Mary Mother of GOD
   Sunday  Saints of this Day January  15 Décimo octávo Kaléndas Februárii.  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Philomena.html HERE
January 14 – Our Lady of Bergemont (France) – our Lady of the Lamp (Rome, Italy) 
 
The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding

 
Pope Authorizes 12 14 2015 Promulgation of Decrees Concerning 17 Causes,
Including Servant of God William Gagnon
November 23 2014 Six to Be Canonized on Feast of Christ the King

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List
Acts of the Apostles
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
How do I start the Five First Saturdays?
Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.


 January 15 – First apparition of Our Lady of the Poor in Banneux (Belgium, 1933)
  404 ST ISIDORE OF ALEXANDRIA governor of the great hospital at Alexandria
 764 St. Ceolwulf King of Northumbria patron of St. Bede
1648 Bl. Frances de Capillas The Proto martyr of China Dominican missionary
1909 Bl. Arnold Jansen Founder of the Society of the Divine Word 


We confess that one and the same Christ, Lord, and only-begotten Son, is to be acknowledged in two natures without confusion, change, division or separation. The distinction between the natures was never abolished by their union, but rather the character proper to each of the two natures was preserved as they came together in one person (prosopon) and one hypostasis. -- Council of Chalcedon

January 15 – First apparition of Our Lady of the Poor in Banneux (Belgium, 1933)  
 On Sunday, January 15, 1933, around 7 pm…
 
From January 15 to March 2, 1933, the Virgin Mary appeared 8 times to an 11-year old girl, Mariette Beco, from Banneux, a town 20 km from Liege, Belgium.

On January 15, 1933, around 7 o’clock pm, Mariette was sitting by the window of her home. The snow was falling outside. It was freezing, at 10°F. When Mariette raised the curtain, she was startled by the sight of an unusual light in the yard. Looking closer, she saw a "beautiful lady." The Virgin called her and Mariette followed her outside... At each apparition, Mariette went outside in the cold, and followed the beautiful Lady.

Message of January 19, 1933: "Who are you, my lovely lady?” -- "I am the Virgin of the Poor." The Virgin asked the girl to dip her hands in a spring... A spring for all the nations, to relieve the sick. -- "I came to relieve suffering," she heard.

February 15, 1933: "Believe in me, I believe in you... Pray so very much!"

March 2, 1933: "I am the Mother of the Savior, the Mother of God. Pray so very much. Farewell!"
(1933 is the year Hitler came into power.)

August 22, 1949, the diocesan bishop officially approved the apparitions of Banneux.
The Mary of Nazareth Team


The Marian Model  January 15 - Our Lady of Banneux (Belgium, 1933) - First Apparition
What is most important about this motherhood to which she gave her free consent is that it places her in union with God uniquely so on a physical level and also, in an archetypical way representative of the whole human race,
on a spiritual level through grace.
Since all of this happens to her precisely as woman, she also signifies "the fullness of the perfection of what is characteristic of woman, of what is feminine. Here we find ourselves, in a sense, at the culminating point, the archetype, of the personal dignity of women."
Pope John Paul II (d. April 2, 2005), Message for the XXVIII  World Day of Peace, December 8, 1994. January 1, 1995

January 15 – First apparition of Our Lady of the Poor in Banneux (Belgium, 1933)
  They come here to find union with God in their struggles
The apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Banneux, Belgium, were approved by the Church on August 22, 1949. The Blessed Virgin appeared eight times to Mariette Beco, introducing herself to the young girl as the "Virgin of the Poor."

On the evening of Sunday, January 15, 1933, while Mariette was sitting by the kitchen window waiting for her younger brother to come home, she saw a strikingly beautiful young woman who seemed to be "made of light."
"Look, Mother! It's the Virgin Mary! She is smiling!" Mariette grabbed her rosary and began to pray.
During her last apparition, on March 2, 1933, Our Lady said:
"I am the Mother of the Savior, the Mother of God. Pray often."
Blessed John Paul II visited Banneux on May 21, 1985, to celebrate Mass for the sick. In his homily, he emphasized that
"today's poor feel at home in Banneux. They come here to seek comfort, courage,
hope and union with God in their struggles."

Father Jean-Bernard Hayet, Pastor of Saint Joseph des Falaises Bidart Parish (Guéthary, France)
Homily of January 15, 2010

 

    250 St. Secundina Martyred virgin
 
250 St. Maximus of Nola Bishop suffered greatly
  303 St. Ephysius martyr revered on Sardinia
        St. Sawl Welsh chieftain and the father of St. Asaph
 342 St. Paul the Hermit
4th v. St. Maura & Britta Virgins
       St. Macarius the Great Egyptian hermit enemy of Arianism
  404 ST ISIDORE OF ALEXANDRIA governor of the great hospital at Alexandria
  450 St. John Calabytes Hermit (at 12) lived unknown in a small hut famous for prayers penances He sanctified his soul by wonderful patience, meekness and prayer.  The legend of Calybites has either originated from, or been confused with, those of St Alexis, St Onesimus, and one or two others in which the same idea recurs of a disguise long
persisted in.

 510 Saint Maurus was the first disciple of St. Benedict of Nursia
 511 St. Eugyppius African priest of Rome companion of St. Severinus of Noricum
6th v. St. Liewellyn & Gwrnerth Welsh monks of Welshpool and Bardsey, Wales
 570 St. Ita virgin founded a community of women dedicated to God extravagant miracles attributed

6th v. St. Lleudadd Welsh abbot, companion of St. Cadfan to Brittany
 600 St. Tarsicia Virgin hermit granddaughter of the Frankish king Clotaire I
 700 St. Bonitus resigned the See Bishop of Clermont in 689 doubts of election
 710 St. Emebert bishop of Cambrai, in Flander
 764 St. Ceolwulf King of Northumbria patron of St. Bede

7th V
St. Malard Bishop of Chartres, in France
 823 St. Blaithmaic Irish abbot who sought martyrdom among the Danes
1208 Bl. Peter of Castelnau Martyred Cistercian papal legate and inquisitor
        St. Teath may also be St. Ita
1648 Bl. Frances de Capillas The Proto martyr of China Dominican missionary
1909 Bl. Arnold Jansen Founder of the Society of the Divine Word

Christ said his coming would bring not peace but a sword (see Matthew 10:34).
The Gospels offer no support for us if we fantasize about a sunlit holiness that knows no problems.
Christ did not escape at the last moment, though he did live happily ever after—
after a life of controversy, problems, pain and frustration.

St. Hilary  (315?-368), like all saints, simply had more of the same.

  In Judæa sanctórum Hábacuc et Michǽæ Prophetárum, quorum corpora, sub Theodósio senióre, divína revelatióne sunt repérta.
       In Judea, the holy prophets Habakkuk and Micah, whose bodies were found by divine revelation in the days of Theodosius the Elder.







250 St. Secundina Martyred virgin.
 Anágniæ sanctæ Secundínæ, Vírginis et Mártyris; quæ sub Décio Imperatóre passa est.
      At Anagni, St. Secundina, virgin and martyr, who suffered under Emperor Decius.
She was a maiden flogged to death during the persecution under Emperor Trajanus Decius in Rome.
250 St. Maximus of Nola Bishop suffered greatly.
 Nolæ, in Campánia, sancti Máximi Epíscopi.
      At Nola in Campania, St. Maximus, bishop.
of Nola, Italy, who ordained St. Felix of Nola. During the Roman persecutions, Maximus fled to the mountains where he suffered greatly. He died at Nola from the sufferings he endured.
303 St.  Ephysius martyr revered on Sardinia
 Cárali, in Sardínia, sancti Ephísii Mártyris, qui, in persecutióne Diocletiáni, sub Flaviáno Júdice, plúrimis torméntis divína virtúte superátis, demum, abscíssis cervícibus, victor migrávit in cælum.
      At Cagliari in Sardinia, St. Ephisius, martyr, who, in the persecution of Diocletian and under the judge Flavian, having, by the assistance of God, overcome many torments, was beheaded and ascended to heaven.

Italy. He was martyred on that island.
342 St. Paul the Hermit
 Sancti Pauli, primi Eremítæ, Confessóris; qui quarto Idus Januárii inter beatórum ágmina translátus fuit.
       St. Paul, the first hermit, who was carried to the home of the blessed on the tenth of this month.

342 ST PAUL THE HERMIT
ELIAS and St John the Baptist sanctified the desert, and Jesus Christ Himself was a model of the eremitical state during His forty days' fast in the wilderness. But while we cannot doubt that the saint of this day was guided by the Holy Ghost to live in solitude far from the haunts of men, we must recognize that this was a special vocation, and not an example to be rashly imitated. Speaking generally, this manner of life is beset with many dangers, and ought only to be embraced by those already well-grounded in virtue and familiar with the practice of contemplative prayer.
   St Paul was a native of the lower Thebaid in Egypt, and lost both his parents when he was fifteen.  He was proficient in Greek and Egyptian learning, gentle and modest, and feared God from his earliest youth. The cruel persecution of Decius disturbed the peace of the Church in 250; and Satan by his ministers sought not so much to kill the bodies, as by subtle artifices to destroy the souls of men. During these times of danger Paul kept himself concealed in the house of a friend; but finding that a brother-in-law coveting his estate was inclined to betray him, he fled into the desert. There he found certain caverns said to have been the retreat of money-coiners in the days of Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt. He chose for his dwelling a cave in this place, near which were a palm tree and a clear spring; the former by its leaves furnished him with raiment, and by its fruit with food; and the latter supplied him with water to drink. Paul was twenty-two when he entered the desert. His first intention was to enjoy liberty in serving God till the persecution should cease; but relishing the sweets of solitude and heavenly contemplation, he resolved to return no more and never to concern himself with the things of the world; it was enough for him to know that there was a world, and to pray that it might grow better. He lived on the fruit of his tree till he was forty-three, and from that time till his death, like Elias, he was miraculously fed with bread brought him every day by a raven. His method of life, and what he did in this place during ninety years, is hidden from us; but God was pleased to make His servant known a little before his death.
     The great St Antony, who was then ninety years of age, was tempted to vanity, thinking that no one had served God so long in the wilderness as he had done, since he believed himself to be the first to adopt this unusual way of life; but the contrary was made known to him in a dream, and the saint was at the same time commanded by Almighty God to set out forthwith in quest of a solitary more perfect than himself. The old man started the next morning. St Jerome relates that he met a centaur, or creature with something of the mixed shape of man and horse, and that this monster or phantom of the devil (St Jerome does not profess to determine which it was), upon his making the sign of the cross, fled away, after having pointed out the road. Our author adds that St Antony soon after met also a satyr, who gave him to understand that he dwelt here in the desert, and was one of those beings whom the deluded gentiles worshipped.* {*Educated pagans were no less credulous than their Christian contemporaries. Plutarch, in his life of Sylla, says that a satyr was brought to that general at Athens and St Jerome tells us that one was shown alive at Alexandria, and after its death was embalmed, and sent to Antioch that Constantine the Great might see it. Pliny and others assure us that centaurs have been seen.}

St Antony, after two days and a night spent in the search, discovered the saint’s abode by a light that shone from it and guided his steps. Having begged admittance at the door of the cell, St Paul at last opened it with a smile; they embraced, and called each other by their names, which they knew by revelation. St Paul then inquired whether idolatry still reigned in the world. While they were discoursing together, a raven flew towards them, and dropped a loaf of bread before them. Upon which St Paul said, “Our good God has sent us a dinner. In this manner have I received half a loaf every day these sixty years past; now you have come to see me, Christ has doubled His provision for His servants.” Having given thanks to God, they both sat down by the spring. But a little contest arose between them as to who should break the bread; St Antony alleged St Paul’s greater age, and St Paul pleaded that Antony was the stranger: both agreed at last to take up their parts together. Having refreshed themselves at the spring, they spent the night in prayer.
    The next morning St Paul told his guest that the time of his death approached, and that he had been sent to bury him, adding, “Go and fetch the cloak given you by Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria, in which I desire you to wrap my body.” This he probably said that he might be left alone in prayer, while expecting to be called out of this world as also that he might testify his veneration for St Athanasius, and his high regard for the faith and communion of the Catholic Church, on account of which that holy bishop was then a great sufferer.
   St Antony was surprised to hear him mention the cloak, of which he could only have known by revelation. Whatever was his motive for desiring to be buried in it, St Antony acquiesced in what was asked of him, and he hastened to his monastery to comply with St Paul’s request. He told his monks that he, a sinner, falsely bore the name of a servant of God; but that he had seen Elias and John the Baptist in the wilderness, even Paul in Paradise. Having taken the cloak, he returned with it in all haste, fearing lest the hermit might be dead; as, in fact, it happened. Whilst on the road he saw his soul carried up to Heaven, attended by choirs of angels, prophets and apostles. St Antony, though he rejoiced on St Paul’s account, could not help lamenting on his own, for having lost a treasure so lately discovered. He arose, pursued his journey, and came to the cave.
   Going in he found the body kneeling, and the hands stretched out. Full of joy, and supposing him yet alive, he knelt down to pray with him, but by his silence soon perceived Paul was dead. Whilst he stood perplexed how to dig a grave, two lions came up quietly, and as it were mourning; and, tearing up the ground, made a hole large enough. St Antony then buried the body, singing psalms according to the rite then usual in the Church. After this he returned home praising God, and related to his monks what he had seen and done. He always kept as a great treasure, and wore himself on great festivals, the garment of St Paul, of palm-tree leaves patched together. St Paul died in the year 342, the hundred and thirteenth of his age, and the ninetieth of his solitude, and is usually called
the First Hermit , to distinguish him from others of that name. He is commemorated in the canon of the Mass according to the Coptic and Armenian rites.

The summary which Alban Butler has here given of the life of the First Hermit is taken from the short biography edited in Latin by St Jerome, and afterwards widely circulated in the West. It seems possible, though this has been much disputed, that St Jerome himself did little more than translate a Greek text of which we have versions in Syriac, Arabic and Coptic, and which contained a good deal of fabulous matter. Jerome, however, undoubtedly regarded the life as in substance historical. The Greek original seems to have been written as a supplement, and in some measure a correction, to the Life of St Antony by St Athanasius.
See on the whole question F. Nau in Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xx (1901), pp. 121—157. The two principal Greek texts have been edited by J. Bidez (1900), the Syriac and Coptic by Pereira (1904). Cf. also J. de Decker, Contribution à l’etude des vies de Paul de Thebes (1905) ; Plenkers in Der Katholik (1905), vol. ii, pp. 294—300; Schiwietz, Das morgenländische Monchturn (1904), pp. 49—51; Cheneau d’Orleans, Les Saints d’Egypte (1923), vol. i, pp. 76—86. For a French translation of Jerome’s Life of Paul, see R. Draguet, Les Pères du desert (1949); and cf. H. Waddell, The Desert Fathers (1936), pp. 35—53.
Also known as Paul the First Hermit and Paul of Thebes, an Egyptian hermit and friend of St. Jerome. Born 229 in Lower The baid, Egypt, he was left an orphan at about the age of fifteen and hid during the persecution of the Church under Emperor Trajanus Decius. At the age of twenty two he went to the desert to circumvent a planned effort by his brother in law to report him to authorities as a Christian and thereby gain control of his property. Paul soon found that the eremitical life was much to his personal taste, and so remained in a desert cave for the rest of his reportedly very long life.

His contemplative existence was disturbed by St. Anthony, who visited the aged Paul. Anthony also buried Paul, supposedly wrapping him in a cloak that had been given to Anthony by St. Athanasius. According to legend, two lions assisted Anthony in digging the grave. While there is little doubt that Paul lived, the only source for details on his life are found in the Vita Pauli written by St. Jerome and preserved in both Latin and Greek versions.

345 St. Paul the Hermit
It is unclear what we really know of Paul's life, how much is fable, how much fact.
Paul was reportedly born 233 in Egypt, where he was orphaned by age 15. He was also a learned and devout young man. During the persecution of Decius in Egypt in the year 250, Paul was forced to hide in the home of a friend. Fearing a brother-in-law would betray him, he fled in a cave in the desert. His plan was to return once the persecution ended, but the sweetness of solitude and heavenly contemplation convinced him to stay.

He went on to live in that cave for the next 90 years. A nearby spring gave him drink, a palm tree furnished him clothing and nourishment.  After 21 years of solitude a bird began bringing him half of a loaf of bread each day. Without knowing what was happening in the world, Paul prayed that the world would become a better place.

St. Anthony attests to his holy life and death. Tempted by the thought that no one had served God in the wilderness longer than he, Anthony was led by God to find Paul and acknowledge him as a man more perfect than himself. The raven that day brought a whole loaf of bread instead of the usual half. As Paul predicted, Anthony would return to bury his new friend.

Thought to have been about 112 when he died, Paul is known as the "First Hermit." His feast day is celebrated in the East; he is also commemorated in the Coptic and Armenian rites of the Mass.
Comment:  The will and direction of God are seen in the circumstances of our lives. Led by the grace of God, we are free to respond with choices that bring us closer to and make us more dependent upon the God who created us. Those choices might at times seem to lead us away from our neighbor. But ultimately they lead us back both in prayer and in fellowship to one another.   
4th v. St. Maura & Britta Virgins.
Virgins whose relics were discovered by St. Euphronius. St. Gregory of Tours related the discovery.
390 St. Macarius the Great Egyptian hermit enemy of Arianism
 In Ægypto sancti Macárii Abbátis, qui fuit discípulus beáti Antónii, ac vita et miráculis celebérrimus éxstitit.
       In Egypt, St. Macarius, abbot, disciple of St. Anthony, very celebrated for his life and miracles.

390 ST MACARIUS THE ELDER
THIS Macarius was born in Upper Egypt, about the year 300, and spent his youth in tending cattle. By a powerful call of divine grace he retired from the world at an early age and, dwelling in a little cell, made mats, in continual prayer and the practice of great austerities. A woman falsely accused him of having offered her violence, for which supposed crime he was dragged through the streets, beaten and insulted, as a base hypocrite under the garb of a monk. He suffered all with patience, and sent the woman what he earned by his work, saying to himself, “Well, Macarius! having now another to provide for, thou must work the harder”.
But God made his innocence known; for the woman falling in labour, lay in extreme anguish, and could not be delivered till she had named the true father of her child. The fury of the people turned into admiration for the saint’s humility and patience. To escape the esteem of men he fled to the vast and melancholy desert of Skete, being then about thirty. In this solitude he lived sixty years, and became the spiritual parent of innumerable holy persons who put themselves under his direction and were governed by the rules he laid down for them; but all occupied separate hermitages. St Macarius admitted only one disciple to dwell with him, whose duty it was to receive strangers. He was compelled by an Egyptian bishop to receive the priesthood that he might celebrate the divine mysteries for the convenience of this colony. When the desert became better peopled, there were four churches built in it, which were served by so many priests.

The austerities of St Macarius were excessive; he usually ate but once a week. Evagrius, his disciple, once asked him leave, when tortured with thirst, to drink a little water; but Macarius bade him content himself with reposing awhile in the shade, saying, “For these twenty years I have never once eaten, drunk or slept as much as nature required”. His face was very pale, and his body feeble and shrivelled. To go against his own inclinations he did not refuse to drink a little wine when others desired him; but then he would punish himself for this indulgence by abstaining two or three days from all manner of drink; and it was for this reason that his disciple besought strangers never to offer him wine. He delivered his instructions in few words, and recommended silence, retirement and continual prayer, especially the last, to all sorts of people. He used to say, “In prayer you need not use many or lofty words. You can often repeat with a sincere heart, ‘Lord, show me mercy as thou knowest best.’ Or, ‘0 God, come to my assistance.’” His mildness and patience were invincible, and wrought the conversion of a heathen priest and many others.
A young man applying to St Macarius for spiritual advice, he directed him to go to a burying-place and upbraid the dead; and after that to go and flatter them. When he returned the saint asked him what answer the dead had made. “None at all”, said the other, “either to reproaches or praises.” “Then”, replied Macarius, “go and learn neither to be moved by abuse nor by flattery. If you die to the world and to yourself, you will begin to live to Christ.”
   He said to another, “Receive from the hand of God poverty as cheerfully as riches, hunger and want as readily as plenty; then you will conquer the Devil, and subdue your passions.” A certain monk complained to him that in solitude he was always tempted to break his fast, whereas in the monastery he could fast the whole week cheerfully. “Vain-glory is the reason”, replied the saint; “Fasting pleases when men see you; but seems intolerable when the craving for esteem is not gratified.”
   One came to consult him who was molested with temptations to impurity; the saint examining into the source, convinced himself the trouble was due to indolence. Accordingly, he advised him never to eat before sunset, to meditate fervently at his work, and to labour vigorously without slackening the whole day. The other faithfully complied, and was freed from his torment.
 God revealed to St Macarius that he had not attained to the perfection of two married women, who lived in a certain town. The saint thereupon paid them a visit, and learned the means by which they sanctified themselves. They were careful never to speak idle or rash words they lived in humility, patience, charity and conformity to the humours of their husbands; and they sanctified all their actions by prayer, consecrating to the divine glory all the powers of their soul and body.

A heretic of the sect of the Hieracites, called so from Hierax, who denied the resurrection of the dead, had caused some to be unsettled in their faith. St Macarius, to confirm them in the truth, raised a dead man to life, as Socrates, Sozomen, Palladius and Rufinus relate. Cassian says that he only made a dead body to speak for that purpose; then bade it rest till the resurrection.

Lucius, the Arian usurper of the see of Alexandria, sent troops into the desert to disperse the zealous monks, several of whom sealed their faith with their blood. The leading ascetics, namely the two Macariuses, Isidore, Pambo and some others were banished to a little island in the Nile delta, surrounded with marshes. The inhabitants, who were pagans, were all converted by the example and preaching of these holy men. In the end Lucius suffered them to return to their cells. Macarius, knowing that his end drew near, paid a visit to the monks of Nitria, and exhorted them in such moving terms that they all fell weeping at his feet. “Let us weep, brethren, said he, “and let our eyes pour forth floods of tears before we go hence, lest we fall into that place where tears will only feed the flames in which we shall burn.” He went to receive the reward of his labours at the age of ninety, after having spent sixty years in Skete. Macarius seems to have been, as Cassian asserts, the first anchoret who inhabited this vast wilderness. Some style him a disciple of St Antony; but it appears that he could not have lived under the direction of Antony before he retired to Skete. It seems, however, that later on he paid a visit, if not several, to that holy patriarch of monks, whose dwelling was fifteen days’ journey distant. Macarius is commemorated in the canon of the Mass according to the Coptic and Armenian rites.

See Palladius, Historia Lausiaca, c. 19 seq. Acta Sanctorum, January 15 Schiwietz, Morgenländ. Mönchtum, vol. i, pp. 97 seq. Bardenhewer, Patrology (Eng. ed), pp. 266—267  Gore in Journ. of Theol. Stud., vol. viii, pp. 85—90; Cheneau d’Onleans, Les saints d’Egypte (1923), vol. i, pp. 117—138

Also called "Macarius of Egypt” or “the Elder.” He was born in Upper Egypt, and went to the desert of Skete, where he was falsely accused of assaulting a woman, but was proven innocent. He was ordained and served as a counselor for thousands. An enemy of Arianism, Macarius was exiled to a small island in the Nile with Macarius the Younger by Lucius of Alexandria. a heretic of the era. Eventually he returned to the desert, and Macarius , considered the pioneering hermit, spent six decades in the wilderness.
404 ST ISIDORE OF ALEXANDRIA governor of the great hospital at Alexandria.  
 Alexandríæ beáti Isidóri, sanctitáte vitæ, fide et miráculis clari.
       At Alexandria, blessed Isidore, renowned for holiness of life, faith, and miracles.

IN early life Isidore, after distributing his large fortune to the poor, became an ascetic in the Nitrian desert. Afterwards he fell under the influence of St Athanasius, who ordained him and took him to Rome in 341. The greater part of his life, however, seems to have been passed as governor of the great hospital at Alexandria.
When Palladius, author of the Lausiac History, came to Egypt to adopt an ascetic life, he addressed himself first to Isidore, who advised him simply to practise austerity and self-denial, and then to return for further instruction. During his last days the saint, when over eighty years of age, was overwhelmed with persecutions, misrepresentations and troubles of every description. St Jerome denounced him in violent terms for his supposed Origenist sympathies, and his own bishop, Theophilus, who had once been his friend, excommunicated him, so that Isidore was driven to take refuge in the Nitrian desert, where he had spent his youth. In the end he fled to Constantinople to seek the protection of St John Chrysostom, and there shortly afterwards he died at the age of eighty-five.

See Palladius, Historia Lausiaca, and Dialogus de vita Chrysostomi; and Acta Sanctorum, January 15.

450 St. John Calabytes Hermit (at 12) lived unknown in a small hut famous for prayers penances He sanctified his soul by wonderful patience, meekness and prayer
 Constantinópoli sancti Joánnis Calybítæ, qui aliquándiu in ángulo domus patérnæ, deínde in tugúrio, ignótus paréntibus, habitávit; a quibus in morte ágnitus, miráculis cláruit.  Ipsíus corpus póstea Romam translátum, et in Insulæ Tiberínæ Ecclésia, in ejus honórem erécta, collocátum est.
       At Constantinople, St. John Calybita.  For some time living unknown to his parents in a corner of their house, and later in a hut on an island in the Tiber, he was recognized by them only at his death.  Being renowned for miracles, his body was afterwards taken to Rome and buried on the Island in the Tiber, where a church was subsequently erected in his honour.

ST JOHN CALYBITES
IT was at Gomon on the Bosphorus, among the “sleepless
monks founded by St Alexander Akimetes, that St John sought seclusion, leaving his father and a large fortune.
After six years he returned disguised in the rags of a beggar, and lived unrecognized upon the charity afforded him by his parents, close to their door in a little hut (
καλνβη) whence he is known as “Calybites”. He sanctified his soul by wonderful patience, meekness and prayer. When at the point of death he is said to have revealed his identity to his mother, producing in proof the book of the gospels, bound in gold, which he had used as a boy. He asked to be buried under the hut he had occupied, and this was granted, but a church was built over it, and his relics were at a later date translated to Rome.

The legend of Calybites has either originated from, or been confused with, those of St Alexis, St Onesimus, and one or two others in which the same idea recurs of a disguise long persisted in.
See the Acta Sanctorum for January 15 and Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xv (1896), pp. 256 -267,  Cf. also Synaxarium Cp. (ed. Delehaye) p. 393
He was born in Constantinople to a wealthy family at Gomon on the Bosporus and became a hermit at the age of twelve. After six years at Gomon he returned to his family’s estate as a beggar. Given a small calybe, he became famous for his prayers and penances, residing there until his death when his identity was at last revealed to his mother.
510 Saint Maurus was the first disciple of St. Benedict of Nursia
From the time of Bollandus and of Mabillon (who in his Acta Sanctorum, 0.S.B., vol. i, pp. 275—298 printed the Life of St Maurus by pseudo-Faustus as an authentic document) down to the present day a lively controversy has raged over the question of St Maurus’s connection with Glanfeuil. Bruno Krusch (Neues Archiv, vol. xxxi, pp. 245—247) considers that we have no reason to affirm the existence of any such monk as Maurus, or any abbey at Glanfeuil in Merovingian times. Without going quite so far as this, Fr Poncelet, in many notes in the Analecta Bollandiana (e.g. vol. xv, pp. 355—356), and U. Berlière in the Revue Bénédictine (vol. xxii, pp. 541—542) are agreed that the life by Faustus is quite untrust­worthy. An admirable review of the whole discussion, summing it up in the same sense, has been published by H. Leclercq in DAC., S.T’. “Glanfeuil” (vol. vi, cc. 1283—1319). See also J. McCann, St Benedict (1938), pp. 274—281.
584 ST MAURUS, ABBOT
 In território Andegavénsi beáti Mauri Abbátis, qui fuit discípulus sancti Benedícti; et, hujus disciplínis usque ab infántia erudítus, quantum in eis profécerit, inter ália quæ apud eum pósitus gessit (res nova et post Petrum fere inusitáti), pédibus super aquas incédens patefécit.  In Gállias inde ab ipso Benedícto diréctus, ibi, constrúcto célebri monastério, cui quadragínta annis præfuit, miraculórum glória clarus, in pace quiévit.
       In the diocese of Angers, blessed Maurus, abbot and disciple of St. Benedict.  Beginning his discipline in infancy, he made great progress with so able a master, for while he was still under the saint's instruction he miraculously walked upon the water, a prodigy unheard of since the days of St. Peter.  Sent later to France by St. Benedict, he built a famous monastery, which he governed for forty years, and after performing striking miracles, he rested in peace.
AMONG other noblemen who placed their sons under the care of St Benedict to be brought up in piety and learning a certain Equitius left his son Maurus, then but twelve years old; and when he was grown up St Benedict made him his assistant in the government of Subiaco. The boy Placid, going one day to fetch water, fell into the lake and was carried the distance of a bow-shot from the bank. St Benedict saw this in spirit in his cell, and bade Maurus run and draw him out. Maurus obeyed, walked unknowingly upon the water, and dragged out Placid by the hair. He attributed the miracle to the prayers of St Benedict; but the abbot declared that God had rewarded the obedience of the disciple. Not long after, the holy patriarch retired to Monte Cassino, and St Maurus may have become superior at Subiaco.

This, which we learn from St Gregory the Great, is all that can be told with any probability regarding the life of St Maurus. It is, however, stated upon the authority of a pretended biography by pseudo-Faustus—i.e. Abbot Odo of Glanfeuil—that St Maurus, coming to France, founded by the liberality of King Theodebert the great abbey of Glanfeuil, afterwards called Saint-Maur-­sur-Loire, which he governed until his seventieth year. Maurus then resigned the abbacy, and passed the remainder of his life in solitude to prepare himself for his passage to eternity. After two years he fell sick, and died on January 15 in the year 584. He was buried on the right side of the altar in the church of St Martin, and on a roll of parchment laid in his tomb was inscribed this epitaph

“Maurus, a monk and deacon, who came into France in the days of King Theodebert, and died the eighteenth day before the month of February.” That this parchment was really found in the middle of the ninth century is probable enough; but there is no reliable evidence to establish the fact that the Maurus so described is identical with the Maurus who was the disciple of St Benedict.

He is mentioned in St. Gregory the Great's biography of the latter as the first oblate; offered to the monastery by his noble Roman parents as a young boy to be brought up in the monastic life. Four stories involving Maurus recounted by Gregory formed a pattern for the ideal formation of a Benedictine monk. The most famous of these involved St. Maurus's rescue of Saint Placidus, a younger boy offered to St. Benedict at the same time as St. Maurus. The incident has been reproduced in many medieval and Renaissance paintings.
Saints Maurus and Placidus are venerated together on 5 October.
 In território Andegavénsi beáti Mauri Abbátis, qui fuit discípulus sancti Benedícti; et, hujus disciplínis usque ab infántia erudítus, quantum in eis profécerit, inter ália quæ apud eum pósitus gessit (res nova et post Petrum fere inusitáti), pédibus super aquas incédens patefécit.  In Gállias inde ab ipso Benedícto diréctus, ibi, constrúcto célebri monastério, cui quadragínta annis præfuit, miraculórum glória clarus, in pace quiévit.
       In the diocese of Angers, blessed Maurus, abbot and disciple of St. Benedict.  Beginning his discipline in infancy, he made great progress with so able a master, for while he was still under the saint's instruction he miraculously walked upon the water, a prodigy unheard of since the days of St. Peter.  Sent later to France by St. Benedict, he built a famous monastery, which he governed for forty years, and after performing striking miracles, he rested in peace.

511 St. Eugyppius African priest of Rome companion of St. Severinus of Noricum.
a companion of St. Severinus of Noricum, on the Danube. He wrote the life of St. Severinus.

hermit at the Benedictine Abbey of Manglieu at Clermont, and died at Lyons while returning from his pilgrimage to Rome.
6th v. St. Liewellyn & Gwrnerth Welsh monks of Welshpool and Bardsey, Wales  
570 St. Ita virgin founded a community of women dedicated to God extravagant miracles attributed.

570 ST ITA, VIRGIN
AMONG the women saints of Ireland, St Ita (also called Ida and Mida, with other variant spellings) holds the foremost place after St Brigid. Although her life has been overlaid with a multitude of mythical and extravagant miracles, there is no reason to doubt her historical existence. She is said to have been of royal descent, to have been born in one of the baronies of Decies, near Drum, Co. Waterford, and to have been originally called Deirdre. A noble suitor presented himself, but by fasting and praying for three days Ita, with angelic help, won her father’s consent to her leading a life of virginity. She accordingly migrated to Hy Conaill, in the western part of the present county of Limerick, There at Killeedy she gathered round her a community of maidens and there, after long years given to the service of God and her neighbour, she eventually died, probably in the year 570. We are told that at first she often went without food for three or four days at a time, An angel appeared and counselled her to have more regard for her health, and when she demurred, he told her that in future God would provide for her needs. From that time forth she lived entirely on food sent her from Heaven. A religious maiden, a pilgrim from afar, asked her one day, “Why is it that God loves thee so much? Thou art fed by Him miraculously, thou healest all manner of diseases, thou prophesiest regarding the past and the future, the angels converse with thee daily, and thou never ceasest to keep thy thoughts fixed upon the divine mysteries.” Then Ita gave her to understand that it was this very practice of continual meditation, in which she had trained herself from childhood, which was the source of all the rest. Ita is said to have been sought out and consulted by the most saintly of her countrymen.
   It appears that St Ita conducted a school for small boys, and we are told that the bishop St Erc committed to her care one who was afterwards destined to be famous as abbot and missionary, the child Brendan, who for five years was trained by her. One day the boy asked her to tell him three things which God specially loved. She answered: “True faith in God with a pure heart, a simple life with a religious spirit, openhandedness inspired by charity—these three things God specially loves.” “And what”, continued the boy, “are the three things which God most abhors?”  “A face”, she said, “which scowls upon all mankind, obstinacy in wrong-doing, and an overweening confidence in the power of money; these are three things which are hateful in God’s sight.”
   Not a few of the miracles attributed to St Ita are very preposterous, as, for example, the story that a skilful craftsman whose services she had retained, and to whom she gave her sister as wife, promising that he should become the father of a famous and holy son, went out to battle against a party of raiders and had his head cut off. On making a search for him, they found the trunk, but the head had been carried away by the victors. Then Ita, because her promise was still unfulfilled, set to work to pray; whereupon the head, by the power of God, flew back through the air to unite itself to the body, and an hour later the man, standing up alive, returned with them to the convent. Afterwards he had a son who was known as St Mochoemog (hypocoristic for Coemgen), the future abbot of Liath-mor or Leagh, in Tipperary. It was St Ita who had care of him, and gave him his name, which means “ my beautiful little one sometimes latinized as Pulcherius. St Ita’s feast is celebrated throughout Ireland.
The life of St. Ita has been critically edited by C. Plummer in VSH. vol. ii, pp. 116-130. See also the Acta Sanctorum, January 15; J. Colgan, Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae LIS., vol. i, p. 200; J. Ryan, Irish Monasticism (1931), pp, 138—140 and J. Begley, Diocese of Limerick, Ancient and Modern (1906), ch. iv.
Ita was reputedly of royal lineage. She was born at Decies, Waterford, Ireland, refused to be married, and secured her father's permission to live a virginal life. She moved to Killeedy, Limerick, and founded a community of women dedicated to God. She also founded a school for boys, and one of her pupils was St. Brendan. Many extravagant miracles were attributed to her (in one of them she is reputed to have reunited the head and body of a man who had been beheaded; in another she lived entirely on food from heaven), and she is widely venerated in Ireland. She is also known as Deirdre and Mida.
Saint Ita, called the "Brigid of Munster"; b. in the present County of Waterford, about 475; d. 15 January, 570. She became a nun, settling down at Cluain Credhail, a place-name that has ever since been known as Killeedy--that is, "Church of St. Ita"--in County Limerick. Her austerities are told by St. Cuimin of Down, and numerous miracles are recorded of her. She was also endowed with the gift of prophecy and was held in great veneration by a large number of contemporary saints, men as well as women. When she felt her end approaching she sent for her community of nuns, and invoked the blessing of heaven on the clergy and laity of the district around Killeedy. Not alone was St. Ita a saint, but she was the foster-mother of many saints, including St. Brendan the Voyager, St. Pulcherius (Mochoemog), and St. Cummian Fada. At the request of Bishop Butler of Limerick, Pope Pius IX granted a special Office and Mass for the feast of St. Ita, which is kept on 15 January.
600 St. Tarsicia Virgin hermit granddaughter of the Frankish king Clotaire I
spending most ofher life living as a hermit near Rodez, France.Tarsicia was the sister of St. Ferrolus of Uzes.

7th v. St. Malard Bishop of Chartres, in France  
All that is known of him definitely is that he attended the Council of Chalons-sur-saone in 650.

700 St. Bonitus resigned the See Bishop of Clermont in 689 doubts of election.
 Arvérnis, in Gállia, sancti Boníti, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
       In Auvergne in France, St. Bonitus, bishop and confessor.

706 ST BONITUS, OR BONET, BISHOP OF CLERMONT

ST BONITUS was referendary or chancellor to St Sigebert III, king of Austrasia and by his zeal, religion and justice flourished in that kingdom under four kings. In 677 Thierry III made him governor of Marseilles, an office he carried out with distinction and liberality. His elder brother, St Avitus II, Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne, having recommended him for his successor, died in 689, and Bonet was consecrated. But after having governed that see some years with exemplary piety, he had a scruple whether his election had been perfectly canonical; and having consulted St Tillo, then leading an eremitical life at Solignac, resigned his dignity, led a most penitential life in the abbey of Manglieu, and after having made a pilgrimage to Rome died at Lyons in 706. The colloquial form of this saint’s name is Bont.

See his life, written by a monk of Sommon in Auvergne, published in the Acta Sanctorum, January 15 MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. vi; and CMH., pp. 37-38.
Also known as Bonet, Bonitus was born in Auvergne, France. He became chancellor of Sigebert III of Austrasia, was appointed governor of Marseilles by Thierry III in 667, and was named Bishop of Clermont in 689. He resigned the See because of doubts about the validity of his election, led a life of holiness as a
710 St. Emebert bishop of Cambrai, in Flanders.
Belgium. He was a brother of Sts. Gudula and Reineldis.

764 St. Ceolwulf King of Northumbria patron of St. Bede.
760? ST CEOLWULF
IT is difficult to find any trace of late medieval cultus of this Northumbrian king, but he was held in high honour after his death, his body in 830 being trans­lated to Norham, and the head to Durham.
 Bede speaks enthusiastically of his virtues and his zeal, and dedicated to him his Ecclesiastical History, which he submitted to the king’s criticism. Ceolwulf ended his days as a monk at Lindisfarne, and it is recorded that through his influence the community, who previously had drunk nothing but water or milk, were allowed to take beer, and even wine. His relics were said to work many miracles. Simeon of Durham assigns his death to 764, but in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle the date given is 760.
Practically all available information will be found collected in Plummer’s edition of Bede, especially vol. ii, p. 340.
England, and patron of St. Bede. He resigned in 738 and became a monk at Lindisfame. St. Bede dedicated his Ecclesiastical History to “the most gracious King Ceolwulf.”
823 St. Blaithmaic Irish abbot who sought martyrdom among the Danes.
he went to England encountered Danes and murdered on the altar steps of the abbey church at Iona.

6th v. St. Lleudadd Welsh abbot, companion of St. Cadfan to Brittany.
France, also listed as Laudatus. He was formerly the abbot of Bardsey, in Gwynedd, Wales.

6th v. St. Sawl Welsh chieftain and the father of St. Asaph.
the great Welsh saint.

St. Teath may also be St. Ita.
 Possibly a daughter of Brychan of Brecknock in Wales. A Cornwall church bears her name. She may also be St. Ita.

1208 Bl. Peter of Castelnau  Martyred Cistercian papal legate and inquisitor

1208 BD PETER OF CASTELNAU, MARTYR
This Cistercian monk was born near Montpellier, and in 1199 we hear of him as archdeacon of Maguelone, but he entered the Cistercian Order a year or two later. To him, aided by another of his religious brethren,
Pope Innocent III
in 1203 confided the mission of taking action as apostolic delegate and inquisi­tor against the Albigensian heretics, a duty which Peter discharged with much zeal, but little success. The opposition against him, which was fanned by Raymund VI, Count of Toulouse, ended in his assassination on January 55, 1209, not far from the abbey of Saint-Gilles. Pierced through the body by a lance, Bd Peter cried to his murderer, “May God forgive thee as fully as I for­give thee”. His relics were enshrined and venerated in the abbey church of Saint-Gilles.

See Acta Sanctorum, March 5; Hurter in Kirchenlexikon, vol. ii, cc. 2031-2035 ; H. Nickerson, The Inquisition, pp. 77—95.
Peter was born near Montpellier and served as archdeacon of Maguelone before entering the Cistercians at Fontfroide, circa 1202. Known for his devout nature and his intelligence, in 1203 he was appointed by Pope Innocent III to the post of papal legate and inquisitor with the task of returning the heretic Albigensians to the Church. Among those who took part in his campaign was St. Dominic. The Albigensians were ill disposed to heed his call, and a group of overzealous heretics murdered Peter near Saint Gilles Abbey, probably at the connivance of Raymond VI, count of Toulouse, who harbored political ambitions and hoped to manipulate the crisis of the Albigensians to advantage. According to tradition, Peter’s dying words were: “May God forgive thee, brother, as I fully forgive thee.”
His murder was the spark that launched the Albigensian Crusade against the heretics in Southern France.
1648 Bl. Frances de Capillas The Proto martyr of China Dominican missionary
He was born in Old Castile, Spain, in 1608 and entered the Dominicans at Valladolid. Sent to China, Francis was successful in Fukien, China, until he was arrested as a spy by the local authorities. He was martyred as a result. Francis was beatified in 1909.
1648 BD FRANCIS DE CAPILLAS, MARTYR
THE Dominicans followed the Jesuits to China early in the seventeenth century, and to the Order of Preachers belongs the honour of having produced the first native Chinese priest and bishop, Gregory La (1616—1691), and the first beatified martyr in China, Francis Ferdinand de Capillas. He was born of humble stock in the province of Valladolid, and joined the Preachers when he was seventeen.

He volunteered for the mission in the Philippines, and received the priesthood at Manila in 1631. For ten years he laboured under a tropical sun in the Cagayan district of Luzon, regarding this apostolic field as a sort of training-ground for the still more arduous mission to which he felt himself destined. Here it was, accordingly, that he already practised great austerities, lying, for example, upon a wooden cross during the short hours he gave to sleep, and deliberately ex­posing his body to the bites of the insects which infest these regions. At last, in 1642, he was chosen to accompany the pioneer missionary, Father Francis Diaz, o.p., who was returning by way of Formosa to take up again the apostolate he had already begun in the Chinese province of Fokien. After learning the language an immense success is said to have attended the labours of Father de Capillas, and in Fogan, Moyan, Tingteu and other towns, he made. many converts.

Unfortunately it was just at this epoch that great revolutionary disturbances shook the whole Chinese empire.

The Ming dynasty came to an end, and the Manchu Tatars were called in to help to quell one party of the rebels, with the result that they themselves eventually became masters of the country. In Fokien a stout resistance was offered to the Tatars, and although they occupied Fogan they were besieged there by the armies of the Chinese viceroy. It would seem that while the town was thus invested Father de Capillas entered it by stealth to render spiritual assistance to some of his converts.
The mandarins of the old adminis­tration had been tolerant and often friendly to the Christians. The new masters were bitterly hostile to the religion of the foreigner. Father de Capillas was caught, cruelly tortured, tried as a spy who was believed to be conveying information to the besiegers, and in the end put to death by having his head cut off, on January 15, 1648.
In view of the question raised in the case of some of our English martyrs as to whether they really died for the faith, or were only put to death as political offenders, it is interesting to note that although Fathers Ferrando and Fonseca in their Spanish History of the Dominicans in the Philippines admit that sedition (rebeldia) was the formal charge upon which Father de Capillas was sentenced to death, the Holy See has pronounced him to be a true martyr.

In reference to this same holy Dominican, a quotation may not be out of place from Sir Robert K. Douglas:

“Why do you so much trouble yourselves”, the emperor [K’anghsi] asked on one occasion of a missionary, “about a world which you have never yet entered?” and adopting the, to him, canonical view, he expressed his opinion that it would be much wiser if they thought less of the world to come and more of the present life. It is possible that when he said this he may have had in his mind the dying word of Ferdinand de Capillas, who suffered martyrdom in 1648: “I have had no home but the world”, said this priest, as he faced his last earthly judge, “no bed but the ground, no food but what Providence sent me from day to day, and no other object but to do and suffer for the glory of Jesus Christ
and for the eternal happiness of those who believe in His name.”

See Touron, Histoire des hommes illustres O.P., vol. vi, pp. 732—735; but especially Juan Ferrando and Joaquin Fonseca, Historia de los PP. Dominicos en las Islas Filipinas, vol. ii, pp. 569—587. Cf. R. K. Douglas, China, in the Story of the Nations series, pp. 61—62. For other martyrs in China see herein under February 17, May 26, July 9 and September 11. Bd Francis de Capillas was beatified in 1909.

1909 Bl. Arnold Jansen Founder of the Society of the Divine Word
Born in Goch, Germany, on November 5, 1837, Arnold studied at Gaesdonck, Munster, and Bonn. He was ordained in 1861 and served as a parish priest. He also served as a chaplain at an Ursuline convent at Kempen. In 1875, he founded the Society of the Divine Word in a mission house in Steyl, Holland. This society was designed to provide priests and lay brothers for the missions. The congregation was approved in 1901. Arnold also founded the Servant Sisters of the Holy Ghost for the missions in 1889. He died in Steyl on January 5, 1909, and was beatified in 1975 by Pope Paul VI.

 Sunday  Saints of this Day January  15 Décimo octávo Kaléndas Februárii.  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  January 2017
Universal: Interreligious Dialogue;  That sincere dialogue among men and women
of different faiths may produce the fruits of peace and justice.

Evangelization: Christian Unity; That by means of dialogue and fraternal charity
and with the grace of the Holy Spirit, Christians may overcome divisions.

   `   

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      
 
                                                                           
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                    We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Saints of January 01 mention with Popes
2nd v. St. Elvan & Mydwyn;   Supposedly two Britons sent by King St. Lucius to Pope St. Eleutherius (c. 174-189) to ask for missionaries.

3rd v. St. Martina, virgin Item Romæ, via Appia, corónæ sanctórum mílitum trigínta Mártyrum, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre. In the same city, on the Appian Way, the crowning with martyrdom of thirty holy soldiers under Emperor Diocletian. Alban Butler informs us correctly that there was a chapel in Rome consecrated to her memory which was frequented with great devotion in the seventh century. We also may learn from him that her relics were discovered in a vault in the ruins of her old church, and translated in the year 1634 under Pope Urban VIII, who built. a new church in her honour and himself composed the hymns used in her office in the Roman Breviary. He adds further that the city of Rome ranks her amongst its particular patrons.

510 St. Eugendus 4th abbot of Condat, near Geneva Switzerland. Also called Oyand, Eugendus was never ordained, but he was a noted Scripture scholar.  In the lives of the first abbots of Condat it is mentioned that the monastery, which was built by St Romanus of timber, being consumed by fire, St Eugendus rebuilt it of stone; and also that he built a handsome church in honour of SS. Peter, Paul and Andrew.
   His prayer was almost continual, and his devotion most ardent during his last illness. Having called the priest among his brethren to whom he had committed the office of anointing the sick, Eugendus caused him to anoint his breast according to the custom then prevalent, and he breathed forth his soul five days after, about the year 510, and of his age sixty-one.*{* The rich abbey of Saint-Claude gave rise to a considerable town built about it, which was made an episcopal see by Pope Benedict XIV in 1748, who, secularizing the monastery, converted it into a cathedral. The canons to gain admittance were required to give proof of their nobility for sixteen degrees, eight paternal and as many maternal.}

533 St. Fulgentius Bishop of Ruspe, Tunisia friend of St. Augustine; “A person may be endowed with the gift of miracles, and yet may lose his soul. Miracles insure not salvation; they may indeed procure esteem and applause; but what will it avail a man to be esteemed on earth and afterwards be delivered up to torments?”   Born Fabius Claudius Gordianus Fulgentius of Carthage, he was a Roman of senatorial rank. His mother, widowed, opposed Fulgentius’ religious career, but he became a monk. He became abbot with Felix but had to flee the monastery in 499 when Vandals or Numidians invaded, going to Sicca Veneria. Retuming to the area, Fulgentius was named bishop of Ruspe, circa 508. King Thrasamund , an Arian, banished Fulgentius to Sardinia, Italy where he and other bishops were aided by Pope St. Symmachus. Fulgentius founded a monastery and wrote such eloquent defenses of orthodox Catholic doctrines that King Thrasamund returned him to his see, only to banish him again. In 523, Fulgentius returned to his see, where he set about rebuilding the faith.

660 ST CLARUS, ABBOT; many marvellous stories of the miracles he worked, *{* It is perhaps desirable to remind the reader once for all that only Almighty God can do miracles. The use of the above and similar expressions is permissible by custom, but in fact God does the miracle through the agency or at the intercession of the saint concerned.}  patron of tailors.  St. Clarus Abbot  numerous miracles  patron of tailors
Clarus was born near Vienne, Dauphine', France. He became a monk at St. Ferreol Abbey and later was spiritual director of St. Blandina Convent, where his mother and sister were nuns. In time he became Abbot of St. Marcellus monastery at Vienne and lived there until his death on January 1. He is reputed to have performed numerous miracles, and his cult was confirmed in 1903 by Pope Pius X. He is the patron of tailors.


1031 St William of Saint Benignus, Abbot; character was great zeal and firmness joined with tender affection for his subjects;  did not hesitate to oppose, both by action and writings, the most powerful rulers of his time, like Emperor St Henry, Robert, King of France, and Pope John XIX, when he felt the cause of justice was at stake; In interests of the Cluniac reform he was constantly active, making many journeys and travelling as far as Rome.

1048 St. Odilo monk at Cluny 5th abbot ecstacies great austerities inaugurated All Souls' Day.  Though he was a friend of princes and popes, he was exceedingly gentle and kind and known throughout Christendom for his liberality to the needy. Odilo's concern for the people was also shown by the lavish help he gave during several famines, especially in 1006, when he sold Church treasures to feed the poor, and again from 1028-1033.

1252 Bl. Berka Zdislava founded Dominican priory of St. Laurence Communion daily;   Zdislava had visions and ecstasies, and even in those days of infrequent communion she is said to have received the Blessed Sacrament almost daily. When she fell grievously ill she consoled her husband and children by saying that she hoped to help them more from the next world than she had ever been able to do in this. She died on January 1, 1252, was buried in the priory of St Laurence which she had founded, and is stated to have appeared to her husband in glory shortly after her death. This greatly strengthened him in his conversion from a life of worldliness. Pope Pius X approved the cult paid to her in her native country in 1907. The alleged connection of Bd Zdislava Berka with the third order of St Dominic remains somewhat of a problem, for the first formal rule for Dominican tertiaries of which we have knowledge belongs to a later date.

1713 St. Joseph Mary Tomasi;  Cardinal confessor of Pope Clement XI {1649 1721}; He answered that the days of actual physical martyrdom are over, and that we are now in the days of hidden martyrdom, seen only by God; the lesson of it all being trust in God; Even before his death the sick were healed through touching his clothing, and when the end had come cures multiplied round his bier. Bd Joseph Tommasi was beatified in 1803.
.  Born the son of the duke of Palermo, he became a member of the Theatine Order. Sent to Rome, he became the confessor of Cardinal Giovanni Francesco Albani, proving instrumental in convincing the cardinal to accept elevation as pope in 1700 under pain of mortal sin. In return, the newly elected pontiff forced Joseph to accept appointment as a cardinal. While he served capably as a cardinal, his first preoccupation was as a brilliant liturgical scholar who published some of his works under the pseudonym J. M. Carus.Among his most notable contributions were: Codices Sacramentorunz Nongentis Annis Vetustiores (1680), including the Missale Gothicurn and the Missale Francorum; Responsalia etA ntiphonaria Ronzanae Ecclesiae a Sancto Gregorio Magno Disposita (1686); and the Antiqua Libri Missaruni Romanae Ecclesiae (1691). Beatified in 1803, he was canonized in 1986 by Pope John Paul II.

Saints of January 02 mention with Popes
379 St. Basil the Great  vast learning and constant activity, genuine eloquence and immense charity Patron of hospital administrators.  379 St Basil The Great, Archbishop of Caesarea and Doctor of The Church, Patriarch of Eastern Monks
St Basil was born at Caesarea, the capital of Cappadocia in Asia Minor, in the year 329.
St. Basil the Great (329-379)
Basil was on his way to becoming a famous teacher when he decided to begin a religious life of gospel poverty. After studying various modes of religious life, he founded what was probably the first monastery in Asia Minor. He is to monks of the East what St. Benedict is to the West, and his principles influence Eastern monasticism today.

One of a family of ten, which included St Gregory of Nyssa, St Macrina the Younger, and St Peter of Sebaste, he was descended on both sides from Christians who had suffered persecution. His father, St Basil the Elder, and his mother, St Emmelia, were possessed of considerable landed property, and Basil’s early years were spent at the country house of his grandmother, St Macrina, whose example and teaching he never forgot. He was less successful in his efforts on behalf of the Church outside his own province. Left by the death of St Athanasius the champion of orthodoxy in the East, he strove persistently to rally and unite his fellow Catholics who, crushed by Arian tyranny and rent by schisms and dissensions amongst themselves, seemed threatened with extinction. His advances, however, were ill-received and he found himself misunderstood, misrepresented, and accused of ambition and of heresy. Even appeals which he and his friends made to Pope St Damasus and the Western bishops to intervene in the affairs of the East and to heal the troubles met with little response—apparently because aspersions upon their good faith had been made in Rome itself.
Nevertheless, relief was at hand, and that from an unexpected quarter. On August 9, 378, the Emperor Valens was mortally wounded at the battle of Adrian­ople, and with the accession of his nephew, Gratian, came the end of the Arian ascendancy in the East. When the news reached St Basil he was on his death-bed, but it brought him consolation in his last moments. He died on January 1, 379 at the age of forty-nine, worn out by his austerities, his hard work, and a painful disease. The whole of Caesarea mourned him as a father and protector—pagans, Jews, and strangers joining in the general lamentation. Seventy-two years after his death the Council of Chalcedon described him as “The great Basil, the minister of grace who has expounded the truth to the whole earth”. He was undoubtedly one of the most eloquent orators the Church has ever produced and his writings have entitled him to a high place amongst her doctors. In the Eastern church his chief feast-day is on January 1.


1146? BD AYRALD, Bishop of MAURIENNE; “Here lies Ayrald, a man of noble blood, monk of Portes, glory of pontiffs, a light of the Church, stay of the unfortunate, shining with goodness and unnumbered miracles.”   THE identity of this holy bishop is involved in much confusion and obscurity. His cultus was confirmed in 1863, and in the decree published on that occasion a summary of his life is given.
If we may credit this account, he was a son of William II, Count of Burgundy. Of his three brothers, one was elected pope under the name of Callistus II; another, Raymond, became king of Castile; and the third, Henry, count of Portugal.


1836 St. Caspar del Bufalo Various miracles many graces were obtained by his intercession.  In 1814 he founded the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood and in 1815, it was formally approved. The second foundation was made in 1819 and the third shortly afterwards at Albano. His wish was to have a house in every diocese, the most neglected and wicked town or district being chosen. The Kingdom of Naples in those days was a nest of crime of every kind; no one's life or property was safe, and in 1821 the pope asked del Bufalo to found six houses there. He joyfully responded but met with endless difficulties before subjects and funds were collected.

Saints of January 03 mention with Popes

236 ST ANTHERUS, POPE AND MARTYR; the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives.  THE name of St Antherus occurs in the list of popes after that of St Pontian. He is believed to have been elected November 21, 235, and to have died January 3, 236, thus reigning only forty-three days. Nothing certain is known regarding his martyrdom, though the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives. He was buried in the “papal crypt” in the catacombs (Cemetery of St Callistus), and De Rossi discovered the site in 1854, together with the fragments of a Greek inscription.

  512 St. Genevieve Paris averted Attila scourge by fasting/ prayer;  500 ST GENEVIEVE, or GENOVEFA, VIRGIN
GENEVIEVE’S father’s name was Severus, and her mother’s Gerontia; she was born about the year 422 at Nanterre, a small village four miles from Paris, near Mont Valérien. When St Germanus, Bishop of Auxerre, went with St Lupus into Britain to oppose the Pelagian heresy, he spent a night at Nanterre on his way. The inhabitants flocked about them to receive their blessing, and St Germanus gave an address, during which he took particular notice of Genevieve, though she was only seven. After his sermon he inquired for her parents, and foretold their daughter’s future sanctity. He then asked Genevieve whether it was not her desire to serve God only and to be naught else but a spouse of Jesus Christ. She answered that this was what she desired, and begged that by his blessing she might be from that moment consecrated to God. The holy prelate went to the church, followed by the people, and during the long singing of psalms and prayers, says Constantius—that is during the recital of None and Vespers, as one text of the Life of St Genevieve expresses it—he laid his hand upon the maiden’s head. After he had supped he dismissed her, telling her parents to bring her again to him the next morning. The father obeyed, and St Germanus asked the child whether she remembered the promise she had made to God. She said she did, and declared that she hoped to keep her word. The bishop gave her a medal or coin, on which a cross was engraved, to wear about her neck, in memory of the consecration she had received the day before; and he charged her never to wear bracelets or jewels or other trinkets. The author of her life tells us that the child, begging one day that she might go to church, her mother struck her on the face, but in punishment lost her sight; she only recovered it two months after, by washing her eyes with water which her daughter fetched from the well and over which she had made the sign of the cross. Hence the people look upon the well at Nanterre as having been blessed by the saint.  

The city of Paris has frequently received sensible proofs of the divine protection, through St Genevieve’s intercession. The most famous instance is that called the miracle des Ardents, or of the burning fever. In 1129 a disease, apparently poisoning by ergot, swept off in a short time many thous and persons, nor could the art of physicians afford any relief. Stephen, Bishop of Paris, with the clergy and people, implored the divine mercy by fasting and sup­plications. Yet the epidemic did not abate till the shrine of St Genevieve was carried in a solemn procession to the cathedral. Many sick persons were cured by touching the shrine, and of all who then were suffering from the disease in the whole town only three died, and no others fell ill.

1130 Pope Innocent II, coming to Paris the year following, after due investigation ordered an annual festival in commemoration of the miracle on November 26, which is still kept in Paris. It was formerly the custom, in extraordinary public calamities, to carry the shrine of St Genevieve in procession to the cathedral. The greater part of the relics of the saint were destroyed or pillaged at the French Revolution.


Saints of January 04 mention with Popes
1821 St. ELIZABETH ANN SET0N (née Bayley). Born in New York City, 1774; married William Seton, 1794; widowed in 1803; received into the Catholic Church in 1805; made religious vows, 1809; died at Emmetsburg in Maryland, 4 January 1821. Mother Seton founded the American Sisters of Charity and was the first native-born American citizen to be beatified, in 1963.
Elizabeth Bayley Seton was the first native born American to be canonized by the Catholic Church.  Born two years before the American Revolution, Elizabeth grew up in the "cream" of New York society. She was a prolific reader, and read everything from the Bible to contemporary novels.  In spite of her high society background, Elizabeth's early life was quiet, simple, and often lonely. As she grew a little older, the Bible was to become her continual instruction, support and comfort; she would continue to love the Scriptures for the rest of her life.In 1794, Elizabeth married the wealthy young William Seton, with whom she was deeply in love. The first years of their marriage were happy and prosperous. Elizabeth wrote in her diary at first autumn, "My own home at twenty-the world-that and heaven too-quite impossible."
Born:  28 August 1774, New York City, New York, USA as Elizabeth Ann Bayley Died:  4 January 1821 Beatification:  17 March 1963 by Pope John XXIII Canonization:  14 September 1975 by Pope Paul VI Patronage:  death of children, in-law problems, loss of parents, opposition of Church authorities, people ridiculed for their piety, diocese of Shreveport Louisiana, widows.  
Readings
We must pray without ceasing, in every occurrence and employment of our lives - that prayer which is rather a habit of lifting up the heart to God as in a constant communication with Him.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
Our God is God. All is as He pleases. I am the happiest creature in the thought that not the least thing can happen but by His will or permission; and all for the best.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills it; and thirdly to do it because it is his will.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton


Saints of January 05 mention with Popes
126 ST TELESPHORUS Pope in the time of Antoninus Pius, St. Telesphorus, pope, who, after many sufferings for the confession of Christ, underwent a glorious martyrdom.  Towards the year 126 he succeeded St Sixtus I, and saw the havoc which the persecution of Hadrian made in the Church. “He ended his life by a glorious martyrdom, says Eusebius, and he is the first one of the successors of St Peter whom St Irenaeus and other early writers refer to as a martyr. The ordinances attributed to him in the Liber Pontificalis, e.g. that the Mass of Christmas—a feast that did not then exist—should be celebrated at midnight, cannot with any probability be ascribed to his pontificate. St Teles­phorus is commemorated to-day in the Mass and Office of the vigil of the Epiphany.

 550 St. Emiliana Mystic aunt of Pope St. Gregory the Great    At Rome, the holy virgin Emiliana, aunt of Pope St. Gregory.  Being called to God by her sister Tharsilla, who had preceded her, she departed to heaven on this day.
She and a sister, Tharsilla, lived in Rome, in the home of their brother, Gregory’s father, practicing great austerity. Emiliana died on January 5, just a few days after Tharsilla.
550 Emiliana of Rome saintly life, visions  V (RM)
550 SS. THARSILLA AND EMILIANA, VIRGINS

 868 St. Convoyon Benedictine abbot exiled by Norseman in Brittany
IN 1866 Pope Pius IX approved the cultus, which from time immemorial had been paid in the neighbourhood of Redon in Brittany to the Benedictine monk who was the founder and abbot of the monastery of Saint Saviour. He was himself a Breton by birth, and it was in 831 that he, with six companions, obtained a grant of land on which to build an abbey. In the disturbed political conditions of the time, the early years of the new foundation seem to have been full of privation and hardship. Owing in part to a charge of simony brought against certain bishops of the province, Convoyon in 848 found himself a member of a deputation sent to Rome to appeal to Pope Leo IV. He is said to have brought back with him to his monastery a chasuble which Leo gave him, and also the relics of Pope St Marcellinus.
Later Convoyon was driven from his monastery by the incursions of the Norsemen, and was absent from it at the time of his death in 868. In 1866 the abbey of Saint Saviour at Redon had passed into the hands of a community of
the Eudist fathers, who were very active in procuring the confirmation of cultus for this local saint.

St. Charles of Sezze a lay brother at Naziano.  John Charles Marchioni was born at Sezze, Italy, on October 19, of humble parents. He became a shepherd and wanted to become a priest. When unable to do so because of his poor scholarship (He barely learned to read and write), he became a lay brother at Naziano, served in various menial positions - cook, porter, gardener - at different monasteries near Rome and became known for his holiness, simplicity, and charity.
He wrote several mystical works, lived a life of great mortifications, and worked heroically to help the stricken in the plague of 1656. He died in Rome on January 6. His family name may have been Melchior, and he is also known as Charles of Sezze. He was canonized by Pope John XXIII in 1959.


1236 St. Roger  da Todi  received the habit from St. Francis of Assisi.   Ruggiero da Todi (Roger) was appointed spiritual director of Blessed Philippa Mareri's Community at Rieti by Francis.
Roger died at Todi, shortly after Philippa's death January 5; his cult was confirmed by Pope Benedict XIV.
 

1860  Bd John NEPOMUCEN NEUMANN. Born in Bohemia, 1811; he was ordained priest in New York City in 1836 and joined the Redemptorist congregation; consecrated fourth bishop of Philadelphia in 1852; he died there on 5 January 1860. Bishop Neumann, a naturalized American citizen, organized Catholic schools into a diocesan system. He was beatified in 1963.
 January 5, 2010 St. John Neumann (1811-1860). The first American bishop to be canonized and the fourth bishop of Philadelphia. A native of Bohemia, he studied at the University of Prague, became a noted scholar, and entered the religious life. Deeply inspired by the letters of Father Frederic Baraga to the Leopold Missionary Society, he volunteered to labor in America, arriving in New York and receiving ordination on June 25, 1836. The next four years were spent in missionary work among the members of the German community around Niagara Falls. In 1840, he joined the Redemptorists in 1842- the first member to be professed in America - and ten years later, on March 28, 1852, he was consecrated bishop of Philadelphia at the suggestion of Archbishop Francis Kenrick of Baltimore. As bishop, Neumann founded fifty churches in the diocese, advanced the program on the cathedral, and was noted especially for his contribution to Catholic education. Finding only two parochial schools at his arrival, Neumann established nearly one hundred by the time of his passing. He also cared for the poor and orphans, and founded the Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis. Beatified by Pope Paul VI in 1963, he was canonized in 1977.

Saints of January 06 mention with Popes
607 St. Peter of Canterbury  Benedictine 1st abbot monastery Sts. Peter/Paul - Canterbury. Peter was originally a monk in the monastery of St. Andrew’s, Rome, and was chosen by Pope St. Gregory I the Great {Doctor of the Church; b. Rome 540; d.12 March 604}to embark with St. Augustine of Canterbury and other monks on the missionary enterprise to England in 596.  Peter became the first abbot of the monastery of Sts. Peter and Paul at Canterbury in 602.  He died by drowning at Ambleteu, near Boulogne while on a mission to France.

 1275 St Raymond of Pennafort canon of Barcelona Dominican, Archbishop     At Barcelona in Spain, St. Raymond of Pennafort, of the Order of Preachers, celebrated for sanctity and learning.  His festival is kept on the 23rd of this month.
1175-1275) encouraged assisted and confessor for Peter Nolasco -- requested by the Blessed Virgin in a vision to found an order especially devoted to the ransom of captives from the Moors. The reputation of the saint for juridical science decided the pope to employ Raymond of Peñafort's talents in re-arranging and codifying the canons of the Church. He had to rewrite and condense decrees that had been multiplying for centuries, and which were contained in some twelve or fourteen collections already existing. We learn from a Bull of Gregory IX to the Universities of Paris and Bologna that many of the decrees in the collections were but repetitions of ones issued before, many contradicted what had been determined in previous decrees, and many on account of their great length led to endless confusion, while others had never been embodied in any collection and were of uncertain authority.

The pope announced the new publication in a Bull directed to the doctors and students of Paris and Bologna in 1231, and commanded that the work of St. Raymond alone should be considered authoritative, and should alone be used in the schools. When Raymond completed his work the pope appointed him Archbishop of Tarragona, but the saint declined the honour. Having edited the Decretals he returned to Spain. He was not allowed to remain long in seclusion, as he was elected General of the Order in 1238; but he resigned two years later.

1373 St. Andrew Corsini regarded as a prophet and a thaumaturgus miracles were so multiplied at his death that Eugenius IV permitted a public cult immediately; Feast kept on February 04.        At Florence, St. Andrew Corsini, a Florentine Carmelite and bishop of Fiesole.  Being celebrated for miracles, he was ranked among the saints by Urban VIII.  His festival is kept on the 4th of February.
He was born in Florence on November 30, 1302, a member of the powerful Corsini family. Wild in his youth, Andrew was converted to a holy life by his mother and became a Carmelite monk. He studied in Paris and Avignon, France, returning to his birthplace. There he became known as the Apostle of Florence. He was called a prophet and miracle worker. Named as the bishop of Fiesole in 1349, Andrew fled the honor but was forced to accept the office, which he held for twelve years. He was sent by Pope Urban V to Bologna to settle disputes between the nobles and commoners, a mission he performed well. Andrew died in Fiesole on January 6, 1373. So many miracles took place at his death that Pope Eugenius IV permitted the immediate opening of his cause.

1611  St. John de Ribera Archbishop Vice-roy of Valencia deported Moors Many miracles attributed his intercession.  Spain. He was the son of the duke of Alcala, and was born in Seville, Spain. Ordained a priest in 1557, he became archbishop in 1568, serving for more than four decades until he died on January 6, in Valencia. John ordered the Moors deported from his see. He was revered by Pope Pius V and King Philip II of Spain. Pope John XXIII canonized him in 1959.
 Providence seems perceptibly to have intervened to shield his virtue from danger. Realizing the perils to which he was exposed, he gave himself up to penance and prayer in preparation for holy orders. In 1557, at the age of twenty-five, Don John was ordained priest; and after teaching theology at Salamanca for a while, he was preconized bishop of Badajoz, much to his dismay, by St Pius V in 1562. His duties as bishop were discharged with scrupulous fidelity and zeal, and six years later, by the desire both of Philip II and the same holy pontiff, he was reluctantly constrained to accept the dignity of archbishop of Valencia. A few months later, filled with consternation at the languid faith and relaxed morals of this province, which was the great stronghold of the Moriscos, he wrote begging to be allowed to resign, but the pope would not consent; and for forty-two years, down to his death in 1611, St John struggled to support cheerfully a load of responsibility which almost crushed him. In his old age the burden was increased by the office of viceroy of the province of Valencia, which was imposed upon him by Philip III.


1925 BD RAPHAELA MARY, VIRGIN, FOUNDRESS OF THE HANDMAIDS OF THE SACRED HEART  her answer to misery was, I see clearly that God wants me to submit to all that happens to me as if I saw Him there commanding it.”  It cannot be doubted that it was in these years that she earned her halo of holiness.
The woman that inaugurated a religious congregation in the circum­stances that she did cannot have found such self-abnegation easy. Attention has several times been drawn in these pages to people who were popularly canonized because they accepted, not formal martyrdom, but simply an unjust death: Mother Raphaela is a beata who lived nearly half her life cheerfully carrying a weight of unjust treatment. Courage and sweetness shone out from her face in old age. The surgeon who operated on her in her last days said it all in a sentence:
Mother, you are a brave woman”; but she had said long before,
“I see clearly that God wants me to submit to all that happens to me as if I saw Him there commanding it.”
                           Bd Raphaela Mary died on the Epiphany in 1925, and she was beatified in 1952.

In English there is a good summary in pamphlet form, In Search of the Will of God (1950), by Fr William Lawson.



1937  Blessed André Bessette (b. 1845) expressed a saint’s faith by a lifelong devotion to St. Joseph.
 St. André Bessette  (1845-1937)  Brother André expressed a saint’s faith by a lifelong devotion to St. Joseph.
Sickness and weakness dogged André from birth. He was the eighth of 12 children born to a French Canadian couple near Montreal. Adopted at 12, when both parents had died, he became a farmhand. Various trades followed: shoemaker, baker, blacksmith—all failures. He was a factory worker in the United States during the boom times of the Civil War.


At 25, he applied for entrance into the Congregation of the Holy Cross. After a year’s novitiate, he was not admitted because of his weak health. But with an extension and the urging of Bishop Bourget (see Marie-Rose Durocher, October 6), he was finally received. He was given the humble job of doorkeeper at Notre Dame College in Montreal, with additional duties as sacristan, laundry worker and messenger. “When I joined this community, the superiors showed me the door, and I remained 40 years,” he said. He is buried at the Oratory. He was beatified in 1982 and canonized in 2010. At his canonization in October 2010, Pope Benedict XVI said that St. Andre "lived the beatitude of the pure of heart."

Saints of January 07 mention with Popes
St. Crispins 1/ Pavia Lombardy 30 yrs 2/bishop w Pope St. Leo I Great.
 Papíæ sancti Crispíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Pavia, St. Crispin, bishop and confessor.
Two brothers bore this name, both canonized. One served Pavia, in Lombardy, Italy, for thirty years.
The other was bishop in the reign of Pope St. Leo I the Great.

335-414 St. Nicetas of Remesiana Bishop Te Deum missionary friend of St. Paulinus of Nola who made fierce and barbarous nations humane and meek by preaching the Gospel to them.  Though a priest of Antioch, we find him at Nicomedia in the year 303, when Diocletian first published his edicts against the Christians. He there suffered a long imprisonment for the faith, for he wrote from out of his dungeon, “All the martyrs salute you. I inform you that the Pope Anthimus [Bishop of Nicomedia] has finished his course by martyrdom.” This happened in 303. Yet Eusebius informs us that St Lucian did not arrive himself at the crown of martyrdom till after the death of St Peter of Alexandria in 311, so that he seems to have continued nine years in prison.
856 St. Aidric Bishop court diplomat Charlemagne and son/successor Louis Raised at Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany, the royal residence of Charlemagne.   Aidric, or Aldericus, grew up serving Charlemagne and his son and successor, Louis. At twenty-one, Aidric left the honors of the court to study for the priesthood at Metz, France. After his ordination, he was recalled to the court by Louis. Nine years later he was made the bishop of Le Mans, where he became known for his sanctity and for his efforts on behalf of his people. When Louis died, Aidric supported Charles the Bald, one of Louis' sons fighting for the throne, and for this reason was forced out of Le Mans, only to be reinstalled by Pope Gregory IV. Aidric served as a legate to the court of King Pepin of Aquitaine, France, where he convinced that monarch to restore vast amounts of Church property stolen by the royal family.
Aidric also took part in the councils of Paris and Tours. He was paralyzed for the last two years of his life.

1131 St. Canute Lavard Martyred nephew of St. Canute son of King Eric the Good.  In Dánia sancti Canúti, Regis et Mártyris.  In Denmark, St. Canute, king and martyr.  Canute had spent part of his youth at the Saxon court, and in 1129 the Emperor Lothair III recognized his rule over the western Wends, with the title of king. This excited the anger of King Niels of Denmark, and on January 7, 1131, Canute was treacherously slain in the forest of Haraldsted, near Ringsted, by his cousins Magnus Nielssen and Henry Skadelaar. Canute, who had supported the missionary activities of St Vicelin, was canonized by Pope Alexander III in 1169 at the request of his son, Valdemar I of Denmark, and of Eskil, Archbishop of Lund. The Roman Martyrology, following the cultus, which Canute received in Denmark, calls him a martyr, but he seems to have been a dynastic hero rather than a martyr.
1225 St. Raymond of Peñafort Dominican Marian; sailed on water w/cloak; Patron of Canonists taught philosophy at 20-gratis. The brave religious of this Order devoted themselves to saving poor Christians captured by the Moors.  Raymund joined to the exercises of his solitude the functions of an apostolical life, by laboring without intermission in preaching, instructing, hearing confessions with wonderful fruit, and converting heretics, Jews, and Moors Among his penitents were James, king of Aragon, and St. Peter Nolasco, with whom he concerted the foundation of the Order of the B. Virgin of mercy for the redemption of captives. James, the young king of Aragon had married Eleonora of Castile within the prohibited degrees, without a dispensation. A legate was sent by pope Gregory IX. to examine and judge the case. In a council of bishops of the two kingdoms, held at Tar rayon, he declared the marriage null, but that their son Don Alphonso should be reputed lawfully born, and heir to his father's crown. The king had taken his confessor with him to the council, and the cardinal legate was so charmed with his talents and virtue, that he associated him in his legation and gave him a commission to preach the holy war against the Moors. The servant of God acquitted himself of that function with so much prudence, zeal, and charity, that he sowed the seeds of the total overthrow of those infidels in Spain.

Saints of January 08 mention with Popes
425 St. Atticus Bishop converted opponent of St. John Chrysostom then called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I.  Atticus was born in Sebaste. He was trained in a heretical sect but converted and was ordained in Constantinople. He and one Arsacacius aided in deposing St. John Chrysostom from the see of Constantinople at the Council of the Oak in 405. Atticus succeeded to the see of Constantinople in 406, recognized by Pope St. Innocent I. He was a tireless foe of heretics, called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I. Atticus died in Constantinople on October 10.

511 St. Maximus Bishop of Pavia, Italy. attended the councils of Rome convened by Pope Symmachus.  He attended the councils of Rome convened by Pope Symmachus.  

1309 Blessed Angela of Foligno dedicated to prayer and works of charity; her Book of Visions and Instructions Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693.  At her confessor’s advice, Angela wrote her Book of Visions and Instructions. In it she recalls some of the temptations she suffered after her conversion; she also expresses her thanks to God for the Incarnation of Jesus. This book and her life earned for Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693.
1456 St. Lawrence Justinian first Patriarch of Venice the death of Eminent for learning, and abundantly filled with the heavenly gifts of divine wisdom the 5th of September, on which day he ascended the pontifical throne.  The Diocese of Castello belonged to the Patriarchate of Grado. On 8 October, 1451, Nicholas V united the See of Castello with the Patriarchate of Grado, and the see of the patriarch was transferred to Venice, and Lawrence was named the first Patriarch of Venice, and exercised his office till his death somewhat more than four years later. His beatification was ratified by Clement VII in 1524, and he was canonized in 1690 by Alexander VIII. Innocent XII appointed 5 September for the celebration of his feast. The saint's ascetical writings have often been published, first in Brescia in 1506, later in Paris in 1524, and in Basle in 1560, etc. We are indebted to his nephew, Bernardo Giustiniani, for his biography.

Saints of January 09 mention with Popes
710 St. Adrian, African Abbot near Naples tomb famous for miracles.  710 ST ADRIAN, ABBOT OF CANTERBURY
ADRIAN was an African by birth, and was abbot of Nerida, not far from Naples, when Pope St Vitalian, upon the death of St Deusdedit, the archbishop of Canterbury, judged him for his learning and virtue to be the most suitable person to be the teacher of a nation still young in the faith. The humble servant of God found means to decline that dignity by recommending St Theodore in his place, but was willing to share in the more laborious part of the ministry. The pope therefore enjoined him to be the assistant and adviser of the archbishop, to which Adrian readily agreed.

Adrian was serving as an abbot in Italy when the new Archbishop of Canterbury appointed him abbot of the monastery of Sts. Peter and Paul in Canterbury. Thanks to his leadership skills, the facility became one of the most important centers of learning. The school attracted many outstanding scholars from far and wide and produced numerous future bishops and archbishops. Students reportedly learned Greek and Latin and spoke Latin as well as their own native languages.

He died there, probably in the year 710, and was buried in the monastery. Several hundred years later, when reconstruction was being done, Adrian’s body was discovered in an incorrupt state. As word spread, people flocked to his tomb, which became famous for miracles. Rumor had it that young schoolboys in trouble with their masters made regular visits there.


Saints of January 10 mention with Popes
681  Pope St. Agatho  678-681 a holy death, concluded a life remarkable for sanctity and learning.  AGATHO, a Sicilian Greek by birth, was remarkable for his benevolence and an engaging sweetness of temper. He had been married and engaged in secular pursuits for twenty years before he became a monk at Palermo; and was treasurer of the Church at Rome when he succeeded Donus in the pontificate in 678. He presided by his three legates at the sixth general council (the third of Constantin­ople) in 680 against the monothelite heresy, which he confuted in a learned letter by the tradition of the apostolic church of Rome “acknowledged”, says he, “by the whole Catholic Church to be the mother and mistress of all churches, and to derive her superior authority from St Peter, the prince of the apostles, to whom Christ committed His whole flock, with a promise that his faith should never fail”. This epistle was approved as a rule of faith by the same council, which declared, “Peter spoke by Agatho”.

1209 St. William of Bourges canon monk Cistercian many miracles deaf, dumb, blind, the mentally ill became sound. The stone of his tomb in the Cathedral Church of Bourges cured mortal wounds and illnesses and delivered possessed persons; the deaf and dumb, the blind, the mentally ill became sound. So many miracles occurred there that the monks could not record them all, and he was canonized nine years after his death, in 1218, by Pope Honorius III. At Bourges in Aquitaine, St. William, archbishop and confessor, renowned for miracles and virtues.  He was canonized by Pope Honorius III.
William de Don Jeon was born at Nevers France. He was educated by his uncle Peter, archdeacon of Soissons, became a canon of Soissons and of Paris and then became a monk at Grandmont Abbey. He became a Cistercian at Pontigny, served as Abbot at Fontaine-Jean in Sens, and in 1187 became Abbot at Chalis near Senlis. He was named Archbishop of Bourges in 1200, accepted on the order of Pope Innocent III and his Cistercian superior, lived a life of great austerity, was in great demand as a confessor, aided the poor of his See, defended ecclesiastical rights against seculars, even the king, and converted many Albigensians during his missions to them.

1276 Teobaldo Visconti Pope St. Gregory X 1210-1276; Arriving in Rome in March, he was first ordained priest, then consecrated bishop, and crowned on the 27th  of the same month, in 1272. He took the name of Gregory X, and to procure the most effectual succour for the Holy Land he called a general council to meet at Lyons. This fourteenth general council, the second of Lyons, was opened in May 1274. Among those assembled were St Albert the Great and St Philip Benizi; St Thomas Aquinas died on his way thither, and St Bonaventure died at the council. In the fourth session the Greek legates on behalf of the Eastern emperor and patriarch restored communion between the Byzantine church and the Holy See.;  miraculous cures performed by him.  At Arezzo in Tuscany, blessed Gregory X, a native of Piacenza, who was elected Sovereign Pontiff while he was archdeacon of Liege.  He held the second Council of Lyons, received the Greeks into the unity of the Church, appeased discords among the Christians, made generous efforts for the recovery of the Holy Land, and governed the Church in a most holy manner.
 1283 BD JOHN OF VERCELLI Immediately on his election to the see of Rome, Bd Gregory X imposed on John of Vercelli and his friars the task of again pacifying the quarrelling states of Italy, and three years later he was ordered to draw up a schema for the Second Ecumenical Council of Lyons. At the council he met Jerome of Ascoli (afterwards Pope Nicholas IV), who had succeeded St Bonaventure as minister general of the Franciscans, and the two addressed a joint letter to the whole body of friars. Later on they were sent together by the Holy See to mediate between Philip III of France and Alfonso X of Castile, continuing the work of peace-maker, in which John excelled.


Arriving in Rome in March, he was first ordained priest, then consecrated bishop, and crowned on the 27th  of the same month, in 1272. He took the name of Gregory X, and to procure the most effectual succour for the Holy Land he called a general council to meet at Lyons. This fourteenth general council, the second of Lyons, was opened in May 1274. Among those assembled were St Albert the Great and St Philip Benizi; St Thomas Aquinas died on his way thither, and St Bonaventure died at the council. In the fourth session the Greek legates on behalf of the Eastern emperor and patriarch restored communion between the Byzantine church and the Holy See. Pope Gregory, we are told, shed tears whilst the Te Deum was sung. Unhappily the reconciliation was short-lived.
After the council, Bd Gregory devoted all his energies to concerting measures for carrying its decrees into execution, particularly those relating to the crusade in the East, which, however, never set out. This unwearied application to business, and the fatigues of his journey across the Alps on his return to Rome brought on a serious illness, of which he died at Arezzo on January 10, 1276. The name of Gregory X was added to the Roman Martyrology by Pope Benedict XIV; his holiness was always recognized, and had he lived longer he would doubtless have left a deeper mark on the Church.

Saints of January 11 mention with Popes
137-140 St. Hyginus, Pope a Greek confronts Gnostic heresy       At Rome, St. Hyginus, pope, who suffered a glorious martyrdom in the persecution of Antoninus.
Pope from 137-140, successorto Pope St. Telesphorus. He was a Greek, and probably had a pontificate of four years. He had to confront the Gnostic heresy and Valentinus and Cerdo, leaders of the heresy, who were in Rome at the time. Some lists proclaim him a martyr. His cult was suppressed in 1969.

250 St. Alexander "The charcoal burner" Bishop of Comana, in Pontus martyr
The discovery of his virtues was due to the very contempt with which he had been regarded. St. Gregory Thaumaturgus had been asked to come to Comana to help select a bishop for that place. As he rejected all the candidates, someone in derision suggested that he might accept Alexander, the charcoal-burner. Gregory took the suggestion seriously, summoned Alexander, and found that he had to do with a saint and a man of great capabilities.
In the modern Roman Martyrology his name occurs, and he is described as a "philosophus disertissimus."
  570 St. Anastasius X Benedictine abbot angel summoned him and monks to heaven. At Suppentonia, near Mount Soracte, St. Athanasius, monk, and his companions, who were called by a voice from heaven to enter the kingdom of God.
Noted by Pope St. Gregory the Great. Anastasius became a monk at Suppentonia in the diocese of Nepi, Italy, serving in time as abbot. Pope St. Gregory the Great recorded that an angel appeared to summon Anastasius and his monks, all of whom died in rapid succession after the visitation.

Saints of January 12 mention with Popes
690 St. Benedict Biscop an English monastic founder; five pilgrimages to Rome; SS Peter and Paul monasteries became the best-equipped in England, and St Benedict’s purchase of books was of special significance, for it made possible the work of the Venerable Bede; On his return to England, Benedict introduced, whenever he could, the religious rites as he saw them practised in Rome; first to introduce into England the building of stone churches and the art of making glass windows; Pope Vitalian sent him and the monk Adrian as advisers with Theodore, the newly appointed Archbishop of Canterbury

1700 St. Marguerite Bourgeoys; Children from European as well as Native American backgrounds in seventeenth-century Canada benefited from her great zeal and unshakable trust in God’s providence.  
Comment: It’s easy to become discouraged when plans that we think that God must endorse are frustrated. Marguerite was called not to be a cloistered nun but to be a foundress and an educator. God had not ignored her after all.

Quote: In his homily at her canonization, Pope John Paul II said, “...in particular, she [Marguerite] contributed to building up that new country [Canada], realizing the determining role of women, and she diligently strove toward their formation in a deeply Christian spirit.” He noted that she watched over her students with affection and confidence “in order to prepare them to become wives and worthy mothers, Christians, cultured, hard-working, radiant mothers.”

1892 St. Anthony Mary Pucci Servite priest caring for sick poor pioneering Holy Childhood Society.  Born Ap16 1819 Poggiole, Italy christened Eustace. He entered the Servites about 1837, taking the name Anthony Mary, and ordained in 1843. Assigned to Viareggio, Italy, Anthony became pastor of the parish in 1847. His entire life was spent instructing children, caring for the sick and poor, and pioneering the Holy Childhood Society.  He was heroic during the epidemics of 1854 and Anthony Mary died on January 14, 1892, in Viareggio. He was canonized in 1962.


Saints of January 13 mention with Popes
368 St. Hilary gentle courteous devoted writing great theology on Trinity      At Poitiers in France, the birthday of St. Hilary, bishop and confessor of the Catholic faith which he courageously defended, and for which he was banished for four years to Phrygia, where, among other miracles, he raised a man from the dead.  Pius IX declared him a doctor of the Church.  His festival is celebrated tomorrow.

1497 Blessed Veronica of Binasco (b. 1445) known as a great contemplative who also gave loving care to sick sisters in her community and ministered to the people of Milan. She had the gifts of prophecy, discernment and miracles..  Although she never learned to read and write, she was known and respected by the secular and ecclesiastical leaders of her day. Several times Christ gave to St. Martha, blessed Veronica of Binasco, virgin, of the Order of St. Augustine in prayer important messages which she carried to influential persons such as the Duke of Milan and Pope Alexander VI.
Born Giovanna Negroni in Binasco, Milan, Italy in 1445, she was raised in a peasant family. When she was 22 years old, she joined the monastery of Saint Martha in Milan. She took the religious name Veronica, reflecting her devotion to the Passion of Christ.
She always spoke of her own sinful life, as she called it, though, indeed, it was most innocent, with feelings of intense compunction. Veronica was favoured by God with many extraordinary visions and consolations. A detailed account is preserved of the principal incidents of our Lord’s life as they were revealed to her in her ecstasies. By her moving exhortations she softened and converted several obdurate sinners. She died at the hour which she had foretold, in the year 1497, at the age of fifty-two, and her sanctity was confirmed by miracles. Pope Leo X in 1517 permitted her to be honoured in her monastery in the same manner as if she had been beatified according to the usual forms, and the name of Bd Veronica of Binasco is inserted on this day in the Roman Martyrology, an unusual distinction in the case of a servant of God who has not been formally canonized.

Saints of January 14 mention with Popes

   255 St. Felix of Nola Bishop distributed inheritance to the poor assistant to St. Maximus of Nola tomb famous for miracles      At Nola in Campania, the birthday of St. Felix, priest, who (as is related by bishop St. Paulinus), after being subjected to torments by the persecutors, was cast into prison, bound hand and foot, and extended on shells and broken earthenware.  In the night, however, his bonds were loosened and he was delivered by an angel.  The persecution over, he brought many to the faith of Christ by his exemplary life and teaching, and, renowned for miracles, rested in peace..  Pope St Damasus pays a tribute in verse to Felix for a cure he himself had received. Cf. Quentin, Les Martyrologes historiques, pp. 518—522.
St Felix was a native of Nola, a Roman colony in Campania, fourteen miles from Naples, where his father Hermias, who was by birth a Syrian and had served in the army, had purchased an estate and settled down. He had two sons, Felix and Hermias, to whom at his death he left his patrimony. The younger sought preferment in the world by following the profession of arms. Felix, to become in effect what his name in Latin imported, that is “happy”, resolved to follow no other standard than that of the King of kings, Jesus Christ. For this purpose he distributed most of his possessions among the poor, and was ordained priest by St Maximus, Bishop of Nola, who, charmed with his virtue and prudence, made him his right hand in those times of trouble, and looked upon him as his destined successor.

368  Sancti Hilárii, Epíscopi Pictaviénsis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris; qui prídie hujus diéi evolávit in cælum.      St. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, confessor and doctor of the Church, who entered heaven on the thirteenth day of this month.  ST AUGUSTINE, who often urges the authority of St Hilary against the Pelagians, styles him “the illustrious doctor of the churches”. St Jerome says that he was amost eloquent man, and the trumpet of the Latins against the Arians” and in another place, that “in St Cyprian and St Hilary, God had transplanted two fair cedars out of the world into His Church  St Hilary was born at Poitiers, and his family was illustrious in Gaul. He himself testifies that he was brought up in idolatry, and gives us a detailed account of the steps by which God conducted him to a knowledge of the faith, He con­sidered, by the light of reason, that man, a moral and free agent, is placed in this world for the exercise of patience, temperance, and other virtues, which he saw must receive a recompense after this life. He ardently set about learning what God is, and quickly discovered the absurdity of polytheism, or a plurality of gods he was convinced that there can be only one God, and that He must be eternal, unchangeable, all-powerful, the first cause and author of all things. Hilary died at Poitiers, probably in the year 368, but neither the year nor the day of the month can be determined with certainty. The Roman Martyrology names his feast on January 14. St Hilary was proclaimed a doctor of the Church by Pope Pius IX in 1851.

 552 St. Datius Bishop of Milan, Italy , exiled by the Arian Ostrogoths  Driven from Milan the bishop betook himself to Constan­tinople, where, in 545, he boldly supported Pope Vigilius against Justinian in the controversy concerning the “Three Chapters”. He seems to have died in 552, while still at Constantinople, whence his remains were at a later date translated to his episcopal city of Milan. Pope St Gregory the Great in his Dialogues recounts a curious story of a haunted house from which the devil used to frighten all intending occupants, by producing the most alarming and discordant howlings of beasts. St Datius, however, showed no fear, but put the aggressor to shame and restored perfect quiet.

1180 Saint Lawrence O'Toole descendant of Irish petty kings    Dublin was a turbulent place in those days. It was practically under the control of half-pagan Danish settlers.  Archbishop Lawrence was a staunch reformer, which won him few friends. He established a rule of life for the clergy of his cathedral, and followed it strictly himself. At several local church councils he upheld the rights of the Church. He also went to Rome to take part in the reformist Third Council of the Lateran (1179). When he passed through England, King Henry II asked him to swear that while at Rome he would do nothing to infringe on the regal "rights" over the church in England and Ireland. Nevertheless, Lawrence was able to obtain from Pope Alexander II papal protection for the dioceses of the Dublin Province. The pope also named him papal legate to Ireland.

1200 BD ODO OF NOVARA He worked many miracles both during life and after death, but it horrified him to think that people should attribute to him any supernatural power.  BD Odo, a Carthusian monk of the twelfth century, stands out from among some of his saintly contemporaries by the fact that we have good first-hand evidence concerning his manner of life. Pope Gregory IX ordered an inquiry to be made with a view to his canonization, and the depositions of the witnesses are still preserved. One or two extracts will serve to sketch his portrait better than a narrative.

 “Master Richard, Bishop of Trivento, having been adjured in the name of the Holy Ghost, the holy Gospels lying open before him, affirmed that he had seen the blessed Odo and knew him to be a God-fearing man, modest and chaste, given up night and day to watching and prayer, clad only in rough garments of wool, living in a tiny cell, which he hardly ever quitted except to pray in the church, obeying always the sound of the bell when it called him to office. Without ceasing, he poured forth his soul in sighs and tears; there was no one he came across to whom he did not give new courage in the service of God; he constantly read the divine Scriptures, and in spite of his advanced age, as long as he stayed in his cell, he laboured with his hands as best he could that he might not fall a prey to idleness.”

One of these, the Archpriest Oderisius, deposes that he was present when Odo breathed his last, and that “as he lay upon the ground in his hair-shirt in the aforesaid little cell, he began to say, when at the point of death, ‘Wait for me, Lord, wait for me, I am coming to thee’; and when they asked him to whom he was speaking, he answered, ‘It is my King, whom now I see, I am standing in His presence.’ And when the blessed Odo spoke these words, just as if someone were offering him his hand, he stood straight up from the ground, and so, with his hands stretched out heavenwards, he passed away to our Lord.” This happened on January 14 in the year 1200, when Odo was believed to be nearly a hundred years old.

1225 St. Sava patron of Serbia monk founded monasteries translated religious works into Serbian. THE public ecclesiastical life and politics of St Sava (i.e. Sabas) were to a great extent conditioned by political considerations, a circumstance common to many churchmen in history, and nowhere more acute than in the Balkans, at the junction of great civil and ecclesiastical powers and the meeting-place of diverse cultures.

Sava, born in 1174, was the youngest of the three sons of Stephen I, founder of the dynasty of the Nemanydes and of the independent Serbian state. At the age of seventeen he became a monk on the Greek peninsula of Mount Athos, where he was joined by his father when that prince abdicated in 1196. Together they established a monastery for Serbian monks, with the name of Khilandari, which is still in existence as one of the seventeen “ruling monasteries” of the Holy Mountain. As abbot, Sava was noted for his light and effective touch in training young monks; it was remarked, too, that his influence was always on the side of gentleness and leniency. He began the work of translating books into the Serbian language, and there are still treasured at Khilandari a psalter and ritual written out by himself, and signed, “I, the unworthy lazy monk Sava”.

1811 St. Joseph Pignatelli, Pius XI said, served "chief link between Society of Jesus that had been and Society to be."  
When St. Ignatius of Loyola established the Society of Jesus in the 16th century, he placed its members at the disposal of the popes.  The Jesuit order thus became one of the chief agencies used by the bishops of Rome in their worldwide governance of the Church.  It was therefore ironic that a pope in 1773 suppressed the order! Not until 1814 was the Society completely restored.  Then St. Joseph Pignatelli, as Pope Pius XI said, served as "the chief link between the Society that had been and the Society that was to be."
Joseph Mary Pignatelli belonged to the Spanish branch of a princely Italian family.  Born in Saragossa, Spain, he entered the Jesuits at 16.  After his ordination he worked in his native city.  There he became noted for his care of prisoners condemned to death.

1892 ST ANTONY PUCCI a member of a religious order, the Servants of Mary, spent most of his life and achieved holiness as a parish priest and miracles of healing took place at his grave.

St Antony Pucci died on January 14, 1892 at the age of 73; his passing was greeted with an outburst of grief in Viareggio, and miracles of healing took place at his grave. He was beatified in 1952, and canonized in 1962 during the Second Vatican Council.  See the decree of beatification in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xliv (1952) ; and Un apostolo della Carità (1920), by a Servite.

Saints of January 15 mention with Popes
 570 St. Ita virgin founded a community of women dedicated to God extravagant miracles attributed.  570 ST ITA, VIRGIN
AMONG the women saints of Ireland, St Ita (also called Ida and Mida, with other variant spellings) holds the foremost place after St Brigid. Although her life has been overlaid with a multitude of mythical and extravagant miracles, there is no reason to doubt her historical existence. She is said to have been of royal descent, to have been born in one of the baronies of Decies, near Drum, Co. Waterford, and to have been originally called Deirdre. A noble suitor presented himself, but by fasting and praying for three days Ita, with angelic help, won her father’s consent to her leading a life of virginity. She accordingly migrated to Hy Conaill, in the western part of the present county of Limerick, There at Killeedy she gathered round her a community of maidens and there, after long years given to the service of God and her neighbour, she eventually died, probably in the year 570.
Not alone was St. Ita a saint, but she was the foster-mother of many saints, including St. Brendan the Voyager, St. Pulcherius (Mochoemog), and St. Cummian Fada. At the request of Bishop Butler of Limerick, Pope Pius IX granted a special Office and Mass for the feast of St. Ita, which is kept on 15 January.

764 St. Ceolwulf King of Northumbria patron of St. Bede.   IT is difficult to find any trace of late medieval cultus of this Northumbrian king, but he was held in high honour after his death, his body in 830 being trans­lated to Norham, and the head to Durham.
 Bede speaks enthusiastically of his virtues and his zeal, and dedicated to him his Ecclesiastical History, which he submitted to the king’s criticism. Ceolwulf ended his days as a monk at Lindisfarne, and it is recorded that through his influence the community, who previously had drunk nothing but water or milk, were allowed to take beer, and even wine. His relics were said to work many miracles. Simeon of Durham assigns his death to 764, but in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle the date given is 760.
Practically all available information will be found collected in Plummer’s edition of Bede, especially vol. ii, p. 340.
England, and patron of St. Bede. He resigned in 738 and became a monk at Lindisfame. St. Bede dedicated his Ecclesiastical History to “the most gracious King Ceolwulf.”

1208 Bl. Peter of Castelnau Martyred Cistercian papal legate and inquisitor.  1208 BD PETER OF CASTELNAU, MARTYR
This Cistercian monk was born near Montpellier, and in 1199 we hear of him as archdeacon of Maguelone, but he entered the Cistercian Order a year or two later. To him, aided by another of his religious brethren,
Pope Innocent III
in 1203 confided the mission of taking action as apostolic delegate and inquisi­tor against the Albigensian heretics, a duty which Peter discharged with much zeal, but little success. The opposition against him, which was fanned by Raymund VI, Count of Toulouse, ended in his assassination on January 55, 1209, not far from the abbey of Saint-Gilles. Pierced through the body by a lance, Bd Peter cried to his murderer, “May God forgive thee as fully as I for­give thee”. His relics were enshrined and venerated in the abbey church of Saint-Gilles.

1909 Bl. Arnold Jansen Founder of the Society of the Divine Word. Born in Goch, Germany, on November 5, 1837, Arnold studied at Gaesdonck, Munster, and Bonn. He was ordained in 1861 and served as a parish priest. He also served as a chaplain at an Ursuline convent at Kempen. In 1875, he founded the Society of the Divine Word in a mission house in Steyl, Holland. This society was designed to provide priests and lay brothers for the missions. The congregation was approved in 1901. Arnold also founded the Servant Sisters of the Holy Ghost for the missions in 1889. He died in Steyl on January 5, 1909, and was beatified in 1975 by Pope Paul VI.

Saints of January 16 mention with Popes



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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
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Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.