Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us that a life of Christian perfection is not impossible.
Day 23 40 Days for Life


 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world.

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary.

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  March 2016
Universal:    
That families in need may receive the necessary support and that children may grow up in healthy and peaceful environments.

Evangelization: That those Christians who, on account of their faith, are discriminated against or are being persecuted,
may remain strong and faithful to the Gospel, thanks to the incessant prayer of the Church

St. Katharine Drexel, Virgin (Optional Memorial)
437 St. Camilla Recluse disciple of St. Germanus of Auxerre
6th v St. Winwaloc Abbot-founder
       St. Non Mother of St. David of Wales
1040 St. Cunegundes Empress Patron of Lithuania virgin
1104 BD SERLO, ABBOT OF GLOUCESTER “How much the grace of God, conspiring with his industry, elevated the place [Gloucester Abbey], what eloquence can sufficiently explain? The management of the abbey in spirituals is what the weak may look up to and the strong not despise. This was effected by the discipline of Serb, a man humble to the good, but menacing and terrible to the proud of heart.”
1167 ST AELRED, ABBOT OF Rievaulx
"He who loves thee, possesses thee and he possesses thee in proportion as he loves, because thou art love. This is that abundance with which thy beloved are inebriated, melting away from themselves, that they may pass into thee by loving thee.”
1508 Blessed Jacobinus de'Canepaci Carmelite lay-brother OC (AC)  this good Carmelite lay-brother seems to have been one of those in which perfection is found by prayer, austerity and charity, A cultus began at his tomb shortly after his death miracles worked there, and this was approved in 1845.
1955 St. Katharine Drexel material and spiritual well-being of black and native Americans
Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

March 3 – 14th apparition at Lourdes (1858)
 
No manifestation of Christ can ever be detached from historical concreteness of the Body of Christ

The Church and Mary are always together and this is precisely the mystery of womanhood in the ecclesial community ... To separate Jesus from the Church would introduce an “absurd dichotomy,” as Blessed Paul VI wrote (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 16). It is not possible “to love Christ but without the Church, to listen to Christ but not the Church, to belong to Christ but outside the Church” (ibid.).
For the Church is herself God’s great family, which brings Christ to us.

Our faith is not an abstract doctrine or philosophy, but a vital and full relationship with a person: Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God who became man, was put to death, rose from the dead to save us, and is now living in our midst. Where can we encounter him? We encounter him … in our hierarchical, Holy Mother Church. It is the Church which says today: “Behold the Lamb of God”; it is the Church, which proclaims him; it is in the Church that Jesus continues to accomplish his acts of grace which are the sacraments.

No manifestation of Christ, even the most mystical, can ever be detached from the flesh and blood of the Church, from the historical concreteness of the Body of Christ. Without the Church, Jesus Christ ends up as an idea, a moral teaching, a feeling.

 
Pope Francis

Excerpt from his homily of January 1, 2015, given in the Vatican Basilica, for the solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God 
 

March 3 - Our Lady of Angels (Toulouse, France) - 14th Apparition in Lourdes
Mary's Unique Holiness
It is no wonder therefore that the usage prevailed among the Fathers whereby they called the mother of God entirely holy and free from all stain of sin, as though fashioned by the Holy Spirit and formed as a new creature. Adorned from the first instant of her conception with the radiance of an entirely unique holiness, the Virgin of Nazareth is greeted, on God's command, by an angel messenger as "full of grace", and to the heavenly messenger she replies, "Behold the handmaid of the Lord, be it done unto me according to thy word."
Thus Mary, a daughter of Adam, consenting to the Divine Word, became the mother of Jesus, the one and only Mediator. Embracing God's salvific will with a full heart and impeded by no sin, she devoted herself totally as a handmaid of the Lord to the person and work of her Son, under Him and with Him, by the grace of almighty God, serving the mystery of redemption.
Lumen Gentium Chapter VIII §56 Pope Paul VI, November 21, 1964

March 9 – Our Lady of Miracles (Treviso, Italy, 1510)
 
How could she ever take away the glory of her children?
 Mary will always have an important place in my life, partly because I was born near the Shrine of Our Lady of the Cape, a major shrine in Quebec. Each time I pray to her, for instance by reciting or "walking" the Rosary with my wife, I know that the saints are not too far off, not to mention all the angels. (…)

Mary intercedes for us here below. Mary cannot be separated from her children, in heaven or on earth, no more than Jesus can be separated from the Church. To pray to Mary is to pray to Jesus. (…) She is close to us because she is close to God. How could we not love her? Just by looking at her, we become better people.

She is more a mother than a queen. To think that she could ever take away the glory of her children! The little Therese exclaimed, on August 21, 1897: "We shouldn't say that because of her prerogatives, she eclipses the glory of all the saints, like the rising sun causes the stars to disappear. My Lord! How strange that is! A Mother taking away the glory of her children! As for me, I think quite the opposite; I believe that she will make the splendor of the elect even greater." Jacques Gauthier www.jacquesgauthier.com

You should never praise anyone until you see how how it turns out in the end.
-- St. Francis of Assisi

 
March 3 - Our Lady of Help (Italy) - 14th Apparition of Lourdes (France, 1858)
 No Big Fan of the Rosary
Before going to Cameroon, I was no big fan of the Rosary. I became an adept thanks to the nuns in my Cameroonian parish. During my captivity, I prayed the Rosary a lot, oftentimes when I was walking. I even invented more mysteries: the "merciful mysteries," and others that don't end in -ful or -ous, around Jesus' healings, and the Seven Words he gave us from the Cross.
However, I was never able to celebrate Mass; I had no bread, no wine, and no missal… but I did pray overtly in front of the guards so as to give a small testimony, so they would know that Christians pray as well.
In the morning, I found it difficult to pray Morning prayer but Evening prayer was always a special time of grace for me. I felt at great peace, and knew that it was a gift, something that didn’t come from me. The fact that I knew so many people were praying for me was also a great source of comfort.
 Missionary Father Georges Vandenbeusch
Ex-hostage kidnapped in Cameroon in November 2013,
interviewed by the newspaper La Croix, issue of January 2, 2014 (Excerpts).


Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Commemoration of faithful Orthodox Christians departed this life in the hope of resurrection to eternal life

308 Basiliscus_Eutropius_and_Cleonicus 

St. Marinus senator & Asterius Roman soldier Martyrs at Caesarea Israel
  250  Alexandríæ pássio sanctórum Cæreális, Púpuli, Caji et Serapiónis.
Ibídem commemorátio sanctórum Presbyterórum, Diaconórum et aliórum plurimórum
       St. Felix Martyr of North Africa with Fortunatus & others
         Natális sanctórum Mártyrum Macárii, Rufíni, Justi et Theóphili.
       Item sanctórum mílitum Cleoníci, Eutrópii et Basilísci, qui, in persecutióne
       Maximiáni, sub Asclepíade Præside, crucis supplício felíciter triumphárunt.
4th v St. Hemiterius and Cheledonius Spanish soldier martyrs in Calahorra
 437 St. Camilla Recluse disciple of St. Germanus of Auxerre
6th v. St. Arthelais Virgin and patron of Benevento
6th v. St. Foila Co-patroness of Kil-Faile and Kil-Golgan parishes
6th v St. Winwaloc Abbot-founder
       St. Non Mother of St. David of Wales
 536 St. Titian Bishop of Brescia great evangelizing and expansion movements
 575 St. Calupan Recluse monk of Meallot
7th v. St. Lamalisse Scottish hermit. An Island near Arran
803 St. Anselm of Nonantola Benedictine abbot duke
1040 St. Cunegundes Empress Patron of Lithuania virgin
1075 ST GERVINUS, ABBOT
1104 BD SERLO, ABBOT OF GLOUCESTER “How much the grace of God, conspiring with his industry, elevated the place [Gloucester Abbey], what eloquence can sufficiently explain? The management of the abbey in spirituals is what the weak may look up to and the strong not despise. This was effected by the discipline of Serb, a man humble to the good, but menacing and terrible to the proud of heart.”

1167 ST AELRED, ABBOT OF Rievaulx "He who loves thee, possesses thee and he possesses thee in proportion as he loves, because thou art love. This is that abundance with which thy beloved are inebriated, melting away from themselves, that they may pass into thee by loving thee.”

1508 Blessed Jacobinus de'Canepaci Carmelite lay-brother OC (AC)  this good Carmelite lay-brother seems to have been one of those in which perfection is found by prayer, austerity and charity, A cultus is said to have begun at his tomb shortly after his death on account of the miracles worked there, and this was approved in 1845.
1899 Bl. Mary Angela Victory over death shone in the gentle countenance of her face
1955 St. Katharine Drexel material and spiritual well-being of black and native Americans
Day 23 40 Days for Life
Dear Readers
 
Today’s message is one we all would like to see for our own city!     
In 273 locations right now, people are praying for an end to abortion in their communities.
And God is continuing to respond.
We have amazing news today about two abortion facilities where a combined tens of thousands of abortions were done. These are locations where faithful people have prayed for years … and numerous 40 Days for Life vigils were held.
Those centers – in Jacksonville, North Carolina and Augusta, Georgia – are now closed!
These are the 68th and 69th abortion facilities … where 40 Days for Life prayer vigils have taken place on the sidewalks outside … that have shut their doors forever and gone out of business.
Praise God!!!
Here are some of the details ... including the celebration in Jacksonville, where local volunteers were joined by 40 Days for Life board members Matt Britton and Tibor Baksy.
 
Jacksonville, North Carolina
Volunteers in Jacksonville thought they would be in for a long battle in their community.
When the local TV station did a report about the start of campaign, the owner of the abortion center where they’re praying appeared in the story … promising he would always be there for “the patients who choose to come to him.”
He had been in business for decades – and according to state health department records, almost 58,000 abortions were performed there over the years. So last month, volunteers launched their fifth 40-day vigil … praying on the sidewalk outside and serving as a witness to their city.
Not quite a week later, it was a very different story. The owner said that because of “unforeseen circumstances,” he would be closing his business.
 “A miracle has happened!” said Theresa, the local 40 Days for Life coordinator in Jacksonville. The closure was totally unexpected.
At a rally outside the center after its final day in business, she told reporters, “We’re just glad the abortions are going to be over … we’re thanking God that this day has come!”
 
Augusta, Georgia
In so many words, Planned Parenthood blamed economics for the closure of its Augusta facility. It used the words “fiscally responsible decisions.”
Quite likely … they simply weren’t making enough money at that location.
People had prayed in front of this business since it opened more than 35 years ago. During that time, there were also ten 40 Days for Life vigils.
 “God has answered many prayers of the Augusta people by closing Augusta Planned Parenthood,” said one Georgia volunteer. Another noted that Planned Parenthood had “long preyed on vulnerable women.”
Over the years, the facility had cut its operating hours. 40 Days for Life volunteers considered that a hopeful sign that Planned Parenthood would one day close. And now it has!
A news account of the closure explored the question of where women will receive medical care now that Planned Parenthood is gone. A representative of one medical center, which receives federal funding to help low-income patients, said it offers every single service that Planned Parenthood did, except one – abortion.
So the argument that poor women will suffer if there’s no Planned Parenthood just doesn’t hold up.
 
Here's today's devotional from Dennis DiMauro of Lutherans for Life.
Day 23 intention
We pray for the strength to love those who do not love us.

Scripture
But the Lord said "You have had pity on the plant for which you have not labored, nor made it grow, which came up in the night and perished in the night. And should I not pity Nineveh, that great city, in which are more than one hundred and twenty thousand persons who cannot discern between their right hand and their left, and much livestock? Should I not be concerned about that great city?" — Jonah 4:10-11

Reflection from Dennis DiMauro
God doesn't value people and things like we do. Jonah loved a shade tree more than an entire city of sinful people. We love our dogs more than a terrorist. We love our cars more than a beggar on the side of the road. And sometimes, we love our money more than a child growing in a desperate teenager's womb.

But God isn't like us. Genesis 1 tells us that humans were the capstone of God's creation. We were created on the sixth day after God had completed the land, the stars, the plants and the animals. Therefore, His love for us is greater than His love for a plant, an animal, or any other created thing.

And the book of Jonah tells us that He loves even the most sinful people and seeks to bring them into His merciful arms. And it's a love that seeks to touch all of his created children: that desperate teenager, the baby growing in her womb, even tyrants and terrorists.

So it's up to us to imitate God's merciful love by helping and praying for those who persecute us, and those who don't love us back.

Prayer
Gracious God, loving our enemies seems like one of most difficult things you could ask of us. Please remind us that this is how you love and that if you ask it of us then you will give us the grace to do it. This we ask through Christ our Lord, Amen.


Printable devotional
To download today's devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share with friends:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day23.pdf

March 3 - Fourteenth Apparition at Lourdes (France, 1858)Unconditional Commitment with Mary
Bernadette Soubirous is the saint of Lourdes … the saint of penance… the saint of poverty. Our Lady’s child visionary is also to many the saint of family. A string of seemingly endless back luck fell on the Soubirous family, but put to the test time and again, Bernadette and her family discovered the meaning of unconditional commitment.
“I do not promise to make you happy in this world, but in the next”…
The happiness that Mary promised to Bernadette was not only for life after death. It is the happiness experienced by all those who progress in the way of prayer; who go beyond prayerful words to the discovery of true prayer. There at the grotto, Bernadette’s deeply prayerful experience silently touched the hearts of all who watched, and crowds began to form in ever greater numbers as the famous Fortnight of Apparitions progressed.
Since the apparitions, millions of pilgrims have come to pray to Our Lady of Lourdes in the Grotto of Massabielle. Many sick people have been cured: 67 cures have been recognized as miracles. One day, you also will be happy to come to Lourdes, to pray in front of the grotto where Bernadette saw the Blessed Virgin eighteen times…Adapted from www.catholicpilgrims.com/lourdes


Concerning the Feelings of Marian Devotion
Of all passions love is the most unmanageable; nay more, I would not give much for that love which is never extravagant, which always observes the proprieties, and can move about in perfect good taste, under all emergencies. What mother, what husband or wife, what youth or maiden in love, but says a thousand foolish things, in the way of endearment, which the speaker would be sorry for strangers to hear; yet they are not on that account unwelcome to the parties to whom they are addressed.
Sometimes by bad luck they are written down, sometimes they get into the newspapers; and what might be even graceful, when it was fresh from the heart, and interpreted by the voice and the countenance, presents but a melancholy exhibition when served up cold for the public eye.
So it is with devotional feelings. Burning thoughts and words are as open to criticism as they are beyond it. What is abstractedly extravagant, may in particular persons be becoming and beautiful, and only fall under blame when it is found in others who imitate them. When it is formalized into meditations or exercises, it is as repulsive as love-letters in a police report.

John Henri Newman  Letter to Pusey, 1866


 St. Marinus senator & Asterius Roman soldier Martyrs at Caesarea Israel.
 Cæsaréæ, in Palæstína, sanctórum Mártyrum Maríni mílitis, et Astérii Senatóris, in persecutióne Valeriáni.  Horum prior, cum accusátus esset a commilitiónibus ut Christiánus, et, interrogátus a Júdice, se Christiánum esse voce claríssima testarétur, martyrii corónam abscissióne cápitis accépit; cumque Astérius corpus Mártyris, cápite truncátum, subjéctis húmeris et substráta veste, qua induebátur, excíperet, honórem quem Martyrii détulit, contínuo et ipse Martyr accépit.
      At Caesarea in Palestine, during the persecution of Valerian, the holy martyrs Marinus, soldier, and Asterius, senator.  The former was examined by the judge on the charge laid against him by his fellow soldiers of being a Christian, and as he admitted the accusation in a firm tone of voice, he was beheaded, and thus received the crown of martyrdom.  His mutilated body was taken by Asterius on his own shoulders, and wrapped in the garment which he himself wore.  This service at once gained for Asterius the palm of martyrdom as a reward for the honour which he had given to a martyr.
Marinus was a Roman soldier from a noble family of Caesarea, Palestine, denounced by a rival and martyred for the faith. Asterius, reportedly a senator, buried Marinus’ remains and was slain also.
262 SS. MARINUS AND ASTYRIUS, MARTYRS
EUSEBIUS, in his Ecclesiastical History, describes the martyrdom of St Marinus. As a man who belonged to a noble family of Caesarea in Palestine, and had served with distinction in the army, he was about to be honoured with the decoration of the vine switch , emblematic of the dignity of “centurion”, when a rival, who was in the running for the same distinction, raised the objection that since Marinus was a Christian and would not sacrifice to the emperor, he was therefore disqualified. Achaeus, the governor, accordingly questioned him, and eliciting a confession of his faith, gave him three hours in which to reconsider his position. As he left the judgement hall he was met by Theotecnus, bishop of the city, who leading him into the church made him stand close to the altar. Pointing to the sword which hung at his side and then to the book of the gospels, he told him to choose between the two. Marinus without hesitation stretched out his hand and took the book. “Hold fast then to God”, said the bishop, “that, strengthened by Him, thou mayest obtain what thou hast chosen. Go in peace.” Upon returning before the judge he declared his faith with as great determination as before, and was immediately led away to execution.

St Astyrius, a Roman senator in high favour with the emperor, was present at the martyrdom. Wrapping the body in the cloak he was wearing he carried it away on his own shoulders and gave it honourable burial. Eusebius does not say that Astyrius himself was put to death, but Rufinus in his Latin version of the history assumes this, and both the Roman Martyrology and the Greek Menaion (under August 7) commemorate the senator as a martyr.

All the information we possess regarding these saints is derived from Eusebius, Eccl. Hist., bk vii, chs. 15 and 16.
St. Felix Martyr of North Africa with Fortunatus & others
Cæsaréæ, in Palæstína, sanctórum Mártyrum Maríni mílitis, et Astérii Senatóris, in persecutióne Valeriáni.  Horum prior, cum accusátus esset a commilitiónibus ut Christiánus, et, interrogátus a Júdice, se Christiánum esse voce claríssima testarétur, martyrii corónam abscissióne cápitis accépit; cumque Astérius corpus Mártyris, cápite truncátum, subjéctis húmeris et substráta veste, qua induebátur, excíperet, honórem quem Martyrii détulit, contínuo et ipse Martyr accépit.
At Caesarea in Palestine, during the persecution of Valerian, the holy martyrs Marinus, soldier, and Asterius, senator.  The former was examined by the judge on the charge laid against him by his fellow soldiers of being a Christian, and as he admitted the accusation in a firm tone of voice, he was beheaded, and thus received the crown of martyrdom.  His mutilated body was taken by Asterius on his own shoulders, and wrapped in the garment which he himself wore.  This service at once gained for Asterius the palm of martyrdom as a reward for the honour which he had given to a martyr.
Luciolus, Marcia, and thirty-six compan­ions
.
4th v St. Hemiterius and Cheledonius Spanish soldier martyrs who died in Calahorra Old Castile, Spain, their martyrdom was recorded by St. Gregory of Tour, France, and Prudentius.
Calagúrri, in Hispánia, natális sanctórum Mártyrum Hemitérii et Cheledónii fratrum, qui, cum apud Legiónem, Gallǽciæ urbem, in castris militárent, ambo, exsurgénte persecutiónis procélla, pro confessióne nóminis Christi, Calagúrrim usque profécti, ibi, plúribus torméntis afflícti, martyrio coronáti sunt.
At Calahorra in Spain, the birthday of the holy martyrs Hermiterius and Cheledonius, soldiers in the army at Léon, a city of Galicia.  Upon the approach of persecution they went to Calahorra in order to confess the name of Christ, and after enduring many torments there, they were crowned with martyrdom.

304 SS. EMETERIUS AND CHELIDONIUS, MARTYRS
BEYOND Their names and the fact of their martyrdom, scarcely anything is actually known about St Emeterius and St Chelidonius, the patrons of Santander. Pruden­tius, who composed a long poem in their honour, says that the persecutors burned the acts of their martyrdom, “grudging us the history of so glorious a triumph”. Tradition says that they were the sons of St Marcellus, both of them soldiers like their father, and that they perished by the sword, under Diocletian, at Calahorra in Spain. According to a story related by St Gregory of Tours, the ring of St Emeterius and the orarium (handkerchief?) of St Chelidonius were caught up into heaven at the moment of their execution.
This seems to be one of the cases in which an early local cultus and tradition fully guarantee the fact of the martyrdom, though we lack knowledge of anything more than the names of the martyrs and the date and place where they suffered. Prudentius mentions them in more than one of his poems, and they are noticed in the “Hieronymianum” (CMH., p. 124). The chapter devoted to them by Gregory of Tours is no. 92 of his In gloria martyrum.
Eódem die pássio sanctórum Felícis, Lucióli, Fortunáti, Márciæ et Sociórum.
       The same day, the passion of the Saints Felix, Luciolus, Fortunatus, Marcia, and their companions.
308 St. Cleonicus Martyr with Eutropius & others
Item sanctórum mílitum Cleoníci, Eutrópii et Basilísci, qui, in persecutióne Maximiáni, sub Asclepíade Præside, crucis supplício felíciter triumphárunt.
Also, the sainted soldiers Cleonicus, Eutropius, and Basiliscus, who gloriously triumphed by death on the cross under the governor Asclepias during the persecution of Maximian.
Basiliscus, and others, put to death by Emperor Galerius in the Province of Pontus on the Black Sea. These martyrs were associated with St. Theodore.
The Holy Martyrs Eutropius, Cleonicus and Basiliscus suffered in the city of Pontine Amasea (Asia Minor) in about the year 308.

The brothers Eutropius and Cleonicus, and Basiliscus the nephew of the Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit (February 17), were comrades. After the martyric death of St Theodore, they wound up in prison and by their preaching brought many of the pagans in prison with them to the Christian Faith.

When he tortured St Theodore, Publius perished shamefully, struck down by divine wrath. Asclepiodotus was chosen as ruler of Amasea, and was more inhumane than his predecessor. Knowing the comrades of St Theodore the Recruit were all in prison, the governor commanded that they be brought to him. Sts Eutropius, Cleonicus and Basiliscus thus firmly confessed their faith in Christ before this new governor. They were mercilessly beaten, so that their bodies were entirely bruised.

As he was being tortured St Eutropius prayed loudly to the Savior, "Grant us, O Lord, to endure these wounds for the sake of the crown of martyrdom, and help us, as You helped Your servant Theodore." In answer to the saint's prayer, the Lord Himself appeared to the martyrs with His angels and the holy Great Martyr Theodore the Recruit, saying to them: "Behold, the Savior has come to help you, that you may know life eternal."

Soldiers and many of the people standing nearby were also granted to behold the Savior. They urged Asclepiodotus to halt the tortures. Seeing that the people were distraught and ready to believe in the true God, the governor commanded the martyrs to be taken away. The governor then invited St Eutropius to supper and urged him to offer public sacrifice to the pagan gods, yet remain a Christian in soul. Eutropius refused this offer.

On the following day they brought the martyrs to a pagan temple, to force them to offer sacrifice. Eutropius entreated the Savior: "Lord, be with us, and destroy the raging of the pagans. Grant that on this place the Bloodless Sacrifice of the Christians be offered to You, the true God." No sooner had these last words been spoken, than an earthquake began. The walls of the temple collapsed, and the statue of the goddess Artemis was smashed to bits. Everyone fled from the temple avoid being crushed among the rubble. In the noise of the earthquake a voice was heard from on high:
"Your prayer has been heard, and on this place a house of Christian prayer shall be built."

When the earthquake ended, the governor Asclepiodotus, barely recovered from his fright, gave orders to drive high wooden stakes into the ground, tie the martyrs to them and pour boiling tar over them. The saints began to pray to God, and Eutropius cried out turning to the torturers: "May the Lord turn your deed against you!"

The tar began to flow beside the bodies of the martyrs, like water with marble, scorching the torturers. Those seeing this fled in terror, but the governor in his bitterness gave orders to rake their bodies with iron hooks and to sting their wounds with mustard mixed with salt and vinegar. The saints endured these torments with remarkable firmness.
The night before their execution the saints spent their time at prayer, and again the Lord appeared to them and strengthened them.

On the morning of March 3, Sts Eutropius and Cleonicus were crucified, but Basiliscus was left in prison.  St Basiliscus was executed on May 22 in the city of Komana. They beheaded him, and threw his body into a river, but Christians found his relics and buried them in a ploughed field. Later at Komana a church was built and dedicated to St Basiliscus.
An account of the life of the holy martyr is found under May 22.
437 St. Camilla Recluse disciple of St. Germanus of Auxerre.
at Ravenna, Italy. She was born in Civitavecchia, became St. Germanus' disciple, and accompanied his missions to Auxerre, France. There she became a hermitess.

536 St. Titian Bishop of Brescia Italy; great evangelizing and expansion movements
Br íxiæ sancti Titiáni, Epíscopi et Confessóris. At Brescia, St. Titian, bishop and confessor.
He was  part of the great evangelizing and expansion movements of the Church in that era. He was German by birth.
6th v. St. Arthelais Virgin and patron of Benevento Italy.
She is recorded as having fled Constantinople, to escape the attentions of Byzantine Emperor Justinian. Arthelais was the daughter of Proconsul Lucius and his wife, Anthusa. When Arthelais fled from the emperor, she went to her uncle, Narses, in Benevento. Tradition states that the entire population of the city welcomed her. Arthelais died at the age of sixteen.

560? ST ARTHELAIS, VIRGIN

DURING the reign of the Emperor Justinian, there lived in Constantinople a charm­ing and virtuous girl, the daughter of the proconsul Lucius and his wife Anthusa. Many were the suitors for the hand of Arthelais, but the emperor, hearing of her beauty, sent messengers to her father asking that she should be handed over to him. Her parents and she were dismayed, and concluded that the only way to avoid dishonour was by flight. It was arranged that she should go to her uncle Narses Patricius at Benevento, and her father escorted her as far as Buda in Dalmatia, where he left her to prosecute her journey under the charge of three attendants. Hardly had he departed when they were set upon by robbers, who seized Arthelais whilst her servants took to flight. After three days’ imprisonment she was miraculously delivered and rejoined her escort, but the wrath of God fell upon her captors. The travellers crossed the sea in safety and arrived at Sipontum, from whence they sent messengers to Narses, who, however, had already started to meet them, having been apprised of their arrival in a dream. From Sipontum they passed on to Lucera and thence to Benevento, where the whole population came out to greet her. From the Golden gate of the city she walked barefoot to the church of our Lady, where she offered gifts, the bells in the meantime pealing forth in her honour. She then gave herself to unceasing prayer and fasted every day except Sunday—thereby, no doubt, undermining her health, for she died of fever at the age of sixteen amid general lamentation.
These historical details cannot be regarded as trustworthy. Besides the two very short biographies printed in the Acta Sanctorum, March, vol. i, a longer account is furnished in the text translated from a Greek original by a certain Peter. See S. Borgia, Memorie istoriche di Benevento, vol. i, pp. 143—176.

575 St. Calupan Recluse monk of Meallot.in Auvergne, France. He lived his later years in a nearby cave.
6th v. St. Foila Co-patroness of Kil-Faile and Kil-Golgan parishes in Galway, Ireland, the sister of St. Colgan.
6th v St. Winwaloc Abbot-founder also called Wonnow, Wynwallow, and Gwenno.
Born at Ploufragen, in Brittany, France, he was of Anglo-Saxon descent. At the age of fifteen he entered the monastery on Lauren Island under Abbot Budoc. Several years later he and eleven monks founded Landevenne Monastery near Brest, in Brittany on land donated by Prince Gallo. Winwabe died there. As there are several churches in Cornwall, England, dedicated to him, it is possible that he had some connection with that region or that some of his relics were translated there in later years.
6th v. ST WINWALOE, OR GUÉNOLÉ, ABBOT
THE accounts of the early life of St Winwaloe are so conflicting that it has been suggested that there were two holy men of that name, one of whom was born in Britain and became the disciple of St Samson, whereas the abbot who is commem­orated on this day was born in Brittany, whither his parents, Fracan and Gwen, had migrated from Britain and settled at Ploufragan.
On account of his beauty, the boy was named Winwaloe, or “He that is fair”, and, because he was their third son, his parents consecrated him to God from his birth. They were tenderly attached to him, and in spite of their vow they kept him with them until he was fifteen, although he had given early evidence of a vocation for the religious life. A violent thunderstorm which they took to be a sign from Heaven finally decided them to part from him, and his father took him to a monastery on the little island of Lauré, under an Abbot Budoc. Here St Winwaloe and his two brothers appear to have spent several years. It is told of him that while he was still at home he was one day walking with his father when he perceived a number of sails on the horizon, and with boyish exaggeration exclaimed, “I see a thousand ships”. They turned out to be pirates who landed on the coast, but Fracan and his followers completely defeated them. Winwaloe, who had been praying earnestly during the fight, persuaded his father to build a monastery with the spoil, and a cross which marks the spot where the invaders landed is called to this day, “The Cross of the Thousand Sails”.

St Winwaloe made such progress as a monk that the thought occurred to him of sailing to Ireland to carry on the labours of St Patrick, but that saint, appearing in a vision, dissuaded him. Thereupon Budoc sent him with eleven monks to found another monastery. After wandering through the northern part of Brittany they found, as they thought, a suitable island at the mouth of the river Aulne, and there they built themselves a settlement of huts which afterwards gave to the island its name of Tibidy or “The House of Prayer”. The place proved, however, to be exposed to such violent storms that, after three years, the monks were obliged to abandon it and to settle on the mainland. With the assistance of the rough Prince Grallo, who had a great veneration for St Winwaloe, they founded the monastery of Landévennec in a sheltered valley on the opposite side of Brest harbour, and there the holy abbot ruled over a large number of monks for many years, until at last in extreme old age he died when standing at the altar after giving the kiss of peace.

The popularity of the saint is attested by the number of dedications made to him and by the many variations of his name. He appears as Winwalocus, Gum­valoeus, Wingalotus, Galnutius, Guingalois, Guignolé, Guenolé and in several other spellings. St Winwaloe’s name is entered in two or three late medieval English calendars, but there seems to have been little cultus outside the area of Celtic influences; there are dedications to him in Cornwall, at Gunwalloe, Landewednack confidence in her was momentarily shaken. Feeling that her position required her and elsewhere vindication, the empress asked to be allowed the ordeal by fire, and walked unscathed. 

The legendary character of the sources upon which this history is based is made evident by the extravagant miracles with which it is freely embroidered. The longest form seems to have been the composition of Wrdisten, Abbot of Landévennec, who lived more than 300 years after the time of St Winwaloe. The text of Wrdisten’s very tedious and discursive biography may be found in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. vii (1888), pp. 167—264. In LBS., vol. iv, pp. 353—362, there is a discussion of the various texts and abridgements of the life. See also G. H. Doble, St Winwaloe (1940) and Fr J. Le Jollec, Guénolé, le saint de Landévennec (1952), who gives an account of the abbey of Landévennec, whose restoration has been undertaken by the Benedictines of Kerbénéat, and of the saint’s cultus.

St. Non Mother of St. David of Wales also called Nonnita or Nonna.
Perhaps born of noble descent in Dyfed, Wales, she was seduced by or possibly married a local chieftain named Sant. The result of their union was St. David. She supposedly went to Cornwall and died in Brittany Her relics were enshrined in Cornwall until the Reformation. 

Non, Widow (AC) (also known as Nonnita) 6th century. Non is an obscure Irish saint of noble birth, who resided at a convent in Ty Gwyn near present-day St. David's in Wales. She is said to have been the unwed mother of Saint David (Dewi), after being seduced by a local chieftain named Sant. Some say she was married to Sant either before or after the birth of David. She was said to have later gone to Cornwall and to have ended her days at a convent in Brittany (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

6th v. ST NON, OR NONNITA
Since the revised March volume of Butler’s Lives was published a church has been opened on the cliffs near Saint Davids by the Passionist fathers dedicated in honour of our Lady and St Non. It therefore seems desirable to say a word about this obscure saint, if only to show how little is known about her.

If St Non is obscure, she is also famous in the Celtic lands as the mother of St David, and the few references to her are mostly to be found in Rhygyfarch’s (Rice-march) life of St David and its derivatives. According to his story there was in the sixth century a religious house of women at Ty Gwyn, north-west of the village-city that we now call Saint Davids and close to the Whitesand bay (Porth Mawr) from which tradition says St Patrick set out to convert the Irish. In this nunnery was a young woman of noble birth and great beauty named Non; she came under the notice of a local chieftain, called Sant, who violated her; and the fruit of this association was St David. He is supposed to have been born during a storm, at the spot on the coast, south of modern Saint Davids and overlooking St Bride’s Bay, where the ruins of the medieval St Non’s chapel still stand. Two hundred yards away is the Catholic church referred to above, built in part of stones from old ecclesiastical buildings of the district. David was baptized in the spring at Porth Clais, it is said, by or at the instance of St Ailbhe, who is stated to have been Non’s nephew and who was responsible, according to some writers, for her leaving the nunnery after her violation.

What truth there is in all this no one can say. It at least seems likely that she was not a nun; the Latin form of her name, Nonna, means “nun”, and so could easily be misunderstood. According to some Irish writers she subsequently had other children. And it may well be that, whether before or after David’s birth, she was Sant’s wife. Later in life she is said to have gone into Cornwall and then settled in Brittany, where place-names and church dedications give some support to the statement. In the west of England in the middle ages she was esteemed to be buried at Altarnun in Cornwall, but Dirinon, in the department of Finistère in Brittany, seems to have a better claim. Her grave is shown in the church there, covered by a striking medieval table-tomb on which is a recumbent effigy of the saint. In both Brittany and Wales there was considerable devotion to St Non in the past; she was often called Non the Blessed, and the bards refer to her beauty. Lewis Glyn Cothi (fifteenth century) in a poem swears “by the hand of Non”, perhaps a reference to the legend that while in labour with David she left the impression of her hand on a stone which was by her side.

See bibliographical note to St David (March 1). A mystery play in Breton, Buhez Sante Nonn, formerly performed at Dirinon, was translated from a manuscript of about 1400 into French in the Revue Celtique (vol. viii, 1887). See also LBS., s.v. Non and David, with numerous references. There are holy wells of St Non at Saint Davids, at Dirinon and at several places in Cornwall, though the best-known one here, at Altarnun, is now dried up; the Saint Davids well is now in the grounds of the Passionist retreat there. For an interesting reference to St David’s birth, see Blackfriars, vol. xxix (1948), pp. 123—125 and cf. G. H. Doble in the Cornish Times for August 17, 1928 (reprinted separately, St Nonna, same year) he suggests that the Cornish St Non was a man.
7th v. St. Lamalisse Scottish hermit. An Island near Arran Scotland, is named in his honor.
7th v. St. Sacer Also Mo-Sacra, an Irish abbot He is honored as the founder of the monastery of Saggard, Dublin.
728 St. Cele-Christ Bishop Leinster England. His name is from Christicola, meaning “Christ-wor­shipper.”  
803 St. Anselm of Nonantola Benedictine abbot duke

803 ST ANSELM OF NONANTOLA, ABBOT
WHEN the Langobard King Aistulf was reigning in Italy, he was greatly assisted in his military campaigns by his brother-in-law, Anselm, Duke of Friuli. The duke was not only a valiant soldier but also an ardent Christian, and founded first a monastery with a hospital at Fanano in the province of Modena and then a larger abbey twenty miles further south at Nonantola. Desirous of consecrating himself entirely to God, he then went to Rome, where he was clothed with the habit of St Benedict and appointed abbot over the new community. 
St. Anselm also received from Pope Stephen III permission to remove to Nonantola the body of Pope St Silvester; and Langobard King Aistulf enriched the abbey with gifts and granted it many privileges it became very celebrated throughout all Italy.
Abbot Anselm came to rule over more than one thousand monks, besides having charge of a great hospital and hospice for the sick and for pilgrims. This he had built near the monastery and dedicated it in honour of St Ambrose. After the death of Aistulf, his successor Desiderius banished the holy abbot to Monte Cassino, where he remained for seven years, but Charlemagne restored him to Nonantola, where he died in a good old age, after having spent fifty years in religion.
The short Latin life of St Anselm, which has been several times printed (e.g. by Mabillon, by Muratori, and in MCH.), was edited with much illustrative matter by P. Bartolotti in 1892, Antica vita di S. Anselmo di Nonantola.

He was born in Forum Juhi, modern Friuli, Italy, heir to a local title and brother-in-law of King Aistulf, the Lombard ruler who married Anselm's sister, Gisaltruda. Anselm left his titles and power, and in 750 founded a monastery at Tanano, Italy. Two years later he built the monastery of Nonantola near Modena, Italy. He then went to Rome where Pope Stephen II invested him with the habit of the Benedictine Order. Anselm founded many charitable institutions; however, he lost his patronage when Aistulf died. Desiderius, the new Lombard ruler, banished Anselm from his kingdom in 756. He went to Monte Cassino for seven years, until Desiderius fell to the armies of Charlemagne. Anselm remained in Nonantola until his death. He is patron of the region.

Anselm of Nonantola, OSB, Abbot (AC) Brother-in-law of the Lombard King Aistulph, and duke of Friuli, Anselm became a monk and founded the abbey of Fanano near Modena, Italy--then a second at Nonantola. Both monasteries included hospitals and hostels. Aistulph's successor, King Desiderius banished Anselm to Montecassino, but after seven years he was restored to Nonantola by Charlemagne (Benedictines).

1040 St. Cunegundes Empress Patron of Lithuania virgin
Bambérgæ sanctæ Cunegúndis Augústæ, quæ, sancto Henríco Primo, Romanórum Imperatóri, nupta, perpétuam virginitátem, ipso annuénte, servávit; ac, bonórum óperum méritis cumuláta, sancto fine quiévit, et post óbitum miráculis cláruit. 
At Bamberg, Empress St. Cunegunda, who preserved her virginity with the consent of her husband, Emperor Henry I.  She completed a life rich in meritorious good works with a holy death, and afterward worked many miracles.

1033 ST CUNEGUND, WIDOW
St CUNEGUND was piously trained from her earliest years by her parents, Siegfried of Luxemburg and his saintly wife Hedwig. She married St Henry, Duke of Bavaria, who gave her as a wedding present a crucifix of eastern workmanship which is said to be identical with one now existing in Munich. Later writers have asserted that they both took a vow of virginity on their wedding-day, and the story is accepted in the Roman Martyrology; but historians now seem to agree that there is no reliable evidence to corroborate the statement. In the middle of the eleventh century Cardinal Humbert knew nothing of the alleged celibate marriage he attributed their childlessness to divine punishment for what he regarded as Henry’s exploitation of the Church.

Upon the death of the Emperor Otto III, Henry was elected king of the Romans, and his coronation by St Willigis at Mama was followed, two months later, by that of his wife at Paderborn. In 1013 they went together to Rome to receive the imperial crown from Pope Benedict VIII.

In spite of her exemplary life, Cunegund is said by the hagiographers of a later age to have become the victim of slanderous tongues, so that even her husband’s confidence in her was momentarily shaken, Feeling that her position required her vindication, the empress asked to be allowed the ordeal by fire, and walked unscathed over red-hot ploughshares. Henry was eager to make amends for his unworthy suspicions, and they lived thenceforth in the closest union of hearts, striving in every way to promote the glory of God and the advancement of religion. But this story too is insufficiently supported.

It was partly at the instigation of St Cunegund that the emperor founded the monastery and cathedral of Bamberg, to the consecration of which Pope Benedict came in person, and she obtained for the city such privileges that by common report her silken threads were a better defence than walls. During a dangerous illness she had made a vow that if she recovered she would found a convent at Kaufungen, near Cassel, in Hesse. This she proceeded to do, and had nearly finished building a house for nuns of the Benedictine Order when St Henry died.

Her later bio­graphers relate a quaint story about the first abbess.
It appears that the empress had a young niece, called Judith or Jutta, to whom she was much attached, and whom she had educated with great care. When a superior had to be found for the new convent, St Cunegund appointed Judith and gave her many admonitions and much good advice. No sooner, however, did the young abbess find herself free, than she began to show symptoms of frivolity and lax observance. It was soon noticed that she was ever the first in the refectory and the last to come to chapel, and that she was a gossip and listened to tales. In vain did her aunt remonstrate with her. The climax came when she failed to appear in the Sunday procession and was found feasting with some of the younger sisters. Filled with indignation St Cunegund sternly upbraided the culprit, and even struck her. The marks of her fingers remained impressed upon the abbess’s cheek until her dying day, and the marvel not only converted her, but had a salutary effect upon the whole community.

On the anniversary of her husband’s death in 1024 Cunegund invited a number of prelates to the dedication of her church at Kaufungen. There, when the gospel had been sung at Mass, she offered at the altar a piece of the true cross, and then, putting off her imperial robes, she was clothed in a nun’s habit, and the bishop gave her the veil. Once she had been consecrated to God in religion, she seemed entirely to forget that she had ever been an empress and behaved as the lowest in the house, being convinced that she was so before God. She feared nothing more than any­thing that could recall her former dignity. She prayed and read much and especially made it her business to visit and comfort the sick. Thus she passed the last years of her life, dying on March 3, 1033 (or 1039). Her body was taken to Bamberg to be buried with her husband’s.

It is to the contemporary chroniclers, rather than to the relatively late biography of St Cunegund, that we must look for a trustworthy statement of the facts of her life. The latter is under suspicion of having been written with a view to her future canonization, which even­tually came about in the year 1200. J. B. Sägmüller, in particular (Theologische Quartalschrift, 1903, 1907, 1951), has shown good reason for doubting that the childlessness of the emperor and empress was due to any compact between the parties to live together as Mary and Joseph; cf. A. Michel in the same, vol. xcviii (1916), pp. 463—467. The biography, in varying forms, has been edited in the Acta Sanctorum (March, vol. i) and by G. Waitz in MCII., Scriptores, vol. vii. There are popular but rather uncritical modern lives of St Cunegund written by Toussaint and by H. Muller, the latter including an account of both St Henry and St Cunegund in one narrative. Cf. Hauck, Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands, vol. iii, p. 539.

The father of St. Cunegundes was Sigfrid, first Count of Luxemburg. After a pious education, she was married to St. Henry, Duke of Bavaria, who, upon the death of Emperor Otho III, was chosen King of the Romans. St. Cunegundes was crowned at Paderborn in 1002. In 1014 she went with her husband to Rome and became Empress, receiving together with him the imperial crown from the hands Pope Benedict VIII. Though married, she lived in continence, for, with her husband's consent, she had made a vow of virginity before marriage. Calumniators accused her of scandalous conduct, but her innocence was signally vindicated by Divine Providence, as she walked over pieces of flaming irons without injury, to the great joy of the Emperor. Her husband, Henry II, died in 1024, leaving his widow comparatively poor, for she had given away nearly all her wealth in charitable works. In 1025, on the anniversary of his death, and on the occasion of the dedication of a monastery which she had built for Benedictine nuns at Kaffungen, she clothed herself with a poor habit, adopted the veil, which she received from the hands of the Bishop, and entered that same monastery. Her occupations consisted in prayer, reading, and manual labor, and thus she spent the last fifteen years of her life. She died in 1040, and her body was carried to Bamberg, where it was laid near that of her husband, St. Henry.
1075 ST GERVINUS, ABBOT
St GERVINUS came of a family which is said to have been related to Bruno, Bishop of Toul, who afterwards was raised to the papacy as Leo IX.

He was born in the district of Rheims and received his education at the episcopal school. A clever and eager student, he was greatly attracted by the Latin classics, and was at one time in danger of being led astray by the sensuous charm of the poetry he read, but by the grace of God he triumphed over temptation. After his ordination to the priesthood he became one of the canons of Rheims, and was thus comfort­ably provided for. Finding, however, that the life of a secular priest did not satisfy him, he entered the abbey of Saint-Vanne at Verdun, where he soon was noted for his wide knowledge, his eloquence and his modesty. In 1045 Henry I, King of France, appointed Gervinus abbot of Saint-Riquier, but he would not accept until he had received the suffrages of all the monks. His term of office was marked by the building of several chapels and sanctuaries, by his pru­dence in the management of the affairs of the abbey and by the zeal he displayed in collecting Greek and Latin manuscripts for the library. Pilgrims used to throng the church, and the abbot sometimes spent nearly the whole day in hearing confessions. Nor was his zeal confined to his abbey, for he made excursions through Picardy, Normandy, Aquitaine and as far as Thuringia, preaching and hearing confessions. When Pope St Leo IX in 1050 came in person to Rheims to consecrate the church of St Remigius and to preside over a council, the abbot of Saint-Riquier accompanied him on his journey back to Rome.

More than once St Gervinus visited England, where his abbey owned estates, and each time he preached the word and visited English shrines. St Edward the Confessor esteemed him highly, and a curious story is told that Queen Edith, sharing her husband’s admiration, on their first meeting came forward accord­ing to the English custom to welcome the abbot with a kiss. Gervinus, think­ing this unseemly, drew back and declined the proffered salute. Queen Edith was so furious that her husband had some difficulty in placating her, but the scene ended in her making the abbot a present of a very handsome cloak.

So great was the veneration in which he was held that he was called “the holy abbot” even during his lifetime. Although, for the last four years of his life, he suffered from a terrible form of leprosy, he continued to carry on all his customary duties as before, and he would often bless God for sending him the trial. On March 3, 1075, when he offered his last Mass in the little underground church of Notre-Dame de Ia Voute which he had built, he was so ill that he could scarcely finish, and had to be carried back to his cell as soon as it was over. To his monks who stood round him in consternation he said, “Children, to-day our Blessed Lady has given me my discharge from this life”, and he insisted upon making a public confession of his sins. He then had himself taken back to the church and laid before the altar of St John Baptist, where he died. When his body was then washed, it was noticed that no trace of the leprosy remained.

The main source of our knowledge of the life of St Gervinus is the Chronicle of Saint­_Riquier compiled by Hariulf. It is printed in Migne, PL., vol. clxxiv, and extracts also in MGH.

1104 BD SERLO, ABBOT OF GLOUCESTER “How much the grace of God, conspiring with his industry, elevated the place [Gloucester Abbey], what eloquence can sufficiently explain? The management of the abbey in spirituals is what the weak may look up to and the strong not despise. This was effected by the discipline of Serb, a man humble to the good, but menacing and terrible to the proud of heart.”

THE claims of Serb to be included in the calendar are perhaps doubtful, but he is described as “Blessed” in the Benedictine martyrologies of Ménard and Bucelin, while as abbot of a famous English monastery he has an interest for English readers. By birth he seems to have been a Norman, and he entered the Benedictine Order at Mont-Saint-Michel. In 1071 he was recommended to William the Conqueror by St Osmund (then chancellor of Salisbury) as a good religious to whose rule the abbey of Gloucester might suitably be confided, and he was consecrated abbot at the hands of St Wulfstan, Bishop of Worcester. When he came to Gloucester there were only two adult monks and about eight young boys: he left when he died a community of more than a hundred professed.

In July 1100 the abbot thought it his duty to write boldly to King William II telling him of the vision which had been vouchsafed to one of the Gloucester monks—it may have been himself—which announced that the cup of the king’s iniquities was full to overflowing, and that the vengeance of Heaven was about to strike him down. Ordericus, the chronicler, tells us that the letter was brought to Rufus on the very morning that he was setting out on the hunting excursion from which he was never to return. After reading the letter the king laughed, gave his orders for the hunt to William Tirel, and said aloud in the presence of all: “I wonder why my lord Serb has been minded to write thus to me, for he is, I believe, a good abbot, and a judicious old than. In his extreme simplicity he passes on to me, busied with so many affairs, the nightmares of his snoring monks, and from a long distance has even sent them to me in writing. Does he suppose that I follow the example of the English, who will defer their journey or their business for the dreams of wheezing old women?” Thereupon the king mounted his horse and rode off, only to be pierced an hour or two later by Tirel’s sharp arrow glancing from a tree (?).

Serb himself died in 1104 after ruling the abbey for more than thirty years. William of Malmesbury, a younger contemporary, writes of him: “How much the grace of God, conspiring with his industry, elevated the place [Gloucester Abbey], what eloquence can sufficiently explain? The management of the abbey in spirituals is what the weak may look up to and the strong not despise. This was effected by the discipline of Serb, a man humble to the good, but menacing and terrible to the proud of heart.” Serb seems to have been a writer of ability both in prose and verse, but it is difficult to disentangle his compositions from what has been written by others who bore the name of Serb and from those of Godfrey of Winchester.

See the Historia a Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucestriae, vol. i (Rolls Series), pp. xvii—xxii, as also the Gesta Region of William of Malmesbury (Rolls Series), vol. ii, p. 512, and Symeon of’ Durham (Rolls Series), vol. ii, p. 236. There is also a notice of Serb in the DNB and in T. D. Hardy, Catalogue of British History, vol. ii, p. 27.

1167 ST AELRED, ABBOT OF Rievaulx "He who loves thee, possesses thee and he possesses thee in proportion as he loves, because thou art love. This is that abundance with which thy beloved are inebriated, melting away from themselves, that they may pass into thee by loving thee.”

AELRED (Ailred) was of good family, son of the “hereditary” priest of Hexham, and was born there in 1110. After a good education he was invited by St David, King of Scotland, to his court, and made master of his household, where he gained the esteem of all. His virtue shone with bright lustre in the world, particularly his meekness, which Christ declared to be the distinguishing mark of His true disciples. The following is a memorable instance of his gentle bearing. A certain person of quality having insulted and reproached him in the presence of the king, inadvertently, his displeasure at my infraction of the rule appeared in his looks, and Aelred heard him out with patience, and thanked him for his charity in telling him his faults. This behaviour made such an impression on his adversary that he asked his pardon on the spot. Another time, whilst he was speaking on a matter of importance, someone interrupted him very harshly and rudely: the servant of God heard him with tranquillity, and afterwards resumed his discourse with the same calm and presence of mind as before. He wished to devote himself entirely to God by forsaking the world; but the claims of friendship detained him some time in it. Reflecting, however, that he must sooner or later he separated by death from those he loved most, he condemned his own cowardice, and broke these ties of friendship at no little cost to himself. He describes his feelings during this crisis, and says, “Those who saw me, judging by the courtly atmosphere in which I lived, and not knowing what passed within my soul, said, speaking of me: ‘Oh, how well is it with him how happy he is!’ But they knew not the anguish of my mind: for the deep wound in my heart caused me a thousand torments, and I was not able to bear the intolerable stench of my sins.” But after he had taken his resolution; he says, “I began then to know, by a little experience, what immense comfort is found in Thy service, and how sweet that peace is which is its inseparable companion.”

To cut himself off from the world, Aelred left Scotland, and embraced the austere Cistercian life at Rievaulx in Yorkshire, where a noble lord called Walter Espec had founded a monastery in 1132. At the age of twenty-four he became a monk under the first abbot, William, a disciple of St Bernard. Fervour lending strength to his delicate body, he practised severe austerities and employed much of his time in prayer and reading. He surrendered his heart with great ardour to the love of God, and by this means finding all his mortifications sweet and light, he cried out, “This is a yoke which does not crush but liberates the soul this burden has wings, not weight.” He speaks of the love of God always with rapture, and from his frequent outbursts these thoughts seem entirely to have absorbed him. “May thy voice” (says he) “so sound in my ears, good Jesus, that my heart may learn how to love thee, that my mind may love thee, that the interior powers of my soul and the very marrow of my heart may love thee, and that my affections may embrace thee, my only true good, my sweet and delightful joy! What is love, 0 my God If I mistake not, it is the wonderful delight of the soul, so much the more sweet as more pure, so much the more overflowing and enlivening as more ardent. He who loves thee, possesses thee and he possesses thee in proportion as he loves, because thou art love. This is that abundance with which thy beloved are inebriated, melting away from themselves, that they may pass into thee by loving thee.”

He had taken much delight in his youth in reading Cicero’s De amicitia: but after his conversion found that author and all other reading tedious which was not sweetened with the honey of the holy name of Jesus and seasoned with the word of God. This he tells us himself in his book, On Spiritual Friendship. He was much edified with the very looks of a monk called Simon, who had despised high birth, an ample fortune and all the advantages of mind and body to serve God in that penitential state. This monk went and came as one deaf and dumb, always recollected in God; and was such a lover of silence that he would scarce speak a few words on necessary occasions. His very silence however, was sweet and full of edification. Aelred says of him, “The very sight of his humility gifted my pride, and made me blush at the immortification of my looks. The silence practised among us prevented my ever addressing him of set purpose; but one day, on my speaking a word to him he suffered me to lie some time prostrate before him to expiate my fault; for which I grieved bitterly, and for which I could never forgive myself.”

St Aelred, much against his inclination, was made abbot of a new monastery of his order, founded at Revesby in Lincolnshire, in 1142, and soon after, in 1147, abbot of Rievaulx, where he presided over three hundred monks. Describing their life, he says that they drank nothing but water ate sparingly and of the coarsest food; laboured hard, slept little, with boards for their bed never spoke except to their superiors on necessary occasions; carried the burdens which were laid on them without refusing any went wherever they were led gave not a moment to sloth or amusements of any kind, and never had any lawsuit or dispute. St Aelred also speaks of their mutual charity and of the peace in which they lived, and he is not able to find words to express the joy which the sight of every one of them inspired in him. His humility and love of solitude made him steadfastly refuse the bishop­rics which were pressed upon his acceptance. Reading and prayer were his delight. Even in times of spiritual dryness, if he opened the divine books, he found his soul flooded with the light of the Holy Ghost. In the Revue Bénédictine for April, 1925, Dom A. Wilmart printed for the first time a very beautiful prayer of St Aelred, which is called his “Oratio Pastoralis”. It is a sort of examination of conscience upon the duties and responsibilities incumbent upon him as superior of a large community. The document throws much light upon the saint’s interior spirit and upon the deep and tender affection with which he regarded the monks committed to his charge. He adapted Osbert of Clare’s life of St Edward the Confessor for the translation of his relics in 1163, and preached at Westminster on that occasion.

It appears clearly from Aelred’s biographers, notably from the life by Walter Daniel, that in spite of all the saint’s stern asceticism there was something singularly gentle and lovable about him in his relations with others. “For seventeen years I lived under his rule”, writes Walter, “and during all that time he dismissed no one from the monastery.”

Towards the close of his life he was a great sufferer, apparently from gout and stone; in 1157 we find the general chapter of the Cistercians granting him exemptions which the state of his health demanded. Never­theless he is heard of in Scotland in 1159 and again in 1165, and other visits of his can be traced to different parts of England, and on one occasion to Citeaux itself. For one afflicted as he was, such journeys must have been a torment. But by 1166 he could leave his monastery no more, and after a lingering illness he died, on January 12, 1167, in the shed alongside the infirmary which for ten years had been his living and sleeping quarters. Of those last days, Aelred’s patience and trust in God, the love and grief of his monks, Walter Daniel has left us a most moving account. It must be admitted that Alban Butler is not at his best in his treatment of St Aelred, who is one of the most attractive of English saints, a great teacher of friendship, divine and human, and a man who, quite apart from his writings, must have exercised a great influence through the monasteries he founded from Rievaulx. He was himself, “One whom I might fitly call friendship’s child: for his whole occupation is to love and to be loved.” (De spirituali amicitia).

It seems that St Aelred was canonized in 1191 his feast is kept on March 3 in the dioceses of Liverpool, Hexham and Middlesbrough, and by the Cistercians.

Besides the admirable study of St Aelred by Father Dalgairns (in Newman’s series of Lives of the English Saints), which may be truly described as one of the classics of hagiography, a very complete and up-to-date account of the saint is provided by F. M. Powicke’s Ailrad of Rievaulx and his Biographer Walter Daniel (1922). This writer shows that the life by Walter Daniel, a contemporary monk of Rievaulx, is the source from which both the two biographies previously known have been condensed. In 1950 Professor Powicke published Daniel’s biography in Latin and English, with notes and a long introduction. We also obtain a good many sidelights upon Aelred’s character from his own treatises and sermons. All these, with the exception of his book on the Hexham miracles, will be found printed in Migne, PL., vol. cxcv. There is a great devotional glow in many of his ascetical writings, notably in his Speculum charitatis. He was the author also of several short biographies— e.g. that of St Ninian—and of historical and theological tractates. There is a translation of De spirituali amicitia by Fr Hugh Talbot, called Christian Friendship. T. E. Harvey’s St Aelred of Rievaulx (1932) is an excellent short book by a Quaker. See also D. Knowles, The Monastic Order in England (1949), pp. 240—245, 257—266 and passim. Aelred’s name is variously spelt. In the DNB., for example, he appears as “Ethelred”, in Powicke and others as “Ailred”. See, further, the Acta Sanctorum for January 12 and the Dictionnaire de Spiritualité, vol. i, cc. 225--234.
1508 Blessed Jacobinus de'Canepaci Carmelite lay-brother; A cultus is said to have begun at his tomb shortly after his death on account of the miracles worked there, and this was approved in 1845. OC (AC)
Born near Vercelli, Piedmont, Italy, in 1438; cultus confirmed in 1845. A Carmelite lay-brother in Vercelli (Benedictines).

1508 BD JACOPINO OF CANEPACI this good Carmelite lay-brother seems to have been one of those in which perfection is found by prayer, austerity and charity, A cultus is said to have begun at his tomb shortly after his death on account of the miracles worked there, and this was approved in 1845.

THE life of this good Carmelite lay-brother seems to have been one of those in which perfection is found by prayer, austerity and charity, and in which there is little to relate of striking achievements or of intercourse with the outer world, He was born of humble parents in the township of Piasca in the diocese of Vercelli, and being animated with an intense devotion to the Blessed Virgin he sought admission at Vercelli among the Carmelites of the old observance. The example of his fervour was a stimulus to all. His special work was to collect alms, begging from door to door throughout the town, and in the discharge of this humble duty he seems to have found many opportunities for consoling those in trouble or saying a word of good advice to the tempted or the fallen, Worn out with toil, austerities and infirm health, he died on his seventieth birthday in 1508. A cultus is said to have begun at his tomb shortly after his death on account of the miracles worked there, and this was approved in 1845.

The outlines of Bd Jacopino’s life are sketched in the office sanctioned for his feast, and there is a short biography, Vita del b. Giacobino di Ayloche (1846).
1899 Bl. Mary Angela Victory over death shone in the gentle countenance of her face.
Blessed Mary Angela, baptized as Sophia Camille, was born in Kalisz, Poland on May 16, 1825. Her parents, Joseph and Josephine Truszkowski, from noble families of the landed gentry, were well educated, devout Catholics and loyal patriots.  Sophia was a highly intelligent, generous, vivacious but frail child. She began her education at home under a private tutor. When the family moved to Warsaw in 1837, Sophia was enrolled in the then prestigious Academy of Madame Guerin.

Because of ill health, Sophia was withdrawn from the Academy and continued her education at home where she availed herself of her father's vast library. She read extensively and, with profound insight, studied the causes and effects of contemporary social problems. Her father, in sharing his experiences as judge in the juvenile courts, broadened her knowledge of the social evils of her day. He helped to shape her sense of justice in an unjust world.

Already from her childhood, Sophia was drawn to prayer and genuine concern for others; but it was in 1848 at the age of 23 that she experienced a great change in her spiritual life which she herself called her "conversion". This was the beginning of a more intensive interior life which manifested itself in a growing devotion to the Holy Eucharist, a greater love of prayer and a more ascetic life. She seriously considered joining the cloistered Visitation Sisters but her confessor advised her not to leave her ailing father. Later, while traveling with him through Germany, Sophia was enlightened by the Lord during her prayer in the cathedral of Cologne that, despite her love of prayer and solitude, she was destined to go among the suffering poor and to serve Christ in them through prayer and sacrifice. She became a member of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. During the day she worked zealously for the cause of the poor and at night she prayed, constantly searching for God's will for herself.

Finally, Sophia discovered her path and forged ahead independently. By this time she had a crystallized vision of her mission. Acknowledging that the evils of her day were due to broken families, a licentious social milieu and a lack of religious and moral training, she undertook the moral and religious education of poor neglected children, gradually extending her spacious heart to the downtrodden, the exploited, the aged and homeless. With her father’s financial help and her cousin Clothilde’s assistance she rented two attic rooms. This center then became the acclaimed "Institute of Sophia Truszkowska" which began to serve as a conscience of its cultural milieu.

Here, before an icon of Our Lady of Czestochowa, Sophia - now named Angela - together with Clothilde solemnly dedicated themselves on the feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, November 21, 1855, to do the will of her Son, Jesus Christ, in all things. Hereafter, this was recorded as the official founding day of the Congregation of the Sisters of St.Felix of Cantalice. Mother Angela determined that the aim of her Congregation was that "in all and by all, God may be known, loved and glorified".


Mother Angela was not only a deeply spiritual woman but a truly enlightened woman of her day. Her community, unique to the then traditional religious life in Poland, was innovative in pioneering nontraditional leadership roles for women and service-oriented roles to meet the needs of the times. However, she integrated these nontraditional roles with the existing forms of religious life, thereby uniting ministry and contemplation within the framework of her own charism.

Through her life, work and personal holiness, the Foundress marked out the role and destiny of this 19th century innovation in Poland. As one of the first active-contemplative communities, her sisters actualized the Gospel message in generating needed social changes, actively survived political suppression of foreign conquerors, and assumed a vital and lasting role in the mission of the Church.

Mother Angela envisioned service for God’s kingdom on earth as all-embracing. When the Church called, the Felician Sisters responded. The myriad of ministries in which they engaged ranged from social and catechetical centers to converted makeshift hospitals for the wounded guerrilla fighters, including Russian and Polish soldiers - the oppressors with the oppressed - with a charity that made no distinctions.

For three successive terms, Mother Angela was elected as superior general of the Congregation. Her desire to multiply herself a thousand times and travel to all parts of the world, to live God’s love and teach his merciful love to all living souls was realized in God’s own way. At the age of 44, at the peak of human competency, the Foundress moved aside and placed her Congregation in the hands of another. She abandoned herself to God’s will and for 30 long years she lived in complete hiddenness suffering progressive deafness, malignant tumors, and excruciating headaches.

Despite the fact that she retired into the background, her concern for the sisters remained very much alive. As foundress and mother of the Congregation, she was the inspirator in the writing of the Constitutions, the initiator of new ministries and, above all, mother and guide to her spiritual daughters. She exerted her influence through letters, petitions, and even confrontations to bring to fruition the vision she had for her Congregation of Felician Sisters. She heartily endorsed the plan to send sisters to America and personally blessed the five pioneers as they left in 1874.

Her submission to God’s will gradually brought her to a complete union with Him in the long mystic experience of her annihilation. Hers was a spirituality of essentials. There were no extraordinary forms of prayer, no visions, ecstasies, or divine revelations. Her lasting legacy of love is the childlike love and imitation of the virtues of Mary, and the Eucharistic spirituality which she bequeathed to her spiritual daughters as a way of life. To this day every provincial house of the Congregation of Sisters of St. Felix of Cantalice has the privilege of public exposition and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament throughout the day.

Mother Mary Angela died on October 10, 1899, at 12:45 a.m. Her face, ravaged by suffering, in death took on an expression of peace and quiet dignity. Victory over death shone in the gentle countenance of her face, and the sisters claimed that she was so beautiful and pleasing to look at that they could scarcely take their eyes off her. By special authorization of the municipality of Cracow, Mother Mary Angela Truszkowska was buried in the chapel adjoining the convent of the Felician Sisters on SmolenskStreet.

For this world today, Blessed Mary Angela Truszkowska remains an example of true femininity, a woman of conviction; a woman who has dared to be prophetic; a religious who has inspired and challenged many to action and contemplation.
1955 St. Katharine Drexel material and spiritual well-being of black and native Americans
Born in 1858, into a prominent Philadelphia family, Katharine became imbued with love for God and neighbor. She took an avid interest in the material and spiritual well-being of black and native Americans. She began by donating money but soon concluded that more was needed - the lacking ingredient was people. Katharine founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored People, whose members would work for the betterment of those they were called to serve. From the age of 33 until her death in 1955, she dedicated her life and a fortune of 20 million dollars to this work. In 1894, Mother Drexel took part in opening the first mission school for Indians, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Other schools quickly followed - for Native Americans west of the Mississippi River, and for the blacks in the southern part of the United States. In 1915 she also founded Xavier University in New Orleans. At her death there were more than 500 Sisters teaching in 63 schools throughout the country. Katharine was beatified by Pope John Paul II on November 20, 1988.
 March 3, 2010 St. Katharine Drexel (1858-1955) 
If your father is an international banker and you ride in a private railroad car, you are not likely to be drawn into a life of voluntary poverty. But if your mother opens your home to the poor three days each week and your father spends half an hour each evening in prayer, it is not impossible that you will devote your life to the poor and give away millions of dollars. Katharine Drexel did that.

She was born in Philadelphia in 1858. She had an excellent education and traveled widely. As a rich girl, she had a grand debut into society. But when she nursed her stepmother through a three-year terminal illness, she saw that all the Drexel money could not buy safety from pain or death, and her life took a profound turn.  She had always been interested in the plight of the Indians, having been appalled by reading Helen Hunt Jackson’s A Century of Dishonor. While on a European tour, she met Pope Leo XIII and asked him to send more missionaries to Wyoming for her friend Bishop James O’Connor. The pope replied, “Why don’t you become a missionary?” His answer shocked her into considering new possibilities.

Back home, she visited the Dakotas, met the Sioux leader Red Cloud and began her systematic aid to Indian missions.  She could easily have married. But after much discussion with Bishop O’Connor, she wrote in 1889, “The feast of St. Joseph brought me the grace to give the remainder of my life to the Indians and the Colored.” Newspaper headlines screamed “Gives Up Seven Million!”  After three and a half years of training, she and her first band of nuns (Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored) opened a boarding school in Santa Fe. A string of foundations followed. By 1942 she had a system of black Catholic schools in 13 states, plus 40 mission centers and 23 rural schools. Segregationists harassed her work, even burning a school in Pennsylvania. In all, she establi shed 50 missions for Indians in 16 states.

Two saints met when she was advised by Mother Cabrini about the “politics” of getting her Order’s Rule approved in Rome. Her crowning achievement was the founding of Xavier University in New Orleans, the first Catholic university in the United States for blacks.  At 77, she suffered a heart attack and was forced to retire. Apparently her life was over. But now came almost 20 years of quiet, intense prayer from a small room overlooking the sanctuary. Small notebooks and slips of paper record her various prayers, ceaseless aspirations and meditation. She died at 96 and was canonized in 2000

Comment:  Saints have always said the same thing: Pray, be humble, accept the cross, love and forgive. But it is good to hear these things in the American idiom from one who, for instance, had her ears pierced as a teenager, who resolved to have “no cake, no preserves,” who wore a watch, was interviewed by the press, traveled by train and could concern herself with the proper size of pipe for a new mission. These are obvious reminders that holiness can be lived in today’s culture as well as in that of Jerusalem or Rome.

Quote:  “The patient and humble endurance of the cross—whatever nature it may be—is the highest work we have to do.” “Oh, how far I am at 84 years of age from being an image of Jesus in his sacred life on earth!” (Saint Katharine Drexel)



On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)



Day 23 40 Days for Life


 
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world.

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa

 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

 
Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).-
Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
The Pope said this today before reciting the midday Angelus with several thousand people gathered in the courtyard of the papal summer residence at Castel Gandolfo, south of Rome.
Referring to the Gospel reading for today's Mass, the Holy Father reflected on the faith of Peter, which is shown to be "still immature and too much influenced by the 'mentality of this world.'”  He explained that when Christ spoke openly about how he was to "suffer much, be killed and rise again, Peter protests, saying: 'God forbid, Lord! No such thing shall ever happen to you.'"
"It is evident that the Master and the disciple follow two opposed ways of thinking," continued the Pontiff. "Peter, according to a human logic, is convinced that God would never allow his Son to end his mission dying on the cross.  "Jesus, on the contrary, knows that the Father, in his great love for men, sent him to give his life for them, and if this means the passion and the cross, it is right that such should happen."
Christ also knew that "the resurrection would be the last word," Benedict XVI added.
Serious illness
The Pope continued, "If to save us the Son of God had to suffer and die crucified, it certainly was not because of a cruel design of the heavenly Father.  "The cause of it is the gravity of the sickness of which he must cure us: an evil so serious and deadly that it will require all of his blood. 
"In fact, it is with his death and resurrection that Jesus defeated sin and death, reestablishing the lordship of God."

Popes mentioned in articles of todays Saints

Pope St Silvester; -- 803 St. Anselm of Nonantola Benedictine abbot duke
St. Anselm
also received from Pope Stephen III permission to remove to Nonantola the body of Pope St Silvester; and Langobard King Aistulf enriched the abbey with gifts and granted it many privileges it became very celebrated throughout all Italy.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints

492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
492 ST. FELIX III Pope helped to get the Church in Africa on its feet
 Romæ natális sancti Felícis Papæ Tértii, qui sancti Gregórii Magni átavus fuit; qui étiam (ut ipse Gregórius refert), sanctæ Tharsíllæ nepti appárens, illam ad cæléstia regna vocávit.
       At Rome, the birthday of Pope St. Felix III, ancestor of St. Gregory the Great, who relates of him that he appeared to St. Tharsilla, his niece, and called her to the kingdom of heaven.

492 ST FELIX II (III), POPE  483 - 492
Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
468  St. Hilary, Pope from 461-468 guardian of Church unity sent decree to Eastern bishops validating decisions of General Councils Nicaea Ephesus and Chalcedon. Hilary consolidated the Church in Sandi, Africa, and Gaul
731 Saint Pope Gregory II served St Sergius I next 4 popes as treasurer of the Church, then librarian, Held synods to correct abuses, stopped heresy, promoted discipline, morality in religious and clerical life

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Benedict VII -- 1011 St. Willigis Bishop missionaries to Scandinavia, founded churches chaplain to Emperor Otto II
On the death of Otto, Willigis became one of the most important and influential people in the empire.
Confirmed by Benedict VII in the right to coronate emperors, Willigis crowned Otto III and later influenced him in favor of abandoning Italy and concentrating his resources north of the Alps. Otto III died young in 1002. The succession was disputed but ended with Willigis crowning Saint Henry II and his wife Saint Cunegund at Paderborn. He then served his third monarch faithfully.



Popes mentioned in articles of Saints
Ordained by Pope Vigilius in 546.  556 St. Maximian of Ravenna Bishop of Ravenna erected St. Vitalis Basilica, which was dedicated in the presence of Emperor Justinian and his wife, Theodora Maximianus of Ravenna B (RM) Born in Pola, Italy, 499; died February 22, 556; feast day formerly February 21. Maximianus was consecrated bishop of Ravenna in 546 by Pope Vigilius.

Pope Julius II died on this day in 1513.  During his reign as pope he laid the cornerstone for St. Peter's Basilica.  
He also commissioned Michelangelo Buonarotti to paint the frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chaper.