Friday Saint of the Day April 01  Kaléndis Aprílis  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.


Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  April 2016
Universal:   Small Farmers --
That small farmers may receive a just reward for their precious labor.
.
Evangelization: African Christians --  That Christians in Africa may give witness to love and faith in Jesus Christ amid political-religious conflicts.

April 1 – Our Lady of Tenderness (Smolensk, Russia) 
 
In these latter times Mary must shine forth more than ever
 
He who finds Mary finds life. … In these latter times Mary must shine forth more than ever in mercy, power and grace; in mercy, to bring back and welcome lovingly the poor sinners and wanderers who are to be converted and return to the Catholic Church; in power, to combat the enemies of God who will rise up menacingly to seduce and crush by promises and threats all those who oppose them; finally, she must shine forth in grace to inspire and support the valiant soldiers and loyal servants of Jesus Christ who are fighting for his cause.

Lastly, Mary must become as terrible as an army in battle array to the devil and his followers, especially in these latter times. For Satan, knowing that he has little time—even less now than ever—to destroy souls, intensifies his efforts and his onslaughts every day. He will not hesitate to stir up savage persecutions and set treacherous snares for Mary's faithful servants and children whom he finds more difficult to overcome than others.
 
Saint Louis Marie Grignion de Montfort  Treatise on True Devotion to the Blessed Virgin §50
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Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary.


550 B.C. The Departure of the Great Prophet Daniel.  Daniel"s_tomb_Susa_Iran >
"After finishing my bread, I lived on herbs and the things one finds in the desert. The clothes I had when I crossed over the Jordan became torn and fell apart.
I suffered both from the summer heat, when the blazing heat fell upon me, and from the winter cold, when I shivered from the frost.
Many times I fell down upon the earth, as though dead. I struggled with various afflictions and temptations.
But from that time until the present day, the power of God has guarded my sinful soul and humble body.
I was fed and clothed by the all-powerful word of God, since man does not live by bread alone, but by every word proceeding from the mouth of God (Dt 8:3, Mt.4:4, Luke 4:4), and those who have put off the old man (Col 3:9) have no refuge, hiding themselves in the clefts of the rocks (Job 24:8, Heb 11:38).
When I remember from what evil and from what sins the Lord delivered me, I have imperishible food for salvation."
"I however," says St Sophronius of Jerusalem  "wrote down the Life of St Mary of Egypt as I heard it from the holy Fathers.
I have recorded everything, putting the truth above all else."

When tempted, invoke your angel. He is more eager to help you than you are to be helped!
Ignore the devil and do not be afraid of him: He trembles and flees at the sight of your guardian angel.
-- St. John Bosco



Our Lady in Bosnia-Herzegovina (I)  April 2 - Our Lady of the Highest Grace (Dominican Republic, 1506)
 - John Paul II
In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, many apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary have been recorded throughout the ages. The most famous being Guadalupe (Mexico), La Salette, and Lourdes (France), Knock (Ireland) and Fatima (Portugal). But never in recorded Marian history has Our Lady appeared daily for so long a period of time, to so many chosen seers, with such a profound impact worldwide.
For more than 25 years, the "Gospa" has appeared daily in the quiet, rural village of Medjugorje in Bosnia-Herzegovina. This unprecedented series of apparitions to six youths (two boys and four girls), and later by inner locution to two more young girls, began in June 1981. It continues to this day, with one overriding objective: to bring the world back to God. The messages are poignant and elevated in urgency as Mary reveals that these will be her final apparitions on earth, because, as she adds, "It will no longer be necessary."
April 1 - Our Lady of Tears (Sicily, 1953)   Akathistos Saturday
On the Saturday of the fifth week of Lent, the Eastern Church sings the majestic "Akathist Hymn" in honor of the Mother of God and most pure Virgin Mary. During Matins service of this Saturday the entire Akathistos (Akathist Hymn) of the Annunciation of the most Holy Mother of God is sung. This hymn can be called the symbol and crown of the sublime cult of the Mother of God in the Eastern Church.

By these endless hymns the Blessed Virgin is thanked for her ever-present protection, in memory of the attacks on Constantinople at the time of Heraclius. At that time, Sassanian king Chosroes II, with the help of Persia's Avar allies, raided Constantinople from the west, crying out blasphemies against God. The sea was covered with ships, the countryside filled with infantry and horsemen. The Patriarch of Constantinople urged the people not to be discouraged, but to trust wholeheartedly in God and His divine and All-Immaculate Mother. The Patriarch and the people carried the icon of the Mother of God in procession, on the ramparts of the city, to ask for the strength to resist, along with the icon of Christ not-painted-by-a-human-hand, the precious, vivifying Cross, and the tunic of the Mother of God.

Boats full of soldiers were heading towards the Church of Our Lady of Blacherna, when a violent storm suddenly stirred up the sea, wrecking the fleet and destroying the enemy. From the shore of Blacherna, the Mother of God repelled the attackers. The Greeks fought the Scythians one against ten, with great courage and exultant joy, led by their invincible general; they opened the gates of the city and fought against their enemies, using only the small number of soldiers that were positioned near a temple called the Source. They wiped out their multitude and the city was saved. Full of gratitude, the people of Constantinople gave thanks to the Mother of God, singing hymns all night long without sitting down (Akathistos, a Greek word meaning not sitting), since she herself had not stopped watching over them for one moment and she had won the victory over their enemies with a supernatural power.

Since then, the Eastern Church traditionally devotes this Saturday to the Mother of God in memory of the great miracle performed by her.  Adapted from the Santa Barbara Byzantine Catholic Church Bulletin, March 1997.
April 1 - Our Lady of Tenderness (Smolensk, Russia)
 
Where could we find a better model?
 
The Mother of God, glory of mankind, first in line, first deified woman, pride and model of women—perfectly accomplished, in herself, the union of masculine and feminine, of the earth and heaven, and of the divine and the human. (…).

Summarizing in her person the qualities of the quintessential woman, which are interiority, gentleness and the merciful love of a mother, the Virgin Mary shows in her person how femininity finds its fulfillment in holiness. (…) Her major work was to welcome the Spirit, something that Seraphim of Sarov says is the goal of Christian life.

(…) Humility, which the Virgin Mary exemplifies, constitutes the best antidote to the temptation of power that poisons human relationships and impedes problem solving in the Church and secular society. Where could we find a better model for today's woman who is searching for her place in society and the Church?

Father Michel Quenot,
Excerpt from the book La Mère de Dieu, Joyau terrestre, Icône de l’humanité nouvelle, (The Mother of God, Earthy Jewel, Icon of the New Humanity), Éd. Saint-Augustin, Saint-Maurice CH, 2006.


          St Mary of EgypSt Zosimas monk at a certain Palestinian monastery on the outskirts of Caesarea
120 -132 St. Theodora Roman martyr sister of  Saint Hermes aid and care to her brother in prison
180 St. Melito Bishop of Sardis in Lydia, Asia Minor powerful gift of prophecy as attested by Saint Jerome and Eusebius
180 St. Philip of Gortyna authorship of a now lost treatise against the Gnostics
255 St. Venantius Bishop martyr prelate serving Dalmatia, Croatia
Sts. Victor and Stephen Two martyrs executed in Egypt probably Alexandria
3rd v. The Martyrs Gerontius and Basilides suffered martyrdom for Christ
     St. Quintian and Irenaeus 2 Armenian martyrs whose Acts are no longer extant
         
Constantinópoli sancti Macárii Confessóris, qui, sub Leóne Imperatóre, pro assertióne sanctárum Imáginum
5thv  to 6th v Saint Tewdric prince of Glamorgan is discussed in the Book of Llan Dav, written much later, Hermit
622 St. (Valery) Walericus Benedictine founder missionary abbot under St. Columbanus His time was entirely occupied
       with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual labor
644 Berhard B  Berhard saintly bishop who had a great affection for Saint Valéry
666 Saint  Leuconus 18th bishop of Troyes, who founded Notre-Dame-des-Nonnains
7th v.  St. Dodolinus bishop of Vienne, in Dauphine, France
7th v. St. Caidoc & Fricor Irish missionaries in northern France  convert  was Saint  Ricarius
9th v. St. Cellach abbot of lona, Scotland  archbishop of Armagh, Ireland
         
Ardpatrícii, in Momónia Hibérniæ província, sancti Celsi Epíscopi, qui beátum Malachíam in Episcopátu
          præcéssit.

     St.
Marcella  A little shepherdess of the Auvergne
830 St. Macarius the Wonder-Worker monk known for miracles
1053 VENERABLE PROCOPIUS, THE CZECH establishing the Monastery of St. John the Forerunner by Sazava river
1129 St. Cellach Last hereditary archbishop of Armagh, Ireland named St. Malachy
1132 St. Hugh of Grenoble Benedictine bishop amazing modesty took upon himself all sins of others the cross he carried was heavy laden holy and redemptive great reputation for miracles
Apud Ambiánum, in Gállia, sancti Waleríci Abbátis, cujus sepúlcrum crebris miráculis illustrátur.
1194 Hugh of Bonnevaux possessed singular powers of discernment and exorcism OSB Cistercian, Abbot (AC)
1220 Jacqueline V Hermit recluse in Sicily reprimanded Pope Innocent III
1220 Blessed Nicholas of Neti Cistercian monk of the community of Santa Maria dell'Arcu near Neti, Sicily, OSB Cist.
1245 ST GILBERT, BISHOP OF CAITHNESS “Three maxims which I have always tried to observe I now commend to you: first, never to hurt anyone and, if injured, never to seek revenge secondly, to bear patiently whatever suffering God may inflict, remembering that He chastises every son whom He receives; and finally to obey those in authority so as not to be a stumbling-block to others.”
1229 The Holy Martyr Abraham the Bulgar, Vladimir Wonderworker convert from Islam martyred for his faith
XII (XIII) Century The Monk John Shauteli -- was a distinguished Gruzinian (Georgian) poet, philosopher and
       rhetorician

1367 Blessed Gerard of Sassoferrato received the Camaldolese habit OSB Cam. (AC)
euthymius_dormition
1404 Saint Euthymius of Suzdal tonsure Nizhegorod Caves under St Dionysius:  founded Savior-Euthymius monastery strict ascetic great man of prayer incorrupt relics 100 yrs
1574 Catherine Tomás strange phenomena mystical experiences both consoling /alarming,
         including gift of prophecy  last years of life continually in ecstasy
1849 BD LUDOVIC PAVONI, FOUNDER OF THE SONS OF MARY IMMACULATE OF
       BRESCIA

1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina (Paul I. Plikhanov) a colonel, to be a general, but became a priest gifts of clairvoyance healing read souls
St Barsanuphius loved spiritual books, especially the Lives of the Saints. He often told people that those who read these Lives with faith benefit greatly from doing so. The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints, he said. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious
"All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the Lord;
and all the families of the nations shall worship before him
"
(Psalm 21:28)


550 B.C. The Departure of the Great Prophet Daniel.

On this day of the last year of king Cyrus King of Babylon, the great righteous prophet Daniel Departed. This prophet was from the tribe of Judah, and from the posterity of king David. He was taken captive along with the Israelites by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon when he captured Jerusalem in the year 3398 of the world. He stayed in babylon for seventy years. This prophet was very young in age, however, he conducted himself in virtuous life, the Holy Spirit filled him and he prophesied in Babylon.

In the fourth year of the exile, Nebuchadnezzar the king saw a dreadful dream and was extremely frightened. When he woke up, he forgot the detail of his dream. He gathered all the wise men of Babylon to tell the king his dream and its meaning. If they failed to tell the king the dream and its interpretation they would all be killed, among those also were Daniel and the three young men. Daniel and the young men prayed to God with supplications to reveal to them the King's dream. God answered their prayers and revealed to Daniel the dream and its interpretation. Daniel went to the king and told him his dream and its interpretation. He also told him about the kings that they are about to rule after him, and what would happen to every one of them. Nebuchadnezzar was pleased with Daniel, and fell on his face before him. The king presented Daniel with great gifts and appointed him over the wise men of Babylon.

After some time had passed, Nebuchadnezzar saw another dream, and Daniel interpreted the dream for him. Daniel told the king that because of his arrogance, God would drive him from among men, to dwell among the beasts of the wild and would eat grass like oxen for seven years, and then God would bring him back to his kingdom, and all that happened to Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel also explained to Belshazzar, the son of Nebuchadnezzar, what the angel of the Lord had written on the wall, when king Belshazzar drank wine in the gold and silver vessels of the temple of the Lord. Daniel told the king: " O king, the Most High gave Nebuchadnezzar your father, a kingdom and majesty, glory and honor... But when his heart was lifted up in pride, he was deposed from his kingdom and thrown from his throne into among the animals. And you, Belshazzar, although you knew all what happened to your father, yet you also lifted your heart against the Lord of heaven. They brought the vessels of the house of the Lord before you, and you , your lords, wives and concubines (mistresses) drank wine from these vessels... Then the fingers of a Hand were send from the Lord, and His writing was written: "Mene, Mene, Tekel, and Upharsin..which meant:

Mene means: God has numbered your days as a king and terminated you rule. Tekel means: You have been weighed in the balances of the Lord and was found wanting. Upharsin means: your kingdom has been divided and given to the Medes and Persians after you. All of them came to pass and the king was killed with all his lords and the kingdom of the Chaldeans ended. Darius, king of Persia, ruled after him.

There was an idol in Babylon named "Bael" which king Darius worshiped. When Daniel was asked why he did not worship it, Daniel answered: "I do not worship something that has no life in it." The king said to him: "He is alive for he eats and drinks every day." Daniel told him that could not be true. The king was angry and wanted to check the matter for himself. He put the food and the drinks in the temple of the idol and closed the door and sealed it. On the next day, he went to the temple, opened the door and did not find the food nor the drinks. But Daniel with the help of some of his companions, covered the floor of the temple with fine ashes, found the feet tracks of those who entered the temple by night and stole the food and drinks.

The king arrested the seventy priests of the idol Bael, together with their wives and children and tortured them until they told him about the secret entrance to the temple. The king then ordered them all to be killed and allowed Daniel to destroy the idol and its altar. The people rebelled against the king and asked him to deliver Daniel to their hands. The king surrendered to their demands and Daniel was cast into the den of lions. However God kept Daniel safe and destroyed his enemies.

Daniel saw in a vision the kingdoms and the kings to come after him to rule the world to the end of time. He also saw the glory of God and the Divinity of Christ the Savior. He prophesied about His coming and His death, the destruction of Jerusalem, and the abolition of the sacrifice and the offerings, and all has been fulfilled.
This great prophet remained in Babylon for seventy years, then departed in peace.
May his prayers be with us, and glory be to God for ever. Amen.
St Mary of Egypt  St Zosimas monk at a certain Palestinian monastery on the outskirts of Caesarea
Having dwelt at the monastery since his childhood, he lived there in asceticism until he reached the age of fifty-three. Then he was disturbed by the thought that he had attained perfection, and needed no one to instruct him. "Is there a monk anywhere who can show me some form of asceticism that I have not attained? Is there anyone who has surpassed me in spiritual sobriety and deeds?"

Suddenly, an angel of the Lord appeared to him and said, "Zosimas, you have struggled valiantly, as far as this is in the power of man. However, there is no one who is righteous (Rom 3:10). So that you may know how many other ways lead to salvation, leave your native land, like Abraham from the house of his father (Gen 12:1), and go to the monastery by the Jordan."
Abba Zosimas immediately left the monastery, and following the angel, he went to the Jordan monastery and settled in it.

Here he met Elders who were adept in contemplation, and also in their struggles. Never did anyone utter an idle word. Instead, they sang constantly, and prayed all night long. Abba Zosimas began to imitate the spiritual activity of the holy monks.  Thus much time passed, and the holy Forty Day Fast approached. There was a certain custom at the monastery, which was why God had led St Zosimas there. On the First Sunday of Great Lent the igumen served the Divine Liturgy, everyone received the All-Pure Body and Blood of Christ. Afterwards, they went to the trapeza for a small repast, and then assembled once more in church.
The monks prayed and made prostrations, asking forgiveness one of another. Then they made a prostration before the igumen and asked his blessing for the struggle that lay before them. During the Psalm "The Lord is my Light and my Savior, whom shall I fear? The Lord is defender of my life, of whom shall I be afraid?" (Ps 26/27:1), they opened the monastery gate and went off into the wilderness.
Each took with him as much food as he needed, and went into the desert. When their food ran out, they ate roots and desert plants. The monks crossed the Jordan and scattered in various directions, so that no one might see how another fasted or how they spent their time.  The monks returned to the monastery on Palm Sunday, each having his own conscience as a witness of his ascetic struggles.
It was a rule of the monastery that no one asked how anyone else had toiled in the desert.
Abba Zosimas, according to the custom of the monastery, went deep into the desert hoping to find someone living there who could benefit him.
He walked into the wilderness for twenty days and then, when he sang the Psalms of the Sixth Hour and made the usual prayers. Suddenly, to the right of the hill where he stood, he saw a human form. He was afraid, thinking that it might be a demonic apparition. Then he guarded himself with the Sign of the Cross, which removed his fear. He turned to the right and saw a form walking southward. The body was black from the blazing sunlight, and the faded short hair was white like a sheep's fleece. Abba Zosimas rejoiced, since he had not seen any living thing for many days.
The desert-dweller saw Zosimas approaching, and attempted to flee from him. Abba Zosimas, forgetting his age and fatigue, quickened his pace. When he was close enough to be heard, he called out,
"Why do you flee from me, a sinful old man? Wait for me, for the love of God."

The stranger said to him, "Forgive me, Abba Zosimas, but I cannot turn and show my face to you. I am a woman, and as you see, I am naked. If you would grant the request of a sinful woman, throw me your cloak so I might cover my body, and then I can ask for your blessing."
Then Abba Zosimas was terrified, realizing that she could not have called him by name unless she possessed spiritual insight.

Covered by the cloak, the ascetic turned to Zosimas: "Why do you want to speak with me, a sinful woman? What did you wish to learn from me, you who have not shrunk from such great labors?"
Abba Zosimas fell to the ground and asked for her blessing. She also bowed down before him, and for a long time they remained on the ground each asking the other to bless. Finally, the woman ascetic said: "Abba Zosimas, you must bless and pray, since you are honored with the grace of the priesthood. For many years you have stood before the holy altar, offering the Holy Gifts to the Lord."

These words frightened St Zosimas even more. With tears he said to her, "O Mother! It is clear that you live with God and are dead to this world. You have called me by name and recognized me as a priest, though you have never seen me before. The grace granted you is apparent, therefore bless me, for the Lord's sake." Yielding finally to his entreaties, she said, "Blessed is God, Who cares for the salvation of men." Abba Zosimas replied, "Amen." Then they rose to their feet. The woman ascetic again said to the Elder, "Why have you come, Father, to me who am a sinner, bereft of every virtue? Apparently, the grace of the Holy Spirit has brought you to do me a service. But tell me first, Abba, how do the Christians live, how is the Church guided?"
Abba Zosimas answered her, "By your holy prayers God has granted the Church and us all a lasting peace. But fulfill my unworthy request, Mother, and pray for the whole world and for me a sinner, that my wanderings in the desert may not be useless."
The holy ascetic replied, "You, Abba Zosimas, as a priest, ought to pray for me and for all, for you are called to do this.
However, since we must be obedient, I will do as you ask.


The saint turned toward the East, and raising her eyes to heaven and stretching out her hands, she began to pray in a whisper. She prayed so softly that Abba Zosimas could not hear her words.
After a long time, the Elder looked up and saw her standing in the air more than a foot above the ground.
Seeing this, Zosimas threw himself down on the ground, weeping and repeating, "Lord, have mercy!"

Then he was tempted by a thought. He wondered if she might not be a spirit, and if her prayer could be insincere. At that moment she turned around, lifted him from the ground and said,
"Why do your thoughts confuse you, Abba Zosimas? I am not an apparition.
I am a sinful and unworthy woman, though I am guarded by holy Baptism."

Then she made the Sign of the Cross and said, "May God protect us from the Evil One and his schemes, for fierce is his struggle against us." Seeing and hearing this, the Elder fell at her feet with tears saying, "I beseech you by Christ our God, do not conceal from me who you are and how you came into this desert. Tell me everything, so that the wondrous works of God may be revealed."

She replied, "It distresses me, Father, to speak to you about my shameless life. When you hear my story, you might flee from me, as if from a poisonous snake. But I shall tell you everything, Father, concealing nothing. However, I exhort you, cease not to pray for me a sinner, that I may find mercy on the Day of Judgment.

"I was born in Egypt and when I was twelve years old, I left my parents and went to Alexandria. There I lost my chastity and gave myself to unrestrained and insatiable sensuality. For more than seventeen years I lived like that and I did it all for free. Do not think that I refused the money because I was rich. I lived in poverty and worked at spinning flax. To me, life consisted in the satisfaction of my fleshly lust.
  "One summer I saw a crowd of people from Libya and Egypt heading toward the sea. They were on their way to Jerusalem for the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. I also wanted to sail with them. Since I had no food or money, I offered my body in payment for my passage. And so I embarked on the ship.

"Now, Father, believe me, I am very amazed, that the sea tolerated my wantonness and fornication, that the earth did not open up its mouth and take me down alive into hell, because I had ensnared so many souls. I think that God was seeking my repentance. He did not desire the death of a sinner, but awaited my conversion.  "So I arrived in Jerusalem and spent all the days before the Feast living the same sort of life, and maybe even worse.

"When the holy Feast of the Exaltation of the Venerable Cross of the Lord arrived, I went about as before, looking for young men. At daybreak I saw that everyone was heading to the church, so I went along with the rest. When the hour of the Holy Elevation drew nigh, I was trying to enter into the church with all the people. With great effort I came almost to the doors, and attempted to squeeze inside. Although I stepped up to the threshold, it was as though some force held me back, preventing me from entering. I was brushed aside by the crowd, and found myself standing alone on the porch. I thought that perhaps this happened because of my womanly weakness. I worked my way into the crowd, and again I attempted to elbow people aside. However hard I tried, I could not enter. Just as my feet touched the church threshold, I was stopped. Others entered the church without difficulty, while I alone was not allowed in. This happened three or four times. Finally my strength was exhausted. I went off and stood in a corner of the church portico.

"Then I realized that it was my sins that prevented me from seeing the Life-Creating Wood. The grace of the Lord then touched my heart. I wept and lamented, and I began to beat my breast. Sighing from the depths of my heart, I saw above me an icon of the Most Holy Theotokos. Turning to Her, I prayed: "O Lady Virgin, who gave birth in the flesh to God the Word! I know that I am unworthy to look upon your icon. I rightly inspire hatred and disgust before your purity, but I know also that God became Man in order to call sinners to repentance. Help me, O All-Pure One. Let me enter the church. Allow me to behold the Wood upon which the Lord was crucified in the flesh, shedding His Blood for the redemption of sinners, and also for me. Be my witness before Your Son that I will never defile my body again with the impurity of fornication. As soon as I have seen the Cross of your Son, I will renounce the world, and go wherever you lead me."

"After I had spoken, I felt confidence in the compassion of the Mother of God, and left the spot where I had been praying. I joined those entering the church, and no one pushed me back or prevented me from entering. I went on in fear and trembling, and entered the holy place. 
"Thus I also saw the Mysteries of God, and how God accepts the penitant. I fell to the holy ground and kissed it. Then I hastened again to stand before the icon of the Mother of God, where I had given my vow. Bending my knees before the Virgin Theotokos, I prayed:
"'O Lady, you have not rejected my prayer as unworthy. Glory be to God, Who accepts the repentance of sinners. It is time for me to fulfill my vow, which you witnessed. Therefore, O Lady, guide me on the path of repentance.'"
"Then I heard a voice from on high: 'If you cross the Jordan, you will find glorious rest.' "I immediately believed that this voice was meant for me, and I cried out to the Mother of God: 'O Lady, do not forsake me!'  "Then I left the church portico and started on my journey. A certain man gave me three coins as I was leaving the church. With them I bought three loaves of bread, and asked the bread merchant the way to the Jordan.

"It was nine o'clock when I saw the Cross. At sunset I reached the church of St John the Baptist on the banks of the Jordan. After praying in the church, I went down to the Jordan and washed my face and hands in its water. Then in this same temple of St John the Forerunner I received the Life-Creating Mysteries of Christ. Then I ate half of one of my loaves of bread, drank water from the holy Jordan, and slept there that night on the ground. In the morning I found a small boat and crossed the river to the opposite shore. Again I prayed that the Mother of God would lead me where She wished. Then I found myself in this desert."
Abba Zosimas asked her, "How many years have passed since you began to live in the desert?" 
"'I think," she replied, "it is forty-seven years since I came from the Holy City."

Abba Zosimas again asked, "What food do you find here, Mother?"
And she said, "I had with me two and a half loaves of bread when I crossed the Jordan.
Soon they dried out and hardened Eating a little at a time, I finished them after a few years."

Again Abba Zosimas asked, "Is it possible you have survived for so many years without sickness, and without suffering in any way from such a complete change?"

"Believe me, Abba Zosimas," the woman said, "I spent seventeen years in this wilderness (after she had spent seventeen years in immorality), fighting wild beasts: mad desires and passions. When I began to eat bread, I thought of the meat and fish which I had in abundance in Egypt. I also missed the wine that I loved so much when I was in the world, while here I did not even have water. I suffered from thirst and hunger. I also had a mad desire for lewd songs.
I seemed to hear them, disturbing my heart and my hearing.
Weeping and striking myself on the breast, I remembered the vow I had made.
At last I beheld a radiant Light shining on me from everywhere. After a violent tempest, a lasting calm ensued.
"Abba, how shall I tell you of the thoughts that urged me on to fornication? A fire seemed to burn within me, awakening in me the desire for embraces. Then I would throw myself to the ground and water it with my tears. I seemed to see the Most Holy Virgin before me, and She seemed to threaten me for not keeping my vow.   I lay face downward day and night upon the ground, and would not get up until that blessed Light encircled me, dispelling the evil thoughts that troubled me.
"Thus I lived in this wilderness for the first seventeen years. Darkness after darkness, misery after misery stood about me, a sinner. But from that time until now the Mother of God helps me in everything."

Abba Zosimas again inquired, "How is it that you require neither food, nor clothing?"
She answered, "After finishing my bread, I lived on herbs and the things one finds in the desert. The clothes I had when I crossed over the Jordan became torn and fell apart. I suffered both from the summer heat, when the blazing heat fell upon me, and from the winter cold, when I shivered from the frost. Many times I fell down upon the earth, as though dead. I struggled with various afflictions and temptations. But from that time until the present day, the power of God has guarded my sinful soul and humble body. I was fed and clothed by the all-powerful word of God, since man does not live by bread alone, but by every word proceeding from the mouth of God (Dt 8:3, Mt.4:4, Luke 4:4), and those who have put off the old man (Col 3:9) have no refuge, hiding themselves in the clefts of the rocks (Job 24:8, Heb 11:38). When I remember from what evil and from what sins the Lord delivered me, I have imperishible food for salvation."
When Abba Zosimas heard that the holy ascetic quoted the Holy Scripture from memory, from the Books of Moses and Job and from the Psalms of David, he then asked the woman,
 "Mother, have you read the Psalms and other books?"

She smiled at hearing this question, and answered, "Believe me, I have seen no human face but yours from the time that I crossed over the Jordan. I never learned from books. I have never heard anyone read or sing from them. Perhaps the Word of God, which is alive and acting, teaches man knowledge by itself (Col 3:16, 1 Thess 2:13).
This is the end of my story. As I asked when I began, I beg you for the sake of the Incarnate Word of God, holy Abba, pray for me, a sinner.  "Furthermore, I beg you, for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior, tell no one what you have heard from me, until God takes me from this earth. Next year, during Great Lent, do not cross the Jordan, as is the custom of your monastery."
Again Abba Zosimas was amazed, that the practice of his monastery was known to the holy woman ascetic, although he had not said anything to her about this.

"Remain at the monastery," the woman continued. "Even if you try to leave the monastery, you will not be able to do so. On Great and Holy Thursday, the day of the Lord's Last Supper, place the Life-Creating Body and Blood of Christ our God in a holy vessel, and bring it to me. Await me on this side of the Jordan, at the edge of the desert, so that I may receive the Holy Mysteries. And say to Abba John, the igumen of your community, 'Look to yourself and your brothers (1 Tim 4:16), for there is much that needs correction. Do not say this to him now, but when the Lord shall indicate."
Asking for his prayers, the woman turned and vanished into the depths of the desert.
For a whole year Elder Zosimas remained silent, not daring to reveal to anyone what he had seen, and he prayed that the Lord would grant him to see the holy ascetic once more.
When the first week of Great Lent came again, St Zosimas was obliged to remain at the monastery because of sickness. Then he remembered the woman's prophetic words that he would not be able to leave the monastery. After several days went by, St Zosimas was healed of his infirmity, but he remained at the monastery until Holy Week.
On Holy Thursday, Abba Zosimas did what he had been ordered to do. He placed some of the Body and Blood of Christ into a chalice, and some food in a small basket. Then he left the monastery and went to the Jordan and waited for the ascetic. The saint seemed tardy, and Abba Zosimas prayed that God would permit him to see the holy woman.
Finally, he saw her standing on the far side of the river.

Rejoicing, St Zosimas got up and glorified God. Then he wondered how she could cross the Jordan without a boat. She made the Sign of the Cross over the water, then she walked on the water and crossed the Jordan. Abba Zosimas saw her in the moonlight, walking toward him. When the Elder wanted to make prostration before her, she forbade him, crying out, "What are you doing, Abba? You are a priest and you carry the Holy Mysteries of God."
Reaching the shore, she said to Abba Zosimas, "Bless me, Father." He answered her with trembling, astonished at what he had seen. "Truly God did not lie when he promised that those who purify themselves will be like Him. Glory to You, O Christ our God, for showing me through your holy servant, how far I am from perfection."
The woman asked him to recite both the Creed and the "Our Father." When the prayers were finished, she partook of the Holy Mysteries of Christ. Then she raised her hands to the heavens and said, "Lord, now let Your servant depart in peace, for my eyes have seen Your salvation."
The saint turned to the Elder and said, "Please, Abba, fulfill another request. Go now to your monastery, and in a year's time come to the place where we first time spoke."

He said, "If only it were possible for me to follow you and always see your holy face!"
She replied, "For the Lord's sake, pray for me and remember my wrechedness."
Again she made the Sign of the Cross over the Jordan, and walked over the water as before, and disappeared into the desert.

Zosimas returned to the monastery with joy and terror, reproaching himself because he had not asked the saint's name. He hoped to do so the following year.
A year passed, and Abba Zosimas went into the desert.
He reached the place where he first saw the holy woman ascetic. She lay dead, with arms folded on her bosom, and her face was turned to the east. Abba Zosimas washed her feet with his tears and kissed them, not daring to touch anything else. For a long while he wept over her and sang the customary Psalms, and said the funeral prayers. He began to wonder whether the saint would want him to bury her or not. Hardly had he thought this, when he saw something written on the ground near her head:
"Abba Zosimas, bury on this spot the body of humble Mary. Return to dust what is dust. Pray to the Lord for me.
I reposed on the first day of April, on the very night of the saving Passion of Christ, after partaking of the Mystical Supper."

Reading this note, Abba Zosimas was glad to learn her name. He then realized that St Mary, after receiving the Holy Mysteries from his hand, was transported instantaneously to the place where she died, though it had taken him twenty days to travel that distance.
Glorifying God, Abba Zosimas said to himself, "It is time to do what she asks. But how can I dig a grave, with nothing in my hands?"

 Then he saw a small piece of wood left by some traveler. He picked it up and began to dig. The ground was hard and dry, and he could not dig it. Looking up, Abba Zosimas saw an enormous lion standing by the saint's body and licking her feet. Fear gripped the Elder, but he guarded himself with the Sign of the Cross, believing that he would remain unharmed through the prayers of the holy woman ascetic. Then the lion came close to the Elder, showing its friendliness with every movement. Abba Zosimas commanded the lion to dig the grave, in order to bury St Mary's body. At his words, the lion dug a hole deep enough to bury the body. Then each went his own way. The lion went into the desert, and Abba Zosimas returned to the monastery, blessing and praising Christ our God.

Arriving at the monastery, Abba Zosimas related to the monks and the igumen, what he had seen and heard from St Mary. All were astonished, hearing about the miracles of God. They always remembered St Mary with faith and love on the day of her repose.  Abba John, the igumen of the monastery, heeded the words of St Mary, and with the help of God corrected the things that were wrong at the monastery. Abba Zosimas lived a God-pleasing life at the monastery, reaching nearly a hundred years of age. There he finished his temporal life, and passed into life eternal.
The monks passed on the life of St Mary of Egypt by word of mouth without writing it down.

"I however," says St Sophronius of Jerusalem (March 11), "wrote down the Life of St Mary of Egypt as I heard it from the holy Fathers. I have recorded everything, putting the truth above all else."
"May God, Who works great miracles and bestows gifts on all who turn to Him in faith, reward those who hear or read this account, and those who copy it. May he grant them a blessed portion together with St Mary of Egypt and with all the saints who have pleased God by their pious thoughts and works. Let us give glory to God, the Eternal King, that we may find mercy on the Day of Judgment through our Lord Jesus Christ, to Whom is due all glory, honor, majesty and worship together with the Unoriginate Father, and the Most Holy and Life-Creating Spirit, now and ever and unto ages of ages. Amen."
120 -132 St. Theodora Roman martyr sister of  Saint Hermes aid and care to her brother in prison
 Romæ pássio sanctæ Theodóræ, soróris illustríssimi Mártyris Hermétis, quæ, sub Hadriáno Imperatóre, ab Aureliáno Júdice affécta martyrio, sepúlta est juxta fratrem suum, via Salária, non longe ab Urbe.
       At Rome, the passion of St. Theodora, sister of the illustrious martyr Hermes.  She underwent martyrdom in the time of Emperor Adrian, under the judge Aurelian, and was buried at the side of her brother, on the Salarian Way, a short distance from the city.
According to the Acta of Pope St. Alexander (r 105-115), she was the sister of  Saint Hermes and was martyred some time after her brother. She had given aid and care to her brother during his difficult time in prison.

Theodora of Rome M (RM) Died 132. According to the Acta of Pope Alexander I, Theodora buried Saint Hermes, her brother, after assisting him in prison and as he was tortured. She was herself martyred some months later. Brother and sister were buried side by side (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

180 St. Philip of Gortyna authorship of a now lost treatise against the Gnostics
Bishop of Gortyna, Crete. Little is known about him except for his authorship of a now lost treatise against the Gnostics.

180 St. Melito Bishop of Sardis in Lydia, Asia Minor; powerful gift of prophecy as attested by Saint Jerome and Eusebius

180 ST MELITO, Bishop OF SARDIS
EUSEBIUS and other ecclesiastical writers greatly commend the writings of  St Melito, Bishop of Sardis in Lydia, who during the second century wrote an Apology for Christianity addressed to the Emperor Marcus Aurelius and many other works, theological and ethical. Eusebius and St Jerome give the titles or the subjects of a number of these writings, but of the books themselves little has survived but a few fragments. According to Tertullian, who was rather disdainful of his oratorical diction and style, St Melito was regarded as a prophet by many people. His name occurs in some of the old martyrologia, but beyond the fact that he was unmarried and was said to have ruled his conduct by the teaching of the Holy Spirit, nothing whatever is known of his life or death.
Owing to the similarity between the names of Sardis and Sardinia, St Melito has often been confused with a fictitious namesake reputed to have been a pupil of St Boniface, the first bishop of Cagliari, and to have suffered martyrdom in Sardinia under Domitian.

There is a very full article on Melito, concerned of course principally with the writings attributed to him, in DTC., vol. x, cc. 540—547, to which the writer, E. Amann, appends a full bibliography. See also G. Salmon in DCE., vol. iii, pp. 894—900, and Bardenhewer, Altkirchliche Literatur, vol. i, pp. 546—557.
He was praised by Eusebius and had the gift of prophecy. Melito had a great reputation as an ecclesiastical writer, authoring an Apologia for Christianity to Emperor Marcus Aurelius. He was also revered by Tertullian as a prophet.

Melito of Sardis B (AC). Bishop Melito of Sardis, Lydia, was an ecclesiastical writer of the period of the apologists. There are some writings attributed him that are now believed to have been composed by an unknown writer. Nevertheless, he was endowed with a powerful gift of prophecy, which led to the surname of "the Prophet," as attested by Saint Jerome and Eusebius (Attwater2, Benedictines, Husenbeth).

SAINT MELETION, THE BISHOP OF SARDIS IN ASIA MINOR
Meletion was a celebrated shepherd of the second-century Church. Governing with great ability, he endeavored to gather all the books of Sacred Scripture into a single Codex. By his meekness and piety, Meletion again labored to restore peace in the Church of Laodicea, which arose over the controversy regarding the celebration of Pascha (The Feast of the Resurrection). Besides this, he defended Christianity against the pagans. He traveled to Rome about the year 170 A.D. and submitted to Emperor Marcus Aurelius a written Apologia (Defense) of the Faith and of the Christian Church. St. Meletion, this learned, pious and zealous man, died peacefully in the Lord in the year 177 A.D. 

255 St. Venantius Bishop martyr prelate serving Dalmatia, Croatia
Eódem die sancti Venántii, Epíscopi et Mártyris.       The same day, St. Venantius, bishop and martyr.
Executed during the persecutions of the Church by the Roman Empire.
His relics were translated from Split (Spalato), Dalmatia, to the Lateran Basilica in Rome under Pope John IV (r. 640-642).
Venantius of Spalato BM (RM). Saint Venantius was a Dalmatian bishop whose body was brought to the Lateran at Spalato by Pope John IV in 641 (Benedictines).
3rd v. The Martyrs Gerontius and Basilides suffered martyrdom for Christ in the third century
They were beheaded by the sword.
Sts. Victor and Stephen Two martyrs executed in Egypt probably Alexandria
  In Ægypto sanctórum Mártyrum Victóris et Stéphani.       In Egypt, the holy martyrs Victor and Stephen.

St_John_Shavteli_of_Salosi Georgia >

Victor and Stephen MM (RM). Egyptian martyrs (Benedictines).
St. Quintian and Irenaeus 2 Armenian martyrs whose Acts are no longer extant.
 In Arménia sanctórum Mártyrum Quinctiáni et Irenǽi.       In Armenia, the holy martyrs Quinctian and Irenæus.
Quintian and Irenaeus MM (RM) Date unknown. Armenian martyrs about whom nothing else is known (Benedictines).

 Constantinópoli sancti Macárii Confessóris, qui, sub Leóne Imperatóre, pro assertióne sanctárum Imáginum, in exsílio vitam finívit.
       At Constantinople, under Emperor Leo, St. Macarius, confessor, who ended his life in exile for defending the veneration of sacred images.

St John Shavteli of Salosi, Bishop of Gaenati, Georgia

283 Martyrs Chrysanthus and Daria 19 March/1 April

Saints Chrysanthus and Daria (and with them Claudius, Hilaria, Jason and Maurus) suffered in Rome in the year 283. Saint Chrysanthus was the son of a distinguished senator, received a brilliant education and from his young years came to love books. Having bought the Gospel and the Apostolic epistles, he read them with interest. The height of the Gospel teaching captivated him, but much in these books he could not understand.
By God's Providence, Chrysanthus became acquainted with a priest, who explained the Christian faith to him in detail. Having studied the Gospel more deeply and having been imbued with the ideal of Christian morality, Chrysanthus renounced the pagan errors of his family and accepted Holy Baptism. Chrysanthus burned with a desire to introduce other pagans also to the Christian faith, and therefore he began diligently and fearlessly to preach the Good Tidings.
His father, a staunch pagan, having learned of his son's baptism and desiring to turn him away from Christianity, put him in a dungeon and began to kill him by hunger and cold. But the sufferings only strengthened Chrysanthus' faith. Then the father, hoping by this to return the son to paganism, freed Chrysanthus from prison and married him to the maiden Daria - a priestess at the pagan temple of Athena. But instead of this, Chrysanthus shortly converted Daria to Christianity, and she was baptized.
When Chrysanthus' father died, the home of the young spouses became an abode for newly-converted Christians. After some time, the Tribune Claudius was informed that Chrysanthus and Daria were preaching Christianity. Claudius gave them over to tortures, but, seeing the steadfastness and miracles of the martyrs, he himself came to believe in Christ with his wife, Hilaria, and their sons, Maurus and Jason.
For this, by order of the emperor, Claudius was drowned with a stone around his neck, while his sons had their heads chopped off by the sword.
Their mother, Hilaria, died on their grave, before they could give her over to tortures. Chrysanthus and Daria, after terrible tortures, were buried alive in the earth.

Subsequently, on the day of the commemoration of Saints Chrysanthus and Daria, many Roman Christians would gather for prayer in a cave near the place of their righteous death. Pagans, having learned of this, blocked up the cave, and those gathered in it perished from hunger. Among those who perished in the cave are named the Presbyter Diodorus and the Deacon Marianus.
5thv  to 6th v Saint Tewdric prince of Glamorgan is discussed in the Book of Llan Dav, written much later, Hermit (AC)
(also known as Theodoric) feast day is sometimes listed as January 3. Saint Tewdric, prince of Glamorgan, is discussed in the Book of Llan Dav, written much later. According to this source, in his later years he resigned his position in favor of his son Meurig in order to become a hermit at Tintern. During an invasion of the Saxons, he placed himself at the head of his people. In the ensuing battle, he was mortally wounded by a lance. Tewdric was buried at Mathern, near Chepstow, formerly called Merthyr Tewdrig, where the church still bears his name. He is the reputed founder of the churches at Bedwas Llandow and Merthyr Tydfil. In the early 17th century, Bishop Francis Godwin of Llandaff found the saints bones, including a badly fractured skull in the church at Mathern (Farmer).

622 St. Walericus Benedictine founder missionary abbot under St. Columbanus His time was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual labor; miracles
 Apud Ambiánum, in Gállia, sancti Waleríci Abbátis, cujus sepúlcrum crebris miráculis illustrátur.
       At Amiens in France, Abbot St. Valery, whose tomb is well known for its frequent miracles.
also called Valery. He served under St. Columbanus at the famed monastery of Luxeuil, in France, and was the founder of the monastic community of Leuconay, on the Somme River.

620 ST WALARICUS, or VALÉRY, Abbot
ST WALARICUS or Valéry, whose body William the Conqueror caused to be publicly exposed that the saint might obtain a favourable wind for his English expedition, was born in a humble home in the Auvergne. Somehow he learned to read, and he is said to have procured a psalter, the contents of which he committed to memory while tending sheep. His uncle one day took him to visit the monastery of Autumo, but when the time came for returning, the boy insisted upon staying behind; so there he was allowed to remain and to continue his education, though it is doubtful whether he ever took the habit there.
Some years later he left to enter the abbey of St Germanus near Auxerre, but his sojourn does not seem to have been a protracted one. It was not unusual in those days for monks voluntarily to go from one monastery to another; some indeed were vagrants by nature who could never settle anywhere, but many of them were men striving after perfection, who were only eager to find a director capable of assisting them to attain their goal. Of this number was Walaricus. The renown of St Columban and of the life led by his followers at Luxeuil determined him to seek out the great Irishman and to place himself under his rule. With him went his friend Bobo, a nobleman who had been converted by him and who had abandoned his possessions to join him. At Luxeuil, where they found the leader and the spiritual life they sought, they settled down happily. To Walaricus fell the duty of cultivating part of the garden. The flourishing condition of his allotment, when the rest of the estate was being devoured by insects, was regarded as miraculous, and is said to have induced St Columban, who already had a high opinion of him, to profess him after an unusually short novitiate.
When King Theodoric expelled the abbot from his monastery, allowing only the Irish and the Bretons to accompany him, Walaricus, not wishing to remain on at Luxeuil without St Columban, obtained leave to join a monk called Waldolanus, who was about to start on a mission of evangelization. Receiving permission to settle in Neustria, they preached freely to the people, and Walaricus’s eloquence and miracles gained many converts. It was not long, however, before he began to feel again the call to retire from the world, but this time he thought it his vocation to be a hermit. By the advice of Bishop Berchundus he chose a solitary spot near the sea, at the mouth of the river Somme, where he proposed to live in solitude but he could not remain hidden. Disciples discovered him and cells sprang up around, which developed into the celebrated abbey of Leuconaus. St Walaricus would occasionally issue forth to preach missions in the countryside, and so successful were his efforts that he is said to have evangelized not only what is now known as the Pas-de-Calais, but the whole eastern shore of the English Channel.
Tall and ascetic-looking, the holy man was noted for his singular gentleness which tempered the stern Rule of St Columban with excellent results. Animals were attracted to him: birds perched on his shoulders and ate from his hand, and often the good abbot would gently warn off an intruding visitor with the words, “Do let these innocent creatures eat their meal in peace”.
After ruling his monastery for six years or more, St Walaricus passed to his rest about the year 620. Numerous miracles reported after his death quickly spread his cultus, at least two French towns, St-Valéry-sur-Somme and St-Valéry-en-Caux, being named after him. King Richard Coeur-de-Lion transferred his relics to the latter town, which is in Normandy, but they were afterwards restored to St-Valéry sur-Somme, on the site of the abbey of Leuconaus.

We are told that a life of St Walaricus was written by Raginbertus, who became abbot of Leuconaus not long after the death of the saint. It was formerly believed that this docu­ment was preserved in substance by a later writer, who re-edited it in a new setting and in a more correct style. Bruno Krusch, however, seems to have proved that this later life dates only from the eleventh century and is a fabrication which borrows freely from other hagio­graphical materials which have nothing to do with St Walaricus. See MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. iv, pp. 157—175 where a more critical text than that of the Bollandists and Mabillon may also be found. For some criticisms of B. Krusch’s edition see Wattenbach Levison, Deutschlands Geschichtsquellen im Mittelalter Vorzeit und Karolinger, vol. (1952),
Walaricus of Leucone, Abbot (RM) (also known as Valéry, Walericus) Born in Auvergne, France; died in Leucone, Picardy, France, on December 12, c. 622; feast of his translation is December 12.
Valéry discovered Benedictine life at Issoire, developed it at Auxerre, fructified it at Luxeuil under Saint Columbanus, and multiplied it with missionary work at Leuconnais (Leuconay), in the Somme region of northern France.

Born into a peasant family in the Auvergne, Valéry tended his father's sheep in his childhood, which gave him plenty of time to develop his prayer life. Out of an ardent desire to grow in spiritual knowledge, he learned to read at an early age and memorized the Psalter. Dissatisfied with his life as a shepherd, he took the monastic habit in the neighboring monastery of St. Antony's at Autumo.

His fervor from the first day of monastic life led him to live the rule perfectly. Sincere humility permitted him to meekly and cheerfully subjected himself to everyone. Seeking a stricter rule, he migrated to the more austere monastery of St. Germanus, where he was received by Bishop Saint Anacharius of Auxerre. He was drawn to Luxeuil by the reputation of the penitential lives of its monks and the spiritual wisdom of Saint Columbanus. There he spent many years, always esteeming himself an unprofitable servant and a slothful monk, who stood in need of the severest and harshest rules and superiors. Next to sin, he dreaded nothing so much as the applause of men or a reputation of sanctity. At Luxeuil he also distinguished himself as a horticulturalist--the preservation of his fruit and vegetables against the ravages of insects that destroyed most other crops was considered miraculous.

When Saint Columbanus was banished from Luxeuil by King Theodoric, the monastery was placed in Valéry's hands until he was sent by Saint Eustasius with his fellow-monk Waldolanus to preach the Gospel in Neustria. There King Clotaire II gave them the territory of Leucone in Picardy, near the mouth of the river Somme. In 611, with the permission of Bishop Bertard of Amiens, they built a chapel and two cells. Saint Valéry by his preaching and the example of his virtue, converted many and attracted fervent disciples with whom he laid the foundation of a monastery.

His fasts he sometimes prolonged for six days, eating only on the Sunday; and he used no other bed than twigs laid on the floor. His time was entirely occupied with preaching, prayer, reading, and manual labor. By this he earned something for the relief of the poor, and he often repeated to others, "The more cheerfully we give to those who are in distress, the more readily will God give us what we ask of him."

When Valéry died, cures were claimed at his tomb and a cultus developed, which eventually spread to England during the Norman Conquest. William the Conqueror exposed Valéry's relics for public veneration. He was invoked for a favorable wind for the expedition in 1066, which sailed from Saint-Valéry

Valéry is honored at Chester Abbey in England and in France, where a famous monastery arose from his cells. His vita was carefully written in 660, by Raimbert, second abbot of Leucone after him. King Richard the Lion Hearted had his relics restored to Saint-Valéry-en-Caux; however, his original abbey later recovered them. Two towns in the Somme district are called Saint- Valéry after him, and there are several dedications to him in England as well (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth).
7th v. St. Caidoc & Fricor Irish missionaries in northern France  converts was Saint  Ricarius
One of their converts was Saint  Ricarius. Their relics are in the parish of Saint-Riquier near Amiens, France.
In some lists Fricor is called Adrian.

Caidoc and Fricor (Adrian) HH (AC) 7th century; they had four feast days at Centula: January 24, March 31, April 1, and May 30. The Irishmen Caidoc and Fricor evangelized the country of the Morini in Picardy, northern France, beginning about 622. Among the souls they won for Christ was the nobleman Riquier (Saint Ricarius), who intervened when some locals to offense to their preaching and took them into his home. Riquier became a fervent Christian, who engaged in penitential austerities and eventually was ordained. In 625, Riquier founded Centula based on the Rule of Columbanus, another Irishman. Their relics are still venerated at the parish church of Saint-Riquier in the diocese of Amiens, although they rested in Centula until the 17th century. Saints Caidoc and Fricor joined Riquier's community and remained there until they were buried in Saint Riquier's church (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Fitzpatrick2, McCarthy, Montague, O'Hanlon).

644 Saint Berhard B  Berhard saintly bishop who had a great affection for Saint Valéry
and who tried to have him buried in his cathedral in Amiens (Encyclopedia)

7th v. St. Dodolinus bishop of Vienne, in Dauphine, France
No details of his ministry have survived.
Dodolinus of Vienne B (AC) 7th century. Bishop Saint Dodolin of Vienne's feast is celebrated in the Dauphiné (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

666 Saint  Leuconus B 18th bishop of Troyes, who founded Notre-Dame-des-Nonnains (Encyclopedia).
9th v. St. Cellach abbot of lona, Scotland  archbishop of Armagh, Ireland
The abbot of lona, Scotland, and the archbishop of Armagh, Ireland. Also called Ceilach and Keilach, he was the founder of the monastery of Kells.

 Ardpatrícii, in Momónia Hibérniæ província, sancti Celsi Epíscopi, qui beátum Malachíam in Episcopátu præcéssit.
       At Ard-Patrick in Munster, a province of Ireland, Bishop St. Celsus, who preceded blessed Malachy in that bishopric.

Marcella  A little shepherdess of the Auvergne Date unknown.(Encyclopedia).
830 St. Macarius the Wonder-Worker monk known for miracles
 Constantinópoli sancti Macárii Confessóris, qui, sub Leóne Imperatóre, pro assertióne sanctárum Imáginum, in exsílio vitam finívit.
      At Constantinople, under Emperor Leo, St. Macarius, confessor, who ended his life in exile for defending the veneration of sacred images.

830 ST MACARIUS THE WONDER-WORKER became celebrated for his miracles of healing
MACARIUS the Wonder-worker was a native of Constantinople. He received an excellent education, showing special aptitude for the study of the Holy Scriptures, “the whole of which”, we read, “he ran through in a short time”. Afterwards, leaving the city, he betook himself to the monastery of Pelekete where he dropped his baptismal name of Christopher to assume that of Macarius. A model monk, he was chosen abbot and soon became celebrated for his miracles of healing. Crowds flocked to Pelekete to be cured of diseases both of body and of mind. The patriarch of Constantinople, St Tarasius, who had received many reports of his sanctity and miracles, greatly desiring to see him, dispatched to be his escort the patrician Paul, who had once been cured by the abbot and whose wife had recently been restored to health by him after she had been given over by the physicians. When the two saints met, Tarasius gave Macarius his blessing and, before allowing him to return, ordained him priest. He was not destined to remain long at peace in his cloister. The Emperor Leo the Armenian attacked in turn all the prominent supporters of the cultus of holy images, and Macarius was tortured in various ways and kept in prison until the emperor’s death. His successor, Michael the Stammerer, released the saint and tried by promises and threats to win him over. Finding, however, that he remained inflexible, the emperor banished him to the island of Aphusia off the shore of Bithynia, where on August 18 he died in exile; the precise year is unknown.

A Greek life of St Macarius by the monk Sabas was edited in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xvi (1897), pp. 140—163. Its historical character is confirmed by certain letters of Theodore Studites. See the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxii (1913), pp. 270—273 and cf. Échos d’Orient, (1898), pp. 274—280. April i seems to have been the day of his trans­lation.
Abbot and victim of persecution by Iconoclast heretics. He was born Christopher at Constantinople. and became a monk at Pelekete Monastery, taking the name Macanus. Elected abbot, he was called the Wonder-Worker because of his prodigious miracles. Two Iconoclast emperors of Constantinople exiled him. Emperor Leo V banished him for a time and then Emperor Michael II sent him to Aphusia Island on the coast of Bythinia, where he died on August 18.

Macarius the Wonder-Worker, Abbot (RM) Born in Constantinople; died on Aphusia Island, Bithynia, on August 18, c. 830.
"To you, O Master, who loves all mankind I hasten on rising from sleep. By your mercy I go out to do your work and I make my prayer to you.  Help me at all times and in all things.  Deliver me from every evil thing of this world and from pursuit by the devil.  Save me and bring me to your eternal kingdom, For you are my Creator, You inspire all good thoughts in me.
In you is all my hope and to you I give glory, now and forever." --Saint Macarius

Piously baptized Christopher in Constantinople, he took the name Macarius upon becoming a monk at Pelekete nearby. Eventually he was elected abbot and became known for the miracles he wrought.
Macarius was ordained by Patriarch Tarasius of Constantinople, was imprisoned and tortured for his opposition to the iconoclasm proclaimed by Emperor Leo the Armenian, and was released by Leo's successor, Emperor Michael the Stammerer. When he refused Michael's demands that he support the iconoclastic heresy, he was exiled to the island of Aphusia off the coast of Bithynia and died there (Attwater2, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

Saint Macarius was born at Constantinople in 785. While still a child, he lost his parents. The saint fervently read the Scriptures and came to realize that earthly things are temporary and perishable, and that heavenly things are permanent and imperishable. Therefore, he decided to devote his life entirely to God. He entered the Pelekete monastery in Bithynia, where at the time the igumen was the renowned ascetic, St Hilarion (March 28).  After the death of St Hilarion, St Macarius was unanimously chosen as igumen by the brethren. During the reign of the Byzantine Emperors Leo V the Armenian (813-820) and Michael II the Stammerer (820-829), St Macarius suffered as a confessor for the veneration of holy icons. He was sent to the island of Aphousia, where he died in about the year 830.

 Apud Ambiánum, in Gállia, sancti Waleríci Abbátis, cujus sepúlcrum crebris miráculis illustrátur.  
       At Amiens in France, Abbot St. Valéry, whose tomb is well known for its frequent miracles.

1053 VENERABLE PROCOPIUS, THE CZECH establishing the Monastery of St. John the Forerunner by the Sazava river
Procopius was born in Hotish, today's Czech Republic. He was ordained a priest and retreated to a mountain to live according to the model of eastern hermits. The Duke (Herceg) Ulrich accidentally came upon Procopius and assisted him in establishing the Monastery of St. John the Forerunner by the Sazava river. This holy man died in the year 1053 A.D.

1132 St. Hugh of Grenoble Benedictine bishop amazing modesty took upon himself all the sins of others the cross he carried was heavy laden holy and redemptive; a great reputation for miracles
 Gratianópoli, in Gállia, sancti Hugónis Epíscopi, qui multis annis in solitúdine vitam exégit, et miraculórum glória clarus migrávit ad Dóminum.
      At Grenoble in France, Bishop St. Hugh, who spent many years of his life in solitude, and departed for heaven with a great reputation for miracles.

Detail from "St. Hugo of Grenoble in the Carthusian Refectory"
By Francisco de Zurbarán; Museo de Bellas Artes, Seville
Courtesy of the Web Gallery of Art 

1132 ST HUGH, Bishop OF GRENOBLE
ST HUGH was born at Châteauneuf, near Valence in the Dauphine, in the year 1052. His father, Odilo, after being twice married, became a Carthusian, and died at the age of 100, receiving viaticum from his son in whose arms he passed away.
   After an education begun in Valence and completed with distinction in foreign centres of learning, Hugh was presented to a canonry in the cathedral of Valence though still a layman—such benefices at that period being often conferred on young students without orders. Very young, good-looking, and extremely bashful, he soon won all hearts by his courtesy and by the modesty which led him to conceal and underrate his talents and learning.
The bishop of Die, another Hugh, was so charmed by his namesake when he came to Valence that he insisted upon attaching him to his household. The prelate soon proved the young Canon’s worth by entrusting him with some difficult negotiations in the campaign then directed against simony; and in 1080 he took him to a synod at Avignon, called to consider, amongst other matters, the disorders which had crept into the vacant see of Grenoble. The council and the delegates from Grenoble severally and collectively appear to have looked on Canon Hugh as the one man who was capable of dealing with the disorders complained of; but though unanimously elected it was with the greatest reluctance that he consented to accept the office. The legate himself conferred on him holy orders up to the priesthood, and took him to Rome that he might receive consecration from the pope.
The kindness of the reception he met emboldened the young bishop elect to consult St Gregory VII about temptations to blasphemy which sometimes beset him, causing him great distress and, as he considered, rendering him unfit for the high office to which he was called. The pontiff reassured him, explaining that God permitted these trials to purify him and render him a more fitting instrument for the divine purposes. These particular temptations continued to assault him until his last illness, but he never yielded to them in any way.
The Countess Matilda gave the twenty-eight-year-old bishop his crozier and some books, including the De officiis ministrorum of St Ambrose and a psalter to which were appended the commentaries of St Augustine. Immediately after his consecration. St Hugh hurried off to his diocese, but he was appalled by the state of his flock. The gravest sins were committed without shame; simony and usury were rampant; the clergy openly flouted the obligation to celibacy; the people were uninstructed; laymen had seized church property and the see was almost penniless. It was indeed a herculean task that lay before the saint.
  For two years he laboured unremittingly to redress abuses by preaching, by denunciations, by rigorous fasts and by constant prayer. The excellent results he was obtaining were patent to all but to himself: he only saw his failures and blamed his own incompetence. Discouraged, he quietly withdrew to the Cluniac abbey of Chaise-Dieu, where he received the Benedictine habit. He did not remain there long, for Pope Gregory commanded him to resume his pastoral charge and return to Grenoble.
   Coming out of his solitude, like another Moses from the mountain, he seemed—so men declared—to preach with greater fervour and success than before. It was to St Hugh of Grenoble that St Bruno and his companions addressed themselves when they decided to forsake the world, and it was he who granted to them the desert called the Chartreuse which gave its name to their order. The bishop became greatly attached to the monks it was his delight to visit them in their solitude, joining in their exercises and performing the most menial offices. Sometimes he would linger so long in these congenial surroundings that St Bruno was constrained to remind him of his flock and of his episcopal duties. These periods of retreat were the bright oases in a hard and anxious life.
With the clergy and the common people St Hugh was most successful, but the nobles continued to withstand him to the end. Moreover, for the last forty years of his life he suffered almost unremittingly from headaches complicated by gastric trouble, and was tormented by severe temptations. Nevertheless occasionally he was granted sensible spiritual consolations which filled his heart with joy.
During his sermons it was not unusual to see the whole congregation in tears, whilst individuals would be moved to make public confession on the spot. Of sin he had the utmost horror, and his loathing of detraction was so great that he disliked the duty of listening to official reports and closed his ears to the news of the day. Temporal things always seemed to him dull and irksome as compared with the heavenly things on which his heart was set.

He besought pope after pope to release him from office. One and all refused point-blank. Honorius II, to whom he pleaded his age and infirmities, replied that he preferred to retain him as bishop of Grenoble—old and ill— rather than have any younger or stronger man in his place.
A generous almsgiver, St Hugh in a time of famine sold a gold chalice as well as rings and precious stones from his church treasury; and rich men were stirred by his example to give liberally to feed the hungry and supply the needs of the diocese. Although at the end of life his soul was further purified by a lingering illness of a very painful character, Hugh never uttered a word of complaint, nor would he speak of what he endured. His only concern was for others. His humility was all the more striking because everyone approached him with the utmost reverence and affection. In reply to someone who asked, “Why do you weep so bitterly—you who never offended God by any wilful sin?” he replied, “Vanity and inordinate affections alone are enough to damn a soul. Only through God’s mercy can we hope to be saved, and should we ever cease to implore it?”
A short time before his death he lost his memory for everything but prayer, and would recite the psalter or the Lord’s Prayer without intermission. St Hugh died on April 1, 1132, two months before attaining the age of eighty, having been a bishop for fifty-two years.  Pope Innocent II canonized him two years later.

The main authority for the life of St Hugh is the Latin biography by Guigo, prior of the Grande Chartreuse, who died only five years after the saint himself. This life is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. i, and elsewhere. See also Albert du Boys, Vie de St Hugues (1837); Bellet in the Bulletin Soc. Archéol. Drôme (1894), xxviii, 5-31 and Marion, Chartulaire de l’Eglise de Grenoble (1869). Hugh is reckoned amongst ecclesiastical writers chiefly on the strength of this cartulary, or collection of charters, copies of which, accom­panied by curious historical notes, are preserved in Grenoble Library. The bishop is often associated with St Bruno as co-founder of the Grande Chartreuse.

b. 1053 Benedictine bishop of Grenoble, France, patron of St. Bruno. He was born in the Dauphine region and became a canon of the cathedral in Valence. In 1080, while attending a synod in Avignon, Hugh was named bishop of Grenoble. He attempted a massive reform of the diocese, but, discouraged, retired to Chaise Dieu Abbey, and became a Benedictine. Pope St. Gregoiy VII ordered him back to Grenoble. Hugh gave St. Bruno


Hugh of Grenoble, OSB B (RM) Born near Valence in the Dauphiné, France, in 1052; died in Grenoble, France, on April 1, 1132; canonized by Pope Innocent II in 1134.
What an amazing modesty Saint Hugh possessed! You may shrug your shoulders, of course. The 20th century is without modesty and doesn't appreciate it. There is something about the modesty of Saint Hugh that governed and colored his life, yet repels and confounds us. We have lost the taste for that virtue in a world where we live like haggling beasts: industrious, envious, quarrelsome, wretched beasts!

By contrast Saint Hugh took to heart Saint Paul's admonition: "Let love be sincere . . . love one another with mutual affection; anticipate one another in showing honor...do not be haughty but associate with the lowly; do not be wise in your own estimation" (Romans 12:9, 16). And again Paul urges: "Do nothing out of selfishness or vainglory; rather, humbly regard others as more important than yourselves.." (Philippians 2:3). the land on which the Grande Chartreuse was founded, thus starting the Carthusians. Hugh died on April 1 and was canonized by Pope Innocent II.

When Hugh of Grenoble was born at Châteauneuf, the French churchmen were very undisciplined. He was the son of the second marriage of Odilo, a knight of excellent reputation, who later became a Carthusian monk. His father lived to the venerable age of 100, before he died in his son's arms after having received viaticum from him. Odilo's goodness inspired his son to greatness. As a youth, Saint Hugh was a pupil of Saint Bruno at Rheims. He later studied in the best foreign centers for education.

Good looks and a diffident manner, added to his abilities, seem to have helped Hugh's swift rise in ecclesiastical office. He won all hearts through his courtesy and modesty that led him to underrate his own talents and learning. Hugh, though a layman, was made a canon of Valence Cathedral at age 25, and set out to reform the church. Bishop Hugh of Die soon saw the young man's zeal and appointed the young man to his household. This bishop was particularly keen to stamp out simony (that is sale for personal gain of positions in the church) and Hugh played a huge part in his campaign.  In 1080, the bishop took Hugh to a council at Avignon. One of the purposes of the council was to sort out the disorders that had arisen in the diocese of Grenoble, whose bishop had just died.
 
To Hugh's surprise, the participants decided that this 27-year-old was by far the best person to be consecrated bishop. He protested that he was only a layman.  "But I repeat to you that I am not worthy of it!" sighed Hugh.
"What fairy tale is this that you're telling me?" asked the papal legate, Bishop Hugh of Die. "Who is asking you to act on your own strength? Count first on God, who will give you help."
Nevertheless, the bishop ordained him and then took him to Rome where the pope consecrated Hugh as bishop though he was barely 30.

Hugh discovered that diocese of Grenoble was in a far worse state than he had imagined. Although the clergy had taken vows of celibacy, many of them lived more or less openly with women. Influential laymen had seized most of the property of the church. Hugh manfully set about putting matters aright. He was unpopular with the nobility, whose confiscation of church property the bishop dealt with firmly. Only Hugh, however, failed to see the excellent results of his policies. Two years after his consecration, believing that he had vainly opposed these disorders, as well as simony and usury, through sermons, threats, example, fast, and prayers, Hugh left the city and withdrew to the abbey of Chaise- Dieu (Cluniac).

This was the first of several times he despaired because of his lack of progress and went to live as a monk. "But I repeat to you that I can't do anything that's good and worthwhile!" he complained gently to those who wanted him to give up this sudden Benedictine vocation and his seeming lack of faith. Each time the pope insisted that he must take up the struggle again.
"Very well, granted. You can't do anything, my son," Pope Saint Gregory VII said to him, "but you are bishop, and the sacrament can do everything." Each time Hugh obeyed. This first time it took a year of discussion before Hugh returned to Grenoble with a crushing sense of his unworthiness and inferiority.

Bishop Hugh of Grenoble sustained the papacy in its dispute with Emperor Henry V, and was persecuted for his loyalty. Grenoble was in the emperor's territory, but his flock rallied to his support.
It was then, in 1084, that Saint Bruno and his companions came in search of silence, solitude, and a perpetual conversation with God on the fringes of the scandals of the world. Hugh was waiting for them. He rolled up his cassock and, like a guide, led them through the craggy rocks of the desert called the Chartreuse. He gave this land to the monks who built there the famous monastery of Grande Chartreuse.
The charter Hugh gave them still exists.

Hugh knew the way to the Grande Chartreuse very well, and often visited the monks. He came so often, in fact, and liked it so much that Saint Bruno often had to send him away, reminding him of his flock and episcopal duties. When he visited them in their solitude, Hugh would join in their exercises and perform the most menial tasks. Hugh saw himself as a bad bishop and wanted nothing more than to stay in the monastery. Hugh's close association with the Carthusians has ensured the custom that the diocesan bishop was always expected (contrary to other monastic orders) to guide and cherish Charterhouses in their diocese.

During his 52-year episcopacy, Hugh vainly tendered his resignation to each pope--Gregory VII, Gelasius II, Calixtus II, Honorius II, Innocent II, and others--and they refused him because of his outstanding ability. He never ceased imploring them to release him from the duties of his episcopal office up to the day of his death. During his last, painful illness he was tormented by headaches and stomach disorders that resulted from his long fasts and vigils, yet never complained. For a short time before his death, he lost his memory for everything but prayer, and would recite the Psalter and the Our Father unceasingly.

It was this humility--which once almost became a blasphemy against Divine Providence--that unwittingly made Hugh such a good bishop. Out of the fear and shame that he was better nourished, housed, and dressed than the poor, he sold his ring, other jewels, furs, a golden chalice, and ornaments to raise money and gave it to those in need. His generosity stirred other rich men to liberally follow his example.

He wept when he heard a penitent's confession and when the disorders of his retinue were brought to his attention, he blamed himself as though it were a personal fault. Hugh also founded three hospitals at Grenoble, built a marketplace, and provided a stone bridge over the Isere, in addition to restoring the cathedral and Saint Laurence's Church. For 52 years Hugh labored as bishop of Grenoble, dying at age 79, having restored the diocese both financially and morally.

He took upon himself all the sins of others, and the cross that he carried was so heavy laden, so holy, and so redemptive that two years after his death, he was canonized amid the jubilation of the people and of his church. By order of Pope Innocent II, Hugh's Carthusian friend Gigues wrote the saints Life which brings out the attractiveness of this modest man's character (Attwater, Attwater2, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Gill, Walsh).

In art, Saint Hugh is a bishop seeing a vision of seven stars. Sometimes he is shown (1) with a lantern; (2) with three flowers; (3) with Saint Bruno, to whom he entrusted the Grande Chartreuse; or (4) turning partridges served to Carthusians on a fast day into tortoises (Roeder). Zurbaran gave Hugh a prominent place in his paintings of the early Carthusians in the museum of Seville (Farmer). Saint Hugh is invoked against headache (Roeder).

St. Hugh of Grenoble (1052-1132)
 
Today’s saint could be a patron for those of us who feel so overwhelmed by all the problems in the world that we don’t know where to begin.
Hugh, who served as a bishop in France for 52 years, had his work cut out for him from the start. Corruption seemed to loom in every direction: the buying and selling of Church offices, violations of clerical celibacy, lay control of Church property, religious indifference and/or ignorance. After serving as bishop for two years, he’d had his fill. He tried disappearing to a monastery, but the pope called him back to continue the work of reform.

Ironically, Hugh was reasonably effective in the role of reformer—surely because of his devotion to the Church but also because of his strong character. In conflicts between Church and state he was an unflinching defender of the Church. He fearlessly supported the papacy. He was eloquent as a preacher. He restored his own cathedral, made civic improvements in the town and weathered a brief exile.

Hugh may be best known as patron and benefactor of St. Bruno, founder of the Carthusian Order.
Hugh died in 1132. He was canonized only two years later.

1129 St. Cellach Last hereditary archbishop of Armagh, Ireland named St. Malachy
 Ardpatrícii, in Momónia Hibérniæ província, sancti Celsi Epíscopi, qui beátum Malachíam in Episcopátu præcéssit.
       At Ard-Patrick in Munster, a province of Ireland, Bishop St. Celsus, who preceded blessed Malachy in that bishopric
as his successor when he died on April 1 at Ardpatrick, in Munster. He was called Cellach Mc Aedh, a native of Ireland, possibly a Benedictine of Glastonbury, also called Celsus. Cellach taught at Oxford, England, until 1106, when he became the archbishop of Armagh at the age of twenty-six, serving there with distinction.
1194 Hugh of Bonnevaux possessed singular powers of discernment and exorcism OSB Cistercian, Abbot (AC)
 Gratianópoli, in Gállia, sancti Hugónis Epíscopi, qui multis annis in solitúdine vitam exégit, et miraculórum glória clarus migrávit ad Dóminum.
       At Grenoble in France, Bishop St. Hugh, who spent many years of his life in solitude, and departed for heaven with a great reputation for miracles.
A nephew of Saint Hugh of Grenoble, Saint Hugh of Bonnevaux became a Cistercian monk at Mezières. In 1163, he was made abbot of Léoncel, and, in 1169, promoted to the abbacy of Bonnevaux. Hugh possessed singular powers of discernment and exorcism, but he is chiefly remembered as the mediator between.

1194 ST HUGH OF BONNEVAUX, ABBOT his powers of divination and exorcism The Mother of Mercy, with a look of great kindness, addressed him, saying, “Bear yourself like a man and let your heart be comforted in the Lord; rest assured that you will be troubled no more by these temptations.”
IN one of his letters St Bernard of Clairvaux mentions with great praise a novice called Hugh, who had renounced considerable riches and entered the abbey of Mézières at a very early age against the wishes of his relations. He was nephew to St Hugh of Grenoble. Once, when greatly troubled by temptations and longings to return to the world, he entered a church to pray for light and help. As he raised his eyes to the altar, he beheld above it a figure which he recognized to be that of our Lady, and then, beside her, appeared the form of her divine Son. The Mother of Mercy, with a look of great kindness, addressed him, saying, “Bear yourself like a man and let your heart be comforted in the Lord; rest assured that you will be troubled no more by these temptations.” Hugh afterwards gave himself up to such severe penances that his health broke down and he seemed to be losing his memory. He owed his recovery to the wise common-sense of St Bernard, who ordered him off to the infirmary with instructions that he should be properly tended and allowed to speak to anyone he liked.
Not long afterwards he was made abbot of Bonnevaux, and in Hugh’s care the abbey became very flourishing. It was noted that the abbot could read men’s thoughts and was quick to detect any evil spirit which had access to the minds of his brethren. The stories that have come down to us testify to his powers of divination and exorcism. Like so many of the great monastic luminaries, both men and women, Hugh did not confine his interests to his own house or even to his order. Moved by what he felt to be divine inspiration he went to Venice in 1177, there to act as mediator between Pope Alexander III and the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. To him is due the credit of negotiating between them a peace which has become historic. St Hugh died in 1194, and his ancient cultus was approved in 1907.

In the Acta Sanctorum, April, vol. i, certain meagre details have been collected front the chroniclers Helinandus, Vincent of Beauvais, etc. On the other hand in vol. xi of the Cistercienser-Chronik (1899) G. Muller has compiled an adequate account, distributed through several numbers, drawing upon the cartularies of Bonnevaux and Léoncel, which have been published by Canon Ulysse Chevalier. And see the unpublished vita in Collectanea O.C.R., vol. vi (1939), pp. 214—218, edited by A. Dimier, and that writer’s St Hugues de Bonnevaux
XII (XIII) Century The Monk John Shauteli -- was a distinguished Gruzinian (Georgian) poet, philosopher and rhetorician
 In his youth he received an excellent education at the Gelata academy (Western Gruzia), where he studied the works of the holy fathers, ancient and Arabic history, philosophy and literature. The saint later accepted monasticism and for many years he asceticised at the famed Cave monastery of Bardzia (in South Gruzia), in a solitary cell. Here, adding work upon work, the Monk John led the life of a strict ascetic, constantly devoting himself to prayerful meditations about the Trinity, the world-creation, the destiny of man and a deep insight into the meaning of the Holy Scripture.
In his constant effort he attained to an high degree of spiritual perfection and he received a remarkable gift of words, revealed in his poetic creativity.

At the Bardzia monastery during the years 1210-1214, the Monk John wrote a remarkable Ode, "Abdul-Messiya" ("Servant of Christ"), in which he intoned the image of the Christian, faithful to the canons of the Holy Orthodox Church. In the ode the monk calls himself very much a "wanderer" and "servant of Christ". Many a prayerful strophe is dedicated in it to the holy Nobleborn Gruzian emperor Saint David III the Restorer (+ 1125, Comm. 26 January) and to the holy Nobleborn Gruzian empress Saint Tamara the Great (+ 1212, Comm. 1 May and on the Sunday of the Myrh-Bearing Women).

Shota Rustaveli, for whom the Monk John Shauteli was a literary predecessor, exclaimed, "For the Abdul-Messiya Shauteli did sing resounding poetic strophe, -- he was a master in the art!" The theological significance of the "Abdul-Messiya" is particularly evident in those strophic verses, where the poet offers up prayers in the Name of the MostHoly Trinity, to give thanks to the Trinity-Almighty and Divine Providence, for having vouchsafed mankind salvation in Christ. Speaking about the array of the world-creation by God, the Monk John writes, in concurrence with the works of Saint Dionysios the Areopagite (+ 96, Comm. 3 October), about the Coelestial and Ecclesial Hierarchies.

In another of his works -- "The Song to the Bardzian Mother of God" -- the Monk John Shauteli eulogised the historical Basian Battle (1204), in which the Gruzian national military forces, proceeding forth from the Bardzian monastery, routed a 400,000 strong Musselman army led by sultan Rukn-ed-din. Thanks to this victory, Gruzia preserved its independence and remained an outpost of Orthodoxy in the Middle East, and this undoubtedly contributed to the strengthening of the oneness of the faith of Byzantium.

The Monk John Shauteli reposed in extreme old age. His memory from of old is venerated by the Gruzinian Church.
14th v. St Gerontius lived a monk of the Kiev Caves Monastery all his life at the monastery, in ascetic deeds of abstinence, obedience, and prayer
He fulfilled the obedience of canonarch (leader of church singing).
He spent all his life at the monastery, in ascetic deeds of abstinence, obedience, and prayer.

St Gerontius was buried in the Far Caves.
His memory is celebrated also together with the Synaxis of the Saints of the Far Caves, on August 28.


Abraham_the_Bulgar
1220 Jacqueline V Hermit recluse in Sicily reprimanded Pope Innocent III
The Roman orphan Jacqueline lived in a hut in Greece and passed herself off as a monk. Later she continued her life as a recluse in Sicily, where she lived in a tree. She reprimanded Pope Innocent III (Encyclopedia).
1220 Blessed Nicholas of Neti Cistercian monk of the community of Santa Maria dell'Arcu near Neti, Sicily, OSB Cist. (AC) (Benedictines).
1229 The Holy Martyr Abraham the Bulgar, Vladimir Wonderworker convert from Islam martyred for his faith
lived during the thirteenth century, was descended from the Kamska Bulgars and brought up as a Moslem. He was good and kindly towards the destitute, and when the Lord enlightened him with the light of reason, he accepted Christianity. 
In the city of Bolgara, on the lower stretches of the Volga, St Abraham began to preach to his fellow countrymen about the true God. They seized him and tried to force him to renounce Christ, but the saint remained firm in his confession. They tortured the martyr fiercely and for a long while, but he endured everything with unshakable patience.

On April 1, 1229 they quartered the holy Martyr Abraham, and then cut off his venerable head. Russian Christians living in the city buried the saint's body in the Christian cemetery. On March 6, 1230, the relics of St Abraham were transferred by the Great Prince St George Vsevolodovich of Vladimir (February 4) to the Dormition cathedral of the Knyaginin (Princess) monastery. His memory began to be celebrated from that time.

1245 ST GILBERT, BISHOP OF CAITHNESS “Three maxims which I have always tried to observe I now commend to you: first, never to hurt anyone and, if injured, never to seek revenge secondly, to bear patiently whatever suffering God may inflict, remembering that He chastises every son whom He receives; and finally to obey those in authority so as not to be a stumbling-block to others.”
FOR his alleged defence of the liberty of the Scottish church, when threatened with subordination to England, St Gilbert was formerly held in honour by his fellow-countrymen as a great patriot. Born in Moray, he received holy orders and became archdeacon of Moray. Legend declared that while still a young man he was summoned with the heads of the Scottish church to a council at Northampton in 1176. As spokesman for the Scottish bishops he opposed with fervour and eloquence a proposal that the northern prelates should be suffragans to the archbishop of York. From the time that Scotland had received the Christian faith it had been free, he maintained, and was subject to no outside authority except that of the pope. It would be iniquitous to place it under an English metropolitan—especially since the English and the Scots were constantly at war, He seems to have carried his point. There was, no doubt, an ecclesiastic named Gilbert who made such a speech, but it is barely conceivable that he can be the man who was made bishop of Caithness in 1223.
According to the Aberdeen Breviary, St Gilbert was high steward to several monarchs, and a legend relates that enemies maliciously burnt the books in which he kept his accounts, hoping thereby to discredit him, but that the books were restored intact in answer to his prayers. After the death of Bishop Adam, who was murdered, King Alexander nominated Gilbert bishop of Caithness, and he ruled that northern diocese wisely and well for twenty years. He built several hospices for the poor as well as the cathedral of Dornoch, and both by preaching and example did much to civilize his flock.
As he lay dying, he said to those who stood by him: “Three maxims which I have always tried to observe I now commend to you: first, never to hurt anyone and, if injured, never to seek revenge secondly, to bear patiently whatever suffering God may inflict, remembering that He chastises every son whom He receives; and finally to obey those in authority so as not to be a stumbling-block to others.”
See Forbes, KSS., pp. 355—356, the Aberdeen Breviary (‘854), and the DNB. (vol. xxi,p. 317), with the references there indicated.
1367 Blessed Gerard of Sassoferrato received the Camaldolese habit OSB Cam. (AC).
Born in 1280; died November 18, 1367. At nine years of age, Gerard received the Camaldolese habit at the abbey of the Holy Cross in Sassoferrato. After his ordination, he was entrusted with the pastoral care of the parish, which he served with untiring zeal (Benedictines).
1404 Saint Euthymius of Suzdal tonsure Nizhegorod Caves under St Dionysius:  founded Savior-Euthymius monastery strict ascetic great man of prayer incorrupt relics 100 yrs
Born in the year 1316 at Nizhni-Novgorod. From early childhood he was taught his letters and received a spiritual upbringing. He received monastic tonsure at the Nizhegorod Caves monastery under its founder, St Dionysius (later the Archbishop of Suzdal, commemorated June 26 and October 15).
The ascetic struggles of St Euthymius were so great that St Dionysius advised him to lessen them. In 1352 Prince Boris of Suzdal sought to establish a men's monastery in his city, and he requested the Nizhegorod Caves monastery to send a monk to establish the monastery. The choice of the saintly igumen fell upon St Euthymius.  After the arrival of St Euthymius in the northern part of the city beyond the Kamenka River, St John of Suzdal (October 15) set up a cross on the site of the future monastery cathedral before a tremendous crowd of people. The prince himself began to dig the ground for the foundation, and St Euthymius made three grave stones for himself, vowing to remain in the new monastery until the very end of his life.

So, the the Savior-Euthymius monastery was founded, where soon more than three hundred monks gathered under the guidance of the saint. The monastery adopted the cenobitic rule. The saint insisted that each of the monks be prepared to fulfill whatever obedience they were given. St Euthymius went often to the Trinity-Sergiev monastery to St Sergius of Radonezh (September 25 and July 5). St Euthymius was a strict ascetic and a great man of prayer. He toiled incessantly for the benefit of all the brethren. St Euthymius died on April 1, 1404.
On July 4, 1507 while a foundation trench was being dug for a new cathedral church, his incorrupt relics were uncovered. The saint was glorified at a Council in 1549.
1574 Catherine Tomás strange phenomena mystical experiences both consoling /alarming, including gift of prophecy  last years of life continually in ecstasy OSA V (RM)
(also known as Catherine Thomas or Catherine of Palma)

1574 ST CATHERINE OF PALMA, VIRGIN profound trances She also possessed the gift of prophecy.
THE whole life of Catherine Tomàs—from the moment of her birth in the little village of Valdemuzza until her death at Palma—was spent in the Balearic island of Majorca. Her parents died when Catherine, their seventh child, was seven years old, leaving her unprovided for. Sad tales are told of the indignities to which she was subjected in the house of her paternal uncle, to whose custody she was transferred. Young as she was, she became a regular little drudge whom the very servants were encouraged to overwork and to slight. Nevertheless she bore her sufferings with unfailing sweetness and patience. When she was about fifteen years old, visions of St Antony and of her patroness St Catherine awoke aspirations after the religious life which she confided to a holy hermit priest, Thinking that time was required as a test of her vocation, he replied that she would receive a reply in due course if she would continue to commend her case to God, as he himself would do. She meekly agreed, but she had to wait for a long time—a delay which was the more trying because the unkindness of her relations was increased by their fear of losing her services. Father Antony, however, had not forgotten her, although he found it difficult to find a convent which could afford to take a dowerless girl. As a preliminary step, he arranged for Catherine to enter the service of a family in Palma where no hindrances would be placed in the way of her spiritual life. The daughter of the house taught her to read and write, but soon became her disciple in religious matters, for Catherine had already advanced very far on the road to perfection.
Eventually several convents offered to open their doors to Catherine almost at the same moment, and she elected to join the canonesses of St Augustine in their convent of St Mary Magdalen at Palma. She was then in her twentieth year. From the moment of her admission she won the veneration of all by her sanctity and their love by her humility and eagerness to serve others. At first there was nothing about the convent life of Catherine Tomàs to distinguish her from any other holy nun, but she soon began to be subject to a number of strange phenomena which are carefully described in the records of her life. Annually, for thirteen or fifteen days before the feast of St Catherine of Alexandria, she was observed to lie in a profound trance and always, after making her communion, she would remain in an ecstasy which usually lasted for the greater part of the day and occasionally extended to several days or even to a fortnight. Sometimes she seemed to be in a cataleptic state, giving no signs of life, but at other times she would move about with her feet together and her eyes shut—sometimes holding converse as with celestial spirits and oblivious of all around, at other times answering quite intelligently questions that were put to her. She also possessed the gift of prophecy.
- Alternating with these occurrences were severe trials and assaults from the powers of darkness. Not only did she suffer from evil suggestions and alarming hallucinations or phantoms, but she was subjected to physical violence of the most distressing nature. On such occasions fearful shrieks and sounds were heard by the other nuns who, however, could never see the attackers although they witnessed the results and tried to alleviate St Catherine’s sufferings. But she tried never to allow her experiences to interfere with the punctual discharge of her duties. The death of St Catherine Tomàs, which she had foretold, took place when she was forty-one. She was beatified in 1792 and canonized in 1930.Father Antony Castagneda.
The bull of canonization, which is printed in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xxii (1930), pp. 371—380, gives a summary of her life and details of the miracles approved in the last stages of the process. Early biographies were written by Canon Salvador Abrines, who had been her confessor, and by Father Pedro Caldes. Both are freely quoted in the documents of the official process, the earliest portions of which appear to have been printed in 1669. There was a Ristretto della Vita della Beata Caterina Tomàs published in Rome at the time of the beatification.
Born in Valdemuzza, Majorca, Spain, in 1533; died there in 1574; canonized in 1930; feast day formerly on April 5.
Saint Catherine was an unhappy little girl who was subjected to indignities in the house of her paternal uncle. Eventually she passed into the service of the canonesses of Saint Augustine in their convent of Saint Mary Magdalen in Palma, where she spent the balance of her life. Her sanctity did not remain hidden for long. She was subjected to a great number of strange phenomena and mystical experiences that were both consoling and alarming, including the gift of prophecy. Although she tried never to allow these experiences to interfere with the discharge of her duties, during the last years of her life she was continually in ecstasy (Attwater2, Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

1849 BD LUDOVIC PAVONI, FOUNDER OF THE SONS OF MARY IMMACULATE OF BRESCIA
THIS forerunner of St John Bosco in the education and care of boys, especially the orphaned and neglected, was born at Brescia in Lombardy in 1784. His parents were Alexander Pavoni and Lelia Pontecarali, and the family was of noble descent, with a sufficiency of property to maintain its position. Ludovic while still young showed a serious disposition; his sister Paolina said of him that “Ludovic was always a good religious youngster, while I was always a scamp”; and as a youth he already outlined his vocation when, during summer holidays at Alfianello, he played with the peasants’ children and taught them the catechism. On another occasion he threw his shirt out of the window to a beggar shivering in the street below. He had a taste and some capacity for the fine arts and might have become a painter or an architect, but probably nobody was surprised when he decided to study for the priesthood. This he did under the Dominicans (all the Lombard seminaries were closed in consequence of the revolution), and he was ordained priest in 1807.
Don Pavoni received no benefice, but ministered as required in the various parishes of Brescia and especially he helped in the several “oratories” (a combination of boys’ club, Sunday-school and church) which had been started by the Oratorian father Manelli and others, work for which he showed a marked ability.
In 1818, when he was only thirty-four years old, he was nominated to a canonry in Brescia cathedral and was made rector of the parish of St Barnabas. Adjoining the church was a former Augustinian monastery, of which a corner served as rectory and the remainder was used as a military store; and the new rector conceived the project of turning this building into a “permanent oratory” or institute, that is, a full-time home wherein boys who were destitute, abandoned or otherwise in need of care could be looked after, taught a trade and prepared for the world in a decent family atmosphere. Such a scheme bristled with difficulties, and Canon Pavoni laid it at the foot of the Crucifix—and the Figure seemed to say to him, “ Go on!”
Mgr Nava, the bishop, promised his support,* [* At a meeting of the Brescia Academy held at the Jesuit college there in 1858, Mr Ronchi acclaimed the holy partnership of Bishop Nays and Canon Pavoni in a hundred hexameters.] and Pavoni began his institute in a small part of the monastery that he called “the rat-hole”, choosing printing as the trade that his boys should learn. The next twenty years is a tale, on the one hand, of encouraging progress, and, on the other, of maddening negotiations with the civil authorities with the object, firstly, of getting the printing-press licensed, and secondly, of obtaining the use of the whole of the monastery buildings for the growing orphanage.
In those days Lombardy was still under Austrian rule, the French Revolution and Napoleon were more than living memories, and Joseph II of Austria (“Our brother the sacristan”), though dead, still spoke. Among a people agitating for independence the authorities viewed an Italian printing-press with grave suspicion, if not alarm; as for the buildings, the Austrian governor, though an admirer of Canon Pavoni, was a good Josephinist and would not easily release to the Church a property of which the state had deprived her. And then there were the ordinary bureaucratic conditions—in quintuplicate. { The institute had to put up with all sorts of vexations. At the carnival of 1828, a circus was allowed to camp itself in the courtyard of the monastery. Fancy trying to keep boys in order with that going on under their windows.}
The press was licensed in 1823 (it had already been working, whether or no), but it was not till 1841 that the city council of Brescia granted the rest of the building required. This gave room for a school of the “three R’s “ a school of design, and a school of music, which, with previous building and other work, Canon Pavoni was able to set up through the generosity of benefactors, of whom his own sister, Paolina Trivellini, and Bishop Nava were among the foremost, though the institute was not always free from money troubles.
In 1832 the work of the printing-press attracted favourable notice at the Brescia Exhibition, and in the following year Pope Gregory XVI commended the institute as Cosa buona, “A good thing”; but in 1836 a great strain was put on its resources when there was a cholera epidemic in Brescia and hundreds of children lost their homes. Among those who distinguished themselves as nurses at this time was Paola di Rosa, foundress of the Handmaids’ of Charity (December 15), and it was she who inspired Mgr Pinzoni to organize a school for deaf-and-dumb boys. Canon Pavoni was asked to take over the responsibility for this undertaking, which he did. He also took over the Mercy Orphanage at the request of the civil governor, and it was this generous action that at last shamed the city council into conveying the St Barnabas building to him, freehold and as a gift.
Ludovic Pavoni was a man of middle-height, well and strongly built, with rather silky hair; his features strongly marked and expressive, with a mouth that had a smile playing about it. By nature he was hot and impulsive, and his words came easily and decisively; but he had schooled himself to patience and calmness, and so gave an impression of restrained energy. He was what would be called today a man of good general culture, versatile but well-balanced, neither superficial nor deeply learned. His ideal of education was a broad one, to dispose a person in his wholeness to be really good; and it is significant that, fifty years before “Rerum Novarum”, he grasped the religious significance of social justice and set an example by his own dealings with his employees. Some of his boys were literally the scourings of the streets, and these had to be made good men, good workmen, good citizens, good Christians. Like St John Bosco after him, Canon Pavoni’s methods were encouraging and preventive rather than repressive; he preferred gentleness to severity. “Rigorism “ he said, “keeps Heaven empty.” For all that, his means of discipline and vigilance might seem excessive to some; but who will dare say they were unnecessary with such tough material as some of it was? He aimed at a family and not an institution (those were the days of Oliver Twist in England), and one has only to read of some of his actual dealings with his pupils to detect a holy man at work and to see him “loving the children with all his heart, and being loved by them”. He was relentless in expelling really vicious characters, lest their fellows be corrupted—but they were not left to sink or swim: he continued to watch over them outside the institute.
If one feels that Rodriguez’s Treatise on Perfection is a rather unhappy choice of spiritual reading for youths, comfort may be found elsewhere in the fact that the cook and kitchen staff were considered of such importance that they were under the immediate control of the director, and that good food, punctuality and good manners to the boys were their first duties; nor was a “discreet measure of wine” regarded as superfluous. Not only that, but Canon Pavoai encouraged play-acting among his charges’ recreations. This was looking for trouble from the Menpensants of mid_nineteenth-century Italy, and it required the presence of the bishop, the seminarists and the pupils of the Jesuit college at the first performance to confound—but not to silence—the critics.
It had been for a long time in Ludovic Pavoni’s mind that he ought to establish a religious society of some kind to carry on the work which he had begun, and he gradually elaborated a rule and constitutions for a congregation of priests and of laybrothers who should work at theft own trades. After long prayer and deep consideration he opened his mind to Mgr Nava and to Cardinal Angelo Mai; both of them encouraged the project, and he decided to go ahead in the face of the adverse criticism of other, less wise, people, some of whom thought that, while it was all right for religious to teach boys the sciences and letters, it was not all right for religious to teach boys the fine and useful arts. Was it not St Teresa who asked to be protected from pious fools:
Premises for a novitiate were acquired at Saiano, a few miles from Brescia. Canon Pavoni restored the old buildings, established a farm colony, and transferred his deaf-mutes to Saiano, and in 1844 the Holy See gave permission for novices to be received. But such things could not be done in Austrian dominions without a further permission—that of the civil power; and so it was not till another three
years had passed that the Congregation of Sons of Mary Immaculate was formally founded. On December 8, 1847, Ludovic Pavoni, already named superior general, made his religious profession. On the previous day he had resigned his canonry, and conveyed the title to his house in Brescia and all his other private property, together with the buildings at St Barnabas’s and Saiano, to the new congregation as a body; and with his canonical cross he no doubt put off also the decoration of a knight of the Iron Crown, which his Imperial Majesty Ferdinand I had conferred on him in 1844. On which occasion Don Pavoni had remarked privately, “Why didn’t the emperor send me a sack of flour to make polenta for my boys instead of this?”
These happy events were not long over when Lombardy was convulsed by a revolt against Austrian domination. For a year the situation became daily more threatening; in January 1849 the government imposed a heavy fine on the city of Brescia; feeling ran so high on both sides that Bd Ludovic thought it prudent to close his beloved printing works: and on March 26 the storm broke. The people rose, and the “Ten Days of Brescia” began. On the following day Bd Ludovic gathered all his charges together, and in a storm of wind and rain they set out for Saiano. At Torricelle, where Paolina Trivellini lived, she wanted to get a carriage for her ageing brother he refused it, “No, I can go on, on foot like my youngsters”. At length, wet through and worn out, the sad procession reached its destination, and Father Pavoni went up the hill to look out over burning Brescia, in the midst of which was the institute that had been his life’s work for thirty years. At that moment he felt the first spasm of that weakening of his heart that in a few days was to end his course.
The rector of St Mary’s, Father Amus, sent him to bed, and Bd Ludovic obediently went (it was the first time he had enjoyed the refinement of linen sheets since he was a young man). Daily he weakened, and a week later, surrounded by his weeping brethren and boys, Bd Ludovic Pavoni died, in his sixty-sixth year. It was April 1, 1849, Palm Sunday; on the previous day and night the dying man had heard the roar of guns bombarding Brescia echoing in the hills around.
The body was buried at Saiano, but afterwards translated to Brescia, where it now rests in the Immacolata church, and his cause was introduced at Rome in 1919. Twenty-eight years later, in 1947, Ludovic Pavoni was solemnly beatified.
There seems to be nothing about Bd Ludovic Pavoni except in Italian. A full “life” Un Apostolo della Gioventu Derelitta, by Canon Luigi Traverso, was published at Monza in 1928 this is summarized in a booklet by Giovanni della Cioppa, Lodovico Pavoni (1946), and a few misstatements of fact are corrected. A selection of the beato’s letters (Lettere del Servo di Dio P. Lodovico Pavoni (1945) should be read by all attracted by this sympathetic character, of whom little is known outside his own country.
1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina (Paul I. Plikhanov) a colonel, to be a general, but became a priest gifts of clairvoyance healing read souls
Born in the city of Samara on July 5,1845, the son of John and Natalia Plikhanov. His mother died in childbirth, and his father later remarried so that his son would have a mother. Although his stepmother was very strict, she was a real mother to him, and he loved her very much.

As a descendant of the Orenburg Cossacks, Paul was enrolled in the Polotsk Cadet Corps. He completed his studies at the Orenburg Military School and received an officer's commission. He later graduated from the Petersburg Cossack Staff Officers' School, and also served at the headquarters of the Kazan military district and eventually rose to the rank of colonel.

Once, as he was sick with pneumonia, Paul sensed that he was about to die. He asked his orderly to read the Gospel to him, and passed out. Then he had a vision in which the heavens seemed to open, and he was afraid because of the great light. His whole sinful life passed before him, and he was overcome with repentance. A voice told him he should go to Optina Monastery, but the doctors did not think he would recover. His health did improve, however, and the colonel visited Optina. In August 1889 the Elder of the Monastery was St Ambrose (October 10), who told Paul to set his worldly affairs in order. Two years later, St Ambrose blessed him to cut all ties to the world and told him to enter Optina within three months.

It was not easy for the colonel to resign his commission within the specified three month period, because obstacles were placed in his way. In fact, he was offered a promotion to the rank of general, and was asked to delay his retirement. Some people even tried to arrange a marriage for him, laughing at his intention to go to the monastery. Only his stepmother was happy that he wished to become a monk. On the very last day of the three months he concluded his affairs and arrived at Optina. However, St Ambrose was already laid out in his coffin in the church.

St Anatole I (January 25) succeeded Fr Ambrose as Elder, and he assigned Paul to Hieromonk Nectarius (April 29) as his cell attendant. He was accepted as a novice in 1892, and tonsured as a rassophore in 1893. Over the next ten years he advanced through the various stages of monastic life, including ordination as deacon (1902), and as priest (1903). The monk Paul was secretly tonsured into the mantiya in December of 1900 because of a serious illness. When they asked him what name he wished to receive, he said it did not matter. They named him in honor of St Barsanuphius of Tver and Kazan (April 11). Although he recovered, they did not give him the mantiya until December of 1902 after the Liturgy when it was revealed that he had been tonsured on his sickbed.

On September 1, 1903 Fr Barsanuphius was appointed to assist Elder Joseph, the skete Superior, in the spiritual direction of the skete brethren and the sisters of the Shamordino convent.  At the beginning of the Russo-Japanese war in 1904, Fr Barsanuphius was sent to the Far East as a military chaplain, where he ministered to wounded soldiers. The war ended in August 1905, and St Barsanuphius returned to Optina on November 1, 1905.
Since Elder Joseph had become too old and frail to administer the skete's affairs, Fr Barsanuphius was appointed as Superior of the skete in his place. Fr Barsanuphius soon reestablished order and discipline, paid off debts, repaired buildings, etc. As Superior, he combined strictness with paternal concern and tenderness for those under him.

St Barsanuphius, like the other Elders of Optina, possessed the gifts of clairvoyance and of healing people afflicted with physical and spiritual ailments. One of his spiritual sons, Fr Innocent Pavlov, recalled his first Confession with the Elder. He became fearful because Fr Barsanuphius seemed to know his innermost thoughts, reminding him of people and events which he had forgotten. The saint spoke gently and told him that it was God who had revealed to him these things about Fr Innocent.
 "During my lifetime, do not tell anyone about what you are experiencing now," he said, "but you may speak of it after my death."

St Barsanuphius loved spiritual books, especially the Lives of the Saints. He often told people that those who read these Lives with faith benefit greatly from doing so. The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints, he said. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious. Although the Lives of the Saints were widely available, it saddened the Elder that more people did not read them.

St Barsanuphius commemorated many saints each day during his Rule of prayer, and this was not accidental. Each saint, he once explained, had some particular importance in his life. If, for example, some significant event took place, he would look to see which saints were commemorated on that day, then he would begin to commemorate them each day. Later he noticed that on their Feast Day, they would often deliver him from some danger or trouble. On December 17, 1891, the commemoration of the Prophet Daniel and the three holy youths, he left Kazan and never returned. That was the day he decided to leave the world, and St Barsanuphius felt that God had delivered him from a furnace of passions. Just as the three youths were delivered from the fiery furnace because they would not bow down before idols, the Elder always believed that he left the world unharmed because he refused to bow down before the idols of lust, pride, gluttony, etc.

By 1908, St Barsanuphius seemed to fall ill more frequently, and began to speak of his approaching death. In April of that year, someone sent him a package containing the Great Schema. Fr Barsanuphius had long desired to be tonsured into the Great Schema before his death, but he had told no one of this except for the archimandrite. Therefore, he regarded this as a sign that he would soon die.

One night in July 1910, the Elder became so ill that he had to leave church during Vigil and return to his cell. The next morning, July 11, he was so weak that he could not sit up by himself. That evening he was tonsured into the Great Schema.

Fr Barsanuphius began to recover, but there were new problems in the monastery. New monks came in from spiritually lax environments. They did not understand the ascetical nature of monasticism or the whole notion of eldership, and so they began to clamor for reform and change. They wanted to assume positions of authority, and to close the skete. Because of their complaints, Fr Barsanuphius was removed from Optina and assigned as igumen of the Golutvinsky Monastery. When he arrived to take up his duties, Fr Barsanuphius found the monastery in a state of physical and spiritual decline. Nevertheless, he did not lose heart, and soon the monastery began to revive. More people began to visit, once they heard that an Optina Elder had come to Goluvinsky, and the monastery's financial position also began to improve. However, the rebellious brethren caused him great sorrow, and he had to expell some of them

At the beginning of 1913, St Barsanuphius became ill again and asked Metropolitan Macarius of Moscow for permission to retire to Optina, but that was not to be. He fell asleep in the Lord on April 1, and his body remained in the church of Golotvino until April 6 (which was also Lazarus Saturday). After the funeral, his body was placed on a train and sent to Optina for burial. The train arrived at Kozelsk Station on April 8, and the coffin was carried to Optina by clergy.

The Moscow Patriarchate authorized local veneration of the Optina Elders on June 13,1996. The work of uncovering the relics of Sts Leonid, Macarius, Hilarion, Ambrose, Anatole I, Barsanuphius and Anatole II began on June 24/July 7, 1998 and was concluded the next day. However, because of the church Feasts (Nativity of St John the Baptist, etc.) associated with the actual dates of the uncovering of the relics, Patriarch Alexey II designated June 27/July 10 as the date for commemorating this event. The relics of the holy Elders now rest in the new church of the Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God.
The Optina Elders were glorified by the Moscow Patriarchate for universal veneration on August 7, 2000.


 Friday Saint of the Day April 01  Kaléndis Aprílis  
On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
 
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013


Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).-
Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
The Pope said this today before reciting the midday Angelus with several thousand people gathered in the courtyard of the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, south of Rome.
Referring to the Gospel reading for today's Mass, the Holy Father reflected on the faith of Peter, which is shown to be "still immature and too much influenced by the 'mentality of this world.'”  He explained that when Christ spoke openly about how he was to "suffer much, be killed and rise again, Peter protests, saying: 'God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you.'"
"It is evident that the Master and the disciple follow two opposed ways of thinking," continued the Pontiff. "Peter, according to a human logic, is convinced that God would never allow his Son to end his mission dying on the cross.  "Jesus, on the contrary, knows that the Father, in his great love for men, sent him to give his life for them, and if this means the passion and the cross, it is right that such should happen."
Christ also knew that "the resurrection would be the last word," Benedict XVI added.
Serious illness
The Pope continued, "If to save us the Son of God had to suffer and die crucified, it certainly was not because of a cruel design of the heavenly Father.  "The cause of it is the gravity of the sickness of which he must cure us: an evil so serious and deadly that it will require all of his blood. 
"In fact, it is with his death and resurrection that Jesus defeated sin and death, reestablishing the lordship of God."
Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.


Popes mentioned in todays  articles of Saints
During his 52-year episcopacy, 1132 St. Hugh of Grenoble Benedictine bishop amazing modesty took upon himself all sins of others the cross he carried was heavy laden holy and redemptive great reputation for miracles:
vainly tendered his resignation to each pope--Gregory VII, Gelasius II, Calixtus II, Honorius II, Innocent II, and others--and they refused him because of his outstanding ability. He never ceased imploring them to release him from the duties of his episcopal office up to the day of his death. During his last, painful illness he was tormented by headaches and stomach disorders that resulted from his long fasts and vigils, yet never complained. For a short time before his death, he lost his memory for everything but prayer, and would recite the Psalter and the Our Father unceasingly.


 440 Pope St. Sixtus III approved Acts of the Council of Ephesus endeavoured to restore peace between Cyril of Alexandria and John of Antioch prominent among the Roman clergy and in correspondence with St. Augustine