Tuesday  Saints of this Day February  07 Séptimo Idus Februárii  
 Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

February 7 – Blessed Pius IX, Pope of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception (d. 1878) 
 
The Blessed Virgin Mary herself confirmed this dogma 
 
Pope Pius IX was born in Senigallia, Italy, on May 13, 1792. He died at the Vatican on February 7, 1878, at the age of 85. His 31-year pontificate is the longest in the history of the papacy, after that of Peter, according to tradition.
Pius IX is also the pope who proclaimed the dogma of the Immaculate Conception.

In the bull Ineffabilis Deus, published on December 8, 1854, Pius IX solemnly declared, by virtue of his apostolic authority, that the Blessed Virgin Mary was conceived free from original sin. This dogma of the Immaculate Conception is often confused with the virginal conception of Jesus at the Annunciation.

Three years later, between February 11th and July 16, 1858, a young, illiterate girl from Lourdes called Bernadette Soubirous affirmed that she saw "a beautiful lady" in the small grotto of Massabielle in Lourdes, France, who told her in the local Gascon Occitan dialect: "Que soi era Immaculada Concepciou." (I am the Immaculate Conception.)

Pius IX also convened the first Vatican Council, which defined papal infallibility.
He was declared "blessed" by the Catholic Church in 2000.

 The Mary of Nazareth Team

Luke is one of the earliest saints to be seen levitating in prayer:  946 St. Luke the Younger Hermit
He worked so many miracles there that the site was turned into an oratory after his death and became known as Soterion or Sterion (place of healing) and he himself as the Thaumaturgus (the wonder-worker).

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
Mary's Divine Motherhood


Pope Authorizes 12 14 2015 Promulgation of Decrees Concerning 17 Causes,
Including Servant of God William Gagnon
November 23 2014 Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List
Acts of the Apostles
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
How do I start the Five First Saturdays?
Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .

 303 Saint Aule suffered martyrdom in London during Diocletian's persecution of Christians.
4th v. St. Chrysolius martyred bishop of Armenia  served as a missionary in northeastern Gaul
372 St. Moses Arab hermit bishop called “the Apostle of the Saracens.” 
722 St. Richard  brother of St. Boniface miracles reported at his tomb father of Saints Willibald, Winnebald, and Walburga
946 St. Luke the Younger Hermit death place called Sterion (place of healing) wonder-worker (Thaumaturgus ) one of the earliest saints to be seen levitating in prayer
1871 Bd Eugenia Smet (Mother Mary of Providence), foundress of the Helpers of the Holy Souls.

 February 7 - Blessed Pius IX, Pope of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception (d. 1878)
 Mary Brought Jesus to Elizabeth
 Mary is a model of charity. In what way is Mary a living example of love for the Church? Let us think about the readiness she showed towards her cousin Elizabeth. In visiting her, the Virgin Mary brought not only material help—she brought this too—but she also brought Jesus, who was already alive in her womb. Bringing Jesus into that house meant bringing joy, the fullness of joy…which comes from Jesus and from the Holy Spirit, and is expressed by gratuitous charity, by sharing with, helping, and understanding others.

Our Lady also wants to bring the great gift of Jesus to us, to us all; and with him she brings us his love, his peace, and his joy. In this, the Church is like Mary, the Church is not a shop, she is not a humanitarian agency, the Church is not an NGO. The Church is sent to bring Christ and his Gospel to all.

She does not bring herself—whether small or great, strong or weak—the Church carries Jesus and should be like Mary when she went to visit Elizabeth. What did Mary take to her? Jesus. The Church brings Jesus: this is the center of the Church, to carry Jesus! If, as a hypothesis, the Church were not to bring Jesus, she would be a dead Church. The Church must bring Jesus, the love of Jesus, the charity of Jesus.
  
Pope Francis  General Audience, October 23, 2013


February 7 - Our Lady of Grace A Most Beloved Mother The Blessed Virgin is "the mother of the members of Christ having cooperated by charity that faithful might be born in the Church..." Wherefore she is hailed as a pre-eminent and singular member of the Church, and as its type and excellent exemplar in faith and charity. The Catholic Church, taught by the Holy Spirit, honors her with filial affection and piety as a most beloved mother.
Lumen Gentium Chapter VIII §53 Dogmatic Constitution on the Church  November 21, 1964

Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh,
was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

 Sancti Romuáldi Abbátis, Monachórum Camaldulénsium Patris, cujus dies natális tertiodécimo Kaléndas Júlii recensétur, sed festívitas hac die, ob Translatiónem córporis ejus, potíssimum celebrátur.
       St. Romuald, founder of the Camaldolese monks, whose birthday is the 19th of June,
but celebrated today because of the transference of his body.

Fifth day of the Afterfeast of the Meeting of the Lord
303 St. Augulus Martyr listed by St. Jerome as a bishop
303  Martyrs at Nicomedia servants of the four dignitaries Bassos,
       Eusebius, Eutychius and Basilides
303 Saint Aule suffered martyrdom in London during Diocletian's
       persecution of Christians.
304 St. Adaucus martyr for the faith
ST THEODORE OF HERACLEA, MARTYR (No DATE?)
319 St. Theodore Stratelates Roman general martyr
4th v. St. Chrysolius martyred bishop of Armenia  served as a missionary in
         northeastern Gaul
4th v. Saint Parthenius Bishop of Lampsacus from age 18 healed sick in the
       name of Christ cast out demons worked other miracles
372 St. Moses Arab hermit bishop called “the Apostle of the Saracens.” 
435 St. Juliana of Bologna widowed woman of Bologna cared for the poor
546 St. Lawrence of Siponto Bishop of Siponto
550 St. Tressan Irish missionary spread the faith in Gaul
570 St. Fidelis Bishop of Merida
6th v. St. Meldon Irish hermit, possibly Frence bishop 
722 St. Richard  brother of St. Boniface miracles reported at his tomb father
       of Saints Willibald, Winnebald, and Walburga 
750 St. Amulwinus Benedictine abbot bishop
946 St. Luke the Younger Hermit death place called Sterion (place of
      healing) wonder-worker (Thaumaturgus ) one of the earliest saints to
      be seen levitating in prayer
        St. Ronan of Kilmaronen came into the valley drove out the devil 
1027 ST ROMUALD, ABBOT FOUNDER OF THE CAMALDOLESE BENEDICTINES
1150 Blessed Nivard of Vaucelles 
        St. Anatolius Bishop of Cahors
1236 Bl. Rizzerio Early Franciscan great austerities mortifications miracle
         from Francis dissolved his despair of God's mercy
1447 St. Colette Poor Clare 17 established monasteries 
1461 Blessed Antony of Stroncone practicing rigorous penance
1551 Blessed Thomas Sherwood denying queen's ecclesiastical supremacy
1593 Blessed James Salès & William Saulte-mouche martyrs
1603 Bl. William Richardson Martyr of England
1812 Blessed Giles Mary of Saint Joseph porter for the friary
1871 Bd Eugenia Smet (Mother Mary of Providence), foundress of the Helpers of the Holy Souls.
 Sancti Romuáldi Abbátis, Monachórum Camaldulénsium Patris, cujus dies natális tertiodécimo Kaléndas Júlii recensétur, sed festívitas hac die, ob Translatiónem córporis ejus, potíssimum celebrátur.
<       St. Romuald, founder of the Camaldolese monks, whose birthday is the 19th of June, but celebrated today because transference of his body.


The fifth day of the Afterfeast of the Meeting of the Lord falls on February 7  
303 St. Augulus Martyr listed by St. Jerome as a bishop
 Augústæ, cui nunc Londíni nomen, in Británnia, natális beáti Auguli Epíscopi, qui, ætátis cursu per martyrium expléto, ætérna præmia suscípere méruit.
       At London, England, the birthday of blessed Augulus, bishop, who ended the course of his life by martyrdom, and deserved to receive an eternal recompense.
He is also described as martyr of London, England, by some scholars. Still others identify him as St. Aule of Normandy, France.

Augulus BM (RM) (also known as Augurius, Aule) Died c. 303. Saint Jerome's martyrology lists Augulus as a bishop. Others describe him as a martyr put to death in London under Diocletian.
French writers normally identify him with Saint Aule of Normandy (Benedictines).

303 Martyrs at Nicomedia servants of the four dignitaries Bassos, Eusebius, Eutychius and Basilides
 Ibídem plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum, urbis uníus cívium, quorum dux erat idem Adáucus; qui, cum omnes Christiáni essent, et constánter in fídei confessióne persísterent, a Galério Maximiáno Imperatóre sunt igne consúmpti.
       Also, many holy martyrs, citizens of this same city of which Adaucus was mayor.  As they were all Christians, and persisted in the confession of the faith, they were burned to death by Emperor Galerius Maximian.
who suffered for Christ with their wives (January 5) in the year 303 during the reign of the emperor Diocletian (284-305).

After the martyric death of their masters, the servants decided to follow their example, and they also confessed themselves Christians before Diocletian. Swayed neither by persuasion nor promises nor rewards, 1003 men, women, and small children were cut down by soldiers who formed a tight circle around them so that none of them remained alive.

304 St. Adaucus martyr for the faith
 In Phrygia sancti Adáuci Mártyris, qui, ex Itálico génere clarus, et omni fere dignitátum gradu ab Imperatóribus insignítus, tandem, cum adhuc Quæstóris offício fungerétur, martyrii coróna pro fídei defensióne dignátus est.
       In Phrygia, St. Adaucus, martyr, an Italian of noble birth, who was honoured by the emperors with almost every dignity.  While he was still discharging the office of quæstor, he was judged worthy of the crown of martyrdom for his defence of the faith.

303 ST ADAUCUS, MARTYR 
The Roman Martyrology for February 7 makes mention of St Adaucus in the following terms: “in Phrygia, of St Adaucus, martyr, who came of noble Italian stock and was honoured by the emperor with dignities of almost every rank, until while performing the office of quaestor, he was found worthy of the martyr’s crown for his defence of the faith. In the same place, of very many holy martyrs, citizens of one city, whose leader this same Adaucus was; who, since they were all Christians and remained constant in the confession of the faith, were burnt with fire by the Emperor Galerius Maximian.” The facts rest upon the high authority of the church historian Eusebius, who was a contemporary, but while he mentions the martyrdom of St Adauc(t)us and the burning of the town in the same chapter, he does not connect the two events, though the early translation of Rufinus does. In Eusebius the matter is presented in this form:
              A small town of Phrygia, inhabited solely by Christians, was completely
            surrounded by soldiers while the men were in it. Throwing fire into it they
            consumed them with the women and children while they were calling upon
            Christ. This they did because all the inhabitants of the city and the curator
            himself, and the governor with all who held office, and the entire populace,
            confessed themselves Christians and would not in the least obey those who
            commanded them to worship idols.
              There was another man of Roman dignity named Adaucus, of a noble
            Italian family, who had advanced through every honour under the emperors,
            so that he had blamelessly filled even the general offices of magistrate, as they
            call it, and of finance minister. Besides all this he excelled in deeds of piety
            and in the confession of the Christ of God and was adorned with the crown of
            martyrdom. He endured the conflict for religion while still holding the office
            of finance minister.

As against the inference that these two incidents occurred in the same place and that Adaucus set the example to his fellow-townsmen, some difficulty has been raised on the ground that a native of Italy who had had so distinguished a career would not be likely to have an official position given him in a small town in Phrygia.  Rufinus, however, who lived in the same century and had travelled much, apparently saw nothing surprising in such an arrangement.
        
           See Eusebius, Eccles. II 1st., bk viii, ch. ii and cf. CMH., pp. 253-254.


This nobleman of Italian birth reached the rank of quaestor in the government in Phrygia (modern Turkey). Emperor Diocletian (r. 284-305) conducted persecutions against Christians during Adaucus' life. In 303 the emperor commanded that Adaucus' town in Phrygia be burned to the ground by Roman soldiers. Adaucus and all the other Christians in the region perished as a result. They were martyred in Astandro, Phrygia.
Adaucus M (RM) (also known as Adauctus). Saint Adaucus an Italian finance minister at imperial court of Diocletian in Phrygia. The emperor had him killed when he discovered that Adaucus was a Christian. 
4th v. St. Chrysolius martyred bishop of Armenia.
who served as a missionary in northeastern Gaul, where he became a bishop. During the persecution of Diocletian (284-305) he was martyred in the region of modern Flanders. His relics are venerated in Bruges. Many Phrygian Christians were martyred with him as their town, Antandro, was burned over their heads (Attwater2, Benedictines).
ST THEODORE OF HERACLEA, MARTYR (No DATE?)
   AMONG the martyrs whom the Greeks honour with the title of Megalomartyr (i.e. great martyr), such as St George, St Pantaleon and others, four are distinguished above the rest: they are St Theodore of Heraclea, surnamed Stratelates (general of the army), St Theodore of Amasea, surnamed Tiro (the recruit), St Procopius and St Demetrius. St Theodore of Heraclea, with whom we are now concerned, is said to have been general of the forces of Licinius and governor of a large tract of Bithynia, Pontus and Paphlagorlia.
Heraclea in Pontus, originally a Greek city founded by a colony from Megan, was where the saint is supposed to have resided, and it was here that, according to one legend, he died a martyr’s death, being beheaded for his faith after having beat cruelly tortured by order of the Emperor Licinius.
   The whole question has been very carefully studied by Father H. Delehaye in his book Les Légendes grecques des saints militaires (1909). In his opinion there was but one St Theodore, probably a martyr and possibly a soldier by profession.  His cult seems traceable at an early date to Euchaita, an inland town in the Heleno-pontus, and it spread widely from that centre.

 By degrees many fictitious and contradictory details were worked into his story by hagiographers who were in nowise concerned to adhere to historic truth in what they wrote. The divergences in the different narratives became in time so flagrant that it was necessary to have recourse to the hypothesis of two different St Theodores—the Stratelates and the Tiro, but even so their biographies overlap and cannot be kept distinct.
One of the fictitious elements introduced into certain versions of the story was a conflict with a dragon, and this detail seems to have attached itself to the legend of St Theodore even earlier than to that of St George. Thus statues and pictures in which he appears mounted on horseback and piercing a dragon with a lance are not rare and are apt to be wrongly identified.


The differentiation of two separate Theodores seems to have occurred somewhat earlier than Father Delehaye supposes. An Armenian homily which F. C. Conybeare believes to be of the fourth century already regards them as distinct and Mgr Wilpert has reproduced a mosaic which Pope Felix IV (526—530) set up in the church of St Theodore on the Palatine, in which our Saviour is represented seated, while St Peter on one side presents to Him one St Theodore and St Paul on the other side presents another.
The earliest written evidence we possess for the cult of St Theodore is a panegyric of
the martyr attributed to St Gregory of Nyssa (Migne, PG., vol. xlvi, pp. 736—748). Even
if it be not authentic it belongs to about the end of the fourth or the beginning of the fifth
century. A selection of the most characteristic of the Greek lives of the two St Theodores
is printed by Fr Delehaye in the book mentioned. An early Armenian homily on the saint
has been translated into English by Prof. Conybeare in his Monuments of Early Christianity
(pp. 217—238). For St Theodore in art, see Kunstlie, Ikonographie, pp. 551—552, who refers
in particular to an article by Hengstenberg, “Der Drachenkampf d. hl. Theodor”, in
Oriens Christianus, 1912, pp. 18 seq. and Wilpert, Die römischen Mosaiken...Taf.
106—107. Cf. St Theodore Tiro herein on November 9.

319 St. Theodore Stratelates Roman general martyr
 Heracléæ, in Ponto, sancti Theodóri, ductóris mílitum, qui, Licínio imperánte, post multa torménta, truncátus cápite, victor migrávit in cælum.
       At Heraclea, in the reign of Licinius, St. Theodore, a military officer, who was beheaded after undergoing many torments, and went victoriously to heaven.
Surnamed Stratelates, he supposedly served in the army of Emperor Licinius Licinianus (r. 308-324) until the decision by that ruler to end the toleration of Christians in the lands under his rule. At the command of the emperor, he was tortured and either beheaded or crucified. Theodore is much venerated by the Orthodox Greek Church. He is also called Theodore of Heraclea.

Theodore Stratelates M (RM) (also known as Theodore of Heraclea)  Theodore lived in Heraclea and was a general (stratelates) commanding one of the armies of the Emperor Licinius and governor of Pontus. A man of great political influence, Theodore also governed part of Licinius's territory. His fellow soldiers realized that their general had embraced the Christian faith when he refused to join them in pagan worship. For this the general was tortured by those he had once loyally served, and was then let out of prison on remand.

He showed his scorn for the idol worshippers by setting fire to a temple dedicated to the goddess Cybele at Amasea in Pontus. The authorities lost no time in throwing him back into prison and again torturing him. The general was comforted by a vision of heaven, before perishing in a furnace. He was buried at Euchaita and is revered by the Eastern Church as a great soldier-saint.

He is probably identical with Theodore Tyro of Amasea, whose later legends became so contradictory and complicated by incredible embroideries that this one was invented to account for the differences. The stratelates is one of the four soldiers honored by the Greeks as a megolomartyr (great martyr) (Attwater, Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

Saint Theodore is pictured as a bearded, early Christian in a long cloak, walking vigorously and carrying a crown. He may also be seen with a dragon and sword (Roeder).
Saint Theodore Stratelates the Commander February 8th & June 8th Troparion (Tone 4) O trophy-bearer Theodore, by thy strategy thou wast a general of the heavenly King; armed with the weapons of faith thou didst annihilate hordes of demons and win the Athletes' contest. With faith we call thee blessed.
St. Theodore was a Roman commander in Emperor Licinius' army and governor of Heraclea. He was tall, strong, good-looking, wealthy and a friend of the Emperor. He considered the Kingdom of God to be more valuable than all of his advantages on earth. He smashed the pagan idols of silver and gold and gave the pieces to the poor. This so enraged Licinius that he had Theodore brutally tortured. He received 600 lashes on his back and 500 on his stomach. Then he was crucified while they shot arrows into him. Finally, he was beheaded with a sword. All during this, Theodore repeated: "Glory to Thee, my God, glory to Thee." His suffering ended at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, February 8, 319. He is regarded as the protector of soldiers. His relics were later taken to the Blachernae Church at Constantinople.
This Icon is a mosaic from the first half of the 14th century, Constantinople. Inscription is in Greek. http://www.comeandseeicons.com/pdg10.htm
4th v. Saint Parthenius, Bishop of Lampsacus from age 18 healed sick in the name of Christ cast out demons worked other miracles
a native of the city of Melitoupolis (in northwestern Asia Minor), where his father Christopher served as deacon. The youth did not receive adequate schooling, but he learned the Holy Scripture by attending church services. He had a good heart, and distributed to the poor the money he earned working as a fisherman.

Filled with the grace of God, St Parthenius from age eighteen healed the sick in the name of Christ, cast out demons and worked other miracles. Learning of the young man's virtuous life, Bishop Philetus of Melitoupolis educated him and ordained him presbyter.

In 325, during the reign of Constantine the Great, Archbishop Achilles of Cyzicus made him bishop of the city of Lampsacus (Asia Minor). In the city were many pagans, and the saint fervently began to spread the faith in Christ, confirming it by through many miracles and by healing the sick.

The people began to turn from their pagan beliefs, and the saint went to the emperor Constantine the Great seeking permission to tear down the pagan temple and build a Christian church in its place. The emperor received the saint with honor, gave him a decree authorizing the destruction of the pagan temple, and provided him with the means to build a church. Returning to Lampsacus, St Parthenius had the pagan temple torn down, and built a beautiful church of God in the city.

In one of the razed temples, he found a large marble slab which he thought would be very suitable as an altar. The saint ordered work to begin on the stone, and to move it to the church. Through the malice of the devil, who became enraged at the removal of the stone from the pagan temple, the cart overturned and killed the driver Eutychian.
St Parthenius restored him to life by his prayer and shamed the devil, who wanted to frustrate the work of God.

The saint was so kind that he refused healing to no one who came to him, or who chanced to meet him by the wayside, whether he suffered from bodily illnesses or was tormented by unclean spirits. People even stopped going to physicians, since St Parthenius healed all the sick for free.
With the great power of the name of Christ, the saint banished a host of demons from people, from their homes, and from the waters of the sea.

Once, the saint prepared to cast out a devil from a certain man, who had been possessed by it since childhood. The demon began to implore the saint not to do so. St Parthenius promised to give the evil spirit another man in whom he could dwell. The demon asked, "Who is that man?" The saint replied, "You may dwell in me, if you wish."  The demon fled as if stung by fire, crying out, "If the mere sight of you is a torment to me, how can I dare to enter into you?"
An unclean spirit, cast out of the house where the imperial purple dye was prepared, said that a divine fire was pursuing him with the fire of Gehenna.
Having shown people the great power of faith in Christ, the saint converted a multitude of idol-worshippers to the true God.  St Parthenius died peacefully and was solemnly buried beside the cathedral church of Lampsacus, which he built
372 St. Moses Arab hermit bishop who is called “the Apostle of the Saracens.”
 In Ægypto sancti Móysis, Epíscopi venerábilis, qui primum in erémo vitam solitáriam duxit; deínde, peténte Regína Saracenórum Máuvia, Epíscopus factus, gentem illam ferocíssimam magna ex parte ad fidem convértit, et gloriósus méritis quiévit in pace.
       In Egypt, St. Moses, a venerable bishop, who first led a solitary life in the desert, and afterwards, at the request of Mauvia, queen of the Saracens, converted to the faith the greater part of that barbarous people.  Being made a bishop, and rich in merits, he peacefully went to his reward.

ST MOSES, BISHOP (c. A.D. 372)
    St Moses, the apostle of the “Saracens”, was an Arab by birth and lived for a long time the life of a hermit at Rhinoclura, in the region between Syria and Egypt.  The country was mainly inhabited by wandering bands of Saracens—worshippers of the stars—who, under their warlike queen, Mavia, waged a guerilla warfare on the Roman frontiers. A punitive expedition sent against them appears to have been of the nature of a religious crusade, and ended in a pact whereby Mavia consented to the evangelization of her people provided they might have the holy hermit Moses as their bishop. Lucius, the archbishop of Alexandria, would have been the right person to consecrate him, but he was an Arian and Moses refused to accept episcopal orders from him.

Eventually he succeeded in being consecrated by orthodox bishops, and thereafter spent his days in moving from place to place—he had no fixed see—teaching, preaching and converting a large proportion of his flock to the faith. He also succeeded during the rest of his life in maintaining peace between the Romans and the Saracens. 
“Saracen”, it should be noted, is a term which was applied by the later Greeks and Romans to the nomad tribes of the Syro-Arabian desert. The exact date of the death of St Moses is not known.
           See Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. ii. The details are supplied by the statements of
         the church historians, Sozomen and Theodoret.


He lived in the desert regions of Syria and Egypt, caring for the local nomadic tribes. When the Romans imposed peace upon the Saracens, Queen Mavia, the Saracen ruler, demanded that Moses be consecrated a bishop. He accepted against his will and maintained the peace between the Saracens and Rome.
The Saracens were a nomadic people of the Syro-Egyptian desert so designated by the Romans.

Moses B (RM) Died c. 372. Saint Moses was an Arab who retired in the desert around Mount Sinai. He served as bishop of the roving nomadic flock until a peace treaty between the Saracens and Romans made him bishop of Egypt (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

435 St. Juliana of Bologna  Married woman of Bologna
 Bonóniæ sanctæ Juliánæ Víduæ.       At Bologna, St. Juliana, widow.
Italy, who was much praised by St. Ambrose of Milan. Juliana had four children when her husband asked to be freed in order to enter the priesthood.
She raised their four children and devoted herself to the care of the poor.
Juliana of Bologna, Widow (RM) Died 435. The piety and charity of Saint Juliana were extolled by Saint Ambrose of Milan. Juliana and her husband agreed to separate so that he could become a priest. She devoted herself to bringing up their four children and to the service of the Church and the poor (Benedictines).

546 St. Lawrence of Siponto Bishop of Siponto
Italy, from 492 until his death. He is credited with building St. Michael’s shrine on Mount Gargano, Italy. He was surnamed Majoranus.
Laurence of Siponto B (AC) Died c. 546. Laurence Majoranus was bishop of Siponto from 492 until his death more than 50 years later. He is said to have built the sanctuary of Saint Michael on Mount Gargano (Benedictines).

550 St. Tressan Irish missionary spread the faith in Gaul
also called Tresian. He left his native country to assist the spread of the faith in Gaul (modern France), receiving ordination from the hands of St. Remigius.

Tressan of Mareuil (AC) (also known as Trésain) Died 550. Saint Tressan is said to be one of five or six brothers, including Saint Gibrian, and three sisters, who travelled from Ireland to France to evangelize for the glory of God in the diocese of Rheims, France. The names of the others are given as Helan, Germanus, Abran (who may be Gibrian), Petran, Franca, Promptia, and Possenna (variations on these names are used).
Tressan worked there as a swineherd, but he was ordained to the priesthood by Saint Remigius, who provided the siblings with suitable retreats from which they could spread the faith. Tressan became curate of Mareuil-sur-Marne, and the patron saint of Avenay in Champagne. His cultus is strong and has been continuous in the area of Rheims. More than 1,000 years after his death, Pope Clement VIII and Archbishop Philip of Rheims authorized the publishing of an Office for his feast (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Encyclopedia, Fitzpatrick, Kenney, Montague, O'Hanlon).

570 St. Fidelis Bishop of Merida
Spain, trained by his predecessor, St. Paul. He was originally from the East.
Fidelis of Mérida B (AC) Died c. 570. Born somewhere in the East, Saint Fidelis travelled to Spain with some merchants and settled in Mérida, where he was trained by Saint Paul, bishop of the city, whom he succeeded in that office (Benedictines).

6th v, St. Meldon Irish hermit, possibly Frence bishop.
He died at Peronne, where he is titular saint of several parishes. He is also listed as Medon.

722 St. Richard, "king of England" brother of St. Boniface Miracles reported at his tomb father of Saints Willibald, Winnebald, and Walburga
 Lucæ, in Túscia, deposítio sancti Richárdi, Regis Anglórum, qui pater éxstitit sancti Willebáldi, Eistetténsis Epíscopi, ac sanctæ Walbúrgæ Vírginis.
       At Lucca in Tuscany, the death of St. Richard, king of England.  He was the father of St. Willebald, bishop of Eichstadt, and of St. Walburga, virgin.

720 ST RICHARD, “KING”
   IN the spring of the year 720 a little party left the Hamble to go on pilgrimage to Rome and the Holy Land. They were a Wessex family, consisting of the father, whose name is not recorded, and his sons, Willibald and Winebald. They sailed up the Seine, landed at Rouen, visited several French shrines, and set out for Rome.
   But at Lucca the father died, and was buried in the church of St Frigidian (San Frediano). Miracles were recorded at his tomb, where his relics still are and where his festival is observed with great devotion.
   The son St Willibald afterwards joined St Boniface, and became first bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria. And we owe the above particulars to a document called the Hodoeporicon, in which, during his lifetime, one of his relatives, a nun of Heidenheim, set down the recollections of his early life that she had from his own mouth.
    It tells us all we know about the father of St Willibald and St Winebald and their sister St Walburga but this was not enough for the faithful of Lucca and of Eichstatt, who had so great a reverence for the holy man. So they supplied him with a name—Richard, a “life” and a background—he was a “king of the English”.  Actually there was no King Richard in England before Coeur-de-Lion, and nothing is known of the status of Willibald’s father except that he could afford to go on a long pilgrimage nevertheless he appears in the Roman Martyrology today as “sanctus Richardus rex Anglorum”. The little we know about him is compensated by a good deal of reliable information about his children.
See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. ii and, especially, Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xlix
(1931) pp. 353—357, where Father M. Coens uses an Eichstätt office of St Richard and an
unpublished vita to throw come light on the evolution of his legend at Eichstätt in the tenth
century and the rise of his cult at Lucca in the twelfth. In view of this article, T. Meyrick’s
The Family of St Richard the Saxon (1844), the second issue of Newman’s Lives of the
English Saints, calls for many corrections.
Richard the "King" (RM) Died 722. Perhaps Saint Richard was not really a king--early Italian legend made him a prince of Wessex--but his sanctity was verified by the fact that he fathered three other saints: Willibald, Winebald (Wunibald), and Walpurga (Walburga). Butler tells us that "Saint Richard, when living, obtained by his prayers the recovery of his younger son Willibald, whom he laid at the foot of a great crucifix erected in a public place in England, when the child's life was despaired of in a grievous sickness...[he was] perhaps deprived of his inheritance by some revolution in the state; or he renounced it to be more at liberty to dedicate himself to the pursuit of Christian perfection...Taking with him his two sons, he undertook a pilgrimage of penance and devotion, and sailing from Hamble-haven, landed in Neustria on the western coasts of France. He made a considerable stay at Rouen, and made his devotions in the most holy places that lay in his way through France."
He fell ill, died suddenly at Lucca, Italy, and was buried in the church of San Frediano. A later legend makes him the duke of Swabia, Germany. Miracles were reported at his tomb, and he became greatly venerated by the citizens of Lucca and those of Eichstatt to where some of his relics were translated. The natives of Lucca amplified accounts of his life by calling him king of the English. Neither of his legends is especially trustworthy--even his real name is unknown and dates only from the 11th century. A famous account of the pilgrimage on which he died was written by his son's cousin, the nun Hugeburc, entitled Hodoeporicon (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Gill, Husenbeth, White)

In art, King Saint Richard is portrayed as a royal pilgrim (ermine- lined cloak) with two sons--one a bishop and one an abbot. His crown may be on a book (Roeder). He is venerated at Heidenheim and Lucca (Roeder).

February 7th Troparion (Tone 3) Accepting Christ our God as King, O Father Richard, thou didst leave thy native Wessex to be a pilgrim. Pray that in our pilgrimage we may find salvation for our souls.

St. Richard of Swabia also known as St. Richard, King of Wessex (Kingdom of the West Saxons) is the brother of St. Boniface. It is uncertain whether or not he was crowned a king in this life, but he is certainly numbered with the "kings and priests" in the Kingdom of Christ. His sons, Willibald and Winebald are also Saints, as is his daughter, Walburga. He and his two sons left England to undertake a pilgrimage of penance and devotion. They made their way through France. Then Richard fell ill and reposed in Lucca, Italy, in 722. He was buried in the Church of St. Frediano. Miracles were reported at his tomb. His sons, now joined by their sister, were recruited by their uncle, the newly elevated Bishop Boniface of Germany, to evangelize Germany. St. Walburga was the first abbess in Heidenheim. St. Willibald settled in Eichstatt. Some of St. Richard's remains were then translated to Eichstatt, and many there were healed through his intercessions. His connection to Swabia is apparently due to devotion to him after his repose for miracles worked through his intercession.
http://www.comeandseeicons.com/inp23.htm
750 St. Amulwinus Benedictine abbot bishop
Amulwinus was St. Erminus' successor at the monastery of Lobbes, Belgium. Amulwinus assumed his post in 737.
Amulwinus of Lobbes, OSB, Abbot-Bishop (AC) (also known as Amolvinus) Died c. 750. In 737, Amulwinus succeeded Saint Erminus as abbot-bishop (chorepiscopus) of Lobbes (Benedictine

St. Anatolius Bishop of Cahors.
France. His life is not recorded, but his relics were venerated at the Saint-Mihiel Abbey in Verdun, France.

946 St. Luke the Younger Hermit death place called Sterion (place of healing) wonder-worker (Thaumaturgus ) one of the earliest saints to be seen levitating in prayer
whose solitary hermitage in Thessaly, Greece, became known as the Soterion, “the place of healing.”

946 ST LUKE THE YOUNGER
  ST LUKE THE YOUNGER, also surnamed Thaumaturgus or the Wonderworker, was a Greek. His family came from the island of Aegina, but were obliged to leave on account of the attacks of the Saracens, and came eventually to settle in Thessaly where they were small farmers or peasant proprietors. His father, Stephen, and his mother, Euphrosyne, had seven children, of whom he was the third. He was a pious and obedient boy, and was at an early age set to mind the sheep and cultivate the fields. From a child he often went without a meal in order to feed the hungry, and sometimes he would strip himself of his clothes that he might give them to beggars. When he went forth to sow, he was wont to scatter half the seed over the land of the poor, and it was noticed that the Lord used to bless his father’s crops with abundant increase.

After the death of Stephen, the boy left the work of the fields and gave himself for a time to contemplation.  He felt called to the religious life, and on one occasion he started off from Thessaly, meaning to seek a monastery, but was captured by soldiers who took him to be a runaway slave. They questioned him; but when he said that he was a servant of Christ and had undertaken the journey out of devotion, they refused to believe him and shut him up in prison, treating him very cruelly. After a time they discovered his identity and released him, but upon returning home he was received with gibes and was jeered at for running away.
      Although he still desired to consecrate himself to God, Luke’s relations were unwilling to let him go, but two monks who, on their way from Rome to the Holy Land, were hospitably entertained by Euphrosyne, managed to persuade her to let her son travel with them as far as Athens. There he entered a monastery, but was not suffered to remain there long. One day the superior sent for him and gave the young man to understand that his (Luke’s) mother had appeared to him in a vision and that, as she was needing him, he had better go home again to help her. So Luke returned once more and was received with joy and surprise ; but, after four months, Euphrosyne herself became convinced that her son had a real call to the religious life and she no longer opposed it.

He built himself a hermitage on Mount Joannitsa near Corinth, and there he went to live, being at that time in his eighteenth year. He led a life of almost incredible austerity, spending his nights in prayer and depriving himself almost entirely of sleep. Nevertheless he was full of joy and charity, although at times he had to wrestle with fierce temptations. He received such graces from God that miracles were wrought through him both during his life and after his death. He is one of the early saints of whom a circumstantial story is told that he was seen raised from the ground in prayer. St Luke’s cell was converted into an oratory after his death and was named Soterion or Sterion—the Place of Healing.
          See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. ii. The Greek text, which was printed
         incomplete by Combefis and in Migne, PG., vol. cxi, cc. 441-480, has been re-edited entire in
         the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xiii, pp. 82—121. The whole text is also found in P. Kremos,
         Phocica. BHG., p. 70.


 Luke tried to become a religious but was arrested as an escaped slave and imprisoned for a time. He finally became a hermit on Mount Joannitsa. near Corinth. There he was revered for his holiness and miracles, which earned him the surname Thaumaturgus.
Luke the Younger (AC) (also known as Luke Thaumaturgus or the Wonder-worker) Died c. 946.

Saint Luke is known to the Greek Church as Luke the Wonderworker. His parents were farmers or peasant proprietors on the island of Aegina, but were forced off their land by attacking Saracens. They settled in Thessaly, Greece. Luke was the third of the seven children of Stephen and Euphrosyne. Although Luke was a pious and obedient boy generally, he often made them angry because of his charity to those poorer than himself. In childhood he often gave his meal away to the hungry, or would strip off his clothes for a beggar. When sowing seed, for instance, Luke the Wonderworker spread at least half of it over the fields of the poor instead of over his parents' fields.

Later it was said that one of wonders God worked on Luke's behalf was to make his parents' crops yield more than anyone else's, even though he had given away half the seeds. But at the time his mother and father were extremely angry.
After Stephen's death, Luke left the fields and gave himself for a time to contemplation.

When he told his family that he wanted to enter a monastery, they tried to stop him. But Luke ran away. Unfortunately, some soldiers caught him and for a time put him in prison, thinking he was a runaway slave. When he said that he was a servant of Christ and had undertaken the journey out of devotion, they refused to believe him. He was shut up in prison and cruelly treated until his identity was discovered. He was allowed to return home where he was scolded for running away.

In the end, however, Luke got his way. Euphrosyne provided hospitality to two monks on their way between Rome and the Holy Land. They managed to persuade his mother to let him accompany them as far as Athens. There Luke was admitted as a novice in a monastery, but he didn't stay long. One day the superior sent for him and told the young saint that Luke's mother had appeared to him in a vision and that, as she needed him, he must return home to help her. Luke went home once again and was received with joy and surprise. After four months Euphrosyne herself became convinced of her son's calling and no longer opposed his entering religious life. So, age the age of 18, he built himself a hermitage on Mount Joannitsa near Corinth and lived there happily for the rest of his life. Luke is one of the earliest saints to be seen levitating in prayer. He worked so many miracles there that the site was turned into an oratory after his death and became known as Soterion or Sterion (place of healing) and he himself as the Thaumaturgus (the wonder-worker) (Benedictines, Bentley, Walsh).

Saint Luke of Hellas was a native of the Greek village of Kastorion.

The son of poor farmers, the saint from childhood had toiled much, working in the fields and shepherding the sheep. He was very obedient to his parents and very temperate in eating. He often gave his own food and clothing to the poor, for which he suffered reproach from his parents. He once gave away almost all the seed which was needed for planting in the fields. The Lord rewarded him for his charity, and the harvest gathered was greater than ever before.

As a child, he prayed fervently and often. His mother saw him more than once standing not on the ground, but in the air while he prayed.

After the death of his father, he left his mother and went to Athens, where he entered a monastery. But through the prayers of his mother, who was very concerned about him, the Lord returned him to his parental home in a miraculous manner. He spent four months there, then with his mother's blessing he went to a solitary place on a mountain called Ioannou (or Ioannitsa). Here there was a church dedicated to the holy Unmercenaries Cosmas and Damian, where he lived an ascetical life in constant prayer and fasting. He was tonsured there by some Elders who were on pilgrimage. After this, St Luke redoubled his ascetic efforts, for which the Lord granted him the gift of foresight.

After a seven years on Ioannou, the saint moved to Corinth because of an invasion of the Bulgarian armies.

Hearing about the exploits of a certain stylite at Patras, he went to see him, and remained for ten years to serve the ascetic with humility and obedience. Afterwards, the saint returned again to his native land and again began to pursue asceticism on Mount Ioannou.
The throngs of people flocking there disturbed his quietude, so with the blessing of his Elder Theophylactus, St Luke went with his disciple to a still more remote place at Kalamion.

After three years, he settled on the desolate and arid island of Ampelon because of an invasion of the Turks. Steiris was another place of his ascetic efforts. Here brethren gathered to the monk, and a small monastery grew up, the church of which was dedicated to the Great Martyr Barbara.
Dwelling in the monastery, the saint performed many miracles, healing sicknesses of soul and of body.

Foreseeing his end, the saint confined himself in a cell and for three months prepared for his departure. When asked where he was to be buried, the monk replied, "Throw my body into a ravine to be eaten by wild beasts." When the brethren begged him to change these instructions, he commanded them to bury his body on the spot where he lay. Raising his eyes to heaven, he said, "Into Thy hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit!"
St Luke fell asleep in the Lord on February 7, 946. Later, a church was built over his tomb. Myrrh flowed from his holy relics, and many healings occurred.
1027 ST ROMUALD, ABBOT FOUNDER OF THE CAMALDOLESE BENEDICTINES
ST ROMUALD, of the family of the Onesti, Dukes of Ravenna, was probably born about the year 950. The statement of his biographer, St Peter Damian that he lived to the age of 120 years is now universally rejected.
Though he grew up a worldly youth and a slave to his passions, yet he occasionally experienced aspirations after higher ideals. His father, whose name was Sergius, had agreed to decide by duel a dispute he had with a relation over some property, and Romuald was an unwilling spectator of the encounter. Sergius slew his adversary and Romuald, horrorstricken, fled to the monastery of Sant’ Apollinare-in-Classe nearby. In this house he passed three years in such fervour and austerity that his observance became a standing reproach to certain lax and unfaithful monks, who were yet more exasperated when he reproved their conduct. So, with the abbot’s consent, he left the monastery and, retiring to the neighbourhood of Venice, placed himself under the direction of a hermit named Marinus. Under him Romuald made great advance in the way of perfection. Romuald and Marinus are said to have been concerned in the retirement of the doge of Venice, St Peter Orseolo, to Cuxa, and to have lived there for a time as solitaries. The example of St Romuald had such an influence on his father Sergius that to atone for his sins he entered the monastery of San Severo, near Ravenna. After a time he was tempted to return to the world, whereupon his son went thither to dissuade him from that infirmity of purpose. He succeeded in this, and Sergius stayed in the monastery for the rest of his life.  
   Romuald seems to have spent the next thirty years wandering about Italy, founding hermitages and monasteries. He stayed three years in a cell near that house which he had founded at Parenzo. Here he labored for a time under great spiritual dryness, but suddenly, one day, as he was reciting the words of the Psalmist, I will give thee understanding and will instruct thee “, he was visited by God with an extraordinary light and a spirit of compunction which from that time never left him.
He wrote an exposition of the Psalms full of admirable thoughts, he often foretold things to come, and he gave counsel inspired by heavenly wisdom to all who came to consult him. He had always longed for martyrdom, and at last obtained the pope’s licence to preach the gospel in Hungary; but he was stricken with a grievous illness as soon as he set foot in the country, and as the malady returned each time he attempted to proceed, he concluded it was a plain indication of God’s will in the matter and he accordingly returned to Italy, though some of his associates went on and preached the faith to the Magyars.
Subsequently he made a long stay at Monte di Sitrio, but whilst there he was accused of a scandalous crime by a young nobleman whom he had reprimanded for his dissipated life.
   Extraordinary as it seems, the monks believed the tale, enjoined on him a severe penance, forbade him to celebrate Mass, and excommunicated him. He bore all in silence for six months, but was then admonished by God to submit no longer to so unjust a sentence, pronounced without authority and without a shadow of foundation. He passed six years in Sitrio, observing strict silence, and, in spite of old age, increasing rather than relaxing his austerities. Romuald had some significance in missions to the Slavs and Prussians through the monastery founded for him and St Bruno of Querfurt at Pereum, near Ravenna, by Otto III in 1001.
  A son of Duke Boleslaus I of Poland was a monk in this monastery, and on behalf of his father presented Romuald with a fine horse. He exchanged it for a donkey, declaring that he felt closer to Jesus Christ when astride such a mount.
   The most famous of all St Romuald’s monasteries is that of Camaldoli, near Arezzo in Tuscany, founded by him about the year iota. It lies beyond a mountain, the descent from which on the farther side is almost a sheer precipice looking down upon a pleasant valley, which then belonged to a lord called Maldolo, who gave it the saint, and from him it retained the name Camaldoli (Campus Maldoli).
 In this place St Romuald built a monastery, and by the several observances he added to St Benedict’s rule he gave birth to that new congregation called the Camaldolese, in which he united the cenobitic and eremitical life. After their benefactor had seen in a vision monks climbing a ladder to heaven all dressed in white garments, Romuald changed the habit from black to white. The hermitage is two short miles distant from the monastery. It is on the mountain-side overshaded by a dark wood of fir trees. In it are seven clear springs of water. The very sight of this solitude in the midst of the forest helps to fill the mind with compunction and a love of contemplation. On the left side of the church is the cell in which St Romuald lived when he first established these hermits. Their cells, built of stone, have each a little garden walled round, and each cell has a chapel in which the occupant may celebrate Mass.
     After some years at Camaldoli Romuald returned to his travels, and eventually died, alone in his cell, at the monastery of Val-di-Castro, on June 19, 1027. A quarter of a century before he had prophesied that death would come to him in that place and in that manner. His chief feast is kept today because it was on February 7, 1481 that his incorrupt body was translated to Fabriano: it was so fixed when Pope Clement VIII added his name to the general calendar in 1595.
           The principal source of information for the life of St Romuald is the biography written
         by St Peter Damian, which has been printed in the Acta Sanctorum February, vol. ii, and
         in many other collections. See BHL., n. 7324. But much subsidiary material is also
         available in the Life of St Peter Orseolo, the Chronicon Venetum, and the two Lives of St
         Bononius of Luccdio. A valuable preliminary study of these sources has been made by
         W. Franke, Quellen und Chronologie zur Geschichte Romualds von Camaldoli und seiner
         Einsiedlergenossenschaften im Zeitalter Ottos III (1910). See Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxi
         (1912), pp. 376-377 and also W. Franke in Hist. Studien,, vol. cvii (1913). Two Italian
         lives were published in 1927, by A. Pagnani and C. Ciampelli and cf. A. Giabbini, L’eremo
         (1945).
1150 Blessed Nivard of Vaucelles, OSB Cist. (PC)
Born c. 1000; died after 1150. Nivard is the product of the very holy family of Saint Bernard. He was the founder's youngest brother, who followed Bernard to Clairvaux and eventually was appointed novice-master at Vaucelles. Information on his later career is rather confused (Benedictines).

St Ronan of Kilmaronen came into the valley and drove out the devil B (AC)
(also known as Ruadan, Ruadhan)
Saint Ronan, a Scottish bishop of Kilmaronen, has erroneously been identified as the Irish monk mentioned by the Venerable Bede as the defender of the Roman calculation for the date of Easter at the Synod of Whitby. St. Ronan's Well at Innerleithen, Peeblesshire, was popularized by one of Sir Walter Scott's novels. According to tradition, Ronan came into the valley and drove out the devil. This event is remembered annually at the end of "Saint Ronan's Games" in July when a schoolboy, given a pastoral staff, is chosen to represent the saint as he "cleeks the devil" (Farmer).

1236 Bl. Rizzerio Early Franciscan great austerities mortifications miracle from Francis that dissolved his despair of God's mercy

1236 BD RIZZERIO
 WHEN St Francis of Assisi, seemingly on August 15, 1222, preached that unforgettable sermon at Bologna of which Thomas of Spalatro has left us a vivid picture, two well-born students of the university were so impressed that they abandoned the world and offered themselves at once for a life of poverty and toil amongst the Friars Minor. One of these was Rizzerio, who belonged to a wealthy family at Muccia, not far from Camerino. The incident is recorded in chapter 27 of the Fioretti, where, however, by some strange confusion Rizzerio is called Rinieri. We are told that St Francis knew by revelation that both applicants were sent by God and that they would lead a holy life in the order, and accordingly, “Knowing their great fervour, he received them gladly”.
He prophesied at the same time that while Peregrine, though a learned canonist, was to remain in the path of lowliness and never become a priest, Rizzerio would “serve his brethren”.  It will be remembered that among the Franciscans the title given to the higher superiors is minister (i.e. servant), and Rizzerio accordingly received holy orders and became in the end provincial minister of the Marches.
    Our early documents, notably the Actus beati Francisci, reproduced in the Fioretti, describe him as most intimate with and tenderly beloved by the saint in the last years of his life on earth, and there is a touching story of Rizzerio’s temptation to despair of Gods mercy. For a long time he fought it by fasts and flagellations and prayers, but at last he determined to have recourse to his beloved father.
    “ If ”, he said, “ Brother Francis shall make me welcome, and shall treat me as his familiar friend, even as he is wont to do, I believe that God will yet have pity on me; but if not, it will be a sign that I shall be abandoned of God.” St Francis was grievously ill at the time, but he knew by revelation of Rizzerio’s temptation and of his coming. So calling Brothers Leo and Maneo he said to them, “ Go quickly to meet my dearest son, Brother Rizzerio, and embrace him in my name and bid him welcome and tell him that among all the friars that are in the world I love him exceedingly.” And when at length the sorely tempted brother came to where St Francis lay, the saint rose up in spite of his illness and went to meet him.
    “And he made the sign of the most holy cross upon his brow and there he kissed him, and afterward said to him, ‘ Dearest son, God hath permitted thee to be thus tempted for thy great gain of merit; but if thou wouldst not have this gain any more, have it not!’” Then the temptation departed from him never to return.
   It was apparently to Brother Rizzerio also that St Francis told his original intention regarding the practice of poverty in the order, viz, that no friar ought to have any possessions whatever, not even books, but only his habit and breeches and the cord with which he was girded. Brother Rizzerio seems to have died young, March 26, 1236. His cultus was confirmed in 1836.
           See the Speculum Perfectionis, ch. 2 the Actus b. Francisci, chs. 36 and 37 the early
         portions of Wadding’s Annales, and the Analecta Franciscana, vol. iv, pp. 283—285.


One of the favorite followers of St. Francis of Assisi. Originally from a wealthy family, he was born at Muccia, in the Italian Marches. While studying at the university of Bologna, Italy, in 1222, he had occasion to hear a sermon delivered by Francis and was so moved that he soon joined the Franciscans. Subsequently ordained, he became a leading advisor and close associate of Francis, served as provincial of the Marches, received from the saint a miracle by which his seemingly insuperable despair of God’s forgiveness was overcome, and was present at Francis’ deathbed. He is men­tioned in the famed work of the Fioretti, The Little Flowers of St. Francis, under the name Rinieri. He died on March 26.

Blessed Rizzerio, OFM (AC) (also known as Richerius) Born in Muccia, Marches, Italy; died March 26, 1236; cultus confirmed 1836. Born into a wealthy family, Rizzerio studied at the University of Bologna. In 1222, he and his fellow-student Blessed Peregrine were so impressed by one of Saint Francis of Assisi's sermons preached there that they immediately joined the Franciscans. Rizzerio was ordained, became a close associate of Francis, and served as provincial of the Marches. He practiced great austerities and mortifications and was the recipient of a miracle from Francis that dissolved his despair of God's mercy. Rizzerio, who was present at the death of Francis, was called Rinieri in The Little Flowers of Saint Francis (Benedictines, Delaney).

1461 Blessed Antony of Stroncone practicing rigorous penance, OFM (AC)

1461 ANTONY OF STRONCONE
     Luigi and Isabella Vici, the father and mother of Antony, were people of good position and ancient lineage. Being fervent tertiaries they were both devoted to the Franciscan Order and seem to have raised no great opposition when their son and heir, at the early age of twelve years, sought admission among the Friars Minor as a lay-brother. His training in the religious life was superintended by his uncle, who was commissary general of the Observants in Italy. The boy, in spite of much ill-health, bravely persisted in the austerities of the life which he had chosen, So great was his progress that when he was twenty-six he was associated with Bd Thomas of Florence as deputy-master of novices at Fiesole, and thirteen years later was appointed to assist the same Thomas in a mission confided to him by the Holy See of denouncing and suppressing the Fraticelli in the Sienese territory and in Corsica. These, developing out of the party of the Spirituals” within the Franciscan body itself, and identifying themselves with an impossible ideal of poverty and moral purity, had grown into a definitely heretical sect which rejected all constituted ecclesiastical authority.
    Bd Antony, though not a priest, was employed on this mission for more than ten years, of which the last three were spent in Corsica; but in 1431 he took up his abode in the friary of the Carceri, a place of retirement not far from Assisi, where he was more free to give rein to his intense longing for self-crucifixion. For thirty years he lived there, eating practically nothing but bread and water seasoned with wormwood, reputing himself the meanest of all and taking every opportunity which offered for humiliation and increased austerity. On one occasion, on account of his known aversion to anything which savoured of self-indulgence, he was suspected of having destroyed a number of vines which produced grapes for the community. He accepted and performed without protest the very severe penance which was enjoined him, but it was afterwards discovered that he was wholly innocent of the offence imputed to him.
 In 1460 Antony was transferred to the historic friary of St Damian in Assisi, and there he happily breathed his last on February 8, 1461, at the age of eighty. Many miracles followed, and popular belief maintains that Bd Antony shows to those who are devout to him the curious favour of warning them beforehand of their approaching death: a knocking is heard which seems to proceed either from his tomb or from some statue or picture representing him. A similar belief is entertained regarding two other Franciscan saints, St Paschal Baylon and Bd Matthia Nazzerei. The cultus of Bd Antony was confirmed in 1687.

           See the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol ii, where a Latin version is printed of the short
         life by Louis Jacobillo of Foligno. Other accounts have been written by Fathers Mariano
         of Florence and James of Oldis. Leon in his L’Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. i,
         has furnished an enthusiastic summary.


Cultus confirmed 1687. Antony dei Vici became a Franciscan lay-brother at age 12. Regardless of his humble status, he was chosen to assist Blessed Thomas of Florence in an important mission on behalf of the Holy See. Afterwards he retired to the friary of the Carceri, near Assisi, where he lived for forty years, combating the heresy of the Fraticelli and practicing rigorous penance (Benedictines).
1447 St. Colette Poor Clare 17 established monasteries
born 1381Colette did not seek the limelight, but in doing God’s will she certainly attracted a lot of attention.  Colette was born in Corbie, France. At 21 she began to follow the Third Order Rule and became an anchoress, a woman walled into a room whose only opening was a window into a church.
After four years of prayer and penance in this cell, she left it. With the approval and encouragement of the pope, she joined the Poor Clares and reintroduced the primitive Rule of St. Clare in the 17 monasteries she established. Her sisters were known for their poverty—they rejected any fixed income—and for their perpetual fast. Colette’s reform movement spread to other countries and is still thriving today. Colette was canonized in 1807.
Comment:  Colette began her reform during the time of the Great Western Schism (1378-1417) when three men claimed to be pope and thus divided Western Christianity. The 15th century in general was a very difficult one for the Western Church. Abuses long neglected cost the Church dearly in the following century; the prayers of Colette and her followers may have lessened the Church’s troubles in the 16th century. In any case, Colette’s reform indicated the entire Church’s need to follow Christ more closely. Quote:  In her spiritual testament, Colette told her sisters: "We must faithfully keep what we have promised. If through human weakness we fail, we must always without delay arise again by means of holy penance, and give our attention to leading a good life and to dying a holy death. May the Father of all mercy, the Son by his holy passion, and the Holy Spirit, source of peace, sweetness and love, fill us with their consolation. Amen."   
1551 Blessed Thomas Sherwood denying the queen's ecclesiastical supremacy M (AC)

1578 BD THOMAS SHERWOOD, MARTYR
   FROM an account written by the martyr’s brother we are exceptionally well-informed regarding this heroic young man of twenty-seven, the son of most devout parents, his mother after his execution having been confined in prison for fourteen years, where eventually she died.
   He was not a student at the English College at Douay, as Challoner alleges, but when in London, after having made his plans to study for the priesthood, he was apprehended on suspicion of being a papist at the instigation of the son of Lady Tregonwell, a Catholic whose house he had frequented. He was sent to the Tower, where he was cruelly racked in a vain endeavour to make him disclose where he had heard Mass, and then thrust into a filthy dungeon.
 More’s son-in-law, Roper, tried to send him money to alleviate his sufferings, but the lieutenant of the Tower would not permit of any money to be spent on him beyond six-pennyworth of clean straw for him to lie on. After six months he was tried, condemned for denying the queen’s supremacy, and hanged at Tyburn.
 The case is interesting because we possess the letter of the lords of the Privy Council directing that the lieutenant of the Tower and others are “to assay him [Sherwood] at the rack upon such articles as they shall think meet to minister unto him for the discovering either of the persons or of further matters”. In other words, they tortured him in order to obtain information which might convict other Catholics. In the Diary of Douay College, the death of the martyr is recorded three weeks later “ On the first of March [1578] Mr Lowe returned to us from England bringing news that a youth, by name Thomas Sherwood, had suffered, for his confession of the Catholic faith, not only imprisonment, but death itself.
Amidst all his torments, his exclamation had been ‘Lord Jesus, I am not worthy to suffer this for thee, much less to receive those rewards which thou hast promised to those that confess thee.’ ”
           See J. H. Pollen, Acts of English Martyrs (1891), pp. 1—20; and MMP, pp. 11—12.


Born in London in 1551; died at Tyburn in 1578; beatified in 1886. Thomas was preparing to go to Douai to study for the priesthood when he was denounced as a Catholic, arrested in London, and imprisoned in the Tower. He was racked in an effort to force him to disclose the place where he had heard Mass. He was finally hanged, drawn, and quartered on the charge of denying the queen's ecclesiastical supremacy (Attwater2, Benedictines).
1593 Blessed James Salès & William Saulte-mouche martyrs, SJ MM (AC)

1593 BD. JAMES SALES AND WILLIAM SAULTEMOUCHE, MARTYRS
    JAMES SALES was born in Auvergne in 1556 son of a servant of the bishop of Clermont, who helped the lad’s father to send him to the Jesuit college at Billom; and there he entered the noviceship of the order at the age of seventeen. Saultemouche was a simple honest youth employed at the same college as a servant, who became a lay-brother a few years later. James meanwhile pursued his studies and graduated at the newly founded University of Pont-à-Mousson.
   Apparently he was the first graduate, and late in the seventeenth century Peter Abram, when writing the history of that institution, ventured to express a hope that “he who figures first on the register of our university may one day be inscribed on the roll of the martyrs”. This anticipation was realized in 1926
   Somewhat later James pursued his studies in Paris, and it was there that the desire for martyrdom came vehemently upon the young scholastic; he accordingly applied for permission to go to the Indies. Father Aquaviva learned that his talent for preaching and teaching made him a very useful subject where he was, and he refused his request in words which now seem prophetic. “ In France he wrote,” “you will find all that the Indies have to give.” In point of fact the Cévennes at that date, as well as a century later, were by no means free from peril for Catholics. It was a stronghold of the Huguenots, religious fanaticism was intense, and the whole country was in a very disturbed state. In the autumn of 1592 the mayor of Aubenas applied to the Jesuit provincial for a father to preach the Advent course with a special view to discussions with the Calvinist ministers. Father Sales was appointed and Brother Saultemouche was chosen for his companion. At the end of November they set out, the priest having about his neck a relic of Bd Edmund Campion, who had suffered at Tyburn less than a year previously. He seems to have had some presentiment that the crown which he had longed for was within his grasp, for he said cheerily to the porter on quitting the house, “Pray for us, dear brother, we are going to face death”.

The Advent course was completed, but the mayor begged that the preacher would remain until Easter. There seems to have been a great dearth of priests in that diocese at the time, and Aubenas was without one. Towards the beginning of February 1593 the father and brother were one night awakened by a clamour outside the walls of the town. Huguenot raiders were thundering at the gates, and knowing what had happened in other places, the two Jesuits made all haste to the church with the view of preventing a sacrilege. Father Sales gave holy communion to the brother and consumed the remainder of the sacred particles. Either by force, or, as seems more probable, by treachery, the raiders effected an entrance, and they were not long in discovering the whereabouts of the man they especially sought, for the vehemence and success of the recent controversial sermons had made a great stir. The Jesuits were seized, and when on being asked for their money the priest could produce no more than thirty sous, this seemed to infuriate their captors.
   They were dragged off with much brutality and brought before a kind of court of Calvinist ministers, one of whom, named Labat, seems to have borne the father a particular grudge in regard of a past encounter in which he had been put to shame.
   The proceedings resolved themselves into an acrimonious theological discussion. This was protracted until the next day and resulted plainly in the intense exasperation of the Protestant disputants as soon as the subject of the Holy Eucharist was broached. The scene ended in the priest being dragged out of the hall into the open air, and there he was shot by order of the Huguenot commander.
   His companion, though exhorted by Father Sales to make his escape, as he might easily have done, would not quit his side. When the priest, kneeling to make a last prayer, was mortally wounded by an arquebus discharged at such close quarters that it singed his habit, the crowd fell upon the two victims with every kind of weapon, and in a few minutes had ended their bloody work amid indescribable brutalities. Brother Saultemouche had thrown his arms round Father Sales, and when his body was afterwards examined it was found to have been stabbed in eighteen places. This took place on February 7, 1593.
           See J. Blanc, Martyrs d’Aubenas (1906), and H. Perroy, Deux martyrs de l’Eucharistie (1926).


beatified in 1926. James Salès was born in 1556, the son of a manservant, and joined the Jesuits. In 1592, in the company of William Saulte-mouche, a temporal coadjutor, he was sent to preach the Advent course at Aubenas in the Cévennes. His sermons, in which he attacked the teaching of the Protestants, were a great success, and the town being then without a parish priest, Blessed James was begged to remain until Easter. Early in February 1593, a band of Huguenot raiders dragged the Jesuits before an improvised court of Calvinist ministers. After a heated theological discussion, Salès was dragged from the hall and shot, while Saulte-mouche, who refused to make his escape, was stabbed to death (Benedictines).

1603 Bl. William Richardson Martyr of England
Born in Sheffield, he studied for the priesthood at Valladolid and Seville, Spain, receiving ordination in 1594. William was sent back to England, where he used the name Anderson. He was soon arrested and executed at Tyburn by being hanged, drawn, and quartered. He was the last martyr in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603).

1812 Blessed Giles Mary of Saint Joseph porter for the friary, OFM (AC)

1812 BD GILES MARY
     ALTHOUGH the life of Bd Giles Mary-of-St-Joseph would have seemed singularly uneventful in the eyes of men, its very simplicity and humility made every day full of merit before the throne of God. He was born in 1729 near Taranto in Apulia.
     He was a rope-maker by trade, but when twenty-five years of age he was received among the Discalced Friars Minor of St Peter of Alcantara at Naples. There he spent most of his life as porter, showing intense compassion for the sick, the poor and the lazzaroni who formed so large a proportion of the population of that city.
   The distribution of alms was largely in his hands, but the more he gave away the more help seemed to flow in, and many miraculous cures are said to have been associated with his works of charity. He was also very earnest in propagating devotion to St Joseph. He died on February 7, 1812, and was beatified in 1888.
           See P. P. Ausserer, Seraphischer Martyrologium (1889), and C. Kempf, The Holiness
         of the Church in the Nineteenth Century
(1916).


Born in Taranto, southern Italy; died 1812; beatified 1888. A rope-maker by trade, he joined the Alcantarine Franciscans at Naples when he was 25. Thereafter served as porter for the friary (Attwater2, Benedictines).

1871 Bd Eugenia Smet (Mother Mary of Providence), foundress of the Helpers of the Holy Souls.  
Born in Lille in 1825; founded her congregation in 1846 in Paris; died there, 1871.  She was beatified in 1947.
http://helpersoftheholysouls.com/
 “Our mission, one of mercy, is to relieve and gain release for the suffering souls in purgatory who can no longer help themselves. We do this by monthly donations, collecting loose change and returning redeemable cans and bottles. All funds collected are used to place Holy Masses for all the Holy Souls in Purgatory.
“We also fulfill our mission by holding a Holy Hour for the Holy Souls every Tuesday night immediately following the 7:00pm Holy Sacrifice of the Mass at the Fatima Shrine Chapel on Route 126 in Holliston, MA. All are welcome.
Our Lady, Queen of Purgatory
“We share our mission by distributing complimentary Prayer Packs (used at our Holy Hour or privately at one’s convenience) to patrons of the Holy Souls. These Prayer Packs are a gift of the Apostolate and no Mass money collected goes toward their cost. All funds collected are used to place Masses for the Holy Souls.”

M. Vianney {St John Vianney} never met Mlle. Eugénie Smet, who, as Mère Marie de la Providence, was to establish throughout the world the Institute of the Helpers of the Holy Souls; yet every time her name was mentioned in his hearing he used to say: “Oh, I know her!” About 1850 the young woman—she was then twenty-five years of age—conceived the idea of founding an association whose prayers and good works would all be applied to the Holy Souls. She understood from the very start that, to achieve success in such an under­taking, souls were required who were dead to self and wholly given to God. But was it necessary to found a new Order, and must she be its first religious? Mlle. Smet, who was timidity and sensitiveness personified, trembled at the prospect. When she consulted Mgr. Chalandon, Bishop of Belley, he advised her to consult the Curé d’Ars. The saint dictated his answer to M. Toccanier: “An Order for the benefit of the Holy Souls! I have long been waiting for it! Let her establish it as soon as ever she wishes. Yes, let her be a religious and let her found this new Order: it will spread rapidly in the Church.”

There were no resources of any kind, however; and then it meant complete separation from beloved parents who obstinately withheld their consent. “Go on with it,” was the holy Curé’s message; “all will be well; moreover, those tears of too natural an affection will soon dry up.” On November 21, 1855, Mlle. Smet unexpectedly secured her mother’s consent. For a time she had to feel her way; trials and sufferings were not spared her, but in the end the Helpers of the Holy Souls, even during M. Vianney’s life­time, established themselves firmly in Paris, whence their institute spread to other parts of France, and later on to Belgium, England, Austria, Italy, the Far East, and America. It would seem that M. Vianney had a special love for this religious family, and, under God, it is to him that the Sisters attribute their existence and their success.

 By Abbe Francis Trochu -- 1927  Translated by Dom Ernest Graf, O.S.B., of St Mary’s Abbey, Buckfast -- 1953

Mary's Divine Motherhood
   Tuesday  Saints of this Day February  07 Séptimo Idus Februárii  
Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  February 2017
Comfort for the Afflicted
That all those who are afflicted, especially the poor, refugees,
and marginalized, may find welcome and comfort in our communities.
ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                                     
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;

March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Saints of February 01 mention with Popes
865 St. Ansgar (b. 801) The “apostle of the north” (Scandinavia) had enough frustrations to become a saint—and he did. He became a Benedictine at Corbie, France, where he had been educated. Three years later, when the king of Denmark became a convert, Ansgar went to that country for three years of missionary work, without noticeable success. Sweden asked for Christian missionaries, and he went there, suffering capture by pirates and other hardships on the way. Less than two years later he was recalled, to become abbot of New Corbie (Corvey) and bishop of Hamburg. The pope made him legate for the Scandinavian missions. Funds for the northern apostolate stopped with Emperor Louis’s death. After 13 years’ work in Hamburg, Ansgar saw it burned to the ground by invading Northmen; Sweden and Denmark returned to paganism.
He directed new apostolic activities in the North, traveling to Denmark and being instrumental in the conversion of another king. By the strange device of casting lots, the king of Sweden allowed the Christian missionaries to return.  Ansgar’s biographers remark that he was an extraordinary preacher, a humble and ascetical priest. He was devoted to the poor and the sick, imitating the Lord in washing their feet and waiting on them at table. He died peacefully at Bremen, Germany, without achieving his wish to be a martyr.
Sweden became pagan again after his death, and remained so until the coming of missionaries two centuries later.

1645 St Henry Morse Jesuit fought off the plague returned several times to England ministering.  Born in Broome, Suffolk, England, in 1595; died at Tyburn, England, February 1, 1645; beatified in 1929; canonized in 1970 by Pope Paul VI as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.
Saint Henry, like so many saints of his period in the British Isles, was a convert to Catholicism. He was a member of the country gentry, who studied at Cambridge then finished his study of law at Barnard's Inn, London. In 1614, he professed the Catholic faith at Douai. When he returned to England to settle an inheritance, he was arrested for his faith and spent the next four years in New Prison in Southwark. He was released in 1618 when a general amnesty was proclaimed by King James.

Saints of February 02 mention with Popes
  St. Cornelius sent for Peter First bishop of Caesarea.  1st century. Palestine, who was originally a centurion in the Italica cohort of the Roman legion in the area. Cornelius had a vision instructing him to send for St. Peter, who came to his home and baptized him, as described in Acts, chapter ten.
619 St. Lawrence of Canterbury Benedictine Archbishop scourged by St. Peter physical scars.  England, sent there by Pope St. Gregory I the Great. A Benedictine, Lawrence accompanied St. Augustine to Canterbury in 597 and succeeded him as archbishop in 604.  When the Britons lapsed into pagan customs, Lawrence planned to return to France, but in a dream he was rebuked by St. Peter for abandoning his flock. He remained in his see and converted the local ruler King Edbald to the faith. He died in Canterbury on February 2. Lawrence is commemorated in the Irish Stowe Missal and is reported to have been scourged by St. Peter in his dream, carrying the physical scars on his back.
1365 Blessed Peter Cambiano Dominican martyr.   Born in Chieri, Piedmont, Italy, in 1320; died February 2, 1365; beatified in 1856.
Peter Cambiano's father was a city councillor and his mother was of nobility. They were virtuous and careful parents, and they gave their little son a good education, especially in religion. Peter responded to all their care and became a fine student, as well as a pious and likeable child.
Peter was drawn to the Dominicans by devotion to the rosary. Our Lady of the Rosary was the special patroness of the Piedmont region, and he had a personal devotion to her. At 16, therefore, he presented himself at the convent in Piedmont and asked for the habit.       The inquisition had been set up to deal with these people in Lombardy before the death of Peter Martyr, a century before. So well did young Peter of Ruffia carryout the work of preaching among them that the order sent him to Rome to obtain higher degrees. The pope, impressed both by his talent and his family name, appointed him inquisitor-general of the Piedmont. This was a coveted appointment; to a Dominican it meant practically sure martyrdom and a carrying on of a proud tradition.
1640 St. Joan de Lestonnac Foundress many miracles different kinds occurred at her tomb.   After her children were raised, she entered the Cistercian monastery at Toulouse. Joan was forced to leave the Cistercians when she became afflicted with poor health.
She returned to Bordeaux with the idea of forming a new congregation, and several young girls joined her as novices. They ministered to victims of a plague that struck Bordeaux, and they were determined to counteract the evils of heresy promulgated by Calvinism. Thus was formed the Congregation of the Religious of Notre Dame of Bordeaux. In 1608, Joan and her companions received the religious habit from the Archbishop of Bordeaux. Joan was elected superior in 1610, and many miracles occurred at her tomb. She was canonized in 1949 by Pope Pius XII.

Saints of February 03 mention with Popes
Gregory IV (827-44) # 102
Elected near the end of 827; died January, 844. When Gregory was born is not known, but he was a Roman and the son of John. Before his election to the papacy he was the Cardinal-Priest of the Basilica of St. Mark, which he adorned with mosaics yet visible. For his piety and learning he was ordained priest by Paschal I. This man, of distinguished appearance and high birth, was raised to the chair of Peter, despite his protestations of unfitness, mainly buy the instrumentality of the secular nobility of Rome who were then securing a preponderating influence in papal elections. But the representatives in Rome of the Emperor Louis the Pious would not allow him to be consecrated until his election had been approved by their master. This interference caused such delay that it was not, seemingly, till about March, 828, that he began to govern the Church.
576 St. Lawrence of Spoleto Bishop “the Illuminator.” miracle worker  of Spoleto, Italy, also called “the Illuminator.” He was a Syrian, forced to leave his homeland in 514 because of Arian persecution. He went to Rome and was ordained by Pope St. Hormisdas. He then preached in Umbria and founded a monastery in Spoleto. Named bishop of Spoleto, Lawrence was rejected as a foreigner until the city’s gates miraculously opened for his entrance.
He is called “the Illuminator” because of his ability to cure physical and spiritual blindness. After two decades, Lawrence resigned to found the Farfa Abbey near Rome.
865 St. Ansgar 1st Archbishop of Hamburg & Bremen missionary first Christian church in Sweden Patron of Scandinavia  At Bremen, St. Ansgar, bishop of Hamburg and later of Bremen, who converted the Swedes and the Danes to the faith of Christ.  He was appointed Apostolic Delegate of all the North by Pope Gregory IV.
Ansgar was born of a noble family near Amiens. He became a monk at Old Corbie monastery in Picardy and later at New Corbie in Westphalia. He accompanied King Harold to Denmark when the exiled King returned to his native land and engaged in missionary work there. Ansgar's success caused King Bjorn of Sweden to invite him to that country, and he built the first Christian Church in Sweden. He became Abbot of New Corbie and first Archbishop of Hamburg about 831, and Pope Gregory IV appointed him Legate to the Scandinavian countries. He labored at his missionary works for the next fourteen years but saw all he had accomplished destroyed when invading pagan Northmen in 845 destroyed Hamburg and overran the Scandinavian countries, which lapsed into paganism.
1331 Bl. Odoric of Pordenone Franciscan missionary to Mongol Great Khan in Peking miracles performed . Born Odoric Mattiussi at Villanova, near Pordenone, Italy, he entered the Franciscans in 1300 and became a hermit. After several years, he took to preaching in the region of Udine, northern Italy, attracting huge crowds through his eloquence. In 1316 he set out for the Far East, journeying through China and finally reaching the court of the Mongol Great Khan in Peking. From 1322 to 1328 he wandered throughout China and Tibet, finally returning to the West in 1330 where he made a report to the pope at Avignon and dictated an account of his travels. He died before he could find missionaries to return with him to the East. His cult was approved in 1755 owing to the reports of miracles he performed while preaching among the Chinese.
1450 Blessed Matthew of Girgenti .  Matthew became a Conventual Franciscan in his hometown. Then he turned to the Observants and worked zealously under Saint Bernardino of Siena, with whom he became close friends as they travelled together on Bernardino's preaching missions. He himself gained a reputation as a great preacher. Pope Eugene IV forced him to accept the bishopric of Girgenti. Once he accepted it as God's will, he set about reforming the see. As a result of the opposition the changes raised, he resigned the see. Then he was refused admittance to the friary he himself had founded because he was deemed to be too much of a firebrand. Matthew died in a Franciscan friary at Palermo (Attwater2, Benedictines).

Saints of February 04 mention with Popes
1373 St. Andrew Corsini Carmelite gifts of prophecy, miracles papal legate Apostle of Florence miracles at  death.  He was born in Florence on November 30, 1302, a member of the powerful Corsini family. Wild in his youth, Andrew was converted to a holy life by his mother and became a Carmelite monk. He studied in Paris and Avignon, France, returning to his birthplace. There he became known as the Apostle of Florence. He was called a prophet and miracle worker. Named as the bishop of Fiesole in 1349, Andrew fled the honor but was forced to accept the office, which he held for twelve years. He was sent by Pope Urban V to Bologna to settle disputes between the nobles and commoners, a mission he performed well. Andrew died in Fiesole on January 6, 1373. So many miracles took place at his death that Pope Eugenius IV permitted the immediate opening of his cause.
On Rabanus Maurus “A Truly Extraordinary Personality of the Latin West
784-856 Blessed Maurus Magnentius Rabanus; monk; celebrated theological and pedagogical writer Wrote Veni, Creator Spiritus.  A truly extraordinary personality of the Latin West: the monk Rabanus Maurus. Together with men such as Isidore of Seville, the Venerable Bede and Ambrose Auperto, already spoken in previous catechesis, [Rabanus Maurus] knew how to stay in contact with the great culture of the ancient scholars and the Christian fathers during the centuries of the High Middle Ages.
For this reason, Rabanus Maurus concentrated his attention above all on the liturgy, as the synthesis of all the dimension of our perception of reality. This intuition of Rabanus Maurus makes him extraordinarily relevant to our times. He also left the famous “Carmina” proposals to be used above all in liturgical celebrations. In fact, Rabanus' interest for the liturgy can be entirely taken for granted given that before all, he was a monk. Nevertheless, he did not dedicate himself to the art of poetry as an end in itself, but rather he used art and whatever other type of knowledge to go deeper in the Word of God. Because of this, he tried with all his might and rigor to introduce to his contemporaries, but above all to the ministers (bishops, priests and deacons), to the understanding of the profound theological and spiritual significance of all the elements of the liturgical celebration.

1505 St. Joan of Valois Order of the Annunciation that she founded holiness and spiritual testament.  At Bourges in Aquitaine, St. Jane de Valois, Queen of France, foundress of the Order of Sisters of the Annunciation of the blessed Virgin Mary, renowned for her piety and singular devotion to the Cross, whom Pope Pius XII added to the catalogue of saints.
1693 St. John de Britto Jesuit martyr in India. In Marava Kingdom in India, St. John de Britto, priest of the Society of Jesus, who having converted many infidels to the faith, was gloriously crowned with martyrdom.
He was a native of Lisbon, Portugal, was dedicated at birth to St. Francis Xavier, and was a noble friend of King Pedro. He entered the Jesuits at the age of fifteen. In his effort to promote conversions among the native Indian people as a missionary to Goa, he wandered through Malabar and other regions and even adopted the customs and dress of the Brahmin caste which gave him access to the noble classes. In 1683, John had to leave India but returned in 1691. Arrested, tortured, and commanded to leave India, he refused and was put to death. Pope Pius XII canonized him in 1947.

Saints of February 05 mention with Popes
1005 Saint Fingen of Metz Abbot restoring old abbeys.  Saint Fingen, a celebrated Irish abbot, migrated to the kingdom of Lothaire, where he acquired a reputation for restoring old abbeys. One of them, Saint Symphorien's, was given over to him about 991 by Bishop Saint Adalbero and an Irish community. At the insistence of the dowager Empress Saint Adelaide, Pope John XVII issued a charter that declared that only Irish monks would administer the abbey as long as they could be found. She obtained a similar charter from Otto III in 992.
1597 St. Leo Karasuma Martyr of Japan Korean Franciscan tertiary.  At Nagasaki in Japan, the passion of twenty-six martyrs.  Three priests, one cleric, and two lay brothers were members of the Order of Friars Minor; one cleric was of the Society of Jesus, and seventeen belonged to the Third Order of St. Francis.  All of them, placed upon crosses for the Catholic faith, and pierced with lances, gloriously died in praising God and preaching that same faith.  Their names were added to the roll of saints by Pope Pius IX.
who served the Franciscan mission, Louis was crucified at Nagasaki, Japan, with twenty-five companions. He was canonized in 1867.

Saints of February 06 mention with Popes
891 Saint Photius, Patriarch of Constantinople, "the Church's far-gleaming beacon," The Synod of 861 was called to end the unrest, at which the deposition of Ignatius and the installation of Photius as patriarch were confirmed. Pope Nicholas I, whose envoys were present at this council, hoped that by recognizing Photius as patriarch he could subordinate him to his power. When the new patriarch proved unsubmissive, Nicholas anathematized Photius at a Roman council.
Until the end of his life St Photius was a firm opponent of papal intrigues and designs upon the Orthodox Church of the East.
In 864, Bulgaria voluntarily converted to Christianity. The Bulgarian prince Boris was baptized by Patriarch Photius himself. Later, St Photius sent an archbishop and priests to baptize the Bulgarian people. In 865, Sts Cyril and Methodius were sent to preach Christ in the Slavonic language.  lived during the ninth century, and came from a family of zealous Christians.   His father Sergius died as a martyr in defense of holy icons.
1597 Philip of Jesus martyred in Japan patron of Mexico City  Born in Mexico City, Mexico, May 1, 1571; died in Nagasaki, Japan, 1597; beatified by Pope Urban VIII; canonized by Pope Pius IX in 1862; feast day formerly February 5. The life of Saint Philip points again to the importance of the domestic church--the family. Early in life Saint Philip ignored the pious teachings of his immigrant Spanish family, but eventually he entered the Reformed Franciscan Convent of Santa Barbara at Puebla, Mexico--and soon exited the novitiate in 1589. Grieved at the inconstancy of his son, Philip's father sent him on a business trip to the Philippines.

Saints of February 07 mention with Popes
ST THEODORE OF HERACLEA, MARTYR (No DATE?).  The differentiation of two separate Theodores seems to have occurred somewhat earlier than Father Delehaye supposes. An Armenian homily which F. C. Conybeare believes to be of the fourth century already regards them as distinct and Mgr Wilpert has reproduced a mosaic which Pope Felix IV (526—530) set up in the church of St Theodore on the Palatine, in which our Saviour is represented seated, while St Peter on one side presents to Him one St Theodore and St Paul on the other side presents another.


550 St. Tressan Irish missionary spread the faith in Gaul.   Tressan worked there as a swineherd, but he was ordained to the priesthood by Saint Remigius, who provided the siblings with suitable retreats from which they could spread the faith. Tressan became curate of Mareuil-sur-Marne, and the patron saint of Avenay in Champagne. His cultus is strong and has been continuous in the area of Rheims. More than 1,000 years after his death, Pope Clement VIII and Archbishop Philip of Rheims authorized the publishing of an Office for his feast (Benedictines, D'Arcy, Encyclopedia, Fitzpatrick, Kenney, Montague, O'Hanlon).
1027 ST ROMUALD, ABBOT FOUNDER OF THE CAMALDOLESE BENEDICTINES.    Romuald seems to have spent the next thirty years wandering about Italy, founding hermitages and monasteries. He stayed three years in a cell near that house which he had founded at Parenzo. Here he labored for a time under great spiritual dryness, but suddenly, one day, as he was reciting the words of the Psalmist, I will give thee understanding and will instruct thee “, he was visited by God with an extraordinary light and a spirit of compunction which from that time never left him.
He wrote an exposition of the Psalms full of admirable thoughts, he often foretold things to come, and he gave counsel inspired by heavenly wisdom to all who came to consult him. He had always longed for martyrdom, and at last obtained the pope’s licence to preach the gospel in Hungary; but he was stricken with a grievous illness as soon as he set foot in the country, and as the malady returned each time he attempted to proceed, he concluded it was a plain indication of God’s will in the matter and he accordingly returned to Italy, though some of his associates went on and preached the faith to the Magyars.
1447 St. Colette Poor Clare 17 established monasteries  .   After four years of prayer and penance in this cell, she left it. With the approval and encouragement of the pope, she joined the Poor Clares and reintroduced the primitive Rule of St. Clare in the 17 monasteries she established. Her sisters were known for their poverty—they rejected any fixed income—and for their perpetual fast. Colette’s reform movement spread to other countries and is still thriving today. Colette was canonized in 1807.

Saints of February 08 mention with Popes



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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.