Octáva sanctórum Innocéntium Mártyrum.   The Octave of the Holy Innocents.
 Wednesday  Saints of this Day January  04 Prídie Nonas Januárii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
 (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
Mary is the Queen and Lady and Mother of the King of Angels (II) 


The Epiphany of the Lord, his manifestation to the nations
January 4 – Epiphany – Our Lady of Roses (Italy, 1418)
- Saint Angela of Foligno
– Blessed Manuel González García (1877-1940) 
 
This faith is fulfilled in the Virgin Mary
 Today we are celebrating above all the Epiphany of the Lord, his manifestation to the nations, while many Eastern Churches, according to the Julian Calendar, celebrate the Birth. … It is a juxtaposition which also makes us reflect also from the viewpoint of faith. Moreover, at Christmas in front of Jesus, we see the faith of Mary, of Joseph and of the shepherds; and today on the Epiphany the faith of the three Magi, come from the East to worship the King of the Jews.
The Virgin Mary, together with her husband, represents the “stump” of Israel, the “remnant” foretold by the prophets, from which the Messiah was to spring. Instead the Magi represent the peoples, and we can say even civilizations… on their way to God, searching for his kingdom of peace, justice, truth and freedom.
There was first a nucleus, embodied above all by Mary, the “daughter of Zion”: a nucleus of Israel, the people that know and have faith in that God who revealed himself to the Patriarchs and on the path of history. This faith is fulfilled in Mary, in the fullness of time; in her, “blessed because she believed,” the Word was made flesh, God “appeared” in the world.
Mary’s faith becomes the first fruits and the model of the faith of the Church, the People of the New Covenant. But from the beginning this people is universal and we can see this today in the figures of the Magi who arrive in Bethlehem…
 Benedict XVI
Monday, January 4, 2016
, Angelus for the Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord
 St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (Memorial)


Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }
The saints “a cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

January 4 – Our Lady of Roses (Italy, 1418) – Saint Angela of Foligno 
 
Become the “Marys” of abandoned tabernacles 
 
Blessed Manuel Gonzalez Garcia (d. January 4, 1940), Bishop of Malaga, is an outstanding figure of the Spanish Church. The two salient features of his spirituality are the devotions to the Blessed Sacrament and the Virgin Mary.

He was ordained a priest in 1901. The vision of an abandoned tabernacle marked him deeply and from that time, he devoted himself to spreading Eucharistic devotion by proclaiming everywhere a phrase that he repeated till his death: "Jesus is here! He is here! Do not abandon him!"

In 1910, he addressed a group of devout women and said, "Let me seek your attention and your help today for the most abandoned of all the poor—the Blessed Sacrament! For the love of Mary Immaculate and for the Sacred Heart who is so ill-rewarded, I ask you to become the Marys of those abandoned tabernacles."

He was alluding to the three "Marys" who were at the foot of the Cross. Thus was born the association of "Marys of Tabernacles-Calvaries" in a spirit of reparation to imitate the Virgin Mary, Saint John and the Holy Women, who remained faithful to Jesus on Calvary.
 
www.abbaye-saint-benoit.ch

 

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  January 2017
Universal: Interreligious Dialogue;  That sincere dialogue among men and women
of different faiths may produce the fruits of peace and justice.

Evangelization: Christian Unity; That by means of dialogue and fraternal charity
and with the grace of the Holy Spirit, Christians may overcome divisions.

Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.


  539 ST GREGORY, Bishop of Langres miracles recorded after death he seemed to give the preference to captives who had been arrested by the officers of human justice
 Apud Língonas, in Gállia, sancti Gregórii Epíscopi, miráculis clari.
       At Langres in France, St. Gregory, a bishop renowned for miracles.

THIS saint is welt known to us from the writings of St Gregory of Tours, who was his great-grandson. Of very distinguished birth, he for forty years governed the district of Autun as count (comes), administering justice equitably but sternly. It was only late in life, after the death of his wife Armentaria that he turned from the world and gave himself unreservedly to God.
1821 St. ELIZABETH ANN SET0N
1821 Bd ELIZABETH ANN SET0N (née Bayley). Born in New York City, 1774; married William Seton, 1794; widowed in 1803; received into the Catholic Church in 1805; made religious vows, 1809; died at Emmetsburg in Maryland, 4 January 1821. Mother Seton founded the American Sisters of Charity and was the first native-born American citizen to be beatified, in 1963.
1897 Birthday of Thérèse de Lisieux (2 January 1873 Alençon, France – 30 September 1897).


January 4 - Our Lady of Roses (Italy, 1418) - Blessed Angela of Foligno (1248-1309)
  Humility is a Prerequisite for Peace
Verily, verily, the Savior of the world has raised meekness and humility to the foundation of all virtue. Abstinence, fasting, austerity, internal or external poverty, good works, miracles, all is nothing without a humble heart. But all these things will take on new life and receive blessings, if humility supports them.
A humble heart is the generating force of virtue; the stem and branches can only come from the roots. Because its price is infinite and because it is the foundation upon which any spiritual perfection must rise, the Lord reserved only for himself the task of telling us to be humble.
And because humility is the universal guardian, the Virgin Mary, as if she overlooked all the other virtues of her soul and body, admired only one of her own qualities, and gave only one reason for the Incarnation of the Son of God in her: "Because He looked upon the humility of his servant..." For this, and no other reason, all generations have called her blessed.
Excerpt from Blessed Angela of Foligno (d. 1309),
The Book of Visions and Instructions


The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.

Her Son placed seven lilies in the crown, and between the lilies he placed seven gems. The first lily is her humility; the second, fear; the third, obedience; the fourth, patience; the fifth, steadfastness; the sixth, kindness, for she kindly gives to all who ask; the seventh is mercy in necessities, for in whatever necessity a person may find himself, if he invokes her with all his heart, he will be rescued.
  From the Blessed Virgin according to Saint Bridget of Sweden, Saint Bride and Her Book: Birgitta of Sweden's Revelations, Book 1, ch.31 January 4 - Our Lady of Roses (Italy, 1418)

Saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says:
‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’
Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” (Exposition of the Orthodox Faith).

Saint John, Son of Mary (IV)  January 4 - Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord
>From 27 to 30 A.D., John spent 3 years following Christ and received with the refreshing purity of his young soul the teachings of the Divine Master. He grew up to become the beloved, preferred or, more precisely according to Eastern tradition, the chosen disciple because he penetrated the Master's thought the deepest
and because he could quote his Master's own exact words.

His love was so strong that he was the only Apostle to be present at the foot of the Cross, at a time of darkness that dispersed all the others in fear. "Mary, the Mother of the Lord was standing before the Cross of her Son; no one else told me this except Saint John the Evangelist. John explained to me how Jesus on the Cross spoke to his mother.
This is the testament of Christ on the Cross, and John signed it. He is a worthy witness of such a great testator.
This valuable testament is not the legacy of money but of eternal life, written not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God. While the other Apostles fled, Mary stood at the foot of the Cross,
and her maternal eyes contemplated the wounds of her Son.
She wasn't waiting for her Beloved's death, but for the salvation of the world." (Saint Ambrose of Milan, d. 397)

"In the person of John, as the Church has always believed," stated Leo XIII,
"Christ designated the human race, especially those who believed in him."
1st v. Synaxis der Siebzig Apostel; Orthodoxe Kirche: 4. Januar - Katholische Kirche: 15. Juli 
1st v. birthday of St. Titus, consecrated bishop of Crete by the apostle St. Paul; In the Christian New Testament, Saint Titus, (a common Roman first name) was a companion of Paul of Tarsus, mentioned in several of Paul's epistles, including the Epistle to Titus. Titus was with Paul and Barnabas at Antioch and accompanied them to the Council of Jerusalem, although his name nowhere occurs in the Acts of the Apostles.
   211 St. Mavilus, martyr, who, being condemned by the very cruel governor Scapula to be devoured by wild beast received the crown of martyrdom.
   300  Saints Hermes, Aggaeus, and Caius, martyrs, who suffered under Emperor Maximian
4th v.  Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum Prisci Presbyteri, et Priscilliáni Clérici, ac Benedíctæ, religiósæ féminæ; qui, témpore impiíssimi Juliáni, gládio martyrium complevérunt.
At Rome, in the reign of the impious Julian, the holy martyrs Priscus, a priest, Priscillian, a cleric; and Benedicta, a religious woman, whose martyrdom was ended by the sword.
   340 St. Anastasia Martyrdom of; Coptic  -- visit those imprisoned for their faith ministered to them, comforted them, offered them whatever they needed; her husband shut her up in house placed guards over her; distributed wealth among poor and those in prison, confessors and strivers, for sake of the faith Commemoration of St. Juliana the Martyr.  On this day also is the commemoration of St. Juliana the martyr.
   484 St. Aquilinus Martyr with Sts. Geminus & companions
         St. Dafrosa Martyred mother of St. Bibiana
  539 ST GREGORY, Bishop of Langres miracles recorded after death; he seemed to give the preference to captives arrested by the officers of human justice
  745 St. Rigobert Benedictine archbishop of Reims; patient acceptance of all trials, love of retirement and prayer, miraculous cures attributed to him, gained him the repute of high sanctity.
  740 St. Pharaildis A Flemish maiden a miracle worker
800 Theoktistos gründete im 8, Jahrhundert ein Kloster in Cucuma (Sizilien) und war auch dessen Leiter. In dem Kloster lebten vor allem griechische Mönche, die vor dem Bildersturm geflohen waren. Theoktistos starb 800.Orthodoxe Kirche: 4. January

1160 BD ROGER OF ELLANT sick and the suffering were the object of his particular care

1309 Bl. Angela of Foligno Franciscan tertiary and mystic Many miracles

1310 BD ORINGA, VIRGIN The Augustinians keep her feast on January 4

1570 Bl. Thomas Plumtree English martyr
1821 St. ELIZABETH ANN SET0N (née Bayley). Born in New York City, 1774; married William Seton, 1794; widowed in 1803; received into the Catholic Church in 1805; made religious vows, 1809; died at Emmetsburg in Maryland, 4 January 1821. Mother Seton founded the American Sisters of Charity and was the first native-born American citizen to be beatified, in 1963.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton; At the suggestion of the president of St. Mary's College in Baltimore, Maryland, Elizabeth started a school in that city. She and two other young women, who helped her in her work, began plans for a Sisterhood. They established the first free Catholic school in America.
1897 Birthday of Thérèse de Lisieux (2 January 1873 Alençon, France – 30 September 1897).
1946 Fritz von Bodelschwingh; When Bodelschwingh got to know in May, 1940 from the euthanasia actions, he exerted himself vehement with the highest places against these people-despising measures, however, reached only to be stamped as a public enemy.


1st v. Orthodoxe Kirche: 4. Januar - Synaxis der siebzig Apostel Katholische Kirche: 15. Juli
Lukas berichtet (Kapitel 10), dass Jesus weitere 70 (oder 72) Jünger einsetzte und aussandte. Die orthodoxe Kirche gedenkt dieser Apostel an verschiedenen Tagen und außerdem am 4. Januar ihrer Synaxis (Zusammenkommen). Gemeint ist damit eine Kommemoration, ein gemeinsames Gedenken aller 70 Apostel.

Eusebius von Cäsarea (263-339) schreibt in seiner Kirchengeschichte: "Es existiert kein Katalog der siebzig Jünger. Barnabas ... wird einer gewesen sein, ... ebenso wird Sosthenes, der den Brief an die Korinther mit Paulus schrieb, einer von ihnen gewesen sein. Clemens schreibt ... Cephas sei einer der siebzig Jünger ... auch Thaddäus soll einer von ihnen gewesen sein."

Die älteste Namensliste der Siebzig stammt nach der Überlieferung von Dorotheus von Tyre. Diese Liste wurde in späteren Zeiten ergänzt und abgeändert. So entfielen die von Dorotheus angeführten Apostel, die sich dem Zauberer Simon anschloßen (siehe unten). Bei einigen Namen ist unklar, ob es sich wirklich um verschiedene Personen handelt (z. B. Markus Johannes und Evangelist Markus oder Silas und Silvanus). Sie werden in einigen Listen als eine Person gezählt. So ergibt sich bei einer Zusammenstellung der Namen aus den verschiedenen Quellen eine höhere Zahl als Siebzig bzw. Zweiundsiebzig. Im folgenden sind die tradierten Namen in alphabetischer Reihenfolge aufgeführt. Die Links führen dann zu dem Gedenktag des jeweiligen Apostels.

1st v. birthday of St. Titus, consecrated bishop of Crete by the apostle St. Paul; In the Christian New Testament, Saint Titus, (a common Roman first name) was a companion of Paul of Tarsus, mentioned in several of Paul's epistles, including the Epistle to Titus. Titus was with Paul and Barnabas at Antioch and accompanied them to the Council of Jerusalem, although his name nowhere occurs in the Acts of the Apostles.
 In Creta natális sancti Titi, qui, ab Apóstolo Paulo Epíscopus Creténsium ordinátus, et, post prædicatiónis offícium fidelíssime consummátum, finem beátum adéptus, in ea sepúltus est Ecclésia, ubi a beáto Apóstolo dignus miníster fúerat constitútus.  Ipsíus tamen festívitas octávo Idus Februárii celebrátur.
      In Crete, the birthday of St. Titus, who was consecrated bishop of that island by the apostle St. Paul.  After having faithfully performed the duty of preaching the Gospel, he reached the end of his saintly life, and was buried in the church of which he had been made a worthy minister by the holy apostle.

He appears to have been a Gentile – for St. Paul sternly refused to have him circumcised, because Paul believed Christ's gospel freed believers from the requirements of the Mosaic Law – and to have been chiefly engaged in ministering to Gentiles. At a later period, Paul's Epistles place him with St. Paul and Timothy at Ephesus, whence he was sent by Paul to Corinth for the purpose of getting the contributions of the church there in behalf of the poor Christians at Jerusalem sent forward.[2] He rejoined the apostle when he was in Macedonia, and cheered him with the tidings he brought from Corinth.[3] After this his name is not mentioned till after Paul's first imprisonment, when we find him engaged in the organization of the church in Crete, where the apostle had left him for this purpose.[4] The last notice of him is in 2 Timothy 4:10, where he appears with Paul at Rome during his second imprisonment. From Rome he was sent into Dalmatia, no doubt on some important missionary errand. The New Testament does not record his death.

According to church tradition, Paul ordained Titus Bishop of Gortyn in Crete. He died in the year 107, aged about 95.

The feast day of St Titus was not included in the Tridentine Calendar. When added in 1854, it was assigned to 6 February. In 1969, the Roman Catholic Church assigned the feast to 26 January so as to celebrate the two disciples of Paul the Apostle, Titus and Timothy, on the day after the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America celebrates these two together with Silas on the same date (see Calendar of Saints).
211 St. Mavilus, martyr, who, being condemned by the very cruel governor Scapula to be devoured by wild beasts, received the crown of martyrdom.
Adruméti, in Africa, commemorátio sancti Mávili Mártyris, qui in persecutióne Sevéri Imperatóris, a sævíssimo Præside Scápula damnátus ad béstias, martyrii corónam accépit.
       At Adrumetum in Africa, in the persecution of Severus, the commemoration of St. Mavilus, martyr, who, being condemned by the very cruel governor Scapula to be devoured by wild beasts, received the crown of martyrdom.

Severus 193-211
300  Saints Hermes, Aggaeus, and Caius, martyrs, who suffered under Emperor Maximian.
 Bonóniæ sanctórum Hermétis, Aggǽi et Caji Mártyrum, qui sub Maximiáno Imperatóre passi sunt.
       At Bologna, the Saints Hermes, Aggaeus, and Caius, martyrs, who suffered under Emperor Maximian.

4th v.  Romæ sanctórum Mártyrum Prisci Presbyteri, et Priscilliáni Clérici, ac Benedíctæ, religiósæ féminæ; qui, témpore impiíssimi Juliáni, gládio martyrium complevérunt.
       At Rome, in the reign of the impious Julian, the holy martyrs Priscus, a priest, Priscillian, a cleric; and Benedicta, a religious woman, whose martyrdom was ended by the sword.

340 St. Anastasia Martyrdom of; visit those imprisoned for their faith ministered to them, comforted them, offered them whatever they needed; her husband shut her up in house placed guards over her; distributed wealth among poor and those in prison, confessors and strivers, for sake of the faith Coptic

On this day, of the year 340 A.D., St. Anastasia, was martyred. She was born in the city of Rome in the year 275 A.D., to a pagan father whose name was "Britastanos" and a Christian mother whose name was "Flavia". Her mother baptized her secretly without her father's knowledge and she brought her up in the teachings of the Christian faith. She was steadfast in her faith and no one was able to dissuade her.

When she was of marriage age, her father gave her in marriage to a pagan youth, against her wishes. St. Anastasia prayed to the Lord Christ with fervent supplications, asking Him to separate her from this pagan youth who was away from the faith.

When her husband left to go to his work, she also left to visit those who were imprisoned for their faith and she ministered to them, comforted them, and offered them whatever they needed. When her husband learned about this, he shut her up in the house and placed guards over her. She continued to pray and ask God with tears and supplications to save her from the hands of her husband. God answered her prayer and speeded up his death. She distributed her wealth among the poor and those who were in prison, the confessors and the strivers, for the sake of the faith. When her fame reached "Florus", the Governor, he brought her before him to inquire about her religion. She confessed that she was a Christian. He tried to entice her to leave her faith by promising her many precious gifts. When she did not listen to his promises, he punished her by torturing her with various tortures and when he became weary of her he ordered her to be drowned. She came out from the sea unharmed with the grace of God. When the governor learned that she was still alive, he ordered that she be tied up to four pegs on the ground and be beaten ferociously, then be thrown into a pit of fire. They did so until she gave up her pure soul and received the crown of martyrdom.
484 St. Aquilinus Martyr with Sts. Geminus & companions
 Item in Africa præclarissimórum Mártyrum Aquilíni, Gémini, Eugénii, Marciáni, Quincti, Theódoti et Tryphónis.
       Also in Africa, the most renowned martyrs Aquilinus, Geminus, Eugenius, Marcian, Quinctus, Theodotus, and Tryphon.
Eugene, Marcian, Quintus, Theodotus, and Tryphon. These martyrs were executed by the Arian Hunneric, the king of the Vandals. St. Bede wrote of their hero
ic deaths
St. Dafrosa Martyred mother of St. Bibiana
 Item Romæ beátæ Dafrósæ, uxóris sancti Flaviáni Mártyris, ac matris sanctárum Bibiánæ et Demétriæ, Vírginum et Mártyrum; quæ, post interfectiónem viri sui, primum exsílio relegáta, deínde, sub præfáto Príncipe, cápite plexa est.       Also at Rome, under the same emperor, blessed Dafrosa, wife of the martyr St. Flavian, and mother of Saints Bibiana and Demetria, virgin martyrs.  After her husband had been killed, she was first banished and then beheaded.
sometimes called Aifrosa. The Acts of Bibiana provide untrustworthy documentation of this martyr­dom which supposedly took place in the reign of Julian the Apostat

539 ST GREGORY, Bishop of Langres miracles recorded after death he seemed to give the preference to captives who had been arrested by the officers of human justice
 Apud Língonas, in Gállia, sancti Gregórii Epíscopi, miráculis clari.
       At Langres in France, St. Gregory, a bishop renowned for miracles.

THIS saint is welt known to us from the writings of St Gregory of Tours, who was his great-grandson. Of very distinguished birth, he for forty years governed the district of Autun as count (comes), administering justice equitably but sternly. It was only late in life, after the death of his wife Armentaria that he turned from the world and gave himself unreservedly to God.

The clergy and people then elected him bishop of Langres, and for the rest of his days he showed an admirable example of devotion to his pastoral duties.

   His abstemious­ness in food and drink, which he was ingenious in concealing from the knowledge of others, was remarkable, and he often gave the hours of the night to prayer, frequenting especially the baptistery of Dijon, in which town he commonly lived. There the saints came to visit him and join him in chanting the praises of God in particular St Benignus, the apostle of Burgundy, whose cultus he had at first neglected, after some words of fatherly rebuke directed him to restore his dilapidated shrine, which has ever since been so famous in Dijon. It was here that Gregory himself, who died at Langres in 539, was brought to be buried in accordance with his own desire.
His epitaph, composed by Venantius Fortunatus, suggests that any severity he had displayed as a secular ruler was expiated by the tender charity he showed to all in his last years. Even in the miracles recorded after death he seemed to give the preference to captives who had been arrested by the officers of human justice.

See Gregory of Tours, Vitae patrum, bk vii; Historia Francorum, bks iii, iv and v; and De Gloria martyrum, li. L. Duchesne, Pastes Episcopaux, vol. ii, pp. 185—186; DCB., vol. ii, p. 770.

745 St. Rigobert Benedictine archbishop of Reims His patient acceptance of all trials, his love of retirement and prayer, and the miraculous cures attributed to him, gained him the repute of high sanctity.
 Rhemis, in Gállia, sancti Rigobérti, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
      At Rheims in France, St. Rigobertus, bishop and confessor.

also known as Robert of Reims. After serving for a time as abbot of Orbais, he was appointed archbishop of Reims, France. As a result of a dispute with Charles Martel, the powerful Frankish mayor of the palace, he was banished and the see was bestowed upon the prelate Muon. When the matter was resolved and Rigobert returned to Reims, he chose not to pursue his rightful claim to the see and instead became a hermit. Rigobert was long venerated as a model of patience and was credited with many miracles.

745 ST RIGOBERT, ARCHBISHOP OF RHEIMS
RIGOBERT seems to have been first of all abbot of Orbais, and afterwards to have been elected to the see of Rheims, but it is not easy to adjust the chronology, and his life, written much later, at the close of the ninth century, cannot be depended upon. St Rigobert, it would appear, offended Charles Martel because he would not takes sides against Raganfred, the mayor of Neustria. Charles accordingly banished Rigobert to Gascony and gave his bishopric to Milon, who already held the temporalities of the see of Trier. In the end some compromise was effected, and the saint was allowed again to officiate in Rheims. His patient acceptance of all trials, his love of retirement and prayer, and the miraculous cures attributed to him, gained him the repute of high sanctity. He must have died between 740 and 750.

See Acta Sanctorum, January 4; Levison in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. vii, pp. 54—80; and Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux vol. iii, pp. 85-86. There is a very important general paper on Charles Martel and his bishops: "Milo at eiusmodi similes", by Eugen Ewig, in St Bonifatius. Gedenkgabe zum zwölfhundertjährigen Todestag (Fulda, 1954), pp. 412—440.

740 ST PHARAILDIS, Vipois A Flemish maiden a miracle worker

THERE is a great deal which is extremely confused and improbable in the accounts preserved to us of this Belgian saint, and it is difficult to know how much of her legend can be regarded as based on historical fact. The main feature of her story is that, though she had secretly consecrated her virginity to God, she was given in marriage by her parents to a wealthy suitor, without any adequate consent on her part. Resolutely determined to keep her vow, she refused to live with him maritaleinent, and he on his part treated her brutally. God protected her, until at last the husband died. Little else is recorded of her except miracles and the numerous translations of her remains. There cannot, however, be any doubt that she became a very popular saint in Flanders, and that her cultus supplies abundant matter of interest to the student of folklore.
  Among her own countryfolk she is called most commonly St Varelde, Verylde or VeerIes She is represented some­times with a goose, sometimes with loaves of bread, and more rarely with a cat. The goose may have reference to a story told of her, as also of St Werburga, that when a goose had been plucked and cooked the saint restored it to life and full plumage. But it may also be connected with the city of Ghent or Gand, where her relics repose, for in Flemish, as in German, gans (cf. English “gander“) means a goose. The bread without doubt must have been suggested by a miracle said to have been worked beside her tomb, when an uncharitable woman who had been asked to give a loaf to a beggar declared that she had none, and then discovered that the loaves she had been hiding were turned into stones.
   St PharaIldis is also supposed to have caused a fountain of water to spring out of the ground at Bruay, near Valenciennes, to relieve the thirst of the harvesters who were reaping for her. The water of this spring is believed to be of efficacy in children’s disorders, and she is constantly invoked by mothers who are anxious about the health of their little ones.

See Hautecceur, Actes de Ste Pharalidis (1882); Destombes, Vies des saints de Cambrai et Arras, voi. i, pp. 30-36; L. van Der Essen, Étude critique cur les Vitae des saints mérovingiens (1907), pp. 303 seq. H. Detzel, Christliche Ikonographie (1896), vol. ii, p. 583.

740 St. Pharaildis A Flemish maiden a miracle worker
Also called Vareide, Varelde, Veerle, and Verylde, a patron saint of Ghent, she was compelled to marry against her will and was subsequently abused by her husband for refusing to consummate the union. She also apparently irritated her husband with her nighttime visits to churches. Pharaildis is honored as a miracle worker.

1160 BD ROGER OF ELLANT sick and the suffering were the object of his particular care

Bd ROGER OF ELLANT takes his name from the monastery of Ellant in the diocese of Rheims, founded by him in the twelfth century. By birth an Englishman, he had crossed over to France and entered the Cistercian monastery of Lorroy in Berry. Noted for his poverty and his exactness in carrying out the rule, he was chosen to found and build a new monastery at Ellant. The sick and the suffering were the object of his particular care. A chapel was dedicated in his honour in the abbey church where his body was buried. He died January 4, 1160.

See Acta Sanctorum, January 4 and Gallia Christiana, vol. ix, p. 310.

1309 Bl. Angela of Foligno Franciscan tertiary and mystic Many miracles
Born in Foligno, Italy, in 1248, Angela married and had several children. Wealthy, she took part in the social events of the city until 1285, when she had a vision. Following that mystical experience, Angela became a member of the Franciscan Third Order. When her husband died, she gave away her possessions and started a community of tertiaries devoted to the care of the needy. Her visions, which were recorded by her confessor, demonstrated a mature mystical union with Christ and the gift of revelation. She is sometimes called "the Mistress of Theologians."
Her tomb is in the church of St. Francis in Foligno. Many miracles have been recorded there.

1310 BD ORINGA, VIRGIN The Augustinians keep her feast on January 4

ALTHOUGH there is no reason to doubt her historical existence, the story of Bd Oringa’s life, told by biographers of late date, is little more than legend. She seems to have been born and also to have spent her last years at Castello di Santa Croce in the valley of the Arno. It is also probably true that she gathered round her a band of devout women and lived with them under the Rule of St Augustine.
  But the rest is a patchwork of vague traditions worked up with fictitious embellish­ments. As a child, when she tended the cattle, we are told that she went aside to pray, bidding the dumb beasts not to touch the crops, and that they always obeyed her. Her brothers beat her because she refused to marry, but she took refuge in the river, or crossed it, without ever getting wet. At length Oringa ran away from home. Night came upon her before she could reach Lucca, her destination, but a hare came to her, played with her, and finally went to sleep in her arms. In the morning it ran before her and guided her safely to the town for which she was bound. After many pilgrimages and adventures, during which she was always protected from harm, leading a life of extreme poverty and continual prayer, she returned to her native place and founded a convent there.

See Acta Sanctorum, under January 10 (The Augustinians keep her feast on January 4) and a popular sketch by M. Baciocchi de Peon, La vergine Oringa (1926).

1570 Bl. Thomas Plumtree English martyr
Born in Lincoinshire, he studied at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and was rector of Stubton. A dedicated Catholic, he took part in the uprising launched by northern Catholics, the Rising of the North against Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603), but was captured as the revolt failed completely. He was offered his freedom if he abjured the faith and he refused. He was hanged in Durham Castle.
1821 Bd ELIZABETH ANN SET0N (née Bayley). Born in New York City, 1774; married William Seton, 1794; widowed in 1803; received into the Catholic Church in 1805; made religious vows, 1809; died at Emmetsburg in Maryland, 4 January 1821. Mother Seton founded the American Sisters of Charity and was the first native-born American citizen to be beatified, in 1963.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton; At the suggestion of the president of St. Mary's College in Baltimore, Maryland, Elizabeth started a school in that city. She and two other young women, who helped her in her work, began plans for a Sisterhood. They established the first free Catholic school in America.
Elizabeth Bayley Seton was the first native born American to be canonized by the Catholic Church.  Born two years before the American Revolution, Elizabeth grew up in the "cream" of New York society. She was a prolific reader, and read everything from the Bible to contemporary novels.  In spite of her high society background, Elizabeth's early life was quiet, simple, and often lonely. As she grew a little older, the Bible was to become her continual instruction, support and comfort; she would continue to love the Scriptures for the rest of her life.In 1794, Elizabeth married the wealthy young William Seton, with whom she was deeply in love. The first years of their marriage were happy and prosperous. Elizabeth wrote in her diary at first autumn, "My own home at twenty-the world-that and heaven too-quite impossible."

This time of Elizabeth's life was to be a brief moment of earthly happiness before the many deaths and partings she was to suffer. Within four years, Will's father died, leaving the young couple in charge of Will's seven half brothers and sisters, as well as the family's importing business. Now events began to move fast - and with devastating effect. Both Will's business and his health failed. He was finally forced to file a petition of bankruptcy. In a final attempt to save Will's health, the Setons sailed for Italy, where Will had business friends. Will died of tuberculosis while in Italy. Elizabeth's one consolation was that Will had recently awakened to the things of God.

The many enforced separations from dear ones by death and distance, served to draw Elizabeth's heart to God and eternity. The accepting and embracing of God's will - "The Will," as she called it - would be a keynote in her spiritual life.  Elizabeth's deep concern for the spiritual welfare of her family and friends eventually led her into the Catholic Church.  In Italy, Elizabeth captivated everyone by her own kindness, patience, good sense, wit and courtesy. During this time Elizabeth became interested in the Catholic Faith, and over a period of months, her Italian friends guided her in Catholic instructions.  Elizabeth's desire for the Bread of Life was to be a strong force leading her to the Catholic Church. Having lost her mother at an early age, Elizabeth felt great comfort in the idea that the Blessed Virgin was truly her mother. She asked the Blessed Virgin to guide her to the True Faith. Elizabeth finally joined the Catholic Church in 1805.

At the suggestion of the president of St. Mary's College in Baltimore, Maryland, Elizabeth started a school in that city. She and two other young women, who helped her in her work, began plans for a Sisterhood. They established the first free Catholic school in America. When the young community adopted their rule, they made provisions for Elizabeth to continue raising her children. On March 25, 1809, Elizabeth Seton pronounced her vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, binding for one year. From that time she was called Mother Seton.

Although Mother Seton was now afflicted with tuberculosis, she continued to guide her children. The Rule of the Sisterhood was formally ratified in 1812. It was based upon the Rule St. Vincent de Paul had written for his Daughters of Charity in France. By 1818, in addition to their first school, the sisters had established two orphanages and another school. Today six groups of sisters trace their origins to Mother Seton's initial foundation.
For the last three years of her life, Elizabeth felt that God was getting ready to call her, and this gave her joy. Mother Seton died in 1821 at the age of 46, only sixteen years after becoming a Catholic. She was canonized on September 14, 1975.
Also known as:  Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton; Mother Seton

January 4, 2010 St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (1774-1821) 
Mother Seton is one of the keystones of the American Catholic Church. She founded the first American religious community for women, the Sisters of Charity. She opened the first American parish school and established the first American Catholic orphanage. All this she did in the span of 46 years while raising her five children.

Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is a true daughter of the American Revolution, born August 28, 1774, just two years before the Declaration of Independence. By birth and marriage, she was linked to the first families of New York and enjoyed the fruits of high society. Reared a staunch Episcopalian by her mother and stepmother, she learned the value of prayer, Scripture and a nightly examination of conscience. Her father, Dr. Richard Bayley, did not have much use for churches but was a great humanitarian, teaching his daughter to love and serve others.

The early deaths of her mother in 1777 and her baby sister in 1778 gave Elizabeth a feel for etern ity and the temporariness of the pilgrim life on earth. Far from being brooding and sullen, she faced each new “holocaust,” as she put it, with hopeful cheerfulness.

At 19, Elizabeth was the belle of New York and married a handsome, wealthy businessman, William Magee Seton. They had five children before his business failed and he died of tuberculosis. At 30, Elizabeth was widowed, penniless, with five small children to support.

While in Italy with her dying husband, Elizabeth witnessed Catholicity in action through family friends. Three basic points led her to become a Catholic: belief in the Real Presence, devotion to the Blessed Mother and conviction that the Catholic Church led back to the apostles and to Christ. Many of her family and friends rejected her when she became a Catholic in March 1805.

To support her children, she opened a school in Baltimore. From the beginning, her group followed the lines of a religious community, which was officially founde d in 1809.

The thousand or more letters of Mother Seton reveal the development of her spiritual life from ordinary goodness to heroic sanctity. She suffered great trials of sickness, misunderstanding, the death of loved ones (her husband and two young daughters) and the heartache of a wayward son. She died January 4, 1821, and became the first American-born citizen to be beatified (1963) and then canonized (1975). She is buried in Emmitsburg, Maryland.

Comment: Elizabeth Seton had no extraordinary gifts. She was not a mystic or stigmatic. She did not prophesy or speak in tongues. She had two great devotions: abandonment to the will of God and an ardent love for the Blessed Sacrament. She wrote to a friend, Julia Scott, that she would prefer to exchange the world for a “cave or a desert.” “But God has given me a great deal to do, and I have always and hope always to prefer his will to every wish of my own.” Her brand of sanctity is open to everyone if we love God and do his will.
Quote:  Elizabeth Seton told her sisters, “The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills it; and thirdly, to do it because it is his will.”

Profile
Born into a wealthy and influential Episcopalian family, the daughter of a physician, and raised in the New York high society of the late 18th century. Her mother died when Elizabeth was three years old, her baby sister a year later. She married the wealthy businessman William Magee Seton at age 19, and was the mother of five.

About ten years into the marriage, William's business failed, and soon after he died of tuberculosis, leaving Elizabeth an impoverished widow with five small children. For years Elizabeth had felt drawn to Catholicism, believing in the Real Presence in the Eucharist and in the lineage of the Church going back to Christ and the Apostles. She converted to Catholicism, entering the Church on 14 March 1805, alienating many of her strict Episcopalian family in the process.

To support her family, and insure the proper education of her children, she opened a school in Boston. Though a private and secular institution, from the beginning she ran it along the lines of a religious community. At the invitation of the archbishop, she established a Catholic girl's school in Baltimore, Maryland which initiated the parochial school system in America. To run the system she founded the Sisters of Charity in 1809, the first native American religious community for women.
 
Born:  28 August 1774, New York City, New York, USA as Elizabeth Ann Bayley Died:  4 January 1821 Beatification:  17 March 1963 by Pope John XXIII Canonization:  14 September 1975 by Pope Paul VI Patronage:  death of children, in-law problems, loss of parents, opposition of Church authorities, people ridiculed for their piety, diocese of Shreveport Louisiana, widows.

Readings
We must pray without ceasing, in every occurrence and employment of our lives - that prayer which is rather a habit of lifting up the heart to God as in a constant communication with Him.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
Our God is God. All is as He pleases. I am the happiest creature in the thought that not the least thing can happen but by His will or permission; and all for the best.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills it; and thirdly to do it because it is his will.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton

What was the first rule of our dear Savior's life? You know if was to do his Father's will. Well, then, the first purpose of our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills; and thirdly, to do it because it is his will.  We know certainly that our God calls us to a holy life. We know that he gives us every grace, every abundant grace; and though we are so weak of ourselves, this grace is able to carry us through every obstacle and difficulty.  from the writings of Elizabeth Ann Seton

1897 Birthday of Thérèse de Lisieux (2 January 1873 Alençon, France – 30 September 1897).
Or Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face, born Marie-Françoise-Thérèse Martin, was a French Carmelite nun who was canonised in 1925 and declared a Doctor of the Church, one of only three women to receive that honour, in 1997. In 1927 she was named co-patron of the missions with St. Francis Xavier, and, in 1944, co-patron of France with St. Joan of Arc. She is also known as "The Little Flower of Jesus".[1]

1946 Fritz von Bodelschwingh; When Bodelschwingh got to know in May, 1940 from the euthanasia actions, he exerted himself vehement with the highest places against these people-despising measures, however, reached only to be stamped as a public enemy.
Evangelische Kirche: 4. Januar

Fritz von Bodelschwingh wurde am 14.8.1877 in Bethel geboren. Seine vier älteren Geschwister starben früh. 1910 übernahm er das Werk seines Vaters, Friedrich von Bodelschwingh und baute Bethel in den Folgejahren aus. Der über den ganzen Erdball reichende Freundeskreis half ihm, Bethel in den Jahren des 1. Weltkrieges und der Inflation zu erhalten. 1933 wurde Bodelschwingh zum Reichsbischof gewählt. Der zunehmende staatliche Druck auf die Kirche und die Gegnerschaft der Deutschen Christen ließ ihn das Amt 1936 zurückgeben. Als Bodelschwingh im Mai 1940 von den Euthanasie-Aktionen erfuhr, setzte er sich vehement bei höchsten Stellen gegen diese menschenverachtenden Maßnahmen ein, erreichte aber nur, als Staatsfeind abgestempelt zu werden. Bodelschwingh weigerte sich, die von der Behörde geforderten Fragebögen über die Bewohner von Bethel ausfüllen zu lassen. Ein Haftbefehl gegen ihn wurde ausgestellt, allerdings nicht vollzogen. Bodelschwinghs unermüdlicher Einsatz und das beharrliche Gebet der Anstaltsgemeinde bewirkten endlich die Einstellung der Euthanasie in Bethel.

Nach dem Krieg wandte sich Bodelschwingh dem Aufbau Bethels, das zum Teil zerstört worden war, zu. Die Christvesper 1945 stellte er schwerkrank unter das Motto "Aus tausend Traurigkeiten zur Krippe gehn wir still; das Kind der Ewigkeiten uns alle trösten will.". Seine Weisung für den Weg der Kirche nach 1945: "Jede Sicherheit der Welt ist für die Kirche Christi eine ernste Gefahr. Alles, was sie ganz auf den Weg des Glaubens stellt, ist heilsames Geschenk. Je weniger äußere Hilfsmittel, desto mehr echte Liebe. Laßt uns um Weisheit und Zucht bitten, daß wir gründlich dem absagen, was so oft der tödliche Schaden der Kirche gewesen ist: Ein jeder sah auf seinen Weg. Wo immer in den verschiedenen Arbeitskreisen der Kirche Männer und Frauen zusammenkommen, um über den Neuanfang ihres Dienstes zu sprechen, da sollte man sich zuerst in der Stille unter Gottes Wort sammeln, die Vergangenheit unter seine Vergebung und die Zukunft in sein Licht stellen.". Bodelschwingh starb am 4.1.
1946 in Bethel.

Beispielhaft zwei Arbeiten zu der Euthanasie im Nationalsozialismus:
Die Innere Mission und ihre Rolle bei der Zwangssterilisation und den nationalsozialistischen Krankenmorden
Patientenschicksale 1933 bis 1945 in der Landesheilanstalt Uchtspringe


 Wednesday  Saints of this Day January  04 Prídie Nonas Januárii.  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  January 2017
Universal: Interreligious Dialogue;  That sincere dialogue among men and women
of different faiths may produce the fruits of peace and justice.

Evangelization: Christian Unity; That by means of dialogue and fraternal charity
and with the grace of the Holy Spirit, Christians may overcome divisions.

   `   

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      
 
                                                                           
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


              We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Saints of January 01 mention with Popes
2nd v. St. Elvan & Mydwyn;   Supposedly two Britons sent by King St. Lucius to Pope St. Eleutherius (c. 174-189) to ask for missionaries.

3rd v. St. Martina, virgin Item Romæ, via Appia, corónæ sanctórum mílitum trigínta Mártyrum, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre. In the same city, on the Appian Way, the crowning with martyrdom of thirty holy soldiers under Emperor Diocletian. Alban Butler informs us correctly that there was a chapel in Rome consecrated to her memory which was frequented with great devotion in the seventh century. We also may learn from him that her relics were discovered in a vault in the ruins of her old church, and translated in the year 1634 under Pope Urban VIII, who built. a new church in her honour and himself composed the hymns used in her office in the Roman Breviary. He adds further that the city of Rome ranks her amongst its particular patrons.

510 St. Eugendus 4th abbot of Condat, near Geneva Switzerland. Also called Oyand, Eugendus was never ordained, but he was a noted Scripture scholar.  In the lives of the first abbots of Condat it is mentioned that the monastery, which was built by St Romanus of timber, being consumed by fire, St Eugendus rebuilt it of stone; and also that he built a handsome church in honour of SS. Peter, Paul and Andrew.
   His prayer was almost continual, and his devotion most ardent during his last illness. Having called the priest among his brethren to whom he had committed the office of anointing the sick, Eugendus caused him to anoint his breast according to the custom then prevalent, and he breathed forth his soul five days after, about the year 510, and of his age sixty-one.*{* The rich abbey of Saint-Claude gave rise to a considerable town built about it, which was made an episcopal see by Pope Benedict XIV in 1748, who, secularizing the monastery, converted it into a cathedral. The canons to gain admittance were required to give proof of their nobility for sixteen degrees, eight paternal and as many maternal.}

533 St. Fulgentius Bishop of Ruspe, Tunisia friend of St. Augustine; “A person may be endowed with the gift of miracles, and yet may lose his soul. Miracles insure not salvation; they may indeed procure esteem and applause; but what will it avail a man to be esteemed on earth and afterwards be delivered up to torments?”   Born Fabius Claudius Gordianus Fulgentius of Carthage, he was a Roman of senatorial rank. His mother, widowed, opposed Fulgentius’ religious career, but he became a monk. He became abbot with Felix but had to flee the monastery in 499 when Vandals or Numidians invaded, going to Sicca Veneria. Retuming to the area, Fulgentius was named bishop of Ruspe, circa 508. King Thrasamund , an Arian, banished Fulgentius to Sardinia, Italy where he and other bishops were aided by Pope St. Symmachus. Fulgentius founded a monastery and wrote such eloquent defenses of orthodox Catholic doctrines that King Thrasamund returned him to his see, only to banish him again. In 523, Fulgentius returned to his see, where he set about rebuilding the faith.

660 ST CLARUS, ABBOT; many marvellous stories of the miracles he worked, *{* It is perhaps desirable to remind the reader once for all that only Almighty God can do miracles. The use of the above and similar expressions is permissible by custom, but in fact God does the miracle through the agency or at the intercession of the saint concerned.}  patron of tailors.  St. Clarus Abbot  numerous miracles  patron of tailors
Clarus was born near Vienne, Dauphine', France. He became a monk at St. Ferreol Abbey and later was spiritual director of St. Blandina Convent, where his mother and sister were nuns. In time he became Abbot of St. Marcellus monastery at Vienne and lived there until his death on January 1. He is reputed to have performed numerous miracles, and his cult was confirmed in 1903 by Pope Pius X. He is the patron of tailors.


1031 St William of Saint Benignus, Abbot; character was great zeal and firmness joined with tender affection for his subjects;  did not hesitate to oppose, both by action and writings, the most powerful rulers of his time, like Emperor St Henry, Robert, King of France, and Pope John XIX, when he felt the cause of justice was at stake; In interests of the Cluniac reform he was constantly active, making many journeys and travelling as far as Rome.

1048 St. Odilo monk at Cluny 5th abbot ecstacies great austerities inaugurated All Souls' Day.  Though he was a friend of princes and popes, he was exceedingly gentle and kind and known throughout Christendom for his liberality to the needy. Odilo's concern for the people was also shown by the lavish help he gave during several famines, especially in 1006, when he sold Church treasures to feed the poor, and again from 1028-1033.

1252 Bl. Berka Zdislava founded Dominican priory of St. Laurence Communion daily;   Zdislava had visions and ecstasies, and even in those days of infrequent communion she is said to have received the Blessed Sacrament almost daily. When she fell grievously ill she consoled her husband and children by saying that she hoped to help them more from the next world than she had ever been able to do in this. She died on January 1, 1252, was buried in the priory of St Laurence which she had founded, and is stated to have appeared to her husband in glory shortly after her death. This greatly strengthened him in his conversion from a life of worldliness. Pope Pius X approved the cult paid to her in her native country in 1907. The alleged connection of Bd Zdislava Berka with the third order of St Dominic remains somewhat of a problem, for the first formal rule for Dominican tertiaries of which we have knowledge belongs to a later date.

1713 St. Joseph Mary Tomasi;  Cardinal confessor of Pope Clement XI {1649 1721}; He answered that the days of actual physical martyrdom are over, and that we are now in the days of hidden martyrdom, seen only by God; the lesson of it all being trust in God; Even before his death the sick were healed through touching his clothing, and when the end had come cures multiplied round his bier. Bd Joseph Tommasi was beatified in 1803.
.  Born the son of the duke of Palermo, he became a member of the Theatine Order. Sent to Rome, he became the confessor of Cardinal Giovanni Francesco Albani, proving instrumental in convincing the cardinal to accept elevation as pope in 1700 under pain of mortal sin. In return, the newly elected pontiff forced Joseph to accept appointment as a cardinal. While he served capably as a cardinal, his first preoccupation was as a brilliant liturgical scholar who published some of his works under the pseudonym J. M. Carus.Among his most notable contributions were: Codices Sacramentorunz Nongentis Annis Vetustiores (1680), including the Missale Gothicurn and the Missale Francorum; Responsalia etA ntiphonaria Ronzanae Ecclesiae a Sancto Gregorio Magno Disposita (1686); and the Antiqua Libri Missaruni Romanae Ecclesiae (1691). Beatified in 1803, he was canonized in 1986 by Pope John Paul II.

Saints of January 02 mention with Popes
379 St. Basil the Great  vast learning and constant activity, genuine eloquence and immense charity Patron of hospital administrators.  379 St Basil The Great, Archbishop of Caesarea and Doctor of The Church, Patriarch of Eastern Monks
St Basil was born at Caesarea, the capital of Cappadocia in Asia Minor, in the year 329.
St. Basil the Great (329-379)
Basil was on his way to becoming a famous teacher when he decided to begin a religious life of gospel poverty. After studying various modes of religious life, he founded what was probably the first monastery in Asia Minor. He is to monks of the East what St. Benedict is to the West, and his principles influence Eastern monasticism today.

One of a family of ten, which included St Gregory of Nyssa, St Macrina the Younger, and St Peter of Sebaste, he was descended on both sides from Christians who had suffered persecution. His father, St Basil the Elder, and his mother, St Emmelia, were possessed of considerable landed property, and Basil’s early years were spent at the country house of his grandmother, St Macrina, whose example and teaching he never forgot. He was less successful in his efforts on behalf of the Church outside his own province. Left by the death of St Athanasius the champion of orthodoxy in the East, he strove persistently to rally and unite his fellow Catholics who, crushed by Arian tyranny and rent by schisms and dissensions amongst themselves, seemed threatened with extinction. His advances, however, were ill-received and he found himself misunderstood, misrepresented, and accused of ambition and of heresy. Even appeals which he and his friends made to Pope St Damasus and the Western bishops to intervene in the affairs of the East and to heal the troubles met with little response—apparently because aspersions upon their good faith had been made in Rome itself.
Nevertheless, relief was at hand, and that from an unexpected quarter. On August 9, 378, the Emperor Valens was mortally wounded at the battle of Adrian­ople, and with the accession of his nephew, Gratian, came the end of the Arian ascendancy in the East. When the news reached St Basil he was on his death-bed, but it brought him consolation in his last moments. He died on January 1, 379 at the age of forty-nine, worn out by his austerities, his hard work, and a painful disease. The whole of Caesarea mourned him as a father and protector—pagans, Jews, and strangers joining in the general lamentation. Seventy-two years after his death the Council of Chalcedon described him as “The great Basil, the minister of grace who has expounded the truth to the whole earth”. He was undoubtedly one of the most eloquent orators the Church has ever produced and his writings have entitled him to a high place amongst her doctors. In the Eastern church his chief feast-day is on January 1.


1146? BD AYRALD, Bishop of MAURIENNE; “Here lies Ayrald, a man of noble blood, monk of Portes, glory of pontiffs, a light of the Church, stay of the unfortunate, shining with goodness and unnumbered miracles.”   THE identity of this holy bishop is involved in much confusion and obscurity. His cultus was confirmed in 1863, and in the decree published on that occasion a summary of his life is given.
If we may credit this account, he was a son of William II, Count of Burgundy. Of his three brothers, one was elected pope under the name of Callistus II; another, Raymond, became king of Castile; and the third, Henry, count of Portugal.


1836 St. Caspar del Bufalo Various miracles many graces were obtained by his intercession.  In 1814 he founded the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood and in 1815, it was formally approved. The second foundation was made in 1819 and the third shortly afterwards at Albano. His wish was to have a house in every diocese, the most neglected and wicked town or district being chosen. The Kingdom of Naples in those days was a nest of crime of every kind; no one's life or property was safe, and in 1821 the pope asked del Bufalo to found six houses there. He joyfully responded but met with endless difficulties before subjects and funds were collected.

Saints of January 03 mention with Popes

236 ST ANTHERUS, POPE AND MARTYR; the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives.  THE name of St Antherus occurs in the list of popes after that of St Pontian. He is believed to have been elected November 21, 235, and to have died January 3, 236, thus reigning only forty-three days. Nothing certain is known regarding his martyrdom, though the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives. He was buried in the “papal crypt” in the catacombs (Cemetery of St Callistus), and De Rossi discovered the site in 1854, together with the fragments of a Greek inscription.

  512 St. Genevieve Paris averted Attila scourge by fasting/ prayer;  500 ST GENEVIEVE, or GENOVEFA, VIRGIN
GENEVIEVE’S father’s name was Severus, and her mother’s Gerontia; she was born about the year 422 at Nanterre, a small village four miles from Paris, near Mont Valérien. When St Germanus, Bishop of Auxerre, went with St Lupus into Britain to oppose the Pelagian heresy, he spent a night at Nanterre on his way. The inhabitants flocked about them to receive their blessing, and St Germanus gave an address, during which he took particular notice of Genevieve, though she was only seven. After his sermon he inquired for her parents, and foretold their daughter’s future sanctity. He then asked Genevieve whether it was not her desire to serve God only and to be naught else but a spouse of Jesus Christ. She answered that this was what she desired, and begged that by his blessing she might be from that moment consecrated to God. The holy prelate went to the church, followed by the people, and during the long singing of psalms and prayers, says Constantius—that is during the recital of None and Vespers, as one text of the Life of St Genevieve expresses it—he laid his hand upon the maiden’s head. After he had supped he dismissed her, telling her parents to bring her again to him the next morning. The father obeyed, and St Germanus asked the child whether she remembered the promise she had made to God. She said she did, and declared that she hoped to keep her word. The bishop gave her a medal or coin, on which a cross was engraved, to wear about her neck, in memory of the consecration she had received the day before; and he charged her never to wear bracelets or jewels or other trinkets. The author of her life tells us that the child, begging one day that she might go to church, her mother struck her on the face, but in punishment lost her sight; she only recovered it two months after, by washing her eyes with water which her daughter fetched from the well and over which she had made the sign of the cross. Hence the people look upon the well at Nanterre as having been blessed by the saint.  

The city of Paris has frequently received sensible proofs of the divine protection, through St Genevieve’s intercession. The most famous instance is that called the miracle des Ardents, or of the burning fever. In 1129 a disease, apparently poisoning by ergot, swept off in a short time many thous and persons, nor could the art of physicians afford any relief. Stephen, Bishop of Paris, with the clergy and people, implored the divine mercy by fasting and sup­plications. Yet the epidemic did not abate till the shrine of St Genevieve was carried in a solemn procession to the cathedral. Many sick persons were cured by touching the shrine, and of all who then were suffering from the disease in the whole town only three died, and no others fell ill.

1130 Pope Innocent II, coming to Paris the year following, after due investigation ordered an annual festival in commemoration of the miracle on November 26, which is still kept in Paris. It was formerly the custom, in extraordinary public calamities, to carry the shrine of St Genevieve in procession to the cathedral. The greater part of the relics of the saint were destroyed or pillaged at the French Revolution.


Saints of January 04 mention with Popes
1821 St. ELIZABETH ANN SET0N (née Bayley). Born in New York City, 1774; married William Seton, 1794; widowed in 1803; received into the Catholic Church in 1805; made religious vows, 1809; died at Emmetsburg in Maryland, 4 January 1821. Mother Seton founded the American Sisters of Charity and was the first native-born American citizen to be beatified, in 1963.
Elizabeth Bayley Seton was the first native born American to be canonized by the Catholic Church.  Born two years before the American Revolution, Elizabeth grew up in the "cream" of New York society. She was a prolific reader, and read everything from the Bible to contemporary novels.  In spite of her high society background, Elizabeth's early life was quiet, simple, and often lonely. As she grew a little older, the Bible was to become her continual instruction, support and comfort; she would continue to love the Scriptures for the rest of her life.In 1794, Elizabeth married the wealthy young William Seton, with whom she was deeply in love. The first years of their marriage were happy and prosperous. Elizabeth wrote in her diary at first autumn, "My own home at twenty-the world-that and heaven too-quite impossible."
Born:  28 August 1774, New York City, New York, USA as Elizabeth Ann Bayley Died:  4 January 1821 Beatification:  17 March 1963 by Pope John XXIII Canonization:  14 September 1975 by Pope Paul VI Patronage:  death of children, in-law problems, loss of parents, opposition of Church authorities, people ridiculed for their piety, diocese of Shreveport Louisiana, widows.  
Readings
We must pray without ceasing, in every occurrence and employment of our lives - that prayer which is rather a habit of lifting up the heart to God as in a constant communication with Him.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
Our God is God. All is as He pleases. I am the happiest creature in the thought that not the least thing can happen but by His will or permission; and all for the best.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills it; and thirdly to do it because it is his will.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton


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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.