Wednesday   Saints of this Day February  15 Quintodécimo Kaléndas Mártii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.





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Acts of the Apostles
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Mary's Divine Motherhood

He is most famous for his accounts of the lives of many hermits of the Egyptian desert, such as Saint Onuphrius.   His feast is celebrated on 15 Meshir in the Coptic Orthodox Church.
6th v St. Faustus An abbot believed to be a disciple of St. Benedict, Italy He was the biographer of St. Maurus,  according to Abbot Odo of Glanfeuil.

Have Compassion on the Heart of Your Most Holy Mother
Our Lady rested her hand on Lucia's shoulder, revealing a heart encircled by thorns.
On February 15, 1926, returning from the garden after doing her chores, Sister Lucia saw the Child Jesus who asked her, "Have you showed the world what the Mother of Heaven has asked? Lucia acknowledged that no, she had not. Then Jesus said, "It's true that many people already receive me every first Saturday, in honor of Our Lady and the 15 mysteries of the Rosary, but unfortunately few of them go all the way, and those who do persevere only to receive the pardons that are promised.

I love the souls who practise the first 5 Saturdays fervently in order to repair the heart of the Mother of Heaven,
rather than those who make 15 Saturdays with indifference."


Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Mary and the Child Jesus appeared to Lucia,
the sole surviving Fatima visionary, at a convent in Pontevedra, Spain.
Our Lady rested her hand on Lucia's shoulder, revealing a heart encircled by thorns.

The Child Jesus said: "Have compassion on the heart of your most holy Mother, covered with thorns with which ungrateful men pierce it at every moment, and there is no one to make an act of reparation..."
Apparition of the Child Jesus to Sister Lucia of Fatima (Pontevedra, 1926) February 15

February 15 – Apparition of the Child Jesus to Lucia of Fatima (Spain, 1926) – 6th apparition of Banneux (Belgium)  
 
The Virgin Mary will assist us at the time of our death 
At the end of 1925, Sister Lucia of Fatima (Portugal), received an apparition of the Child Jesus, who came to explain the conditions to fulfill the observance of the reparatory devotion of the five first Saturdays of the month requested by the Virgin Mary during a previous apparition on July 13th:

"It is true that many souls have already given me every first Saturday in honor of Our Lady and the fifteen mysteries of the Rosary, but sadly few finish them, and those who persevere do it in order to receive the graces that are promised. The souls who make the five first Saturdays with fervor and with the intention of making reparation to the Heart of your Heavenly Mother please me more than those who make fifteen with indifference."

What conclusion can we draw? A simple practice: every first Saturday of the month for 5 consecutive months: go to confession; receive Holy Communion; pray the Rosary; meditate for 15 minutes on the 15 Mysteries of the Rosary in a spirit of reparation.

In this way we will be assisted by the Blessed Virgin at our death,
with all the graces necessary for the salvation of our soul.
 
www.fatima.be

121 St. Faustinus & Jovita martyrs
273 St. Agape Martyr follower of St. Valentine
273 St. Saturninus martyr with Castulus, Magnus, and Lucius members of Saint Valentine of Terni
       St. Joseph Josippus of Antioch Martyred deacon
3rd v  St. Craton Martyr in Rome converted by St. Valentine
In Província Valériæ sancti Sevéri Presbyteri, qui (ut beátus Gregórius Papa scribit), fusis lácrimis, defúnctum revocávit ad vitam.
      St. Modestus, a Sardinian, deacon and martyr
4th v Saint Paphnutius Ascetic Egyptian anchorite of the fourth century.
473 St. Dochow Monastic founder from Wales bishop
500 St. Georgia virgin hermitess nun near Clermont
6th v St. Faustus An abbot believed to be a disciple of St. Benedict
579 St. Quinidius Hermit bishop second patron of Vaison-la-Romaine
       St. Berach Irish abbot nephew of St. Freoch
695 St. Decorosus
30 years Bishop of Capua, Italy Council of Rome in 680
765 St. Walfrid a great and good pastor
808 ST TANCO, BISHOP OF VERDEN, MARTYR  it was a great grief to him to see so many nominal Christians enslaved to degrading passions.
1040 Sts. Winaman  Unaman and Sunaman, martyrs of Sweden
1045 ST SIGFRID, BISHOP OF Växjö: a spring bore Sigfrid’s name was the channel of many miracles
1046 St. Druthmar Benedictine abbot of Corvey Fervor and good observance
1237 Bl. Jordan of Saxony thousand novices to the Dominicans established new foundations Germany and Switzerland
        
It was a sermon of Jordan’s that decided Albertus Magnus to enter the order

1306 BD ANGELO OF BORGO SAN SEPOLCRO the body of Bd Angelo remained entire down to the year 1583, exhaling, it is asserted, a sweet fragrance, and that the veneration paid to his remains at Borgo San Sepolcro as those of a saint has been continuous.
1367 BD JULIA OF CERTALDO, VIRGIN

1682 St. Claude la Colombière special day for the Jesuits spiritual companion, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque.

121 St. Faustinus & Jovita martyrs
Bríxiæ natális sanctórum Mártyrum Faustíni et Jovítæ fratrum, qui sub Hadriáno Imperatóre, post multa præclára ob Christi fidem suscépta certámina, victrícem martyrii corónam accepérunt.
At Brescia, in the time of Emperor Adrian, the birthday of the holy martyrs Faustinus and Jovita, who received the triumphant crown of martyrdom after many glorious combats for the faith of Christ.

SS FAUSTINUS AND JOVITA, MARTYRS
AUSTINUS and Jovita were brothers, nobly born and natives of Brescia. All the incidents in their reputed “acts” are of doubtful authority, and we can only be sure of their names and martyrdom. According to the tradition of Brescia, they preached Christianity fearlessly while their bishop lay in hiding. Their zeal excited the fury of the heathen against them, and they were arrested by a heathen lord called Julian. They were tortured and dragged to Milan, Rome and Naples, and then brought back to Brescia. A single feature may be cited to illustrate the extravagance which characterizes these hagiographical romances. When taken to Rome and Naples the martyrs are represented as having baptized in the course of their journey 191,128 persons in all, 42,118 at the place called Lubras, 22,600 at the Milvian bridge, 73,200 in the city of Rome and 53,210 at Naples. As neither threats nor torments could shake their constancy, the Emperor Hadrian, who happened to be passing through Brescia, commanded them to be beheaded. The city of Brescia honours them as its chief patrons and claims to possess their relics.

On April 18 the Roman Martyrology names the martyr St Calocerus, who figures largely in the legendary history of S. Faustinus and Jovita, whose heroic confession he is said to have witnessed when, as a court official, he accompanied Hadrian to his native city Brescia and was present in the amphitheatre. The constancy of the two confessors and the refusal of the wild beasts to touch them brought about his conversion, and he was baptized by Bishop Apollonius with 12,000 other citizens. He was tortured and imprisoned in several Italian towns, notably in Asti, where he instructed St Secundus who visited him in gaol. Event­ually, we are told, he was taken to Albenga in Liguria and beheaded on the seashore.

A careful study of the text of the fuller “acts” of SS. Faustinus and Jovita with all their intricate ramifications involving the story of 58. Calocerus, Calimerus, Afra, etc., has been made by Fr Fedele Savio in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xv (1896) and in subsequent publications. No good purpose could be served by attempting to summarize his conclusions here. Although it would perhaps be rash to deny the real existence of Faustinus and Jovita and that they suffered at Brescia, still the difficulties involved are serious. As F. Lanzoni in his essay, Le origini della diocesi antiche d’Italia (1923), has pointed out (pp. 532—533), the two early ecclesiastical writers of Brescia, Philastrius and Gaudentius, make no reference to these local patrons, and in the case of Gaudentius; at least, who was a great preacher and a devout collector of relics, this omission is surprising. Though the “Hieronymianum” apparently contained an entry of their names, this entry in most of our best and oldest manuscripts describes them as suffering not in Brescia but in “Brittania” (I) CMH., p. 99. However, St Gregory in his Dialogues refers to a church of St Faustinus at Brescia, and in the episcopal lists of that city the sixth bishop bears the same name. This seems to show that the martyr was honoured there at an early date. St Calocerus, like the story of St Innocent of Tortona, is an excrescence upon the legend of Faustinus and Jovita. Fr Savio maintained that the supposed martyr of Albenga was identical with St Calocerus, Bishop of Ravenna, whose remains were in the eighth century translated to Albenga. As is pointed out in CMH., p. 197, this Calocerus of Brescia cannot be said to be commemorated in the “Hieronymianum”, but he figures prominently in the acta of St Secundus of Asti.

Faustinus and Jovita were brothers, nobly born and natives of Brescia. According to the tradition of Brescia, they preached Christianity fearlessly while their bishop lay in hiding. Their zeal excited the fury of the heathens against them, then they were arrested by a heathen lord called Julian. They were tortured and dragged to Milan, Rome and Naples, and then brought back to Brescia. As neither threats nor torments could shake their constancy, the Emperor Hadrian, who happened to be passing through Brescia, commended them to be beheaded.
   The city of Brescia honors them as its chief patrons and claims to possess their relics.  On April 18 the Roman Martyrology names the martyr St. Calocerus, who figures largely in the legendary history of St. Faustinus and Jovita, whose heroic confession he is said to have witnessed when, as a court official, he accompanied Hadrian to his native city Brescia and was present in the amphitheatre. The constancy of the two confessors and the refusal of the wild beasts to touch them brought about his conversion, and he was baptized by Bishop Apollonius with twelve thousand other citizens. He was tortured and imprisoned in several Italian towns notably in Asti, where he instructed St. Secundus who visited him in gaol. Eventually, we are told, he was taken to Albanga in Liguria and beheaded on the seashore.

273 St. Saturninus martyr with Castulus, Magnus, and Lucius members of Saint Valentine of Terni
Interámnæ natális sanctórum Mártyrum Saturníni, Cástuli, Magni et Lúcii.
At Teramo, the birthday of the holy martyrs Saturninus, Castulus, Magnus, and Lucius.
They were disciples of St. Valentine at Terni, Italy.
Saturninus, Castulus, Magnus & Lucius MM (RM). These martyrs were members of Saint Valentine of Terni's flock. They were buried at Passae (Rocca San Zenone) (Benedictines).

273 St. Agape Martyr follower of St. Valentine
Ibídem sanct æ Agapis, Vírginis et Mártyris.
 In the same place, St. Agape, virgin and martyr.


ST AGAPE, VIRGIN AND MARTYR
THIS Agape is mentioned in many of the early martyrologies, sometimes alone, and sometimes with companions. She is specially honoured at Terni in Umbria, and is one of the patrons of that town. According to a tradition of doubtful authen­ticity she lived at Interamna (Terni) in the days of the martyred bishop St Valentine, under whose direction she formed a kind of community of women who lived like nuns. When persecution against the Christians broke out, it was particularly fierce at Terni and, after a bold witness for Christ, Agape received the martyr’s crown, not long after the death of St Valentine. A church was built at Interturres in her honour. It is probable that she actually suffered at Antioch.

The fact that a St Agape is commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on this day and is said to have suffered at Interamna does not go far towards vindicating her historical existence. No liturgical tradition supports it. There has probably been some confusion with other martyrs of the same name. See Delehaye in Bulletin d’ancienne littérature et d’archéologie chrétiennes, vol. i (1911), pp. 161—168, and P. Franchi de’ Cavalieri in Studi e Testi, no. ix, pp. 1—20.
She belonged to a group of virgins started by St. Valentine. A church in Termi was dedicated to her until the twelfth century, and she is listed in early martyrologies. Agape of Terni VM (RM). The maiden, Agape, was martyred at Terni, Italy. She belonged to a group of virgins formed by Saint Valentine into a community.
From the 6th to the 12th century, there was a church at Terni dedicated to her (Benedictines).
3rd v St. Craton Martyr in Rome converted by St. Valentine
Romæ sancti Cratónis Mártyris, qui, cum uxóre sua et univérsa domo a beáto Valentíno Epíscopo baptizátus, non multo post, una cum illis, martyrio consummátus est.
       At Rome, St. Craton, martyr.  A short time after being baptized with his wife and all his household by the holy bishop Valentine, he was put to death with them.
He was a well-known philosopher, converted by St. Valentine, the bishop of Termi, Italy. Caught up in the persecutions, Craton was martyred with his wife and family.
In Província Valériæ sancti Sevéri Presbyteri, qui (ut beátus Gregórius Papa scribit), fusis lácrimis, defúnctum revocávit ad vitam.
In the province of Valeria, St. Severus, priest, of whom St. Gregory says that by his tears he recalled a dead man to life.

St. Modestus, a Sardinian, deacon and martyr,  At Rome, the martyrdom of who was racked and burned with fire by Emperor Diocletian.  His holy body was afterwards translated to Benevento and buried there in a church named after him.
Romæ pássio sancti Modésti Sardi, Levítæ et Mártyris; qui, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, equúleo tortus atque igne adústus est.  Ipsíus vero corpus, Benevéntum póstea translátum, in Ecclésia suo insigníta nómine collocátum fuit.
St. Joseph Josippus of Antioch Martyred deacon
 Antiochíæ sancti Joséphi Diáconi.       At Antioch, St. Joseph, deacon.
He was slain at Antioch with seven companions. He is sometimes called Josippus.
4th v Saint Paphnutius Ascetic Egyptian anchorite of the fourth century.
He is most famous for his accounts of the lives of many hermits of the Egyptian desert, such as Saint Onuphrius.
His feast is celebrated on 15 Meshir in the Coptic Orthodox Church.
The Departure of St. Abba Nofer the Anchorite.
On this day, the ascetic father, Abba Nofer the Anchorite, departed at a good old age, and of a glorious memory, in the desert of Upper Egypt. The grace of God had moved St. Paphnoute (Paphnutius), and he longed to see the servants of God, the Anchorites.
He saw many of them, among them St. Abba Nofer, and wrote their biographies.
    He said that once he went into the desert and found a well of water and a palm tree. Then he saw the saint coming to him, naked, and the hair of his head and beard covered his body. When St. Paphnutius saw him, he was afraid and thought that he was a spirit. Saint Abba Nofer encouraged him, made the sign of the cross, and prayed the Lord's prayer, then said to him, "Welcome O Paphnoute."
When he called him by his name, St. Paphnutius calmed down. They prayed together, then sat, and talked about the greatness and goodness of God.
    
St. Paphnutius asked Abba Nofer to tell him about his life and how he came to that place. Abba Nofer replied, "I was in a monastery wherein lived holy and righteous monks. I heard them talking about the greatness of those anchorites who dwelled in the desert and their good virtues. I said to them, 'Are there any who are better than you?' They said to me, 'Yes, those anchorites who dwell in the wilderness. We live near the world, if we are sorrowful or sad, we find someone to console us; if we are sick, we find someone to visit and treat us; if we are naked, we find someone to clothe us.
Those who live in the wilderness lack all these things.' When I heard that from them, my heart became anxious.
   "When the night came, I took a little bread and I went out from the monastery. Then I prayed to the Lord Christ and asked Him to guide me to the place where I was to live. The Lord facilitated my way and I found a holy and righteous man. I dwelt with him, and he taught me all about the life and the ways of the hermits and the anchorites. After I came to this place, I found a palm tree, and a well. The tree bore twelve clusters of dates each year. One cluster of dates is enough food for me for a month, and I drink water from this well. I have lived here for sixty years during which I have never seen the face of a man except yours."
   While they were talking together the angel of the Lord came down, and told St. Abba Nofer that his departure was near. Straightway, his color changed and became like fire, then he bowed his knees and worshipped God. After he embraced St. Paphnutius, he delivered up his pure soul. St. Paphnutius wrapped him, and buried him in his cave. St. Paphnutius wished to live in the place of Abba Nofer. But after he had buried him, the palm tree dried and fell down and the water of the well dried up. That happened by the Will of God, so St. Paphnoute would return to the world and tell us about the holy hermits that he had seen.
May their prayers be with us and Glory be to god forever. Amen.
473 St. Dochow Monastic founder from Wales bishop
Dochow formed a monastery in Cornwall, England. The Ulster Annual describes him as a bishop.
Dochow (also known as Dochau, Dogwyn) Date unknown. According to the life of Saint Samson, Dochow travelled from Wales to Cornwall and founded a monastery there.
In the Ulster Annal, he is styled bishop. Saint Dochtwy appears to be another saint altogether (Benedictines).
500 St. Georgia virgin hermitess nun near Clermont
 Arvérnis, in Gállia, sanctæ Geórgiæ Vírginis.       In Auvergne in France, St. Georgia, virgin.
Auvergne, France. No other details are extant. 
Georgia of Clermont V (RM). Young nun who became a hermit near Clermont, Auvergne, France (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
6th v St. Faustus An abbot believed to be a disciple of St. Benedict at Monte Cassino, Italy He was the biographer of St.  Maurus, according to Abbot Odo of Glanfeuil.
579 St. Quinidius Hermit bishop second patron of Vaison-la-Romaine
Vasióne, in Gálliis, sancti Quinídii Epíscopi, cujus mortem in conspéctu Dómini pretiósam mirácula crebra testántur.
At Vaison in France, St. Quinidius, bishop, whose death was precious in  the sight of God, as is shewn by frequent miracles.
He was originally a hermit in the region of Aix in Provence, France, becoming bishop of Vaison in that region.
Quinidius of Vaison B (RM). Quinidius was a hermit at Aix, Provence, until he was raised to the episcopacy of the see of Vaison, also in Provence, France.
He is the second patron of Vaison-la-Romaine (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
6th v St. Berach Irish abbot nephew of St. Freoch
He was raised by his uncle and became a disciple of St. Kevin. Berach, who is sometimes called Barachias or Berachius, founded an abbey at Clusin-Coirpte, in Connaught, Ireland.
He is the patron saint of Kilbarry, County Dublin.
695 St. Decorosus 30 years Bishop of Capua, Italy Council of Rome in 680
Cápuæ sancti Decorósi, Epíscopi et Confessóris.     At Capua, St. Decorosus, bishop and confessor.
He attended the Council of Rome in 680 in the reign of Pope St. Agatho.. (The council, attended in the beginning by 100 bishops, later by 174, was opened 7 Nov., 680, in a domed hall (trullus) of the imperial palace and was presided over by the (three) papal legates who brought to the council a long dogmatic letter of Pope Agatho and another of similar import from a Roman synod held in the spring of 680. )
Decorosus of Capua B (RM) bishop of Capua, Italy, for 30 years. He was one of the prelates who assisted at the council of Rome in 680 under Pope Saint Agatho (Benedictines).

765 St. Walfrid a great and good pastor

765 ST WALFRID, ABBOT
WALFRID or Galfrido della Gherardesca was born in Pisa, of which he became a prosperous and honoured citizen. He married a wife to whom he was deeply attached, and they had five sons and at least one daughter. After a time, Walfrid and his wife Thesia felt that God was calling them to enter the religious life. Walfrid had two friends—a kinsman named Gunduald and a certain Fortis, a native of Corsica like him they were living in the world, but were drawn to a closer service of God under monastic discipline. Together they discussed the future, and were led by a dream to choose Monte Verde, between Volterra and Piombino, as the site of their future monastery.

They decided to follow the Benedictine rule of Monte Cassino and, besides their own abbey of Palazzuolo, they built at a distance of about eighteen miles a convent for women, in which their wives and Walfrid’s daughter Rattruda took the veil. 

The new foundation attracted many novices, and before long there were sixty monks, including Walfrid’s favourite son Gimfrid and Gunduald’s only son Andrew, who became the third abbot and wrote the history of St Walfrid. Gimfrid was made priest, but in an hour of temptation he fled from the monastery, taking with him men, horses and papers which belonged to the community. Walfrid, greatly distressed, sent a search party after the fugitive, On the third day, when he was praying in the midst of his monks for his son’s repentance and return, he besought God also to send Gimfrid a sign which would be constantly before him as a reminder and a warning for the rest of his life. That same day Gimfrid was caught and brought back penitent, but with the middle finger of his right hand so mutilated that he could never use it again. Walfrid ruled the abbey wisely and well for ten years, and after his death was succeeded by Gimfrid, who in spite of his earlier lapse became, as Andrew records, a great and good pastor. St Walfrid’s cultus was confirmed in 1861.

The life by Andrew is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. ii, and also by Mabillon, vol. iii, Pt 2, pp. 178—184.

Walfrid or Galfrido della Gherardesca was born in Pisa, of which he became a prosperous and honored citizen. He married a wife to whom he was deeply attached, and they had five sons and at least one daughter. After a time, Walfrid and his wife Thesia felt that God was calling them to enter the religious life. Walfrid had two friends - A kinsman named Gunduald and a certain Fortis, a native of Corsica: like him they were living in the world, but were drawn to a closer service of God under monastic discipline. Together they discussed the future, and were led by a dream to choose Monte Verde, between Volterra and Piombino, as the site of their future monastery. They decided to follow the Benedictine Rule of Monte Casino and, besides their own Abbey of Palazzuolo, they built at a distance of about eighteen miles a convent for women, in which their wives and Walfrid's daughter Rattruda took the veil.
     The new foundation attracted many novices, and before long there were sixty monks including Walfrid's favorite son Gimfrid and Gunduald's only son Andrew, who became the third Abbott and wrote the history of St. Walfrid. Gimfrid was made priest, but in an hour of temptation he flew from the monastery, taking with him men, horses and papers which belonged to the community. Walfrid, greatly distressed, sent a search party after the fugitive.

     On the third day, when he was praying in the midst of his monks for his son's repentance and return, he besought God also to send Gimfrid a sign which would be constantly before him as a reminder and a warning for the rest of his life. That same day Wimfrid was caught and brought back penitent, but with the middle finger of his right hand so mutilated that he could never use it again. Walfrid ruled the Abbey wisely and well for ten years, and after his death, was succeeded by Gimfrid, who inspite of his earlier lapse became, as Andrew records, a great and good pastor. St. Walfrid's cultus was confirmed in 1861.

Walfrid della Gheradesca, OSB Abbot (AC) (also known as (Gualfredo, Galfrido) Born in Pisa, Italy; died c. 765; cultus confirmed in 1861. Walfrid, the eldest of five children and one of the wealthier citizens of the area, had five or six children of his own. After some years of married life, Walfrid and his wife decided to establish separate Benedictine monasteries on adjoining hills near Pisa. Walfrid was joined by two other married men to found his abbey of Palazzuolo, between Volterra and Piombino, and one for their wives nearby. Novices joined the foundations in large numbers, among them Walfrid's daughter, Rattruda, and his favorite son, Gimfrid, who became a priest.
The Acta Sanctorum relates that Walfrid ruled the abbeys well for at least ten years before he was succeeded by his son Gimfrid, who was "a great and good pastor." Apparently Gimfrid questioned his vocation and ran away from monastic life and the priesthood for a time, but that the prayers of his father and the monks brought him back wiser and stronger in the ways of grace.
We do not have any exact record of when Walfrid died, but legend relates that it was on February 15 that both he and his wife died and were buried together (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
808 ST TANCO, BISHOP OF VERDEN, MARTYR  it was a great grief to him to see so many nominal Christians enslaved to degrading passions.
ST TANCO (or Tatto) was a “Scottish” monk—almost certainly a native of Ireland. Moved by missionary zeal he went over to Germany, to the abbey of Amalbarich, near Verden in Saxony. Here he gained a great reputation for learning and piety, and he was made abbot after the resignation of St Patto, who afterwards became bishop of Verden. Through an ardent desire for martyrdom Tanco also vacated his office; and after preaching in Cleves and in Flanders succeeded Patto as bishop of Verden. His success in propagating the gospel was great, but it was a great grief to him to see so many nominal Christians enslaved to degrading passions. In order to convert or at least to confound them, he preached strenuously against the vices to which they were prone. The mob was so enraged that they attacked him fiercely, and one man stabbed him to death with a lance, thus procuring for him the martyr’s crown. According to another account he overturned the statues of some false gods, and the barbarians beat out his brains with clubs and cut off his arms and legs.
There seems to be no contemporary evidence to substantiate this story, but the legend is duly recounted in the Acta Sanctorum, February, vol. ii; and LIS., vol. ii, P. 567.
1040 St. Winaman  Unaman and Sunaman, martyrs of Sweden
The nephews of St. Sigfrid of Wexiow, they followed in his missionary path, going to Sweden where they were martyred by local pagans.
   Winaman, Unaman & Sunaman, OSB Monks MM (AC). Rather this trio of nephews of Saint Sigfrid of Wexlow, followed their uncle to the Swedish mission. The Benedictine monks were martyred at Wexlow (Växjö) by beheading. There bodies were buried deep in the forest but the heads, which had been thrown into the nearby lake, were recovered and enshrined in the church at Växjö until the Lutherans removed them. These three are venerated in Sweden (Benedictines, Husenbeth).

1045 ST SIGFRID, BISHOP OF Växjö: a spring bore Sigfrid’s name was the channel of many miracles.
THE history of St Sigfrid is somewhat obscure, owing to conflicting narratives. One account states that after King Olaf Tryggvason of Norway had been converted to Christianity (he was confirmed at Andover by St Alphege the martyr who then was bishop of Winchester), he asked the English king, Ethelred, to send him missionaries. Sigfrid, said to have been a priest of York (or possibly Glastonbury), went out from England as a missionary bishop, and with him also went two other bishops, John and Grimkel. They did not confine themselves to Norway, but passed on to Sweden which, after having been in part evangelized by St Anskar, had relapsed into idolatry. There they laboured under the protection of the archbishop of Bremen, and Sigfrid made his headquarters at Växjö.

The king of Sweden, whose name also was Olaf, was himself converted by St Sigfrid, who baptized him at Husaby in a spring which afterwards bore Sigfrid’s name and was the channel of many miracles. St Sigfrid continued his labours successfully for many years, and at his death was buried in the church pf Växjö. Tradition has added many details to the accounts of St Sigfrid’s labours. It is said that when he first arrived at Växjö he began by planting a cross and building a wooden church in which he celebrated the divine mysteries and preached. The twelve principal men of the district were converted by him, and one of them, who died almost immediately, received Christian burial and had a cross placed on his grave. So wonderfully did the truth spread, that within a short time the faith was planted in all Varend. The fountain in which St Sigfrid baptized the catechumens long retained the names of the first twelve converts, engraved on a monument. It is said that he ordained two bishops, for East and West Gothland. His three nephews, Unaman a priest, Sunaman a deacon, and Vinaman a subdeacon, were his chief assistants.

After a time, St Sigfrid entrusted the care of his diocese to these three and set off to carry the light of the gospel into more distant provinces. During his absence, a troop, partly out of hatred for Christianity and partly for booty, plundered the church of VaxjO and murdered Unaman and his brothers, burying their bodies in a forest and placing their heads in a box which they sank in a pond. The heads were duly recovered and placed in a shrine, on which occasion, we are told, the three heads spoke. The king resolved to put the murderers to death, but St Sigfrid induced him to spare their lives. Olaf compelled them, however, to pay a heavy fine which he wished to bestow on the saint, who refused to accept a farthing of it, notwithstanding his extreme poverty and the difficulties with which he had to contend in rebuilding his church. He had inherited in an heroic degree the spirit of the apostles, and preached the gospel also in Denmark. Sigfrid is said, but doubtfully, to have been canonized by Pope Adrian IV, the Englishman who had himself laboured zealously for the propagation of the faith in the North over one hundred years after St Sigfrid. The Swedes honour St Sigfrid as their apostle.

It would be impossible here to discuss the extremely intricate and contested history of the conversion of Sweden. It must be sufficient to refer to two valuable articles, the one by Edmund Bishop in the Dublin Review, January, 1885, especially PP. 182—189; the other by L. Bril, “Les premiers temps du Christianisme en Suede” in the Revue d’histoire ecclésias­tique, October, 1911. Both writers are agreed that Adam of Bremen, to whom commonly appeal is made as a primary authority, has to be used with great caution, it being his obvious purpose to glorify the share of the see of Bremen in the conversion of Scandinavia and to belittle the efforts made by English missionaries. Secondly, they both attach importance to the data furnished by the lives of Sigfrid, though it is admitted that the earliest of these dates only from the beginning of the thirteenth century and that they embody much which is purely legendary. The lives may best be consulted in the Scriptores Rerum Suecicarum, vol. ii, Pt 5, PP. 345—370; and cf. Trois légendes de St Sigfrid” in Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lx (1942), pp. 82—90. The best account is said to be in Swedish, T. Schmid, Den hl Sigfrid (1931). On C. J. A. Oppermann’s English Missionaries in Sweden (1937), see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lvii (1939), PP. 162—164. There seems to be considerable doubt whether Sigfrid was an Englishman.
1046 St. Druthmar Benedictine abbot of Corvey Fervor and good observance
in Saxony, in Germany, by Emperor St. Henry II.
Druthmar of Lorsch, OSB Abbot (AC). In 1014, Saint Druthmar, a Benedictine of Lorsch, was appointed abbot of Corvey, Saxony, by emperor Saint Henry II. Fervor and good observance were marks of his rule (Benedictines).

1237 Bl. Jordan of Saxony more than a thousand novices to the Dominican Order establishing many new foundations in Germany and Switzerland It was a sermon of Jordan’s that decided Albertus Magnus to enter the order

1237 BD JORDAN OF SAXONY
BD JORDAN was St Dominic’s immediate successor, and was therefore the second master general of the Dominicans. Nothing is actually known as to the place and date of his birth; but his name was really Gordanus, or Giordanus, and we know that he was a Saxon and that he was a bachelor of divinity in Paris by 1219, at which date St Dominic sent to him Reginald, one of his first scholars. Apparently it was thus that he first became known to St Dominic. On Ash Wednesday of the following year, he and his friend Henry were clothed with the Dominican habit, and he at once came to the fore from his extraordinary eloquence. While he was yet a novice, as he himself relates in his Life of St Dominic (one of the main sources for that saint’s career), and before he had been two months in the order, he was summoned from Paris, with three other brothers, to attend the first general chapter at Bologna. At the following chapter, at which he was not present, he was chosen prior provincial of Lombardy, and in 1222, after the death of St Dominic, he was elected master general.

Bd Jordan did great things to extend and strengthen the order, and many friaries were founded under him, notably those at Regensburg, Constance, Bale, Freiburg and Strasbourg, and the brothers eventually extended their labours to Denmark and other distant lands. He used to frequent places where young students foregathered, and his eloquence won them in crowds he has been called “the first university chaplain”, and on one occasion he preached the University Sermon at Oxford it was perhaps here that he met and impressed Bishop Grosse­teste.

It was a sermon of Jordan’s that decided Albertus Magnus to enter the order. One learned professor, Walter the German, who had solemnly warned his pupils against the wiles and snares of the Dominican who was coming amongst them, was himself the first to fall into the net. Not that Bd Jordan cared only for the wise and learned. While he was still in Paris, complaints were made to him that there were some sixty novices so uninstructed or of such poor intellect that it was only with the greatest difficulty that they could be taught to read one lesson of the office. He replied, “Let them be—despise not one of these little ones. I tell you that many amongst them will become excellent preachers,” and his words proved true. Not only could he win men, but he knew how to retain them, and he could make allowance for human weakness. Once he had collected a number of postulants or novices in a place where there was no Dominican house. In the evening, when he began Compline in the lodging where they were assembled, one of the young men under emotional strain began to giggle and all the others followed suit. One of the brothers, greatly shocked, made gestures to try to stop them. Jordan finished the office and gave the blessing then, addressing the brother, he asked, “Who made you novice master?” and turning to the young men he said, “Laugh on You may well laugh, for you have escaped from the Devil who formerly held you in bondage. Laugh away, dear sons.”

Many of his sayings which have been preserved are full of religious common sense. Someone asked him whether a paternoster on the lips of an ignorant layman could possibly have as much value as a paternoster in the mouth of a learned cleric who understood it. He replied that a gem lost none of its value when it was in the hand of one who could not appreciate its worth. When asked which was better—studying the Scriptures or praying—he made answer, “You might as well ask me which is better—eating or drinking.” Upon being questioned as to the best way of praying, he said, “The way in which you can pray most fervently.”

Friar Jordan was on his way to the Holy Land in 1237 with two of the brothers when they encountered a great storm off the coast of Syria, and the ship was wrecked, all lives being lost. The body of Bd Jordan was washed ashore and was interred in the Dominican church at Akka. It is said that within a few days of his death he appeared in a vision or dream to a young Carmelite at Akka who was troubled about his vocation and had said, “This Friar Jordan was a good man—and all he got for it was to be drowned.” “Fear not, brother”, said Jordan to the doubter, “Everyone who serves Jesus Christ to the end will be saved.” It has been suggested as an hypothesis that this was the origin of the tradition of St Simon Stock’s scapular-vision of our Lady. The ancient cultus of Bd Jordan was con­firmed in 1828.

The main original sources for a life of Jordan are his own letters and such early Dominican chronicles as the Vitae Fratrum, or the Chronica of Galvagno de La Flamma, with the Acta Capitulorum, both general and provincial, etc. Fr Berthier printed in 1891 a good edition of Bd Jordan’s Opera ad res OP spectantia there is a very useful German volume, Die Briefe Jordans von Sachsen, with comments by B. Altaner (1925), and an edition, B. Jordani de Saxonia epistulae (1950), by A. Walz. The most systematic study of Bd Jordan in his public capacity has been made by Mortier in his Histoire des Maitres Généraux OP., vol. i, pp. 137—274, and there are several special biographies by Danzas, Mothon and others, including M. Aron, Un animateur de la jeunesse . . . (1931). Fr Reichert compiled a valuable Itmerarium of Jordan which was included in the Festschrift zur Jubiläum des deutsches Campo-Santo, pp. 153—160. For a fuller bibliography, see Taurisano, Catalogus, pp. 10—11.

Blessed Jordan of Saxony died in 1237. A Saxon named Gordanus or Giordanus, he received his bachelor of divinity degree at Paris. He met St. Dominic there and in 1220, became a Dominican. He was elected prior provincial of Lombardy the next year, and in 1222, on the death of Dominic, was elected second master general of the Dominicans. He expanded the Order, establishing many new foundations in Germany and Switzerland. He sent missionaries to Denmark, and frequently preached at universities to young students.
      He was a powerful preacher, and St. Albert the Great became a Dominican after hearing one of his sermons. He was on his way to the Holy Land in 1237 when his ship was wrecked on the coast of Syria and all aboard perished. He is the author of a life of St. Dominic that is one of the main sources of information about the founder of the Dominicans. Jordan's cult was approved in 1825.


Blessed Jordan of Saxony, OP (AC) Born in Germany, 1190; died 1237; cultus confirmed in 1828.
Men prayed for strength to resist Jordan's burning eloquence, and mothers hid their sons when Master Jordan came to town. Students and masters warned each other of the fatal magnetism of his sermons. The sweetness of his character and the holiness of his life shone through his most casual words in a flame that drew youth irresistibly to the ideal to which he had dedicated his own life. In his 16 years of preaching, Jordan is said to have drawn more than a thousand novices to the Dominican Order, among whom were two future popes, two canonized saints (e.g., Albert the Great), numerous beati, and countless intellectual lights of his dazzling century.
    Of Jordan's childhood, nothing is known, except that he was born of a noble family. He was drawn to the order in 1220 by the preaching of Blessed Reginald, the beloved son of Dominic, brought back from death by Dominic's and Our Lady's prayers. Jordan was at that time about 30, a student at the University of Paris, and his reputation for sanctity had preceded him into the order.
    He had worn the habit for only two months when he was sent to Bologna as a delegate to the first general chapter of the order. The following year he was elected provincial of Lombardy, Italy, and on the death of Saint Dominic, succeeded him as master general.
    The Order of Preachers was only six years old when Jordan became master general. He carried out the yet untried plans of Dominic, who had hurried off to heaven when many of his dreams were just beginning to open out into realization, and still more vistas beckoned beyond. Under him the new order advanced apace, spreading throughout Germany and into Denmark. Jordan will always be remembered for his work in increasing the manpower of the order, but his contribution to its quality should never be forgotten.
      He added four new provinces to the eight already in existence; he twice obtained for the order a chair at the University of Paris and helped found the University of Toulouse; and he established the first general house of studies of the order. He was a spiritual guide to many, including Blessed Diana d'Andalo; and somewhere in his busy lifetime he found time to write a number of books, including a life of Saint Dominic.
      Jordan was regarded as a menace by the professors of universities where he recruited novices. He emptied classrooms of their most talented students, stole their most noted professors. Young men by the hundreds besieged the order for admittance. Some were mere children, some famous lawyers and teachers, and some were the wealthy young bearers of the most famous names in Christendom. One and all, they were drawn to a life of perfection by this man who preached so well, and who practiced what he preached with such evident relish.
     All the old writers speak of the kindness and personal charm of Jordan. He had the ability to console the troubled and to inspire the despondent with new hope. At one time, a discouraged student was busily saying the Office of the Dead when Master Jordan sat down beside him and began alternating verses with him. When he came to the end of Psalm 26, Jordan said the verse with emphasis: "Oh, wait for the Lord!" Wherewith the sorrows of the young man departed. Another student was rid of troubled thoughts by the mere imposition of Jordan's hands. To bring peace to the brothers who were being annoyed by the devil, Jordan established the beautiful custom of singing the Salve Regina after Compline each night.
Jordan was shipwrecked and drowned when returning from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land (Benedictines, Dorcy).

1306 BD ANGELO OF BORGO SAN SEPOLCRO the body of Bd Angelo remained entire down to the year 1583, exhaling, it is asserted, a sweet fragrance, and that the veneration paid to his remains at Borgo San Sepolcro as those of a saint has been continuous.

THE decree emanating from the Congregation of Sacred Rites, which in 1921 confirmed the cultus of this Augustinian hermit, frankly admits that the life of Angelo said to have been written by John of St William has perished. We are consequently very ill-informed regarding his career. His family name was Scar­petti, and he was born at Borgo San Sepolcro in Umbria. He seems to have taken the Augustinian habit about the same time as his more famous contemporary St Nicholas of Tolentino. The decree referred to states that he spent part of his religious life in England and was instrumental in founding several Augustinian houses in this country. Two anecdotes are also recorded which are believed to illustrate the high favour he enjoyed with Almighty God. We are told that once when he had sternly rebuked a man of scandalous life the offender in a passion raised his arm to strike him. It was, however, instantaneously paralysed, and the miscreant only recovered the use of it by the prayer of Bd Angelo. On another occasion an innocent man who had been sentenced to death recommended himself to Angelo’s prayers. He was hanged in accordance with the sentence, but when the Brothers of the Misericordia came to cut him down and bury him, they found him still alive, and the man declared that Angelo had supported him all the time so that his neck was not broken. Obviously such stories, reported at fourth or fifth hand, are not very convincing but there appears to be better evidence that the body of Bd Angelo remained entire down to the year 1583, exhaling, it is asserted, a sweet fragrance, and that the veneration paid to his remains at Borgo San Sepolcro as those of a saint has been continuous.

See L. Torelli, Ristretto delle vite degli huomini etc. deli’ Online Agostiniano, pp. 165—166, and the decree of confirmation in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 1921, pp. 443—446.

1367 BD JULIA OF CERTALDO, VIRGIN

THIS is another case of confirmation of cult where very little detail seems available regarding the life of the beata thus honoured. Her surname is said to have been della Rena, and it has been hastily assumed that she was a kinswoman of that noble family. However, Julia was at first a domestic servant in the household of some people called Tinolfi, but in 1337 at the age of eighteen she joined the third order of the Augustinians at Florence. Finding that the distractions of a great city interfered with her recollection, she returned to Certaldo, and there, owing to her heroic and, as men believed, miraculous rescue of a child left in a burning house, she was sought out by many as a soul marvellously privileged. This decided her to avoid, as far as could be, intercourse with her fellow-men, and she had herself walled up as a recluse in a cell beside the sacristy of the church of SS. Michael and James at Certaldo. She wished in this, we are told, to follow in the footsteps of Bd Verdiana of Castelfiorentino. In this same tiny anchorage she lived for nearly thirty years, dying on January 9, 1367, at the age of forty-eight. There seems to be good evidence that after her death she was honoured as a saint, and her cultus was accordingly confirmed in 1819.

See I. Malenotti, Vita delta beata Giulia, vergine da Certaldo (1819) and N. Risi. Un giglio tra te spine (1919). F. Dini has shown in Miscellanea storica delta Valdelsa (1902), pp. 56—61, that Julia did not belong to either branch of the great family della Rena.
1682 St. Claude la Colombière special day for the Jesuits spiritual companion, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque.
 (1641-1682 )

1682 BD CLAUD LA COLOMBIERE He so accustomed himself to refer everything to God that human respect and worldly motives became impossible to him.

A CONTEMPORARY artist has left us the portrait of Bd Claud taken when he was between thirty-five and forty-one years of age—a longish face, eyes small but bright and penetrating, a broad forehead, a well-proportioned mouth and rather a pointed chin. We are told that when he entered the Society of Jesus he was fairly strong physically, of a lively disposition, with very high ideals and in every way wise and gracious. Such gifts were to be carefully cultivated in the religious life. His intellect was trained and developed so that his outlook was broad and his judgement acute and sound. He was a lover of the fine arts; and Olivier Patru, a member of the French Academy in 1640, corresponded with him and speaks of his writings in high praise. But these gifts would have been of little use in his work for souls if they had not been united to the interior spirit of the perfect religious animated by zeal for the glory of God. The source of his inner life was union with God in prayer, which occupied him continually. He so accustomed himself to refer everything to God that human respect and worldly motives became impossible to him. This wonderful detachment was indeed his distinguishing feature.

Bd Claud was born at Saint-Symphorien d’Ozon near Lyons in 1641. His family was well-connected, pious and in easy circumstances. There are no special records of his childhood till he was sent to the Jesuit college at Lyons for his studies. Though he acknowledged a strong aversion to the idea of a religious vocation, he conquered himself, and when he applied to be received into the Society he was at once accepted. He made his novitiate at Avignon, and after the usual two years passed into the college in that city to complete his course of philosophy. When this was ended, he was at first put to teach grammar and then the humanities, in which occupations he spent the years from 1661 to 1666. Since 1659 Avignon had been in a state of unrest there was continuous friction between the nobles and the people. In 1662 came the unfortunate affray in Rome between the papal guard and the suite of the French ambassador, which resulted in the occupation of Avignon, at that date still papal territory, by the troops of Louis XIV. The pupils’ studies, however, were not interfered with, and the simultaneous increase of Calvinism only served to redouble the zeal of the Jesuit fathers who spent themselves in apostolic labours in the town and in the neighbouring country.

With the return of peace the townspeople of Avignon celebrated the canoniza­tion of St Francis de Sales, and the older of the two convents of the Order of the Visitation in that city was the scene of a great ecclesiastical function. This was the first occasion on which Bd Claud’s gifts of oratory were displayed. He, though not yet ordained, was one of those chosen to preach the saint’s panegyric in the convent church. His text was: “Out of strength has come sweetness” (Judges xiv, 14), and the sermon was pronounced magnificent. Meanwhile it had been decided to send the young Claud to Paris to finish his course of theology, and here he found himself in the very centre of the intellectual life of France. Here also a great honour was conferred on him the two sons of the famous Colbert were put under his care. Most probably Colbert realized how gifted his sons’ tutor was, and therefore, though he was no friend to the Jesuits, he had chosen Claud for such an important post. However, his connection with the Colbert family came to an abrupt conclusion, as unfortunately a satirical phrase in an article which Claud had written was brought to the great minister’s knowledge. He was much offended, and asked that Claud might be recalled to his own province. This, however, could not be till 1670.

The young priest was in 1673 appointed festival preacher in the college church at Avignon. He took immense pains with his sermons, which are models of the art of preaching both for their sound doctrine and their beauty of language. The same sermons seem to have been preached later in England, and the name of the Duchess of York (Mary of Modena, afterwards queen when James II succeeded to the throne), in whose chapel they were delivered, is traditionally attached to them in the printed editions. During his time in Paris he had come into contact with Jansenism with its network of untruths and calumnies. He could now from the pulpit combat these errors, animated as he was by that special love of the Sacred Heart which was to prove a most potent antidote. At the end of 1674 Father La Chaise, Bd Claud’s rector, was directed by the father general to admit him to solemn profession after he had made a month’s retreat at the outset of what is called the third probation. The retreat brought Claud many graces. He was led to consecrate himself specially to the Sacred Heart, and in addition to the vows of profession he took a private vow to practise exact obedience to the rule of the Society of Jesus in every detail which it prescribed. He notes that he had for some time lived as he was now pledged by this vow to live, and that he had bound himself thus formally in order to insure his perseverance. At this date he was just thirty-three years old, the age at which our Lord died, and the inspiration came to him that he must now die still more completely to the world and to himself. As a spiritual note of his records “It seems right, dear Lord, that I should begin to live in thee and for thee alone, at the age at which thou didst die for all and for me in particular.”

Two months after his solemn profession in February, 1675, Claud was made superior of the college at Paray-le-Monial. It was unusual to put a young professed at the head of a house, and on the other hand gifts such as he possessed seemed hardly to have sufficient scope in a small residence of only four or five fathers such as was Paray. We may well believe that he was sent by God for the sake of an elect soul who needed him. That soul was St Margaret Mary Alacoque. She was suffering and perplexed because of the extraordinary revelations of the Sacred Heart which were granted her and which became every day clearer and more intimate. In obedience to her superior, Mother de Saumaise, she had told everything to a priest, a learned man, but one who had no knowledge of these extraordinary ways. He insisted that she was suffering from delusions, and her distress was only in­creased. She prayed for help and believed that our Lord answered that His faithful servant and perfect friend should be sent her.

Father La Colombière*]* The “de “ was added after his death.] came one day to give the community an instruction. “As he spoke”, the saint tells us, “I heard in my soul the words ‘He it is I send you’.” The first time she went to confession to him he behaved as if he knew what was passing within her. She felt a repugnance and shrank from speaking openly to him, though she knew it was God’s will she should do so. When next he came he told her he was glad to be the means of giving her an opportunity of making a sacrifice to God, and thereupon “without my feeling any pain”, she says, “he opened out my heart and showed me its depths, good and bad. He consoled me greatly and told me not to fear God’s leading as long as I was obedient, that I must give myself entirely to Him to be treated as He willed. He taught me to cherish the gifts of God and to receive His communications with faith and humility.”

Thus he was of the greatest service to her personally, and he did much to further the devotion to the Sacred Heart in the Church in general, realizing that this devotion was the best antidote to Jansenism.

Father La Colombière was not long at Paray. His next mission was very different on the recommendation of Father La Chaize, the confessor of Louis XIV of France, he was sent to London as preacher to Mary Beatrice d’Este, Duchess of York. In England he preached by word and by the example of his holy life. The love of the Sacred Heart became his favourite subject. His process tells us of his work for souls in this country and of the many Protestants he converted. The position of Catholics in England was extremely difficult as the hostile feeling against them was just then intense. An agitation was set on foot to exclude the Duke of York, who had become a Catholic, from the royal succession and to put the Prince of Orange or some other in his place. The story of a spurious “Popish Plot”, a tale fabricated by the infamous Titus Oates and his abettors, convulsed the country and in this Father La Colombière amongst the rest was supposed to be implicated. The object of the plot was said to be the murder of King Charles II and the destruction of the Established Church. Claud La Colombière was accused of having exercised his ministry and of having converted Protestants and lapsed Catholics. He was imprisoned in the King’s Bench, but did not win the martyr’s crown, as through the intervention of Louis XIV he was simply banished from England. His already bad health was completely broken by his imprisonment, and when he returned to France at the beginning of 1679 it was only to lead the life of an invalid. Although there were intervals when he rallied and active work was possible, his lungs were seriously attacked. His superiors, hoping that the air of his native province would be beneficial, sent him to Lyons and to Paray, and it was on a second visit to Paray that by the direct counsel of St Margaret Mary he remained there to die. After setting an example of great humility and perfect patience he passed away on the evening of February 15, 1682, and it seems that the next morning St Margaret Mary was supernaturally assured that his soul was in Heaven and needed no prayers. Bd Claud was beatified in 1929.

See A Jesuit at the English Court, by Sister Mary Philip (1922), and the lives written in French by Fr Seguin and by Fr Charrier, the former of which exists in an English translation but the most up-to-date biography, fully-documented, is by Fr C. Guitton (1943), Mrs M. Yeo’s These Three Hearts is a reprint of a life published first in 1940. See also Frs Monier­-Vinard and Condamin, Bx. Claude...Notes spirituelles (1929), and the Dictionnaire de spiritualité, vol. ii, cc. 939-941. Bd Claud’s complete works, containing a good deal of autobiographical detail, have been more than once published, and some of them translated.

In the decree of beatification Bd Claud is described as the “coadjutor” of St Margaret Mary in propagating devotion to the Sacred Heart, and as one chosen by God to direct her in the time of her trouble and vexation of spirit. For his part in spreading the devotion, ef. P. Pourrat, La spiritualité chrétienne (Paris, 1947 Eng. trans.), vol. iv, pp. 420-423.

This is a special day for the Jesuits, who claim today’s saint as one of their own. It’s also a special day for people who have a special devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus—a devotion Claude la Colombière promoted, along with his friend and spiritual companion, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque. The emphasis on God’s love for all was an antidote to the rigorous moralism of the Jansenists, who were popular at the time.
     Claude showed remarkable preaching skills long before his ordination in 1675. Two months later he was made superior of a small Jesuit residence in Burgundy. It was there he first encountered Margaret Mary Alacoque. For many years after he served as her confessor.
     He was next sent to England to serve as confessor to the Duchess of York. He preached by both words and by the example of his holy life, converting a number of Protestants. Tensions arose against Catholics and Claude, rumored to be part of a plot against the king, was imprisoned. He was ultimately banished, but by then his health had been ruined. He died in 1682.
Pope John Paul the Second canonized Claude la Colombière in 1992.



On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)



40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
Day 4 40 Days for Life vigils
We are the defenders of true freedom.
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 

Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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Popes mentioned in articles of Saints

731 Pope Gregory II, 89th Pope: educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian    (RM)

824 Pope St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.   Popes Html link here: 

731 Gregory II, 89th Pope educated at the Lateran  restore clerical discipline, fought heresies  helped restore and rebuild churches (including Saint Paul-Outside-the-Walls), hospitals, and monasteries, including Monte Cassino under Petrona The outstanding concern of his pontificate was his difficulties with Emperor Leo III the Isaurian (RM)
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817
Pope Innocent III had experienced a similar vision. Without hesitation Innocent provided papal approval for the Order of the Most Holy Trinity for the Redemption of Captives (the Trinitarians), with John of Matha as superior.
824 St. Paschal elected as the 94th pope on the day Pope Stephen IV (V) died, January 25, 817 unsuccessful in attempts to end the iconoclast heresy of Emperor Leo V, encouraged SS. Nicephorous and Theodore Studites in Constantinople to resist iconoclasm, and gave refuge to the many Greek monks who fled to Rome to escape persecution from the iconoclasts.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
1198 - 1216 Pope Innocent III;
One of the greatest popes of the Middle Ages;
a learned theologian; one of the greatest jurists of his time; held various ecclesiastical offices during short reigns of Lucius III, Urban III, Gregory VIII, and Clement III; re-established papal authority in Rome; scarcely a country in Europe over which Innocent III did not in some way or other assert supremacy he claimed for the papacy;
During his reign two great founders of the mendicant orders, St. Dominic and St. Francis, laid before him their scheme of reforming the world. Innocent was not blind to the vices of luxury and indolence which had infected many of the clergy and part of the laity.
In Dominic and Francis he recognized two mighty adversaries of these vices and he sanctioned their projects with words of encouragement.  He wrote "De quadripartita specie nuptiarum" (P. L., CCXVII, 923-968), an exposition of the fourfold marriage bond, namely, between man and wife, between Christ and the Church, between God and the just soul, between the Word and human nature - - entirely based on passages from Holy Scripture.  Popes Html link here: 

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Gregory IV (827-44) # 102
Elected near the end of 827; died January, 844. When Gregory was born is not known, but he was a Roman and the son of John. Before his election to the papacy he was the Cardinal-Priest of the Basilica of St. Mark, which he adorned with mosaics yet visible. For his piety and learning he was ordained priest by Paschal I. This man, of distinguished appearance and high birth, was raised to the chair of Peter, despite his protestations of unfitness, mainly buy the instrumentality of the secular nobility of Rome who were then securing a preponderating influence in papal elections. But the representatives in Rome of the Emperor Louis the Pious would not allow him to be consecrated until his election had been approved by their master. This interference caused such delay that it was not, seemingly, till about March, 828, that he began to govern the Church.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Clement IX 1667-1669: 1670 St. Charles of Sezze Franciscan Pope Clement IX called Charles to his bedside for a blessing;

Pope Pius XI -- 1888 ST JOHN BOSCO, FOUNDER OF THE SALESIANS OF DON Bosco
“IN his life the supernatural almost became the natural and the extraordinary ordinary.” These were the words of Pope Pius XI in speaking of that great lover of children, Don Bosco.


At Paris St. Thomas was honored with the friendship of the King, St. Louis, with whom he frequently dined. In 1261, Urban IV called him to Rome where he was appointed to teach, but he positively declined to accept any ecclesiastical dignity. St. Thomas not only wrote (his writings filled twenty hefty tomes characterized by brilliance of thought and lucidity of language), but he preached often and with greatest fruit. Clement IV offered him the archbishopric of Naples which he also refused. He left the great monument of his learning, the "Summa Theologica", unfinished, for on his way to the second Council of Lyons, ordered there by Gregory X, he fell sick and died at the Cistercian monastery of Fossa Nuova in 1274.
St. Thomas declared Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius V.

Romæ sancti Vitaliáni Papæ.       At Rome, St. Vitalian, pope.

Whereas in the Lord's Prayer, we are bidden to ask for 'our daily bread,' the Holy Fathers of the Church all but unanimously teach that by these words must be understood, not so much that material bread which is the support of the body, as the Eucharistic bread, which ought to be our daily food. -- Pope St. Pius X





Then in 1525, since it was a Holy Year of Jubilee, Angela Merici went as a pilgrim to Rome to gain the great jubilee indulgence. When she had an audience with the Pope Clement VII, he tried to persuade her to stay at Rome and head a congregation of nursing sisters. But she was still convinced of her calling to education work. In fact, years before, she had experienced a vision in which she saw a group of young women ascending to heaven on a ladder of light. A voice had then said:
“Take heed, Angela; before you die you will found at Brescia a company of maidens similar to those you have just seen.
     It was April 1533 that she made this prophecy come true. The Ursalines

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Pope Gregory IX 1227-1241 , having called St Raymund to Rome in 1230, nominated him to various offices and took him likewise for his confessor, in which capacity Raymund enjoined the pope, for a penance, to receive, hear and expedite im­mediately all petitions presented by the poor. Gregory also ordered the saint to gather into one body all the scattered decrees of popes and councils since the collection made by Gratian in 1150. In three years Raymund completed his task, and the five books of the “Decretals” were confirmed by the same Pope Gregory in 1234. Down to the publication of the new Codex Juris Canonici in 1917 this compilation of St Raymund was looked upon as the best arranged part of the body of canon law, on which account the canonists usually chose it for the text of their commentaries.