannonia (Benedictines).
356 Eutychius of Alexandria subdeacon against Arianism martyred & Comps. MM (RM).
Alexandríæ sanctórum Mártyrum Eutychii et aliórum; qui, Constántii témpore, sub Ariáno Epíscopo Geórgio, pro fide cathólica gládio cæsi sunt. At Alexandria, the holy martyrs Eutychius and others, who died by the sword for the Catholic faith, in the time of Constantine, under the Arian bishop George.
Eutychius was a subdeacon of the church of Alexandria who, for his stand against Arianism, was condemned to slavery in the mines, but perished from exhaustion on the road there. His companions were other leading Catholics of Alexandria, four of whom were seized and scourged (but not executed) for showing sympathy for him (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
370 Saints Monk Abibus Anna, Alla, Agnus, Anna Bathus, Bathusius Bercus the priest, Dulcida Reasus Igathrax  Iscoeus (Iskous) Malchus Silas, Presbyters and Vercus with two sons and two daughters, the Arpilus, and the Laymen: Igathrax,  Phillus (Philgas), Silas, Signicus, Sonerilas, Suimbalus, Thermus,  Uiriko (Viriko) and the Women Martyrs: Animais (Animaida)  Larissa (Beride),  Monco (Manca), Mamika,
Larissa =
 Virko and the anonymous martyr with them; also the Gothic Queen Gaatha and the Princess Duclida suffered around the year 375 under Jungerich, Martyrs of the Gothic people
Bathus, Wereka, and their companions Were burned to death in a church by order of their local king.
Saint Bathusius was one of twenty-six martyrs who were killed by Goths around the year 375 under Jungerich, a persecutor of Christians. Ancient synaxaria of the Gothic Church recount the martyrdom of twenty-six Christians in the time of the emperors Valentinian, Valens, and Gratian. The historian Sozomen says that King Athanaric was enraged to see his subjects embracing Christianity because of the preaching of the Arian bishop Ulfilas.
So, he ordered many of them to be tortured and executed, often without a trial.
King Athanaric's ministers placed a statue in a chariot and paraded it before the tents which Christians used for church services. Those who worshiped the idol and offered sacrifice were spared, the rest were burned alive in the tent. Jungerich gave orders to burn down a church during divine services. In the fiery inferno 308 people perished, of whom only twenty-one are known by name. There was also an anonymous man who came to the tent and confessed Christ. He was martyred with the others. Different manuscripts give variants of their names.

In the reign of Valentinian and Theodosius (383-392), the Gothic king's widow Gaatha (who was an Orthodox Christian) and her daughter Duclida gathered up the relics of the holy martyrs and brought them to Syria with the help of some priests and a layman named Thyellas. Gaatha later returned to her native land, where she was stoned and died as a martyr, along with her son Agathon. The relics of the holy martyrs were left to Duclida, who went to Cyzicus in Asia Minor and gave some of the relics for the founding of a church.
St Duclida died in peace. 
The holy martyrs were commemorated on October 23 on the Gothic calendars.
400 Felix of Trier generosity to the poor virtuous (Trèves) B (RM).

400 ST FELIX, Bishop OF TRIER miracles were reported as having taken place at his tomb
ST FELIX was consecrated bishop of Trier in 386 and took part in a synod held in his episcopal city at which St Martin was also present. He was a most holy man and extremely liberal to the poor. He built a monastery and a church which he dedicated to our Lady and the Theban Martyrs and in which he placed the alleged relics of the advance-guard of the Theban Legion—Thyrses the General and nine others. Because he had been elected by those who were said to have compassed the death of Priscillian, St Ambrose and Pope St Siricius refused to hold ecclesiastical communion with St Felix, and it was probably for this reason that he resigned his see in 398 and retired to the monastery he had built, which was subsequently called after St Paulinus. He died an edifying death and many miracles were reported as having taken place at his tomb. Sulpicius Severus speaks of him with much respect.

See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. iii, and Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. iii, p. 36.

In 386, Saint Martin of Tours consecrated his friend Felix as bishop of the church of Trier (Trèves), which he governed for twelve years. Owing to the fact that this took place under the usurping emperor Maximus, the legality of his election was questioned by the Holy See and Saint Ambrose. Consequently, he retired to avoid trouble. Contemporary writers, particularly Saint Sulpicius Severus, speak very highly of Felix's virtues, especially his generosity to the poor (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
Sincheall of Killeigh Abbot early Roman convert of Saint Patrick abbot-founder (AC) 5th century
(also known as Sinell of Killeagh)
Sincheall, an early Roman convert of Saint Patrick, was abbot-founder of the monastery and school at Killeigh, Offaly, Ireland, where he had 150 monks under his direction. The community flourished until the 16th century. During the Reformation, Lord Leonard Gray removed the organ and stained glass windows from the church and installed them in the Protestant church at Maynooth.

Prior to that time (1443), there is an account of Saint Sincheall great feast day celebration. Margaret O'Carroll of Ely, wife of Prince Calvagh O'Connor of Offaly, invited all the Scottish and Irish bards and sages to attend. There were "2700 persons besides the gamesters and poor men." The princess placed two enormous gold chalices on the Sincheall's altar, adopted two orphans, and gave food, money, and gifts to all who entered. Those who could not attend the feast were invited for the feast of the Assumption (Benedictines, D'Arcy, McManus, Montague, Sullivan, Tommasini).
505 Macartin of Clogher miracle-worker early disciple companion of Saint Patrick B (AC).
(also known as Macartan, MacCartan, Maccarthen) feast day formerly March 24.
505 ST MACARTAN, BISHOP
VERY little is known of St Aedh Mac Cairthinn, although his feast is kept throughout Ireland, in the diocese of Clogher, of which see he is said to have been the first bishop, as a double of the first class. On August 15, which was at one time reckoned as his special day, we find this cryptic utterance in the Félire of Oengus “Fer da chrich, a fair champion.” “Fer da chrich”, used here as a name, means “man of two districts”, and the gloss goes on to explain that this “man of two districts” was the abbot of Dairinis, or Bishop Mac Cairthinn, adding: Aedh is truly the man’s name, grandson of Aithmet, with many deeds, his name at Clochar of the churches was afterwards Bishop Mac Cairthinn ‘man of two districts’ was his name at first I will tell you his history, a true brother with victory, with fame, to Mael-ruain, to his teacher. He was the maternal uncle of Mael-ruain, Oengus’s tutor, and from him Mael-ruain brought Fer da chrich’s’ bell, which is in Tallaght.”
Little more is told in the fragmentary Latin life still preserved, except the extravagant miracles with which the saint defeated the attempts of the local chieftain to drive him from Clogher. St Macartan is believed to have been consecrated bishop by St Patrick himself.

A mutilated Latin life is printed by Colgan, and in the Acta Sanctorum (under August 15), from the Codex Salmanticensis. See also LIS., vol. viii, pp. 208 seq.

Saint Macartin (in Irish is Aedh mac Carthin) was an early disciple and companion of Saint Patrick during the latter's missions into pagan territory. He is said to have been consecrated bishop of Clogher in Tyrone by Patrick in 454. It is said the Saint Brigid, Macartin's niece, was present at the founding of the see.
Macartin is also one of the earliest Irish saints to be known as a miracle-worker. His holiness is revealed not so much by any vita, which are non-existent, but by the high veneration in which he is held. Saint Bede records that the earth was taken from his grave as holy relics. His Office is the only one to survive from an Irish source.

A reliquary, called the Great Shrine of Saint Mac Cairthinn, which was designed to contain relics of the True Cross as well as his bones, has been altered over the centuries but still survives as the "Domnach Airgid" in the National Museum. It's inner yew box was given to Macartin by Patrick together with the latter's episcopal staff and Bible.

The Cloch-Oir (Golden Stone), from which this ancient diocese takes its name, was a sacred ceremonial stone to the druids, It was given to Macartin by an old pagan noble, who had harassed Macartin in every possible way until the saint's patient love won the local ruler to the faith. The stone is still preserved and the noble's son, Tighernach of Clones, succeed Macartin as bishop (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Farmer, Healy, Kenney, Montague, Muirhead, Needham).
St. Garbhan monastic efforts to preserve knowledge culture in Ireland 7th century.
Irish abbot honored by the town of Dungarvan, Ireland. He was part of the monastic efforts to preserve knowledge and culture in Ireland.
Garbhan, Abbot (AC) 7th century. The Irish Saint Garbhan appears to have left his name to Dungarvan. Nothing certain is known about him (Benedictines).
639 St. Mochelloc Patron saint of Kilmallock, Limerick.
Ireland. He is also called Celloch, Cellog, Motalogus, and Mottelog.

Mochelloc of Kilmallock (AC) (also known as Cellog, Mottelog, Motalogus) Died c. 639. Mochelloc is the patron saint of Kilmallock in Limerick, Ireland. Reliable details of his life are unavailable (Benedictines).
651 St. Braulio Bishop of Saragossa teach encourage his people extirpate Arian heresy hagiographer of the Spanish saints
Cæsaraugústæ, in Hispánia, sancti Bráulii, Epíscopi et Confessóris. At Saragossa in Spain, St. Braulio, bishop and confessor.

651 ST BRAULIO, BISHOP OF SARAGOSSA
AT the college founded in Seville by St Isidore, one of the more promising of the alumni was a boy of noble birth called Braulio, who grew up to be so eminent a scholar that Isidore regarded him as a friend and disciple rather than a pupil, and used to send him his own writings to correct and revise. Braulio prepared for the priesthood and was ordained, and when in 631 the see of Saragossa became vacant at the death of his brother Bishop John, the neighbouring prelates assembled to elect a successor and their choice fell upon Braulio. They are said to have been assisted in their selection by the appearance of a globe of fire which rested above Braulio’s head, whilst a voice pronounced the words, “Behold my servant whom I have chosen and upon whom my spirit rests”.
As a pastor, St Braulio laboured zealously to teach and encourage his people, and at the same time to extirpate the Arian heresy which continued to flourish even after the conversion of King Reccared. He kept in close touch with St Isidore, whom he assisted in his task of restoring church order and regularizing ecclesiastical discipline. A small portion of the correspondence between the two saints has survived to this day. So great was St Braulio’s eloquence and his power of persuasion, that some of his hearers asserted that they had seen the Holy Spirit, in the form of a dove, resting On his shoulder and imparting in his ear the doctrine he preached to the people.
   He took part in the fourth Council of Toledo, which was presided over by his friend and master St Isidore, and also in the fifth and sixth. The last-named assembly charged him to write an answer to Pope Honorius I, who had accused the Spanish bishops of negligence in the fulfilment of their duties. His defence was dignified and convincing.

The good bishop’s duties did not prevent his constant ministrations in his cathedral church and in that of our Lady “del Pilar”, where he spent many hours of the day and night in prayer. Luxury of all kinds he abhorred: his garments were rough and plain, his food simple and his life austere. An eloquent preacher and a keen controversialist, he could carry conviction by his telling arguments and absolute sincerity. His liberality to the poor was only matched by his tender care of all his flock. The close of his life was saddened by failing eyesight—a heavy trial to anyone, but especially to a scholar. As his end drew near, he realized that he was dying, and the last day of his life was spent in the recitation of psalms. According to a legend, which, however, appears to be comparatively modern, heavenly music resounded in the chamber of death, and a voice was heard to say, “Rise, my friend, and come away!” The saint, as though waking from sleep, replied with his last breath, “I come, Lord : I am ready!”
Of St Braulio’s writings, we have a Life of St Emilian with a poem in his honour, forty-four letters, which were discovered at Leon in the eighteenth century and shed great light on Visigothic Spain, and an eulogy of St Isidore, as well as a catalogue of his works. He is said to have completed some writings which St Isidore lelt unfinished, and he is almost certainly the author of the Acts of the Martyrs of Saragossa. St Braulio is the patron of Aragon and one of the most famous of the Spanish saints.
See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. ii; Florez, España Sagrada, vol. xxx, pp. 305 seq. Cams,  Kirchengeschichte Spaniens, vol. ii, pt a, pp. 145—149; DTC., vol. ii, cc. 1123 seq.; DHG., vol. x, cc. 441 seq.; and C.H. Lynch, St Braulio (1938). But the indispensable work is now the critical edition of the saint’s letters by J. Madoz, published in Madrid in 1941.
At the college founded in Seville by St Isidore, one of the more promising of the alumni was a boy of noble birth called Braulio, who grew up to be so eminent a scholar that Isidore regarded him as a friend and disciple rather than a pupil, and used to send him his own writings to correct and revise. Braulio prepared for the priesthood and was ordained, and when in 631 the see of Saragossa became vacant at the death of his brother Bishop John, the neighbouring prelates assembled to elect a successor and their choice fell upon Braulio.
As a pastor, St Braulio laboured zealously to teach and encourage his people, and at the same time to extirpate the Arian heresy which continued to flourish even after the conversion of King Reccared. He kept in close touch with St Isidore, whom he assisted in his task of restoring church order and regularizing ecclesiastical discipline: a small portion of the correspondence between the two saints has survived.

He took part in the fourth Council of Toledo, which was presided over by his friend and master St Isidore, and also in the fifth and sixth. The last-named assembly charged him to write an answer to Pope Honorius I, who had accused the Spanish bishops of negligence in the fulfilment of their duties. His defence was dignified and convincing. The good bishop's duties did not prevent his constant ministrations in his cathedral church and in that of our Lady ‘del Pilar , where he spent many hours of the day and night in prayer.

Luxury of all kinds he abhorred: his garments were rough and plain, his food simple and his life austere.

An eloquent preacher and a keen controversialist, he could carry conviction by his telling arguments and absolute sincerity. His liberality to the poor was only matched by his tender care of all his flock. The close of his life was saddened by failing eyesight—a heavy trial to anyone, but especially to a scholar.
As end drew near, he realized he was dying, spent the last day of his life in the recitation of psalms.

Braulio of Saragossa B (RM) Born c. 590; died in Saragossa, Spain, c. 646-651. Saint Braulio, son of a Hispano-Roman bishop, Gregory of Osma, became a monk of Saint Engratia's monastery in Saragossa, in 610. He was sent to Seville to study under Saint Isidore, who became his close friend. In 624, he was ordained by Isidore, but the following year he returned to Saragossa. Braulio was ordained to the priesthood by his own brother, John, whom he succeeded to the see of Saragossa in 631.
Braulio was a learned bishop and important reformer of his time, who followed only Saint Isidore as the most influential and respected bishop in Spain. Like so many monks who became bishop, Braulio continued to live an austere life of prayer, almsgiving, and frequent preaching. He participated in the councils of Toledo in 633, 636, and 638, and helped to convert the Visigoths from Arianism to orthodoxy. He also answered Pope Honorius I's charge that the Spanish bishops had been unnecessarily lenient towards the Jews who had converted to Christianity but subsequently lapsed.

Also like Isidore, he was devoted to learning; a number of his letters are still extant, which show familiarity with classical authors of Roman antiquity, as well as his desire to extend his knowledge of Christian writers. He excelled chiefly as a hagiographer of the Spanish saints. It was Saint Braulio who convinced Isidore to undertake his encyclopedic work called Etymologies, and after Isidore's death he polished the book to its final form.

In 650, he became half blind and the same year. His cultus was almost immediately approved locally. Pictures of him survive in Saragossa and Seville (Attwater, Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth, Lynch).
Felicitas of Padua nun relics now at Saint Justina in Padua 9th century V (AC).
Felicitas was a nun, probably Benedictine, who professed the Benedictine Rule in a convent on the Colli Euganei or else in that of SS. Cosmas and Damian at Padua. Her relics are now at Saint Justina in Padua (Benedictines).
809 Saint  Ludger Benedictine bishop missionary founder of Munster Germany counselor of Charlemagne His gentleness did more to attract Saxons to Christ than armies of Charlemagne
Eódem die sancti Ludgéri, Epíscopi Monasteriénsis, qui Saxónibus Evangélium prædicávit.
The same day, St. Ludger, bishop of Munster, who preached the Gospel to the Saxons.

809 ST LUDGER, BISHOP OF MÜNSTER   
IT was in the abbey school of Utrecht, presided over by St Boniface’s friend Gregory, that St Ludger (Liudger), a Frisian, received his earlier education. In the life which the pupil afterwards wrote of his master he tells us that in that school “some were of noble Frankish families; some were English; some of the new seed of God planted among the Frisians and Saxons; others of the Bructeri and the Suevi; others of sundry nations whom God had sent thither. Of all these, I, Ludger, am the least—yea, the weakest and most insignificant.”
At his own request the boy had been sent to Utrecht at an unusually early age by his parents; amongst the memories of his childhood, he cherished the recollection of having once seen the great St Boniface, “when the hair of his head was white and his body decrepit with age”. Ludger was preparing for the diaconate when there arrived in Utrecht a priest from York, Alubert, who had been moved to preach the gospel in Friesland. St Gregory welcomed him eagerly, and urged him to have himself consecrated regionary bishop. Alubert rather unwillingly consented, but only on condition that he should be given one or two native clergy. Sigbold and Ludger were appointed to him, and the three returned to York, where Alubert was consecrated bishop, Sigbold ordained priest and Ludger deacon. There they met the famous Alcuin, whom the archbishop of York had set over the cathedral school. Ludger was attracted to him as steel to a magnet, and when he had to accompany his friends back to Utrecht he earnestly entreated permission to return to England to continue his studies under the most learned man and the greatest teacher of the age. St Gregory wished to retain him, but he was allowed to go back to England. He sat at Alcuin’s feet for three and a half more years, and would, no doubt, have stayed longer, but for an untoward incident. In a quarrel, the son of an English earl had been killed by a Frisian merchant, and to avert the vengeance of the English it was thought expedient that all Frisians in England should return to their own land. Ludger accordingly returned to Utrecht, where he received a warm greeting from Gregory, who died not long afterwards, entrusting his monastery to his nephew Alberic.
Abbot Alberic sent Ludger to rebuild the wrecked church over the reputed grave of St Lebuin at Deventer. While he was occupied with this work, the true place of burial was revealed to him in a dream, and he was able to include the tomb in the new building. As soon as the church had been consecrated, Ludger was sent with several companions to preach on the frontiers of Friesland, where he made a number of converts and destroyed several pagan shrines. In these much treasure was found—the greater part of which was appropriated by Charlemagne, but one-third was returned for ecclesiastical use. Ludger was still only a deacon, and it was felt that he ought to be raised to the priesthood. Accordingly, when Alberic went to Cologne to be consecrated bishop, he took with him Ludger, and there ordained him priest and gave him spiritual charge of the Ostergau.
At Dokkum, the place of St Boniface’s martyrdom, he seems to have built a church, for the porch of which Alcuin sent him from England some lines of his own composition. For seven years St Ludger worked with great success, founding churches, converting pagans and bad Christians and in general laying the foundations of a flourishing Christian community. Suddenly all his efforts were brought to a standstill, and his work to outward appearance ruined, through an invasion of Friesland by the Saxons, under Widukind; they overran the country, destroyed the churches, drove out the priests and compelled the people to return to heathen rites. Ludger conducted his disciples to a place of safety and then started on a pilgrimage to Rome, accompanied by his brother Hildegrim and his nephew Gerfrid. They went on to Monte Cassino, and here Ludger spent three years, not taking the Benedictine vows, but studying and observing the Rule, for, as we read, “he was anxious to build a monastery on his own estate, and this was afterwards done at Werden”.

Meanwhile Alcuin, whom Charlemagne had attached to his court, brought his friend Ludger to the monarch’s notice, and it seems not improbable that the emperor had met the saint on the occasion of his visit to Monte Cassino. In any case St Ludger returned to his country in 785, prepared to resume his missionary labours now that the field was again open to him. Charlemagne formed such a high opinion of him that he gave him spiritual charge over five provinces of Friesland. Aided by his knowledge of the people and of their speech, the holy man’s labours were abundantly blessed, although he had but few helpers. He crossed the water to Heligoland, where he preached to the inhabitants and convened many, baptizing them in the fountain in which St Willibrord had once baptized three converts. On the return journey, he cured a blind minstrel named Bernlef, who embraced Christianity and afterwards accompanied the saint on his missionary journeys. These successes induced Charlemagne to offer Ludger the recently subjugated province of north-west Saxony or Westphalia, and the ardent missionary willingly accepted the additional charge. Although by no means a strong man, he laboured untiringly in this fresh field, travelling over the country, teaching and preaching indoors and in the open air, and baptizing his converts himself. Ludger’s gentleness, persuasiveness and attractive personality did more to reconcile and settle the Saxons than all the emperor’s repressive measures.
His headquarters he made at Mimigerneford, where he built a monastery, from which the town derived its later name of Munster, and in it he instituted the rule of St Chrodegang of Metz for clergy living in community. As the number of the faithful increased it became necessary to have a bishop, and Ludger was accordingly consecrated at Cologne about 804 by Archbishop Hildebald. With the help of his brother Hildegrim, the saint not only succeeded in evangelizing Westphalia, but crossed the Weser into what was formerly known as Eastphalia. His unquenchable zeal prompted him to go still further north, to preach to the Northmen of Denmark and Scandinavia, but Charlemagne refused his consent, realizing no doubt that the saint was growing old and that there were limits even to his powers. Years before, at Utrecht, St Ludger had beheld in a vision his lately deceased master Abbot Gregory, who from a height appeared to be dropping scrolls and fragments which he bade him collect. Automatically he obeyed and gathered them into three piles. The dream had been interpreted by one of the monks to mean that Ludger would become the spiritual guide of three peoples but the saint had then ruefully exclaimed, “Would that God would rather grant me fruit in the place over which I now have charge!”
Legend has attributed to Ludger many monastic foundations, but with some of these, notably that at Helmstädt, which was afterwards called by his name, he had certainly nothing to do. Werden, however, undoubtedly owed its existence to his exertions. It was ruled by his relations until 877, and became one of the most important abbeys in Germany.

In spite of all his external activity, the holy man allowed nothing to interfere with his devotions, public or private. He was so particular about attention at offices, even whilst he was travelling, that when one of his clergy stooped to mend the fire during Matins, to prevent the smoke from blowing into the bishop’s face, he was rebuked at the close of the service. St Ludger was once accused to Charlemagne of wasting his income in indiscriminate almsgiving and neglecting the embellishment of the churches in his care. The prince, who loved to see churches magnificent, considered this a serious charge, and ordered him to appear before him to reply to it. On the morning after his arrival, a chamberlain came to summon him, but found him at prayer. The saint sent back word that he would follow when he had finished his devotions. A second messenger was despatched and yet a third before he was ready, and Charlemagne indignantly asked him why he had not immediately obeyed his summons. “Because I believed that the service of God was to be preferred to yours or to that of any man,” replied the accused calmly. “Such indeed was your wilt when you invested me with the office of a bishop, and therefore I deemed it unseemly to interrupt the service of God, even at the command of your majesty.”
St Ludger suffered great pain towards the end of his life, but he continued his labours until the last day—which was Passion Sunday, 809. That morning he preached at Coesfeld and then hurried to Biller-beck, where he preached again and said Mass. In the evening he peacefully died, surrounded by his disciples and in the presence of his sister, the Abbess Gerburgis. Münster and Werden disputed for the possession of his body, but he had expressed a wish to be buried at Werden. The greater part of his relics remain there to this day.
Our sources of information regarding the life of St Ludger are abundant and, on the whole, reliable. The biography by his admirer Altfrid, who was bishop of Münster from 839 to 849, was compiled from the statements of those who had lived with the saint. The other lives are not so trustworthy. All these documents will be found critically edited by W. Diekamp in his Geschichtsquellen des Bisthums Münster, vol. iv most of them had pre­viously been printed by the Bollandists and Mabillon. There are modern biographies in German by Hüsing, by Pingsmann and by Krimphove, and for English readers there is an excellent account by Stubbs in DCB., vol. iii, pp. 729—731. See also Hauck, Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands, vol. ii, pp. 349, 354 and 406.

He was born in Zuilen, Holland, and was trained by Saint  Gregory at Utrecht. Going to England, Ludger studied under Blessed Alcuin at York. He was ordained in 777 in Cologne, Germany, and spent seven years as a missionary. In 785 he met Charlemagne and was given charge of the spiritual direction of five provinces. He refused the see of Trier but became the founding bishop of Munster in 804. Ludger died on March 26 after celebrating Mass at Butterbreck, Westphalia. Ludger of Utrecht, OSB B (RM) (also known as Liudger) Born near Zuilen, Frisia, the Netherlands, c. 744; died at Billerbeck, Westphalia, Germany, 809. Everything in Ludger's life seems to have worked in favor of his becoming a great man and a saint: a good family, dedicated to the Church; a fine education; a native intelligence and a disposition that won him the affection of all with whom he came in contact. At the age of 14, he met Saint Gregory of Utrecht, who gave him the monastic habit. When he was 24, he was made a deacon; at 34, he was ordained a priest.
Ludger was first taught by Saint Gregory (whose vita he wrote), then he went to England, in 767, as a pupil of Blessed Alcuin of York. He would have stayed there longer than four years had one of his fellow countrymen not killed an English merchant and thus stirred up bad blood against the Netherlands.
In 775, Ludger was sent to revive the work begun by Saint Lebuin at Deventer. It was not until 777 that he was compelled by Gregory's successor Blessed Alberic to be ordained priest. Then was stationed at Dokkum, where Saint Boniface had died and from where Ludger took the Gospel to the Frieslanders. For seven years he built churches (including the one at Dokkum for which Alcuin wrote some verses for the dedication), destroyed idols, and converted many pagans. Then, in 784, the Saxon leader Widekund invaded, destroying Christian foundations and driving out all the missionaries.
Ludger took the opportunity to make a pilgrimage to Rome and also spent two years at the great Benedictine foundation at Monte Cassino, where he planned the monastery he later established at Werden. There he may have met Charlemagne, perhaps through Saint Alcuin who had passed over to France. Returning to Westphalia in 786, the emperor charged him with the spiritual care of five provinces. Ludger based himself on a place called Mimigerneford, which was later known as Münster because of the abbey founded there, which followed the Rule of Saint Chrodegang of Metz. His gentleness did more to attract the Saxons to Christ than did all the armies of Charlemagne. He turned down the bishopric of Trier; and later, around 804, when he became the first bishop of Münster, Ludger himself did missionary work in Heligoland and Westphalia. Although he was denounced to Charlemagne for excessive almsgiving to the detriment of the ornamentation of churches, and kept the emperor waiting for an explanation until he had finished his devotions, he did not lose favor with the king.
Although in some pain from his final illness, the saint continued to preach until the very end of his life. In fact, Ludger died while on a preaching tour and was buried at the Benedictine monastery of Werden, on the Ruhr, which he had founded. Most of his relics remain in there. His feast is recorded in liturgical books from the 9th century (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Encyclopedia, Farmer).

In art, Saint Ludger is portrayed as a bishop with a swan or goose near him (not to be confused with Saint Hugh). Sometimes he may be shown (1) with two swans at his feet; (2) saying his breviary; or (3) holding a model church (Roeder).
878-888 Blessed Bertillo of Dijon abbot martyred by Normans, OSB (AC).
(also known as Bertilo) Bertillo was abbot of Saint Benignus at Dijon, France. The Normans sacked his abbey and massacred him and several of his community at the foot of the altar (Benedictines).
944 Saint Basil the New many miracles healer gift of discernment.

952 ST BASIL THE YOUNGER
THE story of the hermit St Basil the Younger, originally written by his disciple Gregory, has come down to us through Greek channels in which fable has obviously become intermingled with history. According to this tradition, he had a cell not far from Constantinople, but was arrested on suspicion of being a spy, under the rule of Leo VI and Alexander, and was conducted to Constantinople. Under cross-examination, as he refused to reply to the charges brought against him, he was beaten with sticks and suspended by the feet. He was afterwards exposed to the lions, but since they did him no injury, he was then cast into the sea, but was brought safely back to land by dolphins—a very favourite form of rescue in Greek folk-lore, both pagan and Christian. Early the following morning he made his way into the city, where he cured of fever a bedridden man who received him into his house. His miracles and sanctity soon made him famous, but he was several times severely mishandled on account of his stern denunciation of wickedness in high places. When Constantine Porphyrogenitus was attempting to obtain a share in the empire, the holy man foretold his failure and uttered many other remarkable prophecies and Basil never scrupled to admonish the princesses Anastasia and Irene when he deemed that reproof was necessary. He died at the age of 100, and was buried in the church of a nunnery in Constantinople.
See the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. iii, where the Greek text is printed.
Left the world in his youth, and struggled in a desolate place. Once, courtiers of the Byzantine Emperor were passing by and saw him dressed in rags, and were alarmed by his strange appearance. Suspicious of the holy ascetic, they captured him and brought him to the city, where the patrician Samon questioned him. When asked who he was, the saint merely said that he was a stranger in the land. They subjected the monk to terrible tortures, but he endured it in silence, not wishing to reveal the details of his ascetic life to them. Samon lost his patience and asked St Basil, "Impious one, how long will you hide, who are you, and from where do you come?" The saint replied, "It is more appropriate to call impious those who, like yourself, lead a life of impurity."
After his public humiliation, Samon ordered his men to hang the saint upside down with his hands and feet tied. These torments were so cruel that those witnessing them murmured against Samon. When they released the holy ascetic after three days of torture, they found him alive and unharmed.
Samon attributed this miracle to sorcery and had St Basil thrown to a lion. However, the lion did not touch the saint, and lay peacefully at his feet.
Samon ordered St Basil to be drowned in the sea, but two dolphins brought him to shore. The saint went into the city, where he met a sick man named John, who was suffering from fever. St Basil healed the sick man in the name of the Savior, and accepted John's invitation to stay in his home.

Numerous believers came to the saint for advice and guidance, and also to receive healing from sickness through his prayers. St Basil, endowed with the gift of discernment, guided sinners on the path of repentance, and he could predict future events. Among those who visited St Basil was a certain Gregory, who became his disciple and later wrote a detailed Life of his teacher. Gregory once found an expensive sash at an inn, which had been dropped by the inn-keeper's daughter. He hid it on his person, intending to sell it and give the money to the poor. On the way home, he lost the sash and some other things. St Basil admonished him in a dream, showed him a broken pot and said, "If anyone steals such a worthless thing, they will be chastized four times over. You hid a valuable sash, and you will be condemned as a thief. You should return what you found."

After the death of St Theodora, who had attended St Basil, Gregory very much wanted to learn about her life beyond the grave, and he often asked the holy ascetic to reveal this to him. Through the saint's prayers, Gregory saw St Theodora in a dream. She told him how her soul underwent tribulations after death, and how the power of the prayers of St Basil had helped her (The Feast Day of St Theodora of Constantinople is December 30). St Basil died in about the year 944 at the age of 110.
The Church calls him Basil the New to distinguish him from other ascetics of the same name.
952 St. Basil the Younger Hermit gifts of prophecy miracles died at 100
He was living near Constantinople when imprisoned and tortured as a spy. His miracles and prophecies won him his freedom, and he returned to his hermitage with a disciple, Gregory. There he denounced the immorality of the aristocracy, including Princess Anastasia, an activity that brought him persecution.

Basil the Younger, Hermit (AC) Died 952. The entries on Saint Basil are rather cryptic. It appears that adversity took the anchorite Basil to Constantinople where imperial officers seized him as a spy and began to mistreat him. Miracles proved his sanctity, so they sought his favors. He continued to live and exercise his gift of prophecy, until finally he died at age 100 and they argued over his relics. His life was written by his disciple Gregory, who shared his solitude (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
1058 St. Alfwold Bishop and ascetic companion of St. Swithin devotee of St. Cuthbert.
Little is known of Alfwold except for the biographical material gathered by William of Malmesbury. Alfwold was a monk in Winchester, England, before being consecrated bishop of Sherborne in 1045. His austere way of life set a Christian example for the local royalty. St. Swithin was Alfwold's patron in Winchester. Alfwold made a pilgrimage to St. Cuthbert in Durharn.
1198 Blessed Melior of Vallumbrosa many years as a priest and monk Hermit (AC).
(also known as Migliore, Millory) After many years as a priest and monk of Vallumbrosa, Blessed Melior asked to become a recluse in the hermitage called Massa delle Celle, above Vallumbrosa. His relics are enshrined at Vallumbrosa in the "altar of the Ten Beati" (Benedictines).
1435 Blessed Peter Marginet Cistercian monk  rest of his life doing penance OSB Cist. (AC).
Blessed Peter was a Cistercian monk of Poblet near Tarragona, Spain, and the cellarer of the abbey. From a life of high fervor he lapsed into one of crime, apostatized and became the leader of bandits. After some years he repented, went back to the abbey and spent the rest of his life doing penance (Benedictines).
1586 St. Margaret of Clitherow convert harbored fugitive priests.
St. Margaret Clitherow was born in Middleton, England, in 1555, of protestant parents. Possessed of good looks and full of wit and merriment, she was a charming personality. In 1571, she married John Clitherow, a well-to-do grazier and butcher (to whom she bore two children), and a few years later entered the Catholic Church. Her zeal led her to harbor fugitive priests, for which she was arrested and imprisoned by hostile authorities. Recourse was had to every means in an attempt to make her deny her Faith, but the holy woman stood firm. Finally, she was condemned to be pressed to death on March 25, 1586. She was stretched out on the ground with a sharp rock on her back and crushed under a door over laden with unbearable weights. Her bones were broken and she died within fifteen minutes. The humanity and holiness of this servant of God can be readily glimpsed in her words to a friend when she learned of her condemnation: "The sheriffs have said that I am going to die this coming Friday; and I feel the weakness of my flesh which is troubled at this news, but my spirit rejoices greatly. For the love of God, pray for me and ask all good people to do likewise."
1801 Blessed Didacus of Cadiz Capuchin priest difficulty with his studies able to touch minds hearts of young  old rich poor students professors levitated while tireless preaching on love of God Children could see Dove on his shoulder

1801 BD DIDACUS, or DIEGO, OF CADIZ see also March 24

Bd DIDACUS JOSEPH OF CADIZ was popularly called “the apostle of the Holy Trinity”, because of his devotion to the mystery of the Three Divine Persons and the ingenuity with which he contrived to make the theological dogma of the Blessed Trinity the subject of his eloquent and most fruitful sermons.
He was born on March 29, 1743 in Cadiz, and was baptized Joseph Francis. His parents brought him up devoutly, and he preserved throughout his life his baptismal innocence. As a child he liked to construct and decorate little altars, and the same instinct led him when he was older to wait at the church doors in the early morning that he might offer his services to any priest who wanted a server. Constant attendance at the Capuchin church where he made his communions, and the reading of the lives of Capuchin saints, led Diego to desire to enter the Order of St Francis, but he was refused at first as he seemed to be insufficiently educated. However, he overcame this obstacle, and on being at last accepted began his novitiate at Seville as Brother Diego or Didacus. In due course he was raised to the priesthood and sent to preach. From the first it became evident that he was endowed with gifts of no mean order, for his sermons wherever he went brought conviction of sin and amend­ment of life. Throughout Spain, but more particularly in Andalusia, the holy man journeyed, teaching and preaching in remote villages and crowded towns, shrinking from no fatigue or hardship so long as there was work to do for souls. He was content simply to preach the gospel, indulging in no rhetorical artifices or flowery language. A wonderful intuition or sympathy seems to have brought him into touch with his hearers, so that he won the hearts alike of the poor and of the well-to-do, of young students in schools and of professors in universities. His work in the tribunal of penance was complementary to his preaching, for it enabled him to direct and strengthen those whom his sermons had touched. Any free time during the day was spent in visiting prisons and hospitals or in similar works of charity, whilst a great part of the night was given to prayer.

It is related that in preaching about the love of God, there were occasions when Father Diego was raised supernaturally into the air so that he required assistance to regain the floor of the pulpit. Sometimes the largest churches could not contain the crowds who flocked to hear him, and he would preach in a square or in the streets, whilst the crowds stood for hours entranced. At the close of his sermons he had to be protected from the people, who tried to tear pieces from his habit as relics. Popularity, however, could not injure one so humble as Bd Diego: slights and insults might serve, he thought, as a very inadequate expiation for his sins. He shunned all presents, and, if obliged to accept them, he immediately distributed them to the poor: money he absolutely refused. Immediately his death became known in 1801 he was acclaimed as a saint, and Pope Leo XIII proclaimed his beatification in 1894.

See C. Kempf, The Holiness of the Church in the Nineteenth Century; Analecta Ecclesiastica, 1894, pp. 151 seq.; Damase de Soisey, Le bx Diego Joseph de Cadiz (1902).

Born in Cadiz, Spain, and christened Joseph Francis, the youth spent much of his free time around the Capuchin friars and their church. But his desire to enter the Franciscan Order was delayed because of the difficulty he had with his studies. Finally he was admitted to the novitiate of the Capuchins in Seville as Brother Didacus. He later was ordained a priest and sent out to preach.  His gift of preaching was soon evident. He journeyed tirelessly through the territory of Andalusia of Spain, speaking in small towns and crowded cities. His words were able to touch the minds and hearts of young and old, rich and poor, students and professors. His work in the confessional completed the conversions his words began.

This unlearned man was called "the apostle of the Holy Trinity" because of his devotion to the Trinity and the ease with which he preached about this sublime mystery. One day a child gave away his secret, crying out: "Mother, mother, see the dove resting on the shoulder of Father Didacus! I could preach like that too if a dove told me all that I should say."

Didacus was that close to God, spending nights in prayer and preparing for his sermons by severe penances. His reply to those who criticized him: "My sins and the sins of the people compel me to do it. Those who have been charged with the conversions of sinners must remember that the Lord has imposed on them the sins of all their clients."

It is said that sometimes when he preached on the love of God he would be elevated above the pulpit. Crowds in village and town squares were entranced by his words and would attempt to tear off pieces of his habit as he passed by.
He died in 1801 at age 58, a holy and revered man. He was beatified in 1894.

Comment:  Didacus was such a poor student that the Franciscans wouldn’t have him. When Capuchins finally took him into their order and eventually ordained him, he proved to be a powerful preacher—to everyone’s surprise. As we often do, Didacus’s contemporaries expected little from someone with a slow mind. Didacus proved to them that intelligence is not the only measure. The person who has a loving heart, a listening ear and a wealth of compassion is, in the long run, much wiser.   
1908 Blessed Maddalena Caterina Morano Daughters of Mary Help of Christians coordinated catechetical instruction (AC)
Born at Turin, Italy, 1847; died at Catania, Sicily, on March 26, 1908; beatified November 5, 1994.
At the age of eight, Maddalena had to begin working to provide for her family after the death of her father and older sister. Nevertheless, she continued her studies to earn a teaching diploma. But her studies did not end with secular subjects. Instead her exploration of Christian doctrine fanned the fire of her faith and instilled a desire for the religious life. Because family obligations barred immediate fulfillment of this desire, she taught at a school in rural Montaldo while serving as a catechist at the local parish for 12 years. In 1878, when she had accumulated enough savings to provide for her mother, Maddalena joined the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians, which had been founded six years earlier by Saint John Bosco. In 1881, Don Bosco permitted her to be sent to Trecastagni (near Catania), Sicily, to head an institute for women, to which she gave a new orientation inspired by the principles of the Salesian method.

Sicily became her second home, where she carried out a varied and fruitful apostolate. She opened new houses, set up after-school activities and sewing classes, trained teachers, etc. Her real love, though, was for catechism class, since she was convinced that the formation of Christian conscience was the basis of personal maturity and all social improvement. She coordinated catechetical instruction in 18 of Catania's churches and trained lay and religious catechists to bring the Christian message to needy boys and girls.

She spent 25 years in Sicily and served her community as local and provincial superior. She was an attentive mother and caring guide for many local vocations, faithfully living the charism of Mother Maria Mazzarello, co-foundress of the institute (EWTN).

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Former abortion worker finds mercy

 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
 
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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